Sample records for fork flathead watershed

  1. South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisak, Grant; Marotz, Brian

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) began a program aimed at conserving the genetically pure populations of westslope cutthroat trout in the South Fork Flathead River drainage. The objective of this program is to eliminate all of the exotic and hybrid trout that threaten the genetically pure westslope cutthroat populations in the South Fork Flathead. The exotic and hybrid trout populations occur in several headwater lakes and their outflow streams. In 2001 MFWP released a draft environmental assessment, pursuant to the Montana Environmental Policy Act (MEPA), that addressed the use of motorized equipment to deliver personnel and materials to some of these lakes in the Bob Marshall and Great Bear Wildernesses (Grisak 2001). After a 30-day public comment period, MFWP determined that the complexity of issues was too great and warranted a more detailed analysis. These issues included transportation options for personnel, equipment and materials, the use of motorized equipment in wilderness, fish removal methods, fish stocking, and the status and distribution of amphibian populations in the project area. Because the program also involves the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the environmental analysis needs to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In October 2001, pursuant to NEPA, MFWP, along with the USFS and BPA initiated an environmental assessment to address these issues. In June 2002, the three agencies determined that the scope of these issues warranted an Environmental Impact Statement. This specialist report describes the logistical, technical and biological issues associated with this project and provides an analysis of options for fish removal, transportation and fish stocking. It further analyzes issues and concerns associated with amphibian populations and creating new domesticated stocks of westslope cutthroat trout. Finally, this document provides a description of each lake, the best method of fish removal that would achieve the goals of the project, logistics for carrying out the fish removal, and the immediate management direction for each lake following fish removal. The USFS is preparing a specialist report detailing land management issues that relate to National Forest, designated Hiking Areas, and Wilderness. Information from these two documents will be used by BPA to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.

  2. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  3. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NPPC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  4. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  5. Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

  6. WATERSHED RESTORATION PLAN Big Creek, North Fork of the Flathead River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .............................................................................................................. 26 2.5 NONPOINT POLLUTION SOURCE INVENTORY AND THE PROPOSED RESTORATION ACTIVITIES .. 27 SECTION 4 4.1 POLLUTANT REDUCTION: The average monthly air temperatures and average monthly precipitation at Glacier International Airport

  7. DOE/BP-00005043-1 South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy, as part of BPA's program to protect, mitigate Hungry Horse Dam Mitigation U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Project Number represent the views of BPA. Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 Portland, Oregon 97208 #12;South

  8. EIS-0353: DOE Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Fork Flathead Watershed Westslope Cutthroat Trout Conservation Program, Flathead County, Montana

  9. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  10. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  11. Flathead River Watershed conservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposing to fund the acquisition of several parcels of land in northwest Montana for fish habitat mitigation (see map). These parcels total about 95 acres and are located within...

  12. Flathead River Creel Report, 1992-1993. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzel, Delano

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A roving creel survey was conducted on the Flathead River system, May 1992 through May 1993, as part of Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, funded by Bonneville Power Administration. The Flathead River system is a tributary to the Clarks Fork of the Columbia River originating in northwest Montana and southern British Columbia. The river creel survey was conducted in conjunction with a Flathead Lake creel survey. This document summarizes the creel survey on the river system. The purpose of these creel surveys was to quantify fishery status prior to mitigation efforts and provide replicative survey methodology to measure success of future mitigation activities. 4 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  14. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and sedimentation. Among the consequences of the present operational regime are constant, rapid changes in river discharge during spawning and Incubation seasons of trout species present in the lower river. Hamilton and Buell (1976) reported that similar fluctuation might exceed tolerance limits of adults and inhibit spawning behavior, dewater redds, strand fry, and displace juveniles to habitats less suitable for survival. Similar problems are felt to exist on the lower river. Constant fluctuations over backwater vegetation have been linked to major problems in successful northern pike spawning and recruitment by preventing access to spawning sites, and dewatering eggs and attached fry. Phase I of the South Bay investigation was completed this year resulting in a detailed study program for the next three years. Dominant habitat types were mapped, and physical habitat and biological monitoring methods were evaluated and selected. Permanent habitat transects, water quality stations, fish sampling, gillnetting, seining, and trapping sites were established.

  15. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade Project Will Take Advantage of...

  16. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade CHERYL TALLEY, PE Flathead Electric Cooperative Ground Source Heat Pumps Demonstration Projects May 19,...

  17. Landtype-Association (LTA) Descriptions for the Flathead Valley2 Section M333B Flathead Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 6 Landtype-Association (LTA) Descriptions for the Flathead Valley2 Section M333B Flathead illustrations: · Figure 50: Map showing location of M333B within the Northern Region · Figure 51: M333B distribution of LTAS within M333B · Figure 53: Bar chart showing abundance of landform groups within M333B

  18. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

  20. Appendix 68 Bull Trout Data for Hungry Horse and South Fork of the Flathead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4632 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 No.Redds #12;Figure 2

  1. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

  2. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  3. Elm Fork of the Trinity River Floodplain Management Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tickle, Greg; Clary, Melinda

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ELM FORK OF THE TRINITY RIVER FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT STUDYof the Elm Fork of the Trinity River, Dallas County, Dallas,

  4. Lower Flathead River Fisheries Study, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James E.; Cross, Paul D.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January of 1983 a two-phase study of the lower Flathead River was initiated by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes with funding provided by the Bonneville Power Administration. The study fulfills program measure 804 (a) (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. During 1983 Phase I of the study was completed resulting in a detailed study plan for the next four years and the methods to be employed during the study. Preliminary observations suggest the present operation of Kerr hydroelectric facility and land use practices within the drainage have combined to significantly reduce spawning success of salmonids and northern pike, and thus recruitment to the fisheries of the main river and tributaries. Main river spawning marshes were observed to be drained frequently during the northern pike spawning season which would result in desiccation of eggs and loss of attached fry. Water level fluctuations also caused trapping of juvenile fish and may be an important source of juvenile mortality.

  5. fork(), exit(), exec() signals, sockets client/server, shared memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafillou, Peter

    memory semaphores - 2 - #12; µ µ µ UNIX µ µ fork fork µ µ µ fork pid = fork(); fork µµ ( ) µ µ pid - pid (ID) - - pid = 0 ? - 3 - #12;- 4 - #include main() { int pid = 0; printf("hello world\

  6. Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renn, Susan C.P.

    Stream periphyton and coal mining: Comparative Effects in the Elk Flathead Rivers of Southeastern British Columbia Jessica Thompson and F.R. Hauer Coal mining can have a variety of effects on surrounding nutrients into surrounding streams. We examined the potential effects of coal mining by comparing adjacent

  7. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

  8. Rehabilitate Newsome Creek Watershed, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bransford, Stephanie [Nez Perce Tribe Fisheries/Watershed Program

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridgetop approach. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) and the Nez Perce National Forest (NPNF) have formed a partnership in completing watershed restoration activities, and through this partnership more work is accomplished by sharing funding and resources in our effort. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Newsome Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1997. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed through road decommissioning and culvert replacement. Starting in FY 2001 and continuing into the present, a major stream restoration effort on the mainstem of Newsome Creek has been pursued. From completing a watershed assessment to a feasibility study of 4 miles of mainstem rehabilitation to carrying that forward into NEPA and a final design, we will begin the effort of restoring the mainstem channel of Newsome Creek to provide spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish species. Roads have been surveyed and prioritized for removal or improvement as well as culverts being prioritized for replacement to accommodate fish passage throughout the watershed.

  9. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  10. Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

  11. Solar Energy for Charging Fork Truck Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.; Turner, W. C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this price decrease in mind and does an economic study on the feasibility of using photovoltaic cells to charge electric fork lift trucks, at different costs per peak watt. This particular idea could be used as a measure of energy conservation for industrial...

  12. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, Will; Fraley, John J.; Decker-Hess, Janet (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study has investigated the effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee that spawn along the shores of Flathead Lake. We have estimated the spawning escapement to the lakeshore, characterized spawning habitat, monitored egg and alevin survival in redds, and related survival to length of redd exposure due to lake drawdown. Groundwater discharge apparently attracts kokanee to spawning sites along the lakeshore and is responsible for prolonging egg survival in redds above minimum pool. We have quantified and described the effect of lake drawdown on groundwater flux in spawning areas. This report defines optimal lakeshore spawning habitat and discusses eqg and alevin survival both in and below the varial zone.

  13. Emerald Lake Watershed study: Introduction and site description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonnessen, K.A. (California Air Resources Board, Sacramento (United States))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Emerald Lake Watershed study was organized to investigate the effects of acidic deposition on high-elevation watersheds and surface waters of the Sierra Nevada, California. Some of the results of this comprehensive study of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems at a small, headwater basin are presented in four papers in this series. The watershed study site is in Sequoia National Park, on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. This glacial cirque is located in the upper Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. This 120-ha watershed ranges from Alta Peak (3,416 m) down to Emerald Lake (2,400 m). Most of the watershed surface area is exposed granite and granodiorite rocks, with limited coverage (about 20%) by thin, acidic soils. The hydrology of the basin is dominated by snowmelt runoff during March-June. Emerald Lake, a glacial tarn, is 2.72 ha in area, with a maximum depth of 10.5 m. Surface waters are poorly buffered and dominated by calcium and bicarbonate. Most of the yearly precipitation falls as dilute snow (pH5.2-5.4), with acidic rain storms sampled during May-October.

  14. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to a mean of 20-30 percent. Survival in individual spawning areas exposed by lake drawdown varied from 0 to 65 percent. Groundwater reaction to lake stage explained some of the variation in individual spawning area survival. Three types of groundwater reaction to lake stage were identified. Increased survival in exposed redds resulted from two of the three types. A significant statistical relationship was determined between embryo survival and the number of days exposed by lake drawdown. The operation of Kerr Dam in 1983-84 was characterized by an early decline in lake stage, a longer period near minimum pool and a later and more rapid filling compared to the operation seen in 1981-82 and 1982-83. Based on the survival relationship observed in natural redds exposed by drawdown in 1983-84, complete mortality from exposure would have occurred to all redds constructed above 2884.7 ftor 90 percent of all redds constructed above minimum pool. Emergence traps placed over redds below minimum pool in Gravel, Blue, and Yellow bays captured fry in Gravel and Blue bays only. Duration of fry emergence in1984 was three weeks longer than in 1982 or 1983, but was not related to the date of initial redd construction. Survival to fry emergence in Gravel Bay was calculated to be 28.9 percent of egg deposition or 57,484 fry. Survival to fry emergence above and below the zone of greatest redd density was 33.6 and 245 percent, respectively, indicating a relationship between survival and spawner site selection. After analysis of the historic operation of Kerr Dam, it is believed that the dam has, and is continuing to have, a significant impact on successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake. Based on the evidence that prolonged exposure of salmonid embryo by dewatering causes significant mortality, the number of days the lake was held below various foot increments (2884 ft to 2888 ft) during the incubation period was investigated. The annual change in the number of days the lake was held below 2885 ft was further investigated because 80-90 percent of the redds cons

  15. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  16. East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South,Earlsboro,Canton, Ohio:InformationFork Biodiesel

  17. CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

  18. Chemical and biological sensing using tuning forks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Nongjian; Boussaad, Salah

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for sensing a chemical analyte is disclosed. The device is comprised of a vibrating structure having first and second surfaces and having an associated resonant frequency and a wire coupled between the first and second surfaces of the vibrating structure, wherein the analyte interacts with the wire and causes a change in the resonant frequency of the vibrating structure. The vibrating structure can include a tuning fork. The vibrating structure can be comprised of quartz. The wire can be comprised of polymer. A plurality of vibrating structures are arranged in an array to increase confidence by promoting a redundancy of measurement or to detect a plurality of chemical analytes. A method of making a device for sensing a chemical analyte is also disclosed.

  19. The Texas Watershed Steward Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERSHED PROTECTION AND MANAGEMENT · Importance of Local Watershed Involvement · Forming and Sustaining: ­ 7 AICP CM hours (planners) ­ 7 TBPE CPEs (engineers) ­ 7 CCA CEUs (soil & water management) ­ 7Life Extension Service Watershed Protection Planning Short Course January 1216, 2009 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT · Local

  20. Watershed Modeling for Biofuels | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watershed Modeling for Biofuels Argonne's watershed modeling research addresses water quality in tributary basins of the Mississippi River Basin Argonne's watershed modeling...

  1. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproduction Success of Kokanee in the Flathead River System, 1986 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, Will; Clancey, Patrick

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1985 kokanee spawning run in the Flathead system was the strongest in five years. Escapement to the Flathead River system was 147,000 fish, including 123,000 in McDonald Creek and an estimated 20,000 in the main stem. Enumeration of spawners and redds in the Flathead River was hindered by high fall flows and early freezing in November. The upstream spawning migration from Flathead Lake began in late August. Schools of kokanee were seen six miles above the lake on September 4. We counted 1,156 redds in Flathead Lake, distributed primarily along the southeastern shore. An unusually high proportion (90 percent) of lakeshore spawning occurred in the zone above minimum pool, where egg mortality is very high because of exposure from drawdown. Escapement to the Swan River was 1,350 fish. Four year old (III+) fish comprised 95 percent of the spawning run in the Flathead system. This continues a five-year trend toward dominance of the III+ year class. The age composition of spawners has varied considerably for the past 15 years. The average size of spawning fish was 365 mm, which is identical to the average size of the parent year class in 1981. One of the goals of managing Flathead kokanee is to produce mature fish 300-330 mm in length. In the main stem Flathead River, pre-emergent survival was 80 percent. Survival in McDonald Creek, unaffected by hydroelectric operations, was 83 percent. Sampling showed few hatched alevins, probably due to unusually cold winter temperatures. Egg survival at Blue Bay, a spawning area on Flathead Lake where redds are concentrated below minimum pool, varied in relation to depth and dissolved oxygen concentration in the substrate. Eggs survived 78 days at 2,880 feet where dissolved oxygen was 5.7 mg/l. Eggs survived 35 days at 2,870 feet where dissolved oxygen concentration averaged 2.9 mg/l. Low dissolved oxygen contributed to poor survival to emergence at all elevations in Blue Ray. Experiments in Skidoo Bay confirmed that survival of eggs above minimum pool depends on redds being wetted by groundwater seeps. After 40 days exposure by drawdown, eggs in groundwater seeps showed 86 percent survival, whereas outside of the groundwater seeps eggs survived less than six days. These results confirm that exposure by drawdown is the primary factor that limits kokanee reproductive success in redds above minimum pool. We surveyed the west and south shoreline of Flathead Lake to locate potential kokanee spawning habitat. We found conditions which could support incubating eggs at two sites in South Ray and two sites on the west shore of the lake. Seven other sites on the west shore were not suitable due to low groundwater discharge or low dissolved oxygen. In all these areas suitable substrate existed only within the drawdown zone. The lake should be drafted earlier in the fall, and filled earlier in the spring to improve recruitment from lakeshore spawning. We conducted creel surveys during 1985, and estimated that anglers caught 192,000 kokanee. Anglers harvested 49,200 fish during the ice fishery in Skidoo Bay, 129,000 fish during the summer fishery on the lake, and 13,800 during the fall river fishery. Estimated fishing pressure for the year exceeded 188,000 angler hours. The abundance of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake, measured at six index stations, increased to 130/mIf in 1986. My&Is increased tenfold from 1984 to 1985, and about threefold from 1985 to 1986. Monitoring of mysid shrimp and zooplankton populations in Flathead Lake is supplementing an investigation of the growth and survival of juvenile kokanee. Kokanee and mysid shrimp feed primarily on planktonic crustaceans. This work was designed to detect a potential decline in kokanee recruitment or growth brought about by competitive interaction with mysid shrimp. Fluctuation in adult kokanee year class strength is in part attributable to the negative effects of hydroelectric dam operation on reproductive success in the main stem Flathead River and in Flathead Lake. Our results show that egg survival in the river has improved in response to sta

  2. Blanchard Cr West Fk Clearwater R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dick ey Cr Paola Cr Cry stalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl Cr So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathead

  3. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and Methods for Mitigation and Management in the Southern Flathead Valley, Montana, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, Dennis L.; Gregory, Shari K.; Matthews, William C. Jr.; Claar, James J.; Ball, I. Joseph

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kerr Hydroelectric Dam is located at the south end of Flathead Lake, controls water levels on the lake and the Flathead River below the dam, and is currently operated as a load control facility. Current operation of Kerr Dam creates the greatest yearly water level fluctuations on both the lake and river during the Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffitti) brood and nesting period. Data collected from 1980-1982 indicated that goose nest numbers on the river were lower than during the 1950's, and that brood habitat on the lake may be limiting the goose population there. Our study was conducted from 1983-1987 to determine the effects of Kerr Dam operation on Canada goose populations and habitat on the south half of Flathead Lake and the Flathead River, and to formulate management and mitigation recommendations. Nesting geese on the river appeared to be negatively affected by a lack of nest sites free from predators, and responded to available artificial nest structures with an increase in nest numbers and nesting success. Under current dam operation, river channel depths and widths do not discourage access to nesting islands by mammalian predators during some years and high predation on ground nests occurs. Intensively used brood areas on the lake and river were identified and described. Brood habitat on the lake was lower in quality and quantity than on the river due to dam operations. Gosling mortality on the lake was high, almost 2 times higher than on the river. Lake broods expended more energy obtaining food than river broods. Losses of brood habitat in the form of wet meadow marshes were documented and mitigation options developed. Management/mitigation alternatives and monitoring methods for nesting and brooding geese were identified.

  4. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

  5. Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. EIS-0184: South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes the Seattle City Light, a Department of the City of Seattle proposal to construct a hydroelectric project with an installed capacity of 15 MW on the South Fork Tolt River near the town of Carnation located in King County in the State of Washington.

  7. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES Grand Forks, ND 58202

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2011 GRADUATES Grand Forks, ND 58202 Website : www.law.und.edu Phone : 701 Date Deferred 0 Total graduates 81 Unemployed - Not Seeking 0 Employment Status Unknown 2 Unemployed - Seeking 9 Employed - Undeterminable * 0 0 0 0 0 Employed - Bar Passage Required 40 0 1 0 41 Pursuing

  8. Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

  9. A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited. We can move

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A Fork in the Road We stand at a fork in the road. Conventional oil and gas supplies are limited the dirtiest tar sands and tar shales, hydrofracking for gas, continued mountain-top removal and mechanized to society. We must collect a gradually rising fee from fossil fuel companies at the source, the domestic

  10. Impacts of Water Levels on Breeding Canada Geese and the Methodology for Mitigation and Enhancement in the Flathead Drainage, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, Dennis L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Flathead System Canada Goose Study was initiated to determine population trends and the effects of water level fluctuations on nest and brood habitat on the southern half of Flathead Lake and the lower Flathead River as a result of the operations of Kerr Dam. This report presents data collected during the 1984 field season as part of an ongoing project. Geese used Pablo, Kicking Horse, Ninepipe Reservoirs heavily during late summer and fall. Use of the river by geese was high during the winter, when the reservoirs were frozen, and during the breeding period. Most breeding geese left the river after broods fledged. Thirteen percent of the artificial tree nest structures on the river were used by nesting geese. Goose nest initiation on the river peaked the last week in March through the first week in April, and hatching peaked the first week in May. Predation was the most significant cause of nest loss on the river, and nest loss by flooding was not observed. Avian predation was the single largest factor contributing to nest loss on the lake. Habitat use was studied in 4 brood areas on the river and 8 brood areas on the lake, and available habitat was assessed for 2 portions of both the lake and the river. Brood habitat use was significantly different from the available habitat in all areas studied. On the lower river, broods used wheat fields, gravel bars, and shrub habitats. On the upper river, coniferous forest and shrub habitats were preferred. On the West Bay of the lake, brood areas consisted primarily of lawns and tall herbaceous habitat, while on the South Bay, marshes dominated the brood areas studied. Water levels on the river and lake affect both accessibility of these areas to brooding geese, and the ecology of the habitats preferred by geese. 43 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. Forked Deer Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy ParkForked Deer Electric Coop, Inc Jump to:

  12. Cherry Fork, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric SurveyChelan County,Chenango County,Oklahoma:County,Fork,

  13. Grand Forks, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:GrahamBlanc,Grand ElectricForks,

  14. Spanish Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwestern ElectricSpain:Fork, Utah:

  15. Five Forks, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and Wildlife Service8322°,Five Forks, South

  16. Forked River, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,Forked River, New Jersey: Energy

  17. Caney Fork Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridge FundsCampaWindCaney Fork

  18. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    in the South Fork American River, California Sarah A. Cocherell & Gardner J. Jones & Javier B. Miranda & Dennis to frequent pulsed releases of water in the South Fork American River (California) from July to October 2005 and migration, and that telemetry is a tool that allows integration across disciplines and between

  19. Historical narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Alliance and Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Mary Ann; Matz, Mike

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passage on Upper Butte Creek: An Assessment of the NaturalHistorical Narratives of Big Chico Creek Watershed Allianceand Butte Creek Watershed Conservancy Mary Ann King and Mike

  20. The Texas Watershed Steward Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Antonio Bay Other April 2011 Victoria Victoria Urban Watersheds in City of Temple Other May 2011 Pecos River 1 WPP August 2011 Pecos Reeves Pecos River 2 WPP August 2011 Sheffield Pecos Concho River

  1. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  2. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mulholland, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  3. Grays River Watershed Geomorphic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation, completed for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), is part of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment commissioned by Bonneville Power Administration under project number 2003-013-00 to assess impacts on salmon habitat in the upper Grays River watershed and present recommendations for habitat improvement. This report presents the findings of the geomorphic assessment and is intended to support the overall PNNL project by evaluating the following: 􀂃 The effects of historical and current land use practices on erosion and sedimentation within the channel network 􀂃 The ways in which these effects have influenced the sediment budget of the upper watershed 􀂃 The resulting responses in the main stem Grays River upstream of State Highway 4 􀂃 The past and future implications for salmon habi

  4. EA-0956: South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project, Bonneville County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration proposal to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic...

  5. EA-1969: Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project, Bonner County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential effects of a proposal to restore wetland and riparian (riverbank) habitat and to reduce erosion in the Clark Fork River delta located in Bonner County, Idaho.

  6. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  7. WATERSHED EDUCATION PROGRAM The Watershed Education Program (WEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    of watershed hydrology Lake and river systems Urban and rural runoff Best management practices Aquatic leaders, citizens, and natural resource professionals with knowledge and tools to make informed water and land use decisions to protect and restore the integrity of Minnesota's lakes, rivers, streams

  8. SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

  9. Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Survey of the Upper Purgatoire Watershed Las Animas County, CO John Carney Colorado ...............................................................................................................9 Management Urgency Ranks ........................................................................................................10 POTENTIAL CONSERVATION SITE PLANNING BOUNDARIES........................................12 Off

  10. Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Science/Hydrology Graduate Schools University of Arizona Tucson, Arizona 95721://www.ag.arizona.edu/srnr/academicprograms/watershedresources/graduatestudies.html University of California, Davis Davis, California 95616 Program: Hydrologic Sciences http://www.warnercnr.colostate.edu/frws/watershed/graduate/index.html University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 326118140 Programs: Hydrologic Science http

  11. Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Hauck, L.; Blumenthal, B.; Brown, M.; Porter, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan (WPP) began in November 2009 upon acceptance of the WPP by EPA. The primary goals of implementing the plan are to improve the health of the Pecos River watershed and instream water quality...

  12. Agriculture and Natural Resources Arkansas Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provide the natural catchment boundaries for isolating geographical areas with similar hydrological Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines a watershed as "the area of land where all of the waterAgriculture and Natural Resources FSA9521 Arkansas Watersheds Mike Daniels Professor

  13. Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dic key Cr Paola Cr Cr ystalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl C r So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathea d

  14. Watershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukop, Mike

    30% of ponds, lakes and reservoirs 40% of estuaries #12;Watershed Management And Modeling Sources-transpiration Elemental responses are integrated to determine system response #12;Watershed Management And ModelingWatershed Management And Modeling Development and Application of Watershed Models for Simulation

  15. Fitness consequences of social network position in a wild population of forked fungus beetles (Bolitotherus cornutus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodie III, Edmund D.

    Fitness consequences of social network position in a wild population of forked fungus beetles network analysis can be used to describe the components of the social structure of a population as a whole) (Krause et al., 2007; Croft et al., 2008). Additionally, social network analyses can describe many

  16. Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    379 Abstract--Thirty-three skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) (53-73 cm fork length) were caught) Vertical movement patterns of skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean, California 92037-1508 Limited information on the vertical movements of skipjack tuna (Kat- suwonus pelamis

  17. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  18. Urban Retrofit: A Whole-Watershed Approach to Urban Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lithander, Becky

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rely  impervious   Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  cisterns     Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  of  impermeability   Derby/Po)er  Creek  Watershed:  Urban  

  19. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N N E V I L L E P O W E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boundaries of the Flathead Indian Reservation. The acreage is adjacent to Jocko Spring Creek, which is in the Jocko River Watershed (see map). Acres: 140 Partner: BPA is...

  20. factsheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    several parcels of land in Montana's Flathead River watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). These parcels total 43 acres and are located within the boundaries of the...

  1. Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

  2. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifer drawdown from vegetation and irrigation often reduce stream flow; however, several large pools and stretches of the stream retain water throughout the year, except during extreme drought. Base flow in the stream is typically sustained by small... map of the Buck Creek watershed 7 Major aquifers in Texas (Source: Texas Water Development Board) Groundwater Two aquifers, the Seymour and Blaine, underlie the Buck Creek watershed and supply the bulk of available groundwater. The Seymour...

  3. Persistence of Hydrologic Variables and Reactive Stream Solute Concentrations in an East Tennessee Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koirala, Shesh R [ORNL; Gentry, Randall W [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Perfect, Edmund [ORNL; Schwartz, John S [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time and frequency domain analyses were conducted on weekly time series of water chemistry (nitrate, sulfate and calcium concentrations) collected from November 1995 to December 2005 at the West Fork of Walker Branch in Oak Ridge, Tennessee to evaluate the extent of their persistence and the relationship of this persistence to discharge and rainfall. In this study, spectral and wavelet analyses provided a theoretical basis for insights into long-term water chemistry behavior. All water chemistry parameters showed some level of persistence that was influenced by rainfall and/or discharge. Short-term persistence (less than a year) was related to the persistence of rainfall and discharge, whereas long-term persistence (more than a year) was related to the persistence of discharge. The Walker Branch conceptual hydrology model is augmented by these results that relate characteristic periodicities with flowpaths through different zones: the vadose zone (< 20 week period), saturated zone (20-50 week period) and bedrock zone (> 50 week period) with implications for reactive chemistries within the watershed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimal Operation of Large Agricultural Watersheds with Water Quality Restraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, J. R.; Hann, R. W.

    . Nonpoint-source pollution (watersheds) is widely dispersed and not easily measured. Mathematical models are needed to predict nonpoint-source pollution as affected by watershed characteristics, land use, conservation practices, chemical fertilizers...

  5. area watershed management: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which is defi ned as a coordinated environmental management framework that focuses public and private efforts on a watershed?s highest- priority problems. In the past, such an...

  6. Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Bridge Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Secchi Disk Monitoring Program 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-13 Ryan Creek Watershed Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program. Using a Secchi disk, volunteers collected water transparency data from 22 lakes in the Bridge Creek watershed. Secchi depth readings were collected between May

  7. State of the Watershed: Water Quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State of the Watershed: Water Quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado By Sheila F. Murphy Prepared of the watershed : water quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado / by Sheila Murphy. p. cm. ­(USGS Circular ; 1284) Includes bibliographic references. 1. Water quality -- Colorado -- Boulder Creek Watershed (Boulder

  8. Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Assistant Professor of Wildland Watershed Hydrology University of California, Berkeley The faculty invites applications for a tenure-track, academic year appointment in Wildland Watershed Hydrology recognized research program in landscape-scale watershed hydrology related to the fields of climatology

  9. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  10. Red Fork sandstones (lower Pennsylvanian) in deeper parts of Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiting, P.H.; Levine, S.D.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Fork sandstones in the deeper part of the Anadarko basin are the downdip equivalents of fluvial and deltaic sandstones in the Cherokee Group. The sandstones have repetitive, ordered sequences of sedimentary structures in vertical section. Individual bedsets display sharp basal contacts, gradational tops, and contorted bedding. The characteristics indicate these basinal sandstones were deposited by turbidity currents. The sandstones occur as narrow, linear constructional channels that are dip-trending. The lateral change from channel-fill to overbank facies takes place abruptly. The sandstones are very fine-grained litharenites with an average composition of 58% quartz, 8% feldspar, 17% rock fragments, 5% other grains, and 12% matrix. Cement consists mainly of calcite ranging from 2 to 40% of the bulk volume. Quartz content tends to decrease upward and matrix increases upward within bedsets. The compositional grading is accompanied by a decrease in grain size upward within bedsets, indicating deposition during a decreasing flow-regime. Red Fork sandstones are low-permeability reservoirs with an average porosity and permeability of 7.8% and 0.1 md, respectively. Natural gas reservoirs occur mainly in the thicker, channel sequences. The bedding character of the channel and overbank facies is reflected in ..gamma..-ray log responses. Log characters of the two facies are used to interpret turbidite sections of uncored areas. The interpretations are adapted to the East Clinton field for prediction of constuctional channel reservoirs. The interpretation of dip-trending turbidite deposits may aid in exploration and development of the Red Fork sandstones.

  11. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County (Fig. 2). The thicknesses of the sandstone sequences increases upward from 2. 0 cm to 30. 0 cm. These sandstones are characterized by repetitive sequences of laminated and rippled sandstones overlain by thin pelacic shales. The cored interval... Sedimentary structures in the Red Fork sandstones, Woods Switzer "C" 5-1 (photographs A through D), Southwest Leedey Field, 5-15N-21W, Roger Mills County, and Gulf Sprowls 1 (photographs E through J), 28-13N-23W, Roger Mills County. Boldface letters (lower...

  12. Thermoelastic investigation of a quartz tuning fork used in infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spajer, M., E-mail: michel.spajer@univ-fcomte.fr; Cavallier, B.; Euphrasie, S.; Matten, G.; Vacheret, X.; Vairac, P.; Vernier, D. [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l'Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon cedex (France)] [Institut FEMTO-ST, Université de Franche-Comté, CNRS, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l'Observatoire, F-25044 Besançon cedex (France); Jalocha, A. [CILAS, Département de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orléans (France)] [CILAS, Département de Photonique, 8 avenue Buffon, BP 6319, F-45000 Orléans (France)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of quartz tuning forks (QTF) used in infrared spectroscopy for pollutant detection are investigated. The transduction between light and QTF vibration is elucidated, thanks to QTF encapsulation under vacuum. From the sensitivity enhancement which is obtained, we conclude that their interaction is photo-thermoelastic rather than photo-thermoacoustic. A mapping of the local sensitivity of the QTF is obtained by scanning its faces with the excitation probe beam. The comparison between the signal mapping and the theoretical strain mapping indicates that the most efficient areas of the QTF correspond to the areas where the strain or stress is the highest.

  13. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project 1 Finding of No Significant Impact for Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock &EnergyDepartmentCityClark Fork River

  14. Best management practices plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared in support of the Phase II Remedial Design Report (DOE/OR/01-1449&D1) and in accordance with requirements under CERCLA to present the plan for best management practices to be followed during the remediation. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about spill prevention and control, water quality monitoring, good housekeeping practices, sediment and erosion control measures, and inspections and environmental compliance practices to be used during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit.

  15. Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonaradian Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F. Jerry; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize fracture porosity and distribution in the Wasson Clear Fork reservoir and to determine the effects of fractures on well performance. The approach is to measure fracture attributes in an analog outcrop, to develop models of fracture spacing and aperture, and to apply this information to the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir.

  16. Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The “Bacterial Monitoring for the Buck Creek Watershed” project was developed in response to the creek’s listing on the Texas Water Quality Inventory and 303(d) List due to a bacterial impairment and subsequent total maximum daily load (TMDL...

  17. The Regional Watershed Spreadsheet Model (RWSM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Metals Recycling 11) Auto Recycling 12) Old Industrial Areas 13) Power Plants Land Use Mean Concentration of watershed concentrations Output: *Land use specific runoff concentrations Optimization #12;3. Simple User of this plan... Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC Pest Hydro Sed Cu Hg PCB Se Diox PBDE OC PestStep 1 2 3 4 5

  18. Sources of Mercury to East Fork Poplar Creek Downstream from the Y-12 National Security Complex: Inventories and Export Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, George R [ORNL; Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Ketelle, Richard H [ORNL; Floyd, Stephanie B [ORNL

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been heavily contaminated with mercury (also referred to as Hg) since the 1950s as a result of historical activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (formerly the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and hereinafter referred to as Y-12). During the period from 1950 to 1963, spills and leaks of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) contaminated soil, building foundations, and subsurface drainage pathways at the site, while intentional discharges of mercury-laden wastewater added 100 metric tons of mercury directly to the creek (Turner and Southworth 1999). The inventory of mercury estimated to be lost to soil and rock within the facility was 194 metric tons, with another estimated 70 metric tons deposited in floodplain soils along the 25 km length of EFPC (Turner and Southworth 1999). Remedial actions within the facility reduced mercury concentrations in EFPC water at the Y-12 boundary from > 2500 ng/L to about 600 ng/L by 1999 (Southworth et al. 2000). Further actions have reduced average total mercury concentration at that site to {approx}300 ng/L (2009 RER). Additional source control measures planned for future implementation within the facility include sediment/soil removal, storm drain relining, and restriction of rainfall infiltration within mercury-contaminated areas. Recent plans to demolish contaminated buildings within the former mercury-use areas provide an opportunity to reconstruct the storm drain system to prevent the entry of mercury-contaminated water into the flow of EFPC. Such actions have the potential to reduce mercury inputs from the industrial complex by perhaps as much as another 80%. The transformation and bioaccumulation of mercury in the EFPC ecosystem has been a perplexing subject since intensive investigation of the issue began in the mid 1980s. Although EFPC was highly contaminated with mercury (waterborne mercury exceeded background levels by 1000-fold, mercury in sediments by more than 2000-fold) in the 1980s, mercury concentrations in EFPC fish exceeded those in fish from regional reference sites by only a little more than 10-fold. This apparent low bioavailability of mercury in EFPC, coupled with a downstream pattern of mercury in fish in which mercury decreased in proportion to dilution of the upstream source, lead to the assumption that mercury in fish would respond to decreased inputs of dissolved mercury to the stream's headwaters. However, during the past two decades when mercury inputs were decreasing, mercury concentrations in fish in Lower EFPC (LEFPC) downstream of Y-12 increased while those in Upper EFPC (UEFPC) decreased. The key assumption of the ongoing cleanup efforts, and concentration goal for waterborne mercury were both called into question by the long-term monitoring data. The large inventory of mercury within the watershed downstream presents a concern that the successful treatment of sources in the headwaters may not be sufficient to reduce mercury bioaccumulation within the system to desired levels. The relative importance of headwater versus floodplain mercury sources in contributing to mercury bioaccumulation in EFPC is unknown. A mercury transport study conducted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in 1984 estimated that floodplain sources contributed about 80% of the total annual mercury export from the EFPC system (ORTF 1985). Most of the floodplain inputs were associated with wet weather, high flow events, while much of the headwater flux occurred under baseflow conditions. Thus, day-to-day exposure of biota to waterborne mercury was assumed to be primarily determined by the Y-12 source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of recent studies and monitoring within the EFPC drainage with a focus on discerning the magnitude of floodplain mercury sources and how long these sources might continue to contaminate the system after headwater sources are eliminated or greatly reduced.

  19. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    berkeley_landmarks/theta-xi.html. Urban Creeks Council.2007. Codornices Creek Watershed Restoration Action Plan (336-361. NRPI. Codornices Creek at Ohlone Greenway. Accessed

  20. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant biological monitoring and abatement program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Giddings, J.M.; McCarthy, J.F.; Southworth, G.R.; Smith, J.G.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Springborn Bionomics, Inc., Wareham, MA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, a nuclear weapons components production facility located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the US Department of Energy. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of the receiving stream (East Fork Poplar Creek), in particular, the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life, as designated by the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment. A second purpose for the BMAP is to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that will include construction of nine new wastewater treatment facilities over the next 4 years. Because of the complex nature of the effluent discharged to East Fork Poplar Creek and the temporal and spatial variability in the composition of the effluent (i.e., temporal variability related to various pollution abatement measures that will be implemented over the next several years and spatial variability caused by pollutant inputs downstream of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), a comprehensive, integrated approach to biological monitoring was developed for the BMAP. 39 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Vol. 20, No. 1 A Publication of the Brushy Fork Institute Spring-Summer 2010 Mountain Promise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    cooled, gas prices dropped and most of us were pretty happy about that. But when energy sector prices today. The key sectors we are trying to move--economic development, education, energy, government. The Brushy Fork Institute carries forward this commit- ment by working to develop strong leadership

  2. Acquisition of Wildlife Habitat in the Calispell Creek Watershed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Calispell Creek watershed in Pend Oreille County, Wash. BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key...

  3. Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Crop Production: Watershed Scale Evaluation of the Sustainability and Productivity of Dedicated Energy Crop and Woody Biomass Operations DOE Bioenergy Technologies...

  4. Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

  5. Understanding Nutrient Loading to the Coastal Zone from Urban Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Timothy H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Land Use in the Carpinteria Valley, California.TIONS: Speaker: Carpinteria Creek Watershed Coalition annualand Forecasts for Carpinteria Creek", Lions' Club,

  6. Optimizing Data Locality for Fork/Join Programs Using Constrained Work Stealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lifflander, Jonathan; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Kale, Laxmikant

    2014-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach to improving data locality across different phases of fork/join programs scheduled using work stealing. The approach consists of: (1) user-specified and automated approaches to constructing a steal tree, the schedule of steal operations and (2) constrained work stealing algorithms that constrain the actions of the scheduler to mirror a given steal tree. These are combined to construct work stealing schedules that maximize data locality across computation phases while ensuring load balance within each phase. These algorithms are also used to demonstrate dynamic coarsening, an optimization to improve spatial locality and sequential overheads by combining many finer-grained tasks into coarser tasks while ensuring sufficient concurrency for locality-optimized load balance. Implementation and evaluation in Cilk demonstrate performance improvements of up to 2.5x on 80 cores. We also demonstrate that dynamic coarsening can combine the performance benefits of coarse task specification with the adaptability of finer tasks.

  7. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Know Your Plants to Protect Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rector, Barron S.

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plants are the foundation of the range ecosystem. The plant species growing on a property can indicate the health of the watershed and the success of the land manager. Learn how to "read your plants to understand the effect of your management....

  8. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ; the more variable the landscape within a unit, the more tran- sects are needed. There will be obvious seasonal changes in vegetative cover because of plant growth and death Increasing Bare Ground Indicates Poor Watershed Health K. Brian Hays, Barron S...

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    , total nitrogen, orthophosphate and total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicatedENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2004-2005 by Michael A Hanover County Tidal Creeks Project and Year 7 of the Wilmington Watersheds Project. Water quality data

  10. Sources and transport of nitrogen in arid urban watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, Rebecca L.; Turnbull, Laura; Earl, Stevan; Grimm, Nancy B.; Riha, Krystin M.; Michalski, Greg; Lohse, Kathleen; Childers, Daniel L.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban watersheds are often sources of nitrogen (N) to downstream systems, contributing to poor water quality. However, it is unknown which components (e.g., land cover and stormwater infrastructure type) of urban watersheds contribute to N export and which may be sites of retention. In this study we investigated which watershed characteristics control N sourcing, biogeochemical processing of nitrate (NO3–) during storms, and the amount of rainfall N that is retained within urban watersheds. We used triple isotopes of NO3– (?15N, ?18O, and ?17O) to identify sources and transformations of NO3– during storms from 10 nested arid urban watersheds that varied in stormwater infrastructure type and drainage area. Stormwater infrastructure and land cover—retention basins, pipes, and grass cover—dictated the sourcing of NO3– in runoff. Urban watersheds can be strong sinks or sources of N to stormwater depending on the proportion of rainfall that leaves the watershed as runoff, but we found no evidence that denitrification occurred during storms. Our results suggest that watershed characteristics control the sources and transport of inorganic N in urban stormwater but that retention of inorganic N at the timescale of individual runoff events is controlled by hydrologic, rather than biogeochemical, mechanisms.

  11. Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Watersheds:The Caspar Creek Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Proceedings of the Conference on Coastal Watersheds:The Caspar Creek Story May 6, 1998 Ukiah. 1998. Proceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference on coastal watersheds: theProceedings of the conference

  12. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

  13. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment Final Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Geist, David R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Abbe, Timothy; Barton, Chase [Herrera Environmental Consultants, Inc.

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat-forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  14. Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment, 2006 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher; Geist, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment was funded to address degradation and loss of spawning habitat for chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (Onchoryhnchus tshawytscha). In 1999, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed lower Columbia River chum salmon as a threatened Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). The Grays River watershed is one of two remaining significant chum salmon spawning locations in this ESU. Runs of Grays River chum and Chinook salmon have declined significantly during the past century, largely because of damage to spawning habitat associated with timber harvest and agriculture in the watershed. In addition, approximately 20-25% of the then-remaining chum salmon spawning habitat was lost during a 1999 channel avulsion that destroyed an important artificial spawning channel operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Although the lack of stable, high-quality spawning habitat is considered the primary physical limitation on Grays River chum salmon production today, few data are available to guide watershed management and channel restoration activities. The objectives of the Grays River Watershed and Biological Assessment project were to (1) perform a comprehensive watershed and biological analysis, including hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological assessments; (2) develop a prioritized list of actions that protect and restore critical chum and Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Grays River based on comprehensive geomorphic, hydrologic, and stream channel assessments; and (3) gain a better understanding of chum and Chinook salmon habitat requirements and survival within the lower Columbia River and the Grays River. The watershed-based approach to river ecosystem restoration relies on a conceptual framework that describes general relationships between natural landscape characteristics, watershed-scale habitat-forming processes, aquatic habitat conditions, and biological integrity. In addition, human land-use impacts are factored into the conceptual model because they can alter habitat quality and can disrupt natural habitat forming processes. In this model (Figure S.1), aquatic habitat--both instream and riparian--is viewed as the link between watershed conditions and biologic responses. Based on this conceptual model, assessment of habitat loss and the resultant declines in salmonid populations can be conducted by relating current and historical (e.g., natural) habitat conditions to salmonid utilization, diversity, and abundance. In addition, assessing disrupted ecosystem functions and processes within the watershed can aid in identifying the causes of habitat change and the associated decline in biological integrity. In this same way, restoration, enhancement, and conservation projects can be identified and prioritized. A watershed assessment is primarily a landscape-scale evaluation of current watershed conditions and the associated hydrogeomorphic riverine processes. The watershed assessment conducted for this project focused on watershed processes that form and maintain salmonid habitat. Landscape metrics describing the level of human alteration of natural ecosystem attributes were used as indicators of water quality, hydrology, channel geomorphology, instream habitat, and biotic integrity. Ecological (watershed) processes are related to and can be predicted based on specific aspects of spatial pattern. This study evaluated the hydrologic regime, sediment delivery regime, and riparian condition of the sub-watersheds that comprise the upper Grays River watershed relative to their natural range of conditions. Analyses relied primarily on available geographic information system (GIS) data describing landscape characteristics such as climate, vegetation type and maturity, geology and soils, topography, land use, and road density. In addition to watershed-scale landscape characteristics, the study area was also evaluated on the riparian scale, with appropriate landscape variables analyzed within

  15. Trout Creek, Oregon Watershed Assessment; Findings, Condition Evaluation and Action Opportunities, 2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runyon, John

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the assessment is to characterize historical and current watershed conditions in the Trout Creek Watershed. Information from the assessment is used to evaluate opportunities for improvements in watershed conditions, with particular reference to improvements in the aquatic environment. Existing information was used, to the extent practicable, to complete this work. The assessment will aid the Trout Creek Watershed Council in identifying opportunities and priorities for watershed restoration projects.

  16. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, Bob; Munson, Vicki (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT); Rogers, Rox (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Libby, MT)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network Inc. (KRN) was incorporated in Montana in early 1995 with a mission ''to involve stakeholders in the protection and restoration of the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Kootenai River Basin waters''. The KRN operates with funding from donations, membership dues, private, state and federal grants, and with funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a Focus Watershed Coordinator Program. The Focus Watershed Program is administered to KRN as of October 2001, through a Memorandum of Understanding. Katie Randall resigned her position as Watershed Coordinator in late January 2003 and Munson Consulting was contracted to fill that position through the BPA contract period ending May 30, 2003. To improve communications with in the Kootenai River watershed, the board and staff engaged watershed stakeholders in a full day KRN watershed conference on May 15 and 16 in Bonners Ferry, Idaho. This Annual General Meeting was a tremendous success with over 75 participants representing over 40 citizen groups, tribes and state/provincial/federal agencies from throughout northern Montana and Idaho as well as British Columbia and Alberta. Membership in the KRN increased during the course of the BPA 02/03 grant period. The board of directors grew in numbers during this same time frame and an Advisory Council was formed to assist in transboundary efforts while developing two reorganized KRN committees (Habitat/Restoration/Monitoring (HRM) and Communication/Education/Outreach (CEO)). These committees will serve pivotal roles in communications, outreach, and education about watershed issues, as well as habitat restoration work being accomplished throughout the entire watershed. During this BPA grant period, the KRN has capitalized on the transboundary interest in the Kootenai River watershed. Jim and Laura Duncan of Kimberley, British Columbia, have been instrumental volunteers who have acted as Canadian liaisons to the KRN. As a result, restoration work is in the planning stages for Canadian tributaries that flow into the Moyie River in northern Idaho and the Yaak River in northwest Montana.

  17. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  18. North Fork John Day Dredge Tailings Restoration Project Final Report 1997-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, John A. (US Forest Service, Pendleton, OR)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The USDA Forest Service (USFS) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) worked together to rehabilitate 2.1 miles of Clear Creek floodplain, a tributary of the North Fork John Day River Basin. Dredge tailing were deposited from mining operations on Clear Creek's floodplain from the 1930's to the 1950's. These tailing confined the stream channel and degraded the floodplain. The work was completed by moving dredge tailing piles adjacent to the Clear Creek channel, using track-mounted excavators and dump trucks. A caterpillar tractor was used to contour the material placed outside the immediate floodplain, blending it into the hillside. The restored floodplain was very near channel bankfull level following excavation and contoured to accept future flood flows. Monitoring was initiated through pre and post-project photo points and cross-section measurements. Work was completed in two efforts. In 1997 and 1998 floodplain restoration was adjacent to the reconstruction of Road 13 from the junction with Road 10 from Clear Creek River Mile 1.9 to 3.1 for a distance of 1.2 miles. In 1999 the Environmental Assessment for Lower Clear Creek--Granite Creek Floodplain Restoration Project was completed for work proposed on Clear Creek from the mouth up to River mile 1.9 and the Granite Creek floodplain from River miles 5.9 to 7.7. Restoration proposed in the 1999 Environmental Assessment is the subject of this report.

  19. Lesson 1: Data Types and Watershed Populations In this first lesson, you will discover some information about each of the two watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of people per block. This is a good summary of how many people are in the watershed and where they live the condition of the watersheds regarding how people are currently living on and using the land. We will use Arc watershed (2000 census), the population density (average number of people per hectare), and to visualize how

  20. A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: balance equations for mass, momentum, energy Hassanizadehb a Centre for Water Research, Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b Department of Water Management, Environmental and Sanitary Engineering

  1. Modeling Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis-Stokes, Aaron

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) are a commonly used means of wastewater treatment in the Dickinson Bayou watershed which is located between Houston and Galveston. The Dickinson Bayou is classified as "impaired" by the Texas Commission...

  2. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by DIl 5~ HARRIET ?GELL ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1974 Major Subject: Range Science WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by HARRIET GELL ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1974...

  3. Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, Allen

    COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-396 2011 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Final Report By T. Allen Berthold Texas Water Resources Institute Prepared... for Texas General Land Office March 2011 Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 396 Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 Public Service Announcements for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed By T...

  4. Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthold, T. Allen; Flores, Jaime

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report August 2011 By T. Allen Berthold and Jaime Flores Texas Water Resources Institute Texas Water Resources Institute Technical Report No. 411 Texas A&M University... System College Station, Texas 77843-2118 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-411 2011 Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Implementation Project Final Report By T. Allen Berthold and Jaime Flores Texas Water Resources...

  5. Baseline and Postremediation Monitoring Program Plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek operable unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements to present the plan for baseline and postremediation monitoring as part of the selected remedy. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the requirements to monitor for soil and terrestrial biota in the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain; sediment, surface water, and aquatic biota in LEFPC; wetland restoration in the LEFPC floodplain; and human use of shallow groundwater wells in the LEFPC floodplain for drinking water. This document describes the monitoring program that will ensure that actions taken under Phases I and II of the LEFPC remedial action are protective of human health and the environment.

  6. South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project : Adopted Portions of a 1987 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project that world produce 6.55 average megawatts of firm energy per year and would be sited in the Snohomish River Basin, Washington, was evaluated by the Federal Energy Regulatory commission (FERC) along with six other proposed projects for environmental effects and economic feasibility Based on its economic analysis and environmental evaluation of the project, the FERC staff found that the South Fork Tolt River Project would be economically feasible and would result in insignificant Impacts if sedimentation issues could be resolved. Upon review, the BPA is adopting portions of the 1987 FERC FEIS that concern the South Fork Tolt River Hydroelectric Project and updating specific sections in an Attachment.

  7. Risk assessment of runoff on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwaltney, Tracy Marie

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A drip type rainfall simulator and an existing watershed study were used to assess relationships between runoff, infiltration, erosion and associated risk thresholds on a range watershed in Brazos County, Texas. The focus ...

  8. An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sedimentation in Lavon Reservoir Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

    potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in the watershed above Lavon Reservoir. The study focuses on: (a) effects of erosion controls on farm income, (b) off-side sediment damages in the watersheds; (c) costs of administering and enforcing alternative...

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely developed yet its surface water system encompasses two arroyos, an engineered detention basin (Lake Haussmann), storm channels, and wetlands. Conversely, the more rural Site 300 includes approximately 7,000 acres of largely undeveloped land with many natural tributaries, riparian habitats, and wetland areas. These wetlands include vernal pools, perennial seeps, and emergent wetlands. The watersheds within which the Laboratory's sites lie provide local and community ecological functions and services which require protection. These functions and services include water supply, flood attenuation, groundwater recharge, water quality improvement, wildlife and aquatic habitats, erosion control, and (downstream) recreational opportunities. The Laboratory employs a watershed approach to protect these surface water systems. The intent of this approach, presented in this document, is to provide an integrated effort to eliminate or minimize any adverse environmental impacts of the Laboratory's operations and enhance the attributes of these surface water systems, as possible and when reasonable, to protect their value to the community and watershed. The Laboratory's watershed approach to surface water protection will use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Watershed Framework and guiding principles of geographic focus, scientifically based management and partnerships1 as a foundation. While the Laboratory's unique site characteristics result in objectives and priorities that may differ from other industrial sites, these underlying guiding principles provide a structure for surface water protection to ensure the Laboratory's role in environmental stewardship and as a community partner in watershed protection. The approach includes pollution prevention, continual environmental improvement, and supporting, as possible, community objectives (e.g., protection of the San Francisco Bay watershed).

  10. Investigation of Coupled Hydrologic and Geochemical Impacts of Wildfire on Southern California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Megan Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is routed through the reach network to the watershed outlet using storage routing, or kinematic wave

  11. Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors chip tile bioreactors to reduce nitrate losses in the upper Embarras River watershed in east. Three tile bioreactors will be installed in various locations in the watershed, again for determining

  12. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kootenai River Network, (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kootenai River Network (KRN) was contracted by the Bonneville Power Administration; PPA Project Number 96087200 for the period June 1, 2003 to May 31, 2004 to provide Kootenai River basin watershed coordination services. The prime focus of the KRN is coordinating activities and disseminating information related to watershed improvement and education and outreach with other interest groups in the Kootenai River basin. To this end, the KRN primarily focuses on maintaining communication networks among private and public watershed improvement groups in the Columbia River Basin. The KRN willing shares its resources with these groups. The 2003-2004 BPA contract extended the original Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks contract, which was transferred to the Kootenai River Network through a Memorandum of Understanding in November 2001. The KRN objectives of this contract were carried out through Watershed Coordinator position. The highly successful Kootenai River Network Annual General Meeting in Bonners Ferry in May 2003 demonstrated the tremendous gains that the Kootenai River Network has made in trans-boundary networking of watershed issues and accomplishments. The Annual General Meeting included seventy five participants representing more than forty US and Canadian citizen groups, tribes, first nations, agencies, ministries, businesses and private land owners from Montana, British Columbia, Idaho and Alberta. The International Restoration Tour in July 2004 featured the Grave Creek and Therriault Wetlands restoration projects in Montana and the Sand Creek and Wolf Creek restoration projects in British Columbia. The tour was attended by more than thirty people representing US and Canadian Federal and State/Provincial agencies, schools, colleges, conservation groups, private land owners, consultants, tribes, first nations, and politicians. These exciting trans-boundary successes encouraged the KRN to establish half-time Watershed Coordinator positions in both the United States and Canada. In September 2004 Kim Laub was hired as US-Watershed Coordinator and Jim and Laura Duncan were hired as Canadian Watershed Coordinators. To rejuvenate and revitalize the KRN, the Board conducted a strategic thinking and planning meeting in November 2004. All Board, staff and Advisory members participated in a combined effort to clearly define the goals of the KRN and to design ways of achieving those goals. Affirming and integrating board policy was a primary focus and it included writing accurate job descriptions for all KRN positions. KRN committee goals, the BPA contract and the Statement of Work plan were reviewed to establish future directions for a complex organization.

  13. The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes the calmodulin-binding protein in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    The fork head transcription factor Hcm1p participates in the regulation of SPC110, which encodes and abolish the ability of Hcm1p to act as a suppressor of calmodulin mutants. The promoter of SPC110 contains a match to the consensus binding site. Deletion of HCM1 does not affect the basal level of SPC110

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - John Day Watershed Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the John Day Watershed Restoration Program, which includes projects to improve watershed conditions, resulting in improved fish and wildlife habitat. The project was planned and coordinated by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs through the John Day Basin Office in Prairie City, Oregon. A variety of activities will be implemented, described below. The project will involve the installation of four permanent lay flat diversions (structures) to replace temporary diversions. Two structures would be constructed in Beech Creek, one in Little Beech Creek and one in the John Day River. The structures will replace temporary pushup dams, which were constructed annually of various materials. Installation of the permanent diversion structures eliminates the stream-disturbing activities associated with annual installation of temporary structures. They also will enable fish passage in all flow conditions, an improvement over the temporary structures which can obstruct fish passage under some conditions. Five scour chains will be installed in six sites within the John Day River. The chains will be 3 feet long and consist of 1/4 inch chain. They will be buried within the streambed to monitor the movement of material in the streambed. Other activities that will be implemented include: Installation of off-site water systems in areas where fencing and revegetation projects are implemented, in order to restrict livestock access to waterways; construction of facilities to return irrigation flows to the Johns Day River, including the installation of pipe to replace failing drains or return ditches; installation of pumps to replace temporary diversions; and removal of junipers from approximately 500 acres per year by hand felling.

  15. Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Management: An Evaluation of the Mullen Slough Capital Improvement Project Study MANAGEMENT in the School of Resource and Environmental Management Report No. 321 © Fiona Murray McNair 2003 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY July 2003 All rights reserved. This work may not be reproduced in whole

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    to a significant increase in total phosphorus. Several water quality parameters indicated a subsequent worseningENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY OF WILMINGTON AND NEW HANOVER COUNTY WATERSHEDS 2005-2006 by Michael A: The City of Wilmington, New Hanover County and the US EPA 319 Program (through NC Division of Water quality

  17. University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Tennessee Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .state.tn.us/environment/wpc/wshed1.htm Watts Bar Watershed McMinn Monroe Pond Creek #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Water Quality in Pond Creek 35.6 miles of Mud Creek, Greasy Branch and Pond Creek listed on 2002? #12;University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture Pond Creek · Pasture based beef and dairy

  18. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  19. Nine Elements of Watershed Based Plans for EPA Section 319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Protection Plan Feb 2008 #12;a.) Identify sources and causes for impairment (load duration curve of concern Uhland sub-area Confidence intervals from regression analysis of load duration curve Management knowledge of: the nature and source of the WQ problem, the pollutant load reductions needed to meet WQS

  20. Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

  1. Phase 2 confirmatory sampling data report, Lower East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Remedial Investigation of East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) concluded that mercury is the principal contaminant of concern in the EFPC floodplain. The highest concentrations of mercury were found to be in a visually distinct black layer of soil that typically lies 15 to 30 cm (6 to 12 in.) below the surface. Mercury contamination was found to be situated in distinct areas along the floodplain, and generally at depths > 20 cm (8 in.) below the surface. In accordance with Comprehensive, Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), a feasibility study was prepared to assess alternatives for remediation, and a proposed plan was issued to the public in which a preferred alternative was identified. In response to public input, the plan was modified and US Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Record of Decision in 1995 committing to excavating all soil in the EFPC floodplain exceeding a concentration of 400 parts per million (ppm) of mercury. The Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) remedial action (RA) focuses on the stretch of EFPC flowing from Lake Reality at the Y-12 Plant, through the city of Oak Ridge, to Poplar Creek on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and its associated floodplain. Specific areas were identified that required remediation at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Site along Illinois Avenue and at the Bruner Site along the Oak Ridge Turnpike. The RA was conducted in two separate phases. Phase 2, conducted from February to October 1997, completed the remediation efforts at the NOAA facility and fully remediated the Bruner Site. During both phases, data were collected to show that the remedial efforts performed at the NOAA and Bruner sites were successful in implementing the Record of Decision and had no adverse impact on the creek water quality or the city of Oak Ridge publicly owned treatment works.

  2. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and implementation of watershed protection plans for each watershed. The Leon River is listed as an impaired water body for elevated levels of E. coli and does not support its designated contact recreation use. The Lampasas River was also considered impaired...

  3. Flathead Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and WildlifeFlash Steam PowerFlat

  4. An Assessment of health risk associated with mercury in soil and sediment from East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revis, N.; Holdsworth, G.; Bingham, G.; King, A.; Elmore, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results from a study conducted to determine the toxicity of Mercury in soils sediments samples. Mice were fed via diet, soils and sediment, from various locations along the East Fork Poplar creek. Tissue distribution of pollutants was determined at various intervals. The tissue level relative to toxicity was used to determine the effect of a complex matrix on the gastrointestinal absorption and tissue distribution of the pollutants (other pollutants included cadmium and selenium).

  5. Paso del Norte Watershed Council Coordinated Water Resources Database Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher; Sheng, Zhuping; Rich, Matt

    data elements/variables Heavy metals Source(s) of data Field Study Spatial extent El Paso, Cd. Juarez Data gathered or updated 2002-2003 Frequency of data One Time Format of digital file Excel spreadsheet Restrictions on use None...@infolnk.net Contact address 4145 Benjamin Franklin and 4158 Estocolmo Pronaf circuit Cd. Juarez, Chihuahua Contact FAX number (656) 611-1270 Paso del Norte Watershed Council PDNWC Contact: Alfredo Granados Ph.D. Metadata form for USACE and EPWU Coordinated...

  6. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  7. Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    Assessment of Water Resources and Watershed Conditions in Moores Creek National Battlefield, North Assessment of Park Water Resources.......................................................................25 resources........................................................................15 Biological resources

  8. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis Achanges may impact the hydrology of the Tijuana Riverclimate changes might impact hydrology in the Tijuana River

  9. Appalachian Rivers II Conference: Technology for Monitoring, Assessing, and Restoring Streams, Rivers, and Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 28-29, 1999, the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and the WMAC Foundation co-sponsored the Appalachian Rivers II Conference in Morgantown, West Virginia. This meeting brought together over 100 manufacturers, researchers, academicians, government agency representatives, watershed stewards, and administrators to examine technologies related to watershed assessment, monitoring, and restoration. Sessions included presentations and panel discussions concerning watershed analysis and modeling, decision-making considerations, and emerging technologies. The final session examined remediation and mitigation technologies to expedite the preservation of watershed ecosystems.

  10. INTEGRATED OUTCROP AND SUBSURFACE STUDIES OF THE INTERWELL ENVIRONMENT OF CARBONATE RESERVOIRS: CLEAR FORK (LEONARDIAN-AGE) RESERVOIRS, WEST TEXAS AND NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Jerry Lucia

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of the project ''Integrated Outcrop and Subsurface Studies of the Interwell Environment of Carbonate Reservoirs: Clear Fork (Leonardian-Age) Reservoirs, West Texas and New Mexico'', Department of Energy contract no. DE-AC26-98BC15105 and is the third in a series of similar projects funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy and The University of Texas at Austin, Bureau of Economic Geology, Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonates. All three projects focus on the integration of outcrop and subsurface data for the purpose of developing improved methods for modeling petrophysical properties in the interwell environment. The first project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-89BC14470, was a study of San Andres outcrops in the Algerita Escarpment, Guadalupe Mountains, Texas and New Mexico, and the Seminole San Andres reservoir, Permian Basin. This study established the basic concepts for constructing a reservoir model using sequence-stratigraphic principles and rock-fabric, petrophysical relationships. The second project, funded by contract no. DE-AC22-93BC14895, was a study of Grayburg outcrops in the Brokeoff Mountains, New Mexico, and the South Cowden Grayburg reservoir, Permian Basin. This study developed a sequence-stratigraphic succession for the Grayburg and improved methods for locating remaining hydrocarbons in carbonate ramp reservoirs. The current study is of the Clear Fork Group in Apache Canyon, Sierra Diablo Mountains, West Texas, and the South Wasson Clear Fork reservoir, Permian Basin. The focus was on scales of heterogeneity, imaging high- and low-permeability layers, and the impact of fractures on reservoir performance. In this study (1) the Clear Fork cycle stratigraphy is defined, (2) important scales of petrophysical variability are confirmed, (3) a unique rock-fabric, petrophysical relationship is defined, (4) a porosity method for correlating high-frequency cycles and defining rock-fabric flow layers is described, (5) Clear Fork fractures are described and geomechanical modeling of fractures is investigated, and (6) most importantly, new statistical methods are developed for scaleup of petrophysical properties from the core to the layer scale and for retaining stratigraphic layering in simulation models.

  11. Second report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Black, M.C. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)] [and others

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NDPES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Y-12 Plant protect the classified uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a Water Pollution Control Program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing; (2) bioaccumulation studies; (3) biological indicator studies; and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic (bottom-dwelling) macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the second in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted between July 1986 and July 1988, although additional data collected outside this time period are included, as appropriate.

  12. First report on the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for East Fork Poplar Creek

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M.; Adams, S.M.; Allison, L.J.; Boston, H.L.; Huston, M.A.; McCarthy, J.F.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Stewart, A.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Black, M.C. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Gatz, A.J. Jr. (Ohio Wesleyan Univ., Delaware, OH (United States)); Hinzman, R.L. (Oak Ridge Research Inst., TN (United States)); Jimenez, B.D. (Puerto Rico Univ.,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As stipulated in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant on May 24, 1985, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream, East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The objectives of the BMAP are (1) to demonstrate that the current effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant protect the uses of EFPC (e.g., the growth and propagation of fish and aquatic life), as designated by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE)], and (2) to document the ecological effects resulting from implementation of a water pollution control program that includes construction of several large wastewater treatment facilities. The BMAP consists of four major tasks: (1) ambient toxicity testing, (2) bioaccumulation studies, (3) biological indicator studies, and (4) ecological surveys of stream communities, including periphyton (attached algae), benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. This document, the first in a series of reports on the results of the Y-12 Plant BMAP, describes studies that were conducted from May 1985 through September 1986.

  13. A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Fritz R.

    A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed A Thesis Presented Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment of the Paradise Creek Watershed," has been reviewed in final form ____________________________________Date____________ Margrit von Braun #12;iii iii A Probabilistic Water Resources Assessment

  14. Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession-flow analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Estimating basin-wide hydraulic parameters of a semi-arid mountainous watershed by recession 2002; accepted 23 April 2003 Abstract Insufficient sub-surface hydraulic data from watersheds often and in watersheds with low population densities because well-drilling to obtain the hydraulic data is expensive

  15. The Relative Importance of Road Density and Physical Watershed Features in Determining Coastal Marsh Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    with overall Water Quality Index scores. Road density also showed positive correlations with total nitrate Marsh Water Quality in Georgian Bay Rachel DeCatanzaro Ã? Maja Cvetkovic Ã? Patricia Chow-Fraser Received and physical watershed features (watershed size, wetland cover, and bedrock type) on water quality in coastal

  16. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order Watershed Ecosystem Restoration at Springville Dam, Draft Detailed Project Report/Environmental Assessment

  17. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course...

  18. Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploring the Environmental Effects of Shale Gas Development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed STAC Committee). 2013. Exploring the environmental effects of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay of shale gas development in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The purpose of this workshop was to engage

  19. Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria Nicole Asay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria Nicole Asay A thesis;ABSTRACT Quantification of glacier melt volume in the Indus River watershed Maria N. Asay Department of Geological Sciences, BYU Master of Science Quantifying the contribution of glaciers to water resources

  20. Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    for Undergraduates, 2006 #12;Modeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Urban Hydrology Water's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) Solves differential and algebraic equations involved in calculatingModeling Harry's Brook Watershed Alexandra Konings, REU 2006 Tracing the Water: Detailed Modeling

  1. Image segmentation and analysis via multiscale gradient watershed hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauch, John M.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Machine Intell., vol. 9, pp. 726–741, Nov. 1987. [3] S. Buecher, “Watersheds of functions and picture segmentation,” in Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Paris, France, May 1982, pp. 1928–1931. [4] S. Beucher and F. Meyer... based on morphological filtering,” IEEE Trans.Pattern Anal.Machine Intell., vol. 11, pp. 649–700, 1989. [11] J. J. Clark, “Singularities of contrast functions in scale space,” in Proc. 1st Int. Conf. Computer Vision, London, U.K., 1987, pp. 491–495. [12...

  2. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  3. Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Enviro n me n t a l Protec t i o n Agency (EPA). Since the progra m? s incept i o n in 2005, Extens i o n educat e d agricu l t u r a l produc e r s on proper nutrien t manageme n t and product i o n techniq u e s , pr omot e d progra ms associ a t e... and mercury and PCBs in edible fish tissue. Figure 3. Land use in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed. In 1998 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) initiated an effort to develop a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for pollutants causing low...

  4. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02ReportWaste-to-Energy andAprilWater andWatershed Scale

  5. Evaluation of Calendar Year 1996 groundwater and surface water quality data for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data are presented in Calendar Year 1996 Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the US Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, along with the required data evaluations specified in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime. This report provides additional evaluation of the CY 1996 groundwater and surface water monitoring data with an emphasis on regime-wide groundwater contamination and long-term concentration trends for regulated and non-regulated monitoring parameters.

  6. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian enclosure. This structure would include up to four wood fence posts and two deadman anchors buried in the ground. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat by preventing livestock from entering the riparian area via the river. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Carl Rudeen with the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (August 4, 2004) and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are gray wolf, Canada lynx, bald eagle, Ute ladies'Tresses, Snake River chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead trout, and Columbia River Basin bull trout. It was determined that the proposed fence crossing construction project would have no effect on these species. Bald eagle, gray wolf and Canada lynx are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity. Since the site is used primarily as livestock pasture it does not lend itself to the presence of Ute ladies'Tresses. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. Soil disturbance will be limited to the livestock pasture and to two holes that will be used to bury anchors for the suspended portion of the fence. Required river crossings will be made on foot. Requirements associated with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act were handled by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), in cooperation with staff from the U.S. Forest Service (Boise National Forest), under their existing Programmatic Agreement with the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A description of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project and site information was reviewed by a qualified archaeologist and it was determined that an archaeological survey was needed. Bruce Blackmere with NRCS conducted an intensive-complete survey of the project site and cultural resources were not identified (July 30, 2004). Based on these findings, it was recommended that the project proceed as planned. All survey findings were provided to the Idaho SHPO. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals. Public involvement has occurred as part of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. This project was coordinated through the Upper Salmon Basin Technical Team and Advisory Committee composed of representatives from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game. In addition, the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District holds monthly meetings that are open to the public in which this project was discussed.

  8. Baseline for Climate Change: Modeling Watershed Aquatic Biodiversity Relative to Environmental and Anthropogenic Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurakis, Eugene G

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of the two-year study were to (1) establish baselines for fish and macroinvertebrate community structures in two mid-Atlantic lower Piedmont watersheds (Quantico Creek, a pristine forest watershed; and Cameron Run, an urban watershed, Virginia) that can be used to monitor changes relative to the impacts related to climate change in the future; (2) create mathematical expressions to model fish species richness and diversity, and macroinvertebrate taxa and macroinvertebrate functional feeding group taxa richness and diversity that can serve as a baseline for future comparisons in these and other watersheds in the mid-Atlantic region; and (3) heighten people’s awareness, knowledge and understanding of climate change and impacts on watersheds in a laboratory experience and interactive exhibits, through internship opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, a week-long teacher workshop, and a website about climate change and watersheds. Mathematical expressions modeled fish and macroinvertebrate richness and diversity accurately well during most of the six thermal seasons where sample sizes were robust. Additionally, hydrologic models provide the basis for estimating flows under varying meteorological conditions and landscape changes. Continuations of long-term studies are requisite for accurately teasing local human influences (e.g. urbanization and watershed alteration) from global anthropogenic impacts (e.g. climate change) on watersheds. Effective and skillful translations (e.g. annual potential exposure of 750,000 people to our inquiry-based laboratory activities and interactive exhibits in Virginia) of results of scientific investigations are valuable ways of communicating information to the general public to enhance their understanding of climate change and its effects in watersheds.

  9. Kootenai River Focus Watershed Coordination, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, Gretchen (Kootenai River Network, Libby, MT)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2001-2002 Kootenai River Network Annual Report reflects the organization's defined set of goals and objectives, and how by accomplishing these goals, we continue to meet the needs of communities and landowners throughout the Kootenai River Basin by protecting the resource. Our completed and ongoing projects throughout the watershed reflect the cooperation and support received and needed to accomplish the rehabilitation and restoration of critical habitat. They show that our mission of facilitation through collaboration with public and private interests can lead to improved resource management, the restoration of water quality and the preservation of pristine aquatic resources. Our vision to empower local citizens and groups from two states, one province, two countries and affected tribal nations to collaborate in natural resource management within the basin is largely successful due to the engagement of the basin's residents--the landowners, town government, local interest groups, businesses and agency representatives who live and work here. We are proof that forging these types of cooperative relationships, such as those exhibited by the Kootenai River subbasin planning process, leads to a sense of entitlement--that the quality of the river and its resources enriches our quality of life. Communication is essential in maintaining these relationships. Allowing ourselves to network and receive ideas and information, as well as to produce quality, accessible research data such as KRIS, shared with like organizations and individuals, is the hallmark of this facilitative organization. We are fortunate in the ability to contribute such information, and continue to strive to meet the standards and the needs of those who seek us out as a model for watershed rehabilitative planning and restoration. Sharing includes maintaining active, ongoing lines of communication with the public we serve--through our web site, quarterly newsletter, public presentations and stream table education--at every opportunity. We continue to seek ideas to guide us as we grow. We want to enlarge that sense of ownership that the river does indeed run through it, and belongs to us all. Through a continued and common effort, we hope to carry forward the good work and the momentum that underscores our intent. We are proud to report our accomplishments of this past year because they reflect our renewed sense of purpose. In alliance with diverse citizen groups, individuals, business, industry and tribal and government water resource management agencies, we strive to continue to protect and restore the beauty and integrity that is the Kootenai River watershed.

  10. John Day Watershed Restoration Projects, annual report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Linda (Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, John Day Basin Office, John Day, OR)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  11. Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  12. Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

  13. Urbanizing Watersheds and Changing River Flood Dynamics: Implications for Urban Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanization alters river hydrology, morphology, water quality, and habitat and ecology. Most of these associated changes are due to an increase in impervious surface cover (ISC) throughout the watershed. But the spatial location of urban areas...

  14. Minimization of Cost, Sediment Load, and Sensitivity to Climate Change in a Watershed Management Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    caused by non-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs management practice (BMP) plans for entire watersheds. Each of these alternative BMP configurations are non: multiobjective, differential evolution, robustness to uncertainty, stormwater management, best management

  15. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  16. NIFA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (formerly NRI): Water and Watershed Competitive Grants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracking to Identify Nonpoint Fecal Pollution in Agricultural Watersheds Principal Investigator: Nachabe, M of Award: Grant 2002-35102-12383; $204,862; 3 Years Title of Award: Variable-Frequency Acoustic Profiling

  17. Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    Hydro-Ecologic Responses to Land Use in Small Urbanizing Watersheds Within the Chesapeake Bay. The consequences for both the hydrology and 41 #12;42 HYDRO-ECOLOGIC RESPONSES TO LAND USE IN SMALL URBANIZING

  18. An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

    of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages...

  19. Nitrogen and Phosphorus Biogeochemistry of Watersheds Along the Western Slope of the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homyak, Peter Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both EML and Pear Lake (PRL) (J. Sickman, unpublished data),hypolimnetic O 2 concentrations. PRL is a 8.0 ha 591,000 m 3hypolimnetic anoxia. The PRL watershed is 142 ha of which

  20. Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans: Texas water resources professionals gather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Ric

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 6 Story by Ric Jensen Course helps professionals develop watershed protection plans | pg. 6 tx H2O | pg. 7 W ater resources professionals wanting training on watershed protection plan development are benefiting from a course... Casebolt of Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Lucas Gregory of Texas Water Resources Institute, Vanessa Escobar of the Texas Water Development Board, and Ernest Moran of the San Antonio River Author- ity calculate load duration curves...

  1. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  2. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY AND FACIES ANALYSIS OF THE ROLLINS SANDSTONE MEMBER (MOUNT GARFIELD FORMATION) AND RE-EXAMINATION OF THE CONTACT BETWEEN THE MOUNT GARFIELD AND WILLIAMS FORK FORMATIONS (LATE CRETACEOUS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Jesse David

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    there is no upward-climbing geometry at the top of the Mount Garfield Formation, and the Rollins Sandstone Member and the Cameo Wheeler coal zone (of the Williams Fork Formation) are not time-equivalent units. The marine- shoreface deposits within the Rollins...

  3. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment at Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project, Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, 1985 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, J.H.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat based assessment was conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Hills Creek Dam and Reservoir Project on the Middle Fork Willamette River, Oregon, to determine losses or gains resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric related components of the project. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types of the project site were mapped based on aerial photographs from 1944, 1964, and 1979, respectively. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected area and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Fifteen wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the project. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the project. The Hills Creek Project extensively altered or affected 4662 acres of land and river in the Middle Fork Willamette River drainage. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 2694 acres of old-growth forest and 207 acres of riparian habitat. Impacts resulting from the Hills Creek Project included the loss of winter range for Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for black-tailed deer, black bear, cougar, river otter, beaver, ruffed grouse, spotted owl, and other nongame species. Bald eagle and osprey were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected area to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Hills Creek Project, losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the life of the project.

  4. Curve Number and Peakflow Responses Following the Cerro Grande Fire on a Small Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, E. P.; Hawkins, Richard H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Curve Number (CN) method is routinely used to estimate runoff and peakflows following forest fires, but there has been essentially no literature on the estimated value and temporal variation of CNs following wildland fires. In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned the headwaters of the major watersheds that cross Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a stream gauging network presented an opportunity to assess CNs following the fire. Analysis of rainfall-runoff events indicated that the pre-fire watershed response was complacent or limited watershed area contributed to runoff. The post-fire response indicated that the complacent behavior continued so the watershed response was not dramatically changed. Peakflows did increase by 2 orders of magnitude following the fire, and this was hypothesized to be a function of increase in runoff volume and changes in watershed network allowing more efficient delivery of runoff. More observations and analyses following fires are needed to support definition of CNs for post-fire response and mitigation efforts.

  5. Community Perceptions and Priorities for Managing Water and Environmental Resources in the River Njoro Watershed in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Njoro Watershed in Kenya M. W. Jenkins1 , F. K. Lelo2 , L.W. Chiuri2 , W. A. Shivoga2 and S. N. Miller3, respectively, in Environmental Science, Egerton University, Njoro, Kenya; Tel (+254) 51 62085, emails: lelo@uwyo.edu Abstract The Njoro Watershed, typical of the semi-arid basins in the Rift Valley of Kenya, is undergoing

  6. Idaho Model Watershed Project : Annual Report to the Bonneville Power Administration January 1, 1997 - December 31, 1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, Allen; Slavin, Katie

    1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Model Watershed Project was initiated in the fall of 1992 with a grant from Bonneville Power Administration. The objective of this project is to protect, enhance and restore anadromous and resident fish habitat and achieve and maintain a balance between resource protection and resource use on a holistic watershed basis.

  7. What is the effect of LiDAR-derived DEM resolution on large-scale watershed model results?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Yang; Daniel B. Ames; Andre Fonseca; Danny Anderson; Rupesh Shrestha; Nancy F. Glenn; Yang Cao

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the effect of raster cell size on hydrographic feature extraction and hydrological modeling using LiDAR derived DEMs. LiDAR datasets for three experimental watersheds were converted to DEMs at various cell sizes. Watershed boundaries and stream networks were delineated from each DEM and were compared to reference data. Hydrological simulations were conducted and the outputs were compared. Smaller cell size DEMs consistently resulted in less difference between DEM-delineated features and reference data. However, minor differences been found between streamflow simulations resulted for a lumped watershed model run at daily simulations aggregated at an annual average. These findings indicate that while higher resolution DEM grids may result in more accurate representation of terrain characteristics, such variations do not necessarily improve watershed scale simulation modeling. Hence the additional expense of generating high resolution DEM's for the purpose of watershed modeling at daily or longer time steps may not be warranted.

  8. Characterization of coastal urban watershed bacterial communities leads to alternative community-based indicators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.H.; Sercu, B.; Van De Werhorst, L.C.; Wong, J.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Hazen, T.C.; Holden, P.A.; Andersen, G.L.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities in aquatic environments are spatially and temporally dynamic due to environmental fluctuations and varied external input sources. A large percentage of the urban watersheds in the United States are affected by fecal pollution, including human pathogens, thus warranting comprehensive monitoring. Using a high-density microarray (PhyloChip), we examined water column bacterial community DNA extracted from two connecting urban watersheds, elucidating variable and stable bacterial subpopulations over a 3-day period and community composition profiles that were distinct to fecal and non-fecal sources. Two approaches were used for indication of fecal influence. The first approach utilized similarity of 503 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) common to all fecal samples analyzed in this study with the watershed samples as an index of fecal pollution. A majority of the 503 OTUs were found in the phyla Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The second approach incorporated relative richness of 4 bacterial classes (Bacilli, Bacteroidetes, Clostridia and a-proteobacteria) found to have the highest variance in fecal and non-fecal samples. The ratio of these 4 classes (BBC:A) from the watershed samples demonstrated a trend where bacterial communities from gut and sewage sources had higher ratios than from sources not impacted by fecal material. This trend was also observed in the 124 bacterial communities from previously published and unpublished sequencing or PhyloChip- analyzed studies. This study provided a detailed characterization of bacterial community variability during dry weather across a 3-day period in two urban watersheds. The comparative analysis of watershed community composition resulted in alternative community-based indicators that could be useful for assessing ecosystem health.

  9. Where does streamwater come from in low-relief forested watersheds? A dual-isotope approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus, Julian [Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology (LIST), Dept. Environmental Research and Innovation, Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time and geographic sources of streamwater in low-relief watersheds are poorly understood. This is partly due to the difficult combination of low runoff coefficients and often damped streamwater isotopic signals precluding traditional hydrograph separation and convolution integral approaches. Here we present a dual-isotope approach involving 18O and 2H of water in a low-angle forested watershed to determine streamwater source components and then build a conceptual model of streamflow generation. We focus on three headwater lowland sub-catchments draining the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, USA.

  10. Where does streamwater come from in low-relief forested watersheds? A dual-isotope approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Klaus, Julian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time and geographic sources of streamwater in low-relief watersheds are poorly understood. This is partly due to the difficult combination of low runoff coefficients and often damped streamwater isotopic signals precluding traditional hydrograph separation and convolution integral approaches. Here we present a dual-isotope approach involving 18O and 2H of water in a low-angle forested watershed to determine streamwater source components and then build a conceptual model of streamflow generation. We focus on three headwater lowland sub-catchments draining the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, USA.

  11. Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers: Lampasas River Watershed Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Casarez, E.; Truesdale, J.; Di Giovanni, G.; Owen, T.; Wolfe, J.

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas Water Resources Institute TR 441 April 2013 Bacterial Source Tracking to Support the Development and Implementation of Watershed Protection Plans for the Lampasas and Leon Rivers L. Gregory, E. Casarez, J. Truesdale, G. Di Giovanni, R... Oxygen E. coli Escherichia coli EPA Environmental Protection Agency ERIC-PCR Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Sequence Polymerase Chain Reaction ERIC-RP ERIC-PCR and RiboPrinting Composite DNA Fingerprints LRW Leon River...

  12. Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Evan

    Sediment storage and yield in an urbanized karst watershed Evan A. Harta,*, Stephen G. Schurgerb, sinkholes and other drainage features control the temporal and spatial pattern of sediment storage across storage function of sinkholes and caves has not been investigated using a sediment budget approach

  13. Success of the Melton Valley Watershed Remediation at the ORNL - 12351

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, David; Wilkerson, Laura [DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (United States); Sims, Lynn; Ketelle, Richard; Garland, Sid [Oak Ridge/Restoration Service, Inc. - UCOR/RSI (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The source remediation of the Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory was completed 5 years ago (September 2006). Historic operations at the laboratory had resulted in chemical and radionuclide contaminant releases and potential risks or hazards within 175 contaminated units scattered across an area of 430 hectares (1062 acres) within the watershed. Contaminated areas included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pit/trenches, hydrofracture wells, leak and spill spites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediments. The remediation of the watershed was detailed in the MV Interim Action Record of Decision (ROD) and included a combination of actions encompassing containment, isolation, stabilization, removal, and treatment of sources within the watershed and established the monitoring and land use controls that would result in protection of human health. The actions would take place over 5 years with an expenditure of over $340 M. The MV remedial actions left hazardous wastes in-place (e.g., buried wastes beneath hydraulic isolation caps) and cleanup at levels that do not allow for unrestricted access and unlimited exposure. The cleanup with the resultant land use would result in a comprehensive monitoring plan for groundwater, surface water, and biological media, as well as the tracking of the land use controls to assure their completion. This paper includes an overview of select performance measures and monitoring results, as detailed in the annual Remediation Effectiveness Report and the Five-Year Report. (authors)

  14. Fine Sediment Sources in Coastal Watersheds with Uplifted Marine Terraces in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    County, California Stephen Sungnome Madrone1 and Andrew P. Stubblefield1 Abstract Erosion in the Mill and Luffenholtz Creek watersheds in Humboldt County, California, with their extensive clay soils, can lead to high) there is still the potential for creation of a dangerous by-product, chloro-tri- halomethanes that can remain

  15. An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

  16. The British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    hillslopes to stream channels are restored, a also low-level treatment, where only hillslope restoration work a restoration program would be over a 4-8 year period, using 8-16 experimental stream triplets. AppropriateThe British Columbia Watershed Restoration Program: Summary of the Experimental Design, Monitoring

  17. Corbicula Biomonitoring in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    1 Corbicula Biomonitoring in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources and estuary sites for eight weeks and tissues analyzed for 21 pesticides, 28 PCB congenors, 18 PAHs and 6 tPAHs were significently increased. Clams placed just above tide in three of five main tributaries

  18. Corbicula Active (ABM) Biomonitoring and Passive (POM) Chlordane Monitoring in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    in the Anacostia River Watershed (MD). Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L hydrocarbons (PAHs), 28 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners (PCBs), 6 Aroclors, 21 pesticides, and five metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb) plus technical chlordane, percent water and percent lipid. This ABM study

  19. Active Biomonitoring for PCB, PAH and Chlordane Sources in the Anacostia Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    1 Active Biomonitoring for PCB, PAH and Chlordane Sources in the Anacostia Watershed Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L. Phelps June 1, 2008 ABSTRACT In 2007, active's Anacostia River upper tributaries. The contaminated tributaries included Indian Creek (PAHs), Lower

  20. Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright, and David Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    classified as Decision Support Systems (DSS) (Loucks 1995). Contemporary DSS's contain a mixture9-1 Chapter 9 Urban Stormwater and Watershed Management: A Case Study James P. Heaney, Len Wright. The concept of integrated water and land management was first articulated in the western U.S. by John Wesley

  1. Calibration of Watershed Models using Cloud Computing Marty Humphrey, Norm Beekwilder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty

    .e. runoff from agricultural and urban lands to water bodies. This difference in scope introduces-- Understanding hydrologic systems at the scale of large watersheds and river basins is critically important to society when faced with extreme events, such as floods and droughts, or with concerns about water quality

  2. Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opsomer, Jean

    Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake Watershed: Sampling Design, Methods and Results by J Association June 11, 2001 Iowa State University Ames, Iowa #12;2 Environmental Assessment for the Rathbun Lake health assessment, are briefly described in the article. All the selected plots and stream locations were

  3. Evaluation of shrub encroachment and brush control on water availability in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afinowicz, Jason David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................... 99 VITA ........................................................................................................... 102 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2-1 A comparison of the same area as viewed from (a) a 30-m spatial resolution..., and light brush in the Upper Guadalupe River watershed as determined by remote sensing shown by dark regions?.. ................................................................................... 21 3-1 The location and stream network...

  4. Coupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Such models lack the capacity to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality processes of larger waterCoupling upland watershed and downstream waterbody hydrodynamic and water quality models (SWAT and CE-QUAL-W2) for better water resources management in complex river basins B. Debele & R. Srinivasan

  5. TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    21 TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL, the best location for 1 or 3 dry dams). To take into account the spatial variability of the rainfall, we, following subcatchments delineation. A dry dam can be placed at the outlet of any unit. Such a simple model

  6. NAME: Salt Creek Estuary Restoration LOCATION: Salt Creek Watershed, Clallam County, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Salt Creek Estuary Restoration LOCATION: Salt Creek Watershed, Clallam County, Washington Federal funds $0 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Salt Creek Estuary Reconnection project will significantly enhance tidal and fluvial hydrology to 22.5 acres of salt marsh, which will return the salt marsh to its

  7. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  8. SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOURCE AND EFFECT OF ACID ROCK DRAINAGE IN THE SNAKE RIVER WATERSHED, SUMMIT COUNTY, COLORADO Belanger, Laura (M.S., Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering) Source and Effect of Acid Rock (the weathering of disseminated pyrite) sources of acid rock drainage (ARD). Stream waters

  9. Hydrologic Modeling of a Canal-Irrigated Agricultural Watershed with Irrigation Best Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a hydrologic perspective. In this study, an approach is developed to model canal irrigation systems understanding of irrigation systems and a proper represen- tation of them in watershed models are required it for modeling purposes. Therefore, the next alternative is to use a model to simulate irrigation systems

  10. Risk assessment of watershed erosion at Naesung Stream, South Korea Un Ji a,*, Mark Velleux b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    simulated runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport in the Naesung Stream watershed is a significant river management issue and critical environmental problem (Kane and Julien, 2007). Typically, land for analysis of precipitation, overland runoff, channel flow, soil erosion, and stream sediment transport

  11. Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    bacterial survival in hydro- environmental systems such as sunlight, temperature, soil moisture conditions1559 Better understanding of bacterial fate and transport in watersheds is necessary for improved regulatory management of impaired streams. Novel statistical time series analyses of coliform data can

  12. Report on the Watershed Monitoring Program at the Paducah Site January-December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Watershed Monitoring of Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks has been conducted since 1987. The monitoring was conducted by the University of Kentucky between 1987 and 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of monitoring are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for DOE protect and maintain the use of Little Bayour and Big Bayou creeks for frowth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota. The watershed (biological) monitoring discussed in this report was conducted under DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. Future monitoring will be conducted as required by the Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) in March 1998. A draft Watershed Monitoring Program plan was approved by the Kentucky Division of Water and will be finalized in 1999. The DOE permit also requires toxicity monitoring of one continuous outfall and of three intermittent outfalls on a quarterly basis. The Watershed Monitoring Program for the Paducah Site during calendar year 1998 consisted of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of fish communities. This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from january 1998 to December 1998, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

  13. Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit 3 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper East Fork Popular Creek Operable Unit 3 (UEFPC OU 3) is a source term OU composed of seven sites, and is located in the western portion of the Y-12 Plant. For the most part, the UEFPC OU 3 sites served unrelated purposes and are geographically removed from one another. The seven sites include the following: Building 81-10, the S-2 Site, Salvage Yard oil storage tanks, the Salvage Yard oil/solvent drum storage area, Tank Site 2063-U, the Salvage Yard drum deheader, and the Salvage Yard scrap metal storage area. All of these sites are contaminated with at least one or more hazardous and/or radioactive chemicals. All sites have had some previous investigation under the Y-12 Plant RCRA Program. The work plan contains summaries of geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological information specific to each OU 3 site. The potential for release of contaminants to receptors through various media is addressed, and a sampling and analysis plan is presented to obtain objectives for the remedial investigation. Proposed sampling activities are contingent upon the screening level risk assessment, which includes shallow soil sampling, soil borings, monitoring well installation, groundwater sampling, and surface water sampling. Data from the site characterization activities will be used to meet the above objectives. A Field Sampling Investigation Plan, Health and Safety Plan, and Waste Management Plan are also included in this work plan.

  14. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  15. A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Chad Edward

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients ...

  16. Microbial Risk Perspective on the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Indicator Bacteria in Texas Urban and Rural Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan Ravichandran, Sriambharrish

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    contaminated waters as indicated by ingestion of Escherichia coli found in surface water for contact recreation scenarios. The watersheds were chosen because many segments were previously placed on the 303 (d) list (published by the TCEQ) for failing...

  17. Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason Samuel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions, and geologic characteristics. This study describes the development, accuracy, and application of a decision support geographic information system (DSGIS) for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River watersheds...

  18. Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Heather Grace

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    service valuation model to each of the land use classes over the discreet time periods. Hydrologic peak flow models using the Soil Conservation Service Curve Number Method were developed and applied to each watershed for each discreet time period...

  19. Runoff sources and land cover change in the Amazon: an end-member mixing analysis from small watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    watersheds Christopher Neill · Joaquin E. Chaves · Trent Biggs · Linda A. Deegan · Helmut Elsenbeer · Ricardo 02543, USA e-mail: cneill@mbl.edu T. Biggs Department of Geography, San Diego State University, San

  20. Spatially explicit load enrichment calculation tool and cluster analysis for identification of E. coli sources in Plum Creek Watershed, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teague, Aarin Elizabeth

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the 2004 303(d) List, 192 segments are impaired by bacteria in the State of Texas. Impairment of streams due to bacteria is of major concern in several urban watersheds in Texas. In order to assess, monitor ...

  1. Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Note to Teachers : A Tale of Two Watersheds: Land Use, Topography, and the Potential for Urban the upward limit of geographical features such as pediments, fans and depositional features of ice and wind

  2. Watershed characteristics contributing to the 1983-84 debris flows in the Wasatch Range, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, William Kevin

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 3. 983-84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY ?UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Submitted to Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Geology WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS CONTRIBUTING TO THE 1. 983 ? 84 DEBRIS FLOWS IN THE WASATCH RANGE, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH A Thesis by WILLIAM KEVIN COLEMAN Approved...

  3. A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Chad Edward

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A WATER QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPORT OF TURFGRASS SOD GROWN WITH COMPOSTED DAIRY MANURE INTO A SUBURBAN WATERSHED A Thesis by CHAD EDWARD RICHARDS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... OF TURFGRASS SOD GROWN WITH COMPOSTED DAIRY MANURE INTO A SUBURBAN WATERSHED A Thesis by CHAD EDWARD RICHARDS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  4. Water quality improvements in the Upper North Bosque River watershed due to phosphorous export through turfgrass sod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, George Russell

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    these problems, Texas A&M University researchers have developed a turfgrass sod Best Management Practice (BMP) to remove excess nutrients from impaired watersheds. Turfgrass harvest of manure fertilized sod removes a thin layer of topsoil with most... of the manure applied P. Plot and field scale research has demonstrated the effectiveness of turfgrass to remove manure phosphorus (P). In order to assess the impact of the turfgrass BMP on a watershed scale, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used...

  5. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  6. Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damodaram, Chandana

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    watershed scenarios are described based on land use coverage characteristics and implementation of a detention pond ............................ 23 4 No. of Parking Lots and Rooftops being retrofit based on the percentage of area... ecosystems (USEPA 2000; Coffman 2000). Low Impact Development (LID) practices are an alternative approach for controlling storm water at the source like rooftops, parking lots and sidewalks. LID technologies include permeable pavements, rainwater...

  7. Developing a Methodology to Prioritize Texas Watersheds for Environmental Restoration Efforts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, R.; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Jones, C. Allan; Harris, B.L.; Jensen, Ricard W.

    and terrestrial “portfolios” developed by the Nature Conservancy, major rivers, aquifer recharge zones, major reservoirs, and critical stream segments. At the same time, watershed threats were identified by assessing data on such factors as water and wind... by TPWD. The presence of Texas Nature Conservancy (TNC) Aquatic, Terrestrial and Marine Portfolios Finally, for each HUC the percentage of riparian cropland was determined. Those HUCs within the top 20% were determined to be significant...

  8. Restoration in the Anacostia river watershed: An ecosystem management case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses various aspects of an ecosystem approach to watershed restoration as illustrated by the Anacostia River Watershed Restoration initiative. This information was derived from a case study conducted as part of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Initiative (IEMI), an outgrowth of a recommendation in the National Performance Review. The purpose of this study was to identify components of the ecosystem approach used in the Anacostia initiative that may be useful to other ecosystem restoration and management initiatives in the future. Water quality and ecological conditions within the Anacostia River watershed have become degraded due to urban and suburban development and other activities in the watershed over the last two centuries. An intergovernmental partnership has been formed to cooperatively assess the specific problems in the basin and to direct and implement restoration efforts. The Anacostia initiative includes a number of cooperative efforts that cross political boundaries, and involves numerous states, local agencies, civic groups, and private individuals in addition to the Federal players. In contrast with some of the other case studies in the IEMI, the Anacostia restoration effort is primarily driven by state and local governments. There has, however, been Federal involvement in the restoration and use of Federal grants. In addition, the establishment of a forum for setting goals, priorities and resolving differences was viewed as essential. Closer relationships between planning and regulatory functions can help advance the restoration goals. Public participation, including education, outreach and involvement, is essential to viable ecosystem initiatives. Comprehensive planning and modeling must be balanced with continuous visible results in order to sustain administrative and public support for the initiative.

  9. Subtask 1.18 - A Decision Tool for Watershed-Based Effluent Trading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xixi Wang; Bethany A. Kurz; Marc D. Kurz

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Handling produced water in an economical and environmentally sound manner is vital to coalbed methane (CBM) development, which is expected to increase up to 60% in the next 10-15 years as the demand for natural gas increases. Current produced water-handling methods (e.g., shallow reinjection and infiltration impoundments) are too costly when implemented on a well-by-well basis. A watershed-based effluent credit trading approach may be a means of managing produced water at reduced cost while meeting or surpassing water quality regulations. This market-based approach allows for improved water quality management by enabling industrial, agricultural, and municipal discharge facilities to meet water quality permit requirements by purchasing pollutant reduction credits from other entities within the same watershed. An evaluation of this concept was conducted for the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Montana and Wyoming by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). To conduct this assessment, the EERC collected and evaluated existing water quality information and developed the appropriate tools needed to assess the environmental and economic feasibility of specific trading scenarios. The accomplishments of this study include (1) an exploration of the available PRB water quantity and quality data using advanced statistical techniques, (2) development of an integrated water quality model that predicts the impacts of CBM produced water on stream salinity and sodicity, (3) development of an economic model that estimates costs and benefits from implementing potential trading options, (4) evaluation of hypothetical trading scenarios between select watersheds of the PRB, and (5) communication of the project concept and results to key state and federal agencies, industry representatives, and stakeholders of the PRB. The preliminary results of a basinwide assessment indicate that up to $684 million could be saved basinwide without compromising water quality as a result of implementing a watershed-based credit-trading approach.

  10. Implementing the Pecos River Watershed Protection Plan through a Heliborne Electromagnetic (EM) Survey: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Sheng, Z.; Hassan, A.; McDonald, A.; Porter, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , completing financial status reports, hosting the program website, developing the project final report, facilitating the acceptance of bids from companies capable of collecting heliborne electromagnetic (HEM) data, awarding the HEM contract, and ultimately..., and the contract was awarded in May 2013. SkyTEM was the company that provided the bid with the best value and met data collection requirements. As a part of the Pecos River WPP Implementation Project (TSSWCB 08-08), public meetings were held in the watershed...

  11. A watershed blueprint: partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  12. A watershed blueprint: Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado's health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    txH2O | pg. 18 A watershed blueprint Partners work together to restore Arroyo Colorado?s health In 2002 the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) set a target of 90 percent reduction of nutrients and biochemical oxygen demand... for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  13. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaobing [Oak Ridge National Lab] [Oak Ridge National Lab

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High initial cost and lack of public awareness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, which is a heating only central GSHP system using shallow aquifer as heat source and installed at a warehouse and truck bay at Kalispell, MT. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, utility bills, and calculations of energy consumptions of conventional central heating systems for providing the same heat outputs as the central GSHP system did. The evaluated performance metrics include energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GSHP system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of GSHP system compared with conventional heating systems. This case study also identified areas for reducing uncertainties in performance evaluation, improving operational efficiency, and reducing installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future. Publication of ASHRAE at the annual conference in Seattle.

  14. Appendix 58 Flathead Forest Plan Amendment 21, Appendix IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this is designated or proposed wilderness), 20 percent by Plum Creek Timber Company, 10 by the Swan River State, camping, firewood cutting, snowmobiling, fishing, and hunting. · Extensive road network and logging

  15. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Will Take Advantage of Abundant Water in Shallow Aquifer. Demonstrate Low Temperature GSHP System Design. Provides a Baseline for Local Industrial Geothermal Project Costs and Benefits.

  16. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  17. Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring 2009, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks would convey a conservation easement on the property to BPA to ensure...

  18. Flathead County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,and WildlifeFlash Steam PowerFlat Jump

  19. Remediation of the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Lab: An Accelerated Closure Success Story

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Ch.; Cange, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, R. [U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge Operations Office, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adams, V. [U.S. DOE, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley (MV) Watershed at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) encompasses approximately 430 hectares (1062 acres). Historic operations at ORNL produced a diverse legacy of contaminated facilities and waste disposal areas in the valley. In addition, from 1955 to 1963, ORNL served as a major disposal site for wastes from over 50 off-site government-sponsored installations, research institutions, and other isotope users. Contaminated areas in the watershed included burial grounds, landfills, underground tanks, surface impoundments, liquid disposal pits/trenches, hydro-fracture wells, leak and spill sites, inactive surface structures, and contaminated soil and sediment. Remediation of the watershed in accordance with the requirements specified in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Actions in Melton Valley, which estimated that remedial actions specified in the ROD would occur over a period of 14 years, with completion by FY 2014. Under the terms of the Accelerated Closure Contract between DOE and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, the work was subdivided into 14 separate sub-projects which were completed between August 2001 and September 2006, 8 years ahead of the original schedule. (authors)

  20. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  1. Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

  2. This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    understanding of the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. This document is the product of more thanForeword This document is the result of a major interdisciplinary effort to synthesize our topics include overviews of the effects of fuel management on both terrestrial and aquatic watershed

  3. The Pumpkin Creek Watershed Limited Irrigation and No-Till Demonstration Gary L. Stone, Gary W. Hergert, Dean Yonts, Jim Schild, Rex A. Nielson and James Margheim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    in the Panhandle can fit into limited irrigation cropping systems in the Pumpkin Creek Watershed. The NPNRD allowsThe Pumpkin Creek Watershed Limited Irrigation and No-Till Demonstration Gary L. Stone, Gary W irrigation applies less water than is required to meet full evapotranspiration (ET) or irrigation demand

  4. Comparative analyses for the prediction of streamflow from small watershed by use of digitized radar data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braatz, Dean Thomas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study. (Source: ARS, USDA, Chickasha, Oklahoma) N 149 Cy ril 147 154 125 ~ q q ~ ~l. t 124 130 \\ 522 l g 131' ~ 132 $ 133 Ninnekah if l, 134 135 VCement 151 ~+ f 150 14'e 181 144 153 182 r 156 Fletcher 161 160 f59 0 5 Rush Springs Scale..., Agriculture Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Chickasha, Oklahoma, for two small sub-basins within the larger experimen- tal watershed of the Washita River basin. The actual rainfall values collected by the ARS network...

  5. Flood forecasting with the A&M watershed model: a hydrometeorological study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Cedric Glynn

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'c 219R'? 67. 6R ' "' 66. 5R'w 204Rc o 205R' " ) 3PPR~? 450R' '" j 184R' '" 278R"'" 240R'""' 176R'" 15 I R "' 179R'" 227n'o 17 8R "c 150R"" 137R' "" 330R'? 298R''" ) 520Rwo 730Rcn ) 255R' " 426R' 'c Sal'man (1957) Shupiatskii (1957... procedure. The rain gage locations reporting valid data within or near the watershed boundary are identified. The rainfall measured by each gage is compared to the amount measured by the radar at the gage location. If the measured rainfall exceeds a...

  6. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheney suggesting a billVehicles | DepartmentStrategicfrom Lower15

  7. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  8. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Phase I, Volume Two (A), Clark Fork Projects, Thompson Falls Dam, Operator, Montana Power Company.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn

    1984-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thompson Falls Dam inundated approximately 347 acres of wildlife habitat that likely included conifer forests, deciduous bottoms, mixed conifer-deciduous forests and grassland/hay meadows. Additionally, at least one island, and several gravel bars were inundated when the river was transformed into a reservoir. The loss of riparian and riverine habitat adversely affected the diverse wildlife community inhabiting the lower Clark Fork River area. Quantitative loss estimates were determined for selected target species based on best available information. The loss estimates were based on inundation of the habitat capable of supporting the target species. Whenever possible, loss estimates bounds were developed by determining ranges of impacts based on density estimates and/or acreage loss estimates. Of the twelve target species or species groups, nine were assessed as having net negative impacts. 86 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Water Use in Agricultural Watersheds Derrel Martin, Professor, Irrigation and Water Resources Engineer, Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering, UNL Background Concerns about water use have intensified and Republican River Basins, and the implementation of LB 962. To understand water use it is helpful to consider

  10. PROGRESS TOWARD DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS BASED WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT TOOL FOR SMALL RURAL WATERSHEDS: MODIFICATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    for the Palouse Region of the Pacific Northwest. We apply and modify the Soil Moisture Routing (SMR) model which in the Palouse Region provided that saturated hydraulic conductivities determined in the laboratory are adjusted University are developing a GIS-based problem-solving tool for small rural watersheds in the Palouse Region

  11. Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

    and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that is, the costs to society...

  12. The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

  13. Quantification of Water Quality Improvement in Sandy Creek, A Tributary Watershed of Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Cape Fear River Basin, After Stream and Riparian Restoration and Wetland Treatment Cell Creation: Final to restoration. The Duke Forest Stream and Wetlands Restoration was established to rectify these problems delivery following watershed development, a three-phase stream and floodplain restoration was planned

  14. NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Green Gulch Creek Stream Restoration Project LOCATION: Redwood Creek Watershed in Marin County, CA (closest town is Muir Beach) ACRES: 1.5 acres riparian habitat; 0.3 miles of stream channel-modified, straightened, and downcut channel; relocate the farm road and fences paralleling the stream to provide

  15. Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple but consistent rainfall-runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple Lyon, FRANCE Abstract We investigate the assessment of the overall efficiency of a set of dry dams of the best locations for a set of dams was previously studied using a simplistic rainfall-runoff model

  16. chApter 1. Introduction to Synthesis of Current Science 1 Regarding Cumulative Watershed Effects of Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watershed Effects of Fuel Reduction Treatments Douglas F. Ryan chApter 2. Fire Regimes and Ecoregions 7 Robert G. Bailey chApter 3. Fuel Management in Forests of the Inland West 19 Russell T. Graham, Theresa B. Jain, Susan Matthews chApter 4. Tools for Fuel Management 69 Bob Rummer chApter 5. Fuel Management

  17. Deep groundwater flow as the main pathway for chemical outputs in a small headwater watershed (Mule Hole, South India)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Deep groundwater flow as the main pathway for chemical outputs in a small headwater watershed (Mule of a groundwater baseflow located into the active zone of the crystalline aquifer, below the weir. These findings indicate that groundwater contributes to a large part of chemical outputs at the catchment scale

  18. Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER Watershed Zones of Intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    1 Haiti Soil Fertility Analysis and Crop Interpretations for Principal Crops in the Five WINNER degradation dominate the landscape in Haiti and there is little accurate soil-fertility research available in five major watershed regions of Haiti: Gonaives, Archaie/Cabaret, Cul-de-Sac, Kenscoff, and Mirebalais

  19. The watershed depositon tool : a tool for incorporating atmospheric deposition in water-quality analyses {sup 1}.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwede, D. B.; Dennis, R. L.; Bitz, M. A.; Decision and Information Sciences; NOAA; EPA

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for providing the linkage between air and water-quality modeling needed for determining the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and for analyzing related nonpoint-source impacts on watersheds has been developed. Using gridded output of atmospheric deposition from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, the Watershed Deposition Tool (WDT) calculates average per unit area and total deposition to selected watersheds and subwatersheds. CMAQ estimates the wet and dry deposition for all of its gaseous and particulate chemical species, including ozone, sulfur species, nitrogen species, secondary organic aerosols, and hazardous air pollutants at grid scale sizes ranging from 4 to 36 km. An overview of the CMAQ model is provided. The somewhat specialized format of the CMAQ files is not easily imported into standard spatial analysis tools. The WDT provides a graphical user interface that allows users to visualize CMAQ gridded data and perform further analyses on selected watersheds or simply convert CMAQ gridded data to a shapefile for use in other programs. Shapefiles for the 8-digit (cataloging unit) hydrologic unit code polygons for the United States are provided with the WDT; however, other user-supplied closed polygons may be used. An example application of the WDT for assessing the contributions of different source categories to deposition estimates, the contributions of wet and dry deposition to total deposition, and the potential reductions in total nitrogen deposition to the Albemarle-Pamlico basin stemming from future air emissions reductions is used to illustrate the WDT capabilities.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  1. Brush Management/Water Yield Feasibility Study for Four Watersheds In Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bednarz, Steven T.; Dybala, Tim; Amonett, Carl; Muttiah, Ranjan S.; Rosenthal, Wes; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Arnold, Jeff G.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,942,859.17 2,013.01 15,704.92 11.31 18 166,110.60 556,785,852.99 1,708.71 13,330.85 12.46 19 1,029,797.78 2,823,542,988.67 8,665.14 67,602.72 15.23 20 886,216.09 2,440,216,220.39 7,488.75 58,424.91 15.17 21 364,992.01 1,015,478,003.63 3,116.39 24,313.10 15... for Arrowhead (Figure 1-4) was likely due to the higher percentage of hydrologic group “D” soils in this watershed (54 percent vs. 39, 21, 38 for Brownwood, Phantom Hill, and Palo Pinto, respectively) that produced a greater difference in annual runoff volume...

  2. In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field). CRC Press, Boca Raton. Publication in 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    1 In: Management of Wet-Weather Flow in the Watershed (Edited by Dan Sullivan and Richard Field...........................................................................................................................................................................14 Prevention of Dry-Weather Pollutant Entries into Sewerage Systems

  3. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  4. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as Whiteoak'' Creek).

  5. Hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, October 1990--December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Watts, J.A.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes for the 15-month period of October 1990-- December 1991 the available dynamic hydrologic data collected, primarily on the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, along with information collected on the surface flow systems that affect the quality or quantity of surface water. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to: (1) characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow systems; (2) assist with the planning and assessment of remedial action activities; and, (3) provide long-term availability of data and quality assurance. Characterization of the hydrology of the WOC watershed is critical for understanding the processes that drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identification of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. In addition, hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping (WAG) boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. For these reasons, it is of paramount importance to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) to collect and report hydrologic data activities that contribute to the Site Investigations component of the ERP. (White Oak Creek is also referred to as ``Whiteoak`` Creek).

  6. Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen B.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

  7. Trace metal and ancillary data in the watersheds and urban embayments of Puget Sound. Data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, A.J.; Curl, H.C.; Feely, R.A.; Massoth, G.J.; Krogslund, K.A.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of three data reports encompassing trace metal and ancillary data obtained by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of NOAA in Puget Sound, Washington, between 1979 and 1986. The report includes the complete data set from two urban embayments (Elliott and Commencement Bays) and the watersheds discharging into Puget Sound. Building on research then underway at PMEL on estuarine circulation, laboratory scientists began a coordinated study that began with the description of the distribution of properties (salinity, temperature, trace metals and trace organics) in the water column and underlying sediments. The objectives of the Marine Environmental Quality trace metal program were (1) to quantify the sources and sinks of selected trace metals for Puget Sound, (2) to determine geochemical mechanisms that transform trace metals between the dissolved and particulate phases and (3) to determine to what extent these geochemical mechanisms alter the fate of trace metals entering Puget Sound. The text of the data report consists of the sampling and analytical methods with the accompanying quality control/quality assurance data. The text of the data sections are a summary of the data and published literature in which the data are interpreted along with a catalogue of the data available on microfiche located in the back pocket of the data report.

  8. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-68)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA provides funds to the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program which cooperates with local agencies and landowners to plan, fund, and implement anadromous fish habitat restoration projects in the Grande Ronde Basin. The GRMWP has agreed to partially fund three bridge replacement projects with the Union County Public Works Department. This Supplement Analysis covers those bridge replacement activities that will take place at the Mill Creek crossing and the Little Creek crossing. The Union County Public Works Department is responsible for replacing structurally deficient bridges with structures able to pass 50-year peak flow events. The UCPWD replacement structures of choice, due to budget limitations, are large 8-10 foot corrugated metal pipes. These pipes would meet peak flow requirements but would be less than ideal for fish passage. The GRMWP proposes to provide funding assistance to UCPWD to upgrade replacement structures to full-channel spanning stringer bridges. These full-channel spanning structures will provide the best possible conditions for fish passage, water quality, and accommodation of peak flows.

  9. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  10. Post-project appraisal of a channel reconstruction on Cuneo Creek, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Aren

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a case study at Bull Creek, Humboldt Redwoods State Park.Rosgen, D. 1991. Bull Creek Watershed Restoration Plan,the South Fork of Cuneo Creek and contributes large amounts

  11. Annual hydrologic data summary for the White Oak Creek Watershed: Water Year 1990 (October 1989--September 1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borders, D.M.; Gregory, S.M.; Clapp, R.B.; Frederick, B.J.; Moore, G.K.; Watts, J.A.; Broders, C.C.; Bednarek, A.T.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes, for the Water Year 1990 (October 1989-- September 1990), the dynamic hydrologic data collected on the Whiteoak Creek (WOC) Watershed's surface and subsurface flow systems. These systems affect the quality or quantity of surface water and groundwater. The collection of hydrologic data is one component of numerous, ongoing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) environmental studies and monitoring programs and is intended to 1. characterize the quantity and quality of water in the flow system, 2. plan and assess remedial action activities, and 3. provide long-term availability of data and assure quality. Characterizing the hydrology of the WOC watershed provides a better understanding of the processes which drive contaminant transport in the watershed. Identifying of spatial and temporal trends in hydrologic parameters and mechanisms that affect the movement of contaminants supports the development of interim corrective measures and remedial restoration alternatives. Hydrologic monitoring supports long-term assessment of the effectiveness of remedial actions in limiting the transport of contaminants across Waste Area Grouping boundaries and ultimately to the off-site environment. The majority of the data summarized in this report are available from the Remedial Action Programs Data and Information Management System data base. Surface water data available within the WOC flow system include discharge and runoff, surface water quality, radiological and chemical contamination of sediments, and descriptions of the outfalls to the WOC flow system. Climatological data available for the Oak Ridge area include precipitation, temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction. Information on groundwater levels, aquifer characteristics, and groundwater quality are presented. Anomalies in the data and problems with monitoring and accuracy are discussed. 58 refs., 54 figs., 15 tabs.

  12. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  13. EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, K.

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

  14. Evaluating the Economics of Best Management Practices for Tarrant Regional Water District’s Eagle Mountain Lake Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason L.

    manag e me n t unit of analys i s is one designated wetland project encompassing 20.6 acres. In-Lake BMPs Based on feedback from TRWD personne l , it was noted that BMP 20 (Hypolimnetic Aeration ) and BMP 21 (P Inactiva t i o n with Alum... years. The manage me n t unit of analysi s is one designa t e d hypol i mn e t i c aerat i o n proj ec t withi n the Eagle Mountai n Lake watersh e d . BMP 21 P Inactivation with Alum. T h e addition of powdered alum at variou s lake depths...

  15. White Oak Creek watershed: Melton Valley area Remedial Investigation report, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains Appendixes A ``Source Inventory Information for the Subbasins Evaluated for the White Oak Creek Watershed`` and B ``Human Health Risk Assessment for White Oak Creek / Melton Valley Area`` for the remedial investigation report for the White Oak Creek Watershed and Melton Valley Area. Appendix A identifies the waste types and contaminants for each subbasin in addition to the disposal methods. Appendix B identifies potential human health risks and hazards that may result from contaminants present in the different media within Oak Ridge National Laboratory sites.

  16. The development of an aquatic spill model for the White Oak Creek watershed, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops an aquatic spill model applicable to the White Oak Creek watershed draining the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hazardous, toxic, and radioactive chemicals are handled and stored on the laboratory reservation. An accidental spill into the White Oak Creek watershed could contaminate downstream water supplies if insufficient dilution did not occur. White Oak Creek empties into the Clinch River, which flows into the Tennessee River. Both rivers serve as municipal water supplies. The aquatic spill model provides estimates of the dilution at sequential downstream locations along White Oak creek and the Clinch River after an accidental spill of a liquid containing a radioactively decaying constituent. The location of the spill on the laboratory is arbitrary, while hydrologic conditions range from drought to extreme flood are simulated. The aquatic spill model provides quantitative estimates with which to assess water quality downstream from the site of the accidental spill, allowing an informed decision to be made whether to perform mitigating measures so that the integrity of affected water supplies is not jeopardized.

  17. Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

  18. Chapter 3 -Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low-Flow Conditions, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 3 - Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low of the water quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado, during high-flow and low-flow conditions in the year 2000 constituents in Boulder Creek increased after the creek received wastewater effluent. INTRODUCTION Two programs

  19. Integrating Historical Imagery and Sediment Radioisotopes to Shed Light on Long-Term Rangeland Dynamics and Ecosystem Services at the Watershed Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Matthew

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of such transitions and much more so regarding the effects on hydrology and sediment dynamics in these areas. Using a watershed approach in the Lampasas Cut Plain of Texas, we applied object-oriented classification methods and hand-digitizing of historical aerial...

  20. Montana contains the headwaters for three continental watersheds-the St. Mary's River, the Columbia River, and the Missouri River. The St. Mary's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    -the largest in Montana-drains more than one half of the state's land area, but yields less than one, wind-sailing, and wildlife watching. You can float 207 miles from Montana Power Company's Morony Dam of the state. The major watersheds of Montana are those carved by the Columbia River's tributaries

  1. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  2. A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    A GIS-based Estimate of Net Erosion Rate for Semi-arid Watersheds in New Mexico Richardson, C.P.1 and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Place Socorro, NM, 87801, h2odoc@nmt.edu 2 Jose B. Gallegos.gallegos@arcadis-us.com 3 Jaime Ealey, Graduate Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, New Mexico

  3. Feasibility Study of Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Lacatell; David Shoch; Bill Stanley; Zoe Kant

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Rivers conservation area encompasses approximately 2,000 square miles of agricultural and forest lands in four Virginia watersheds that drain to the Chesapeake Bay. Consulting a time series of classified Landsat imagery for the Chesapeake Rivers conservation area, the project team developed a GIS-based protocol for identifying agricultural lands that could be reforested, specifically agricultural lands that had been without forest since 1990. Subsequent filters were applied to the initial candidate reforestation sites, including individual sites > 100 acres and sites falling within TNC priority conservation areas. The same data were also used to produce an analysis of baseline changes in forest cover within the study period. The Nature Conservancy and the Virginia Department of Forestry identified three reforestation/management models: (1) hardwood planting to establish old-growth forest, (2) loblolly pine planting to establish working forest buffer with hardwood planting to establish an old-growth core, and (3) loblolly pine planting to establish a working forest. To assess the relative carbon sequestration potential of these different strategies, an accounting of carbon and total project costs was completed for each model. Reforestation/management models produced from 151 to 171 tons carbon dioxide equivalent per acre over 100 years, with present value costs of from $2.61 to $13.28 per ton carbon dioxide equivalent. The outcome of the financial analysis was especially sensitive to the land acquisition/conservation easement cost, which represented the most significant, and also most highly variable, single cost involved. The reforestation/management models explored all require a substantial upfront investment prior to the generation of carbon benefits. Specifically, high land values represent a significant barrier to reforestation projects in the study area, and it is precisely these economic constraints that demonstrate the economic additionality of any carbon benefits produced via reforestation--these are outcomes over and above what is currently possible given existing market opportunities. This is reflected and further substantiated in the results of the forest cover change analysis, which demonstrated a decline in area of land in forest use in the study area for the 1987/88-2001 period. The project team collected data necessary to identify sites for reforestation in the study area, environmental data for the determining site suitability for a range of reforestation alternatives and has identified and addressed potential leakage and additionality issues associated with implementing a carbon sequestration project in the Chesapeake Rivers Conservation Area. Furthermore, carbon emissions reductions generated would have strong potential for recognition in existing reporting systems such as the U.S. Department of Energy 1605(b) voluntary reporting requirements and the Chicago Climate Exchange. The study identified 384,398 acres on which reforestation activities could potentially be sited. Of these candidate sites, sites totaling 26,105 acres are an appropriate size for management (> 100 acres) and located in priority conservation areas identified by The Nature Conservancy. Total carbon sequestration potential of reforestation in the study area, realized over a 100 year timeframe, ranges from 58 to 66 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, and on the priority sites alone, potential for carbon sequestration approaches or exceeds 4 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. In the absence of concerted reforestation efforts, coupled with policy strategies, the region will likely face continued declines in forest land.

  4. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS--Tapteal Bend Riparian Corridor Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the restoration of approximately 500 feet of streambank along the Yakima River at river mile 8, upstream of the Van Giesen Bridge on SR 224, in and between Richland and West Richland, Washington. This project will also result in the acquisition of Fox Island, a 12-acre island directly across the river from the restoration area. There is no development planned for the island. The proposed project includes: The installation of a bio-engineered streambank that incorporates barbs to capture silt and deflect flow, roughened rock or log toes, a riparian buffer, soil reinforcement, and bank grading. Long-term photo-point and plot sampling will also be implemented to evaluate the effectiveness and success of the restoration project. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Darrel Sunday, a contractor with Sunday and Associates, Inc. (April 4, 2004), and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are the pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, bull trout, Ute ladies'-tresses, and mid-Columbia Steelhead. The pygmy rabbit, bald eagle, and Ute ladies'Tresses are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity, and it was determined that the proposed restoration project would have no effect on these species. It is difficult to determine if bull trout occur within the Tapteal project area and Dave Carl of the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife was contacted and concurred with this assumption. It was determined that the project may affect, but is not likely to adversely affect bull trout, and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has concurred with that determination (July 28, 2004). For the mid-Columbia Steelhead, an anadromous fish species, BPA has determined that if conducted in accordance with the applicable terms and conditions identified in the ESA Consultation Biological Opinion (BO) and Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act Essential Fish Habitat Consultation, for BPA's Habitat Improvement Program (HIP), the Tapteal Bend Restoration Project meets the requirements of consistency and no further consultation is required. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. In complying with the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, BPA contracted with the Cultural Resources Protection Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) for cultural resource survey work. Shawn Steinmetz prepared a report (December 15, 2002) concluding that there were only two isolated finds in the project area. BPA and the Washington Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation have concurred with the conclusions and recommendations set out in the report and the determination that no historic properties will be affected by the current project as proposed (January 31, 2003). It was recommended that a cultural resource monitor be present during ground disturbing activities. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Tapteal Bend Restoration project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals.

  5. Reducing methylmercury accumulation in the food webs of San Francisco Bay and its local watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.A., E-mail: jay@sfei.org [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Looker, R.E. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); Yee, D. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Marvin-Di Pasquale, M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)] [U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division/MS 480, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grenier, J.L. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Austin, C.M. [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States)] [San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, 1515 Clay Street, Suite 1400, Oakland, CA 94612 (United States); McKee, L.J.; Greenfield, B.K. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States)] [San Francisco Estuary Institute, 4911 Central Avenue, Richmond, CA 94804 (United States); Brodberg, R. [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, 1001 I Street, Sacramento, CA 95812 (United States); Blum, J.D. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, 1100 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and its local watersheds present an interesting case study in estuarine mercury (Hg) contamination. This review focuses on the most promising avenues for attempting to reduce methylmercury (MeHg) contamination in Bay Area aquatic food webs and identifying the scientific information that is most urgently needed to support these efforts. Concern for human exposure to MeHg in the region has led to advisories for consumption of sport fish. Striped bass from the Bay have the highest average Hg concentration measured for this species in USA estuaries, and this degree of contamination has been constant for the past 40 years. Similarly, largemouth bass in some Bay Area reservoirs have some of the highest Hg concentrations observed in the entire US. Bay Area wildlife, particularly birds, face potential impacts to reproduction based on Hg concentrations in the tissues of several Bay species. Source control of Hg is one of the primary possible approaches for reducing MeHg accumulation in Bay Area aquatic food webs. Recent findings (particularly Hg isotope measurements) indicate that the decades-long residence time of particle-associated Hg in the Bay is sufficient to allow significant conversion of even the insoluble forms of Hg into MeHg. Past inputs have been thoroughly mixed throughout this shallow and dynamic estuary. The large pool of Hg already present in the ecosystem dominates the fraction converted to MeHg and accumulating in the food web. Consequently, decreasing external Hg inputs can be expected to reduce MeHg in the food web, but it will likely take many decades to centuries before those reductions are achieved. Extensive efforts to reduce loads from the largest Hg mining source (the historic New Almaden mining district) are underway. Hg is spread widely across the urban landscape, but there are a number of key sources, source areas, and pathways that provide opportunities to capture larger quantities of Hg and reduce loads from urban runoff. Atmospheric deposition is a lower priority for source control in the Bay Area due to a combination of a lack of major local sources. Internal net production of MeHg is the dominant source of MeHg that enters the food web. Controlling internal net production is the second primary management approach, and has the potential to reduce food web MeHg in some habitats more effectively and within a much shorter time-frame. Controlling net MeHg production and accumulation in the food web of upstream reservoirs and ponds is very promising due to the many features of these ecosystems that can be manipulated. The most feasible control options in tidal marshes relate to the design of flow patterns and subhabitats in restoration projects. Options for controlling MeHg production in open Bay habitat are limited due primarily to the highly dispersed distribution of Hg throughout the ecosystem. Other changes in these habitats may also have a large influence on food web MeHg, including temperature changes due to global warming, sea level rise, food web alterations due to introduced species and other causes, and changes in sediment supply. Other options for reducing or mitigating exposure and risk include controlling bioaccumulation, cleanup of contaminated sites, and reducing other factors (e.g., habitat availability) that limit at-risk wildlife populations.

  6. Wildlife Loss Estimates and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume Three, Hungry Horse Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel

    1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Hungry Horse Dam project on the South Fork of the Flathead River and previous mitigation of theses losses. In order to develop and focus mitigation efforts, it was first necessary to estimate wildlife and wildlife hatitat losses attributable to the construction and operation of the project. The purpose of this report was to document the best available information concerning the degree of impacts to target wildlife species. Indirect benefits to wildlife species not listed will be identified during the development of alternative mitigation measures. Wildlife species incurring positive impacts attributable to the project were identified.

  7. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

  8. Roaring Fork Valley- Renewable Energy Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE), a nonprofit organization promoting renewable energy and energy efficiency in western Colorado, offers residential and commercial rebates within...

  9. FORKING AND MULTIPLICITY IN FIRST ORDER THEORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, John T.

    sequence hb i j i 2 Xi in p over A. 7 #12; COHEIRS Let M j= T and M ` A, p 2 S(A) is a coheir of pjM of pjM . 1. p does not divide over M . 2. If E = he i : i 2 Ii contained in MB is a coherent sequence

  10. SOUTH FORK CLEARWATER RIVER HABITAT ENHANCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Everson, Project Manager U. S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration Division of Fish

  11. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Eagle, Pitkin and Gunnison Counties can participate in the Energy Smart Program. The Energy Smart Program helps residents identify, finance, and complete energy improvements in their...

  12. Spanish Fork Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,

  13. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2: Appendixes A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions. The industrial and recreational exposure scenarios are used to provide a risk assessment reference context to evaluate levels of contamination in surface water, groundwater, soil, and sediment within each subbasin of the Melton Valley watershed. All available analytical results for the media of interest that could be qualified for use in the risk assessment were screened to determine carcinogenic risk values and noncarcinogenic hazard indexes and to identify the chemicals of concern (COCs) for each evaluated media in each subbasin.

  14. Remedial investigation report on the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Evaluation, interpretation, and data summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed presents a multifaceted management and decision-making challenge because of the very heterogeneous conditions that exist with respect to contaminant type, disposal unit age, mode of disposal, release mechanism, and potential risk-producing pathways. The investigation presented here has assembled relevant site data in the geographic context with the intent of enabling program managers and decision-makers to understand site conditions and evaluate the necessity, relative priority, and scope of potential remedial actions.

  15. 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    TD 603 1. Go on top of the check-dam and survey the water-shed, i.e., the upstream part from which water ows into the storage. 2. What is the storage in the dam (in cu.m.)? 3. What is the length and depth of the dam? What is its structure and cost? How much time did it take to build the dam? 4. Where

  16. Correlation of measures of ambient toxicity and fish community diversity in Chesapeake Bay, USA, tributaries -- urbanizing watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, S.I.; Dawson, C.E.; Durell, E.Q. [Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources, Annapolis, MD (United States). Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Div.] [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was performed to evaluate ambient toxicity conditions in Chesapeake Bay tidal tributaries whose watersheds are impacted by urban development and to further evaluate an existing toxicological risk ranking model. A battery of water-column and sediment bioassays were employed with animals and plants. Tests were conducted at five sample sites in each of four tidal tributaries. Mortality, reproduction, and growth rates in the water-column assays did not consistently indicate chemical contamination in any system. Chemical analyses did not indicate elevated levels of contaminants in the water column. Sediment bioassays demonstrated greater responses than water-column assays. Sediment in the upstream reaches of the South River demonstrated significant toxicity. Toxicity was also observed at the uppermost Severn River station and the middle Patuxent River station. Chemical analyses of composite sediment samples indicated elevated metals levels in the South River. Some metals were above threshold values in the Patuxent and Wicomico rivers. Organic analyses demonstrated low level polycyclicaromatic hydrocarbon contamination in all four systems. The toxicological risk ranking model ranked the South River as the most contaminated-impacted site. The ranking model identified specific locations in the Severn and Patuxent rivers that indicate sediment contamination. The Wicomico River had the lowest overall risk score. The toxicological risk ranking results for sediment were significantly correlated with species diversity for fish communities sampled by bottom trawl. Results were consistent with data from previous years. Regression analysis of 2 years of data indicate that fish community impairment can be predicted with ambient toxicity results.

  17. In Situ Stabilization of Inactive Low Level Waste Pipelines in the Melton Valley Watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cange, J.; Cox, J. [Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coye, St. [Sevenson Environmental Services, Inc., Niagara Falls, NY (United States); Skinner, R. [US DOE Oak Ridge Operations, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shaw, K. [Restoration Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McGinley, S. [Pro2Serve, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melton Valley watershed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contained an inactive waste pipeline system consisting of approximately 12 kilometers of buried waste pipelines and over 142 m{sup 3} in surface/subsurface appurtenances (e.g., vents, valve pits, pump vaults, etc.). Historically, the system was used to transport liquid low level and process waste between generator facilities in Melton Valley, storage and disposal sites in Melton Valley, and storage/treatment facilities in Bethel Valley. The selected remedy in the Melton Valley Record of Decision (ROD) for inactive pipelines was isolation, removal, or stabilization. Pipeline remediation activities began in the summer of 2005 and were completed in the spring of 2006. The task entailed an iterative process of selecting pipeline access points, excavating and exposing pipelines, performing tapping, draining and cutting activities, either installing fittings for grouting or plugging and capping the lines. Grouting was accomplished using paired access points, with one location serving as the grout injection point and the other as vent/drain and grout confirmation point. Grouting was conducted by pumping a cement-bentonite grout into the specially installed fittings and typically proceeded from a low point to a high point to ensure complete filling of the pipeline (i.e., no void space). The project successfully grouted a total of 8,454 meters (linear distance) of pipeline; another 3,573 meters of pipeline was stabilized through isolation. (authors)

  18. A watershed-based method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, Liem T., E-mail: ltran1@utk.edu [Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); O& #x27; Neill, Robert V. [OTIE and Associates, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Elizabeth R. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region. The method is based on the concept of 'self-/peer-appraisal' of a watershed in term of vulnerability. The self-/peer-appraisal process is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. The analysis provided insights on the environmental conditions, in general, and the relative vulnerability pattern, in particular, of the Mid-Atlantic region. The suggested method offers a simple but effective and objective way to perform a regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Consequently the method can be used in various steps in environmental assessment and planning. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is based on the self-/peer-appraisal concept in term of vulnerability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method provides insights on the regional relative vulnerability pattern.

  19. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  20. Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marjorie Ann

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale marks an abrupt increase in depo- sitional rate for Carboniferous rocks; Morris (1974) calculates a rate of 333 m/m. y. Cline (1966) believes this is the beginning of flysch sedimentation within the Ouachita trough. A southeastern source has.... The stratigraphic units in the area can be divided into three structural packages with different mechanical responses based on their observed style of deformation. The Mazarn-Womble shale units behaved as one macroscopically ductile package. Flexural flow folds...

  1. Structural geology of the Irons Fork - North Fork Creek area, Lake Ouachita, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Marjorie Ann

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shale marks an abrupt increase in depo- sitional rate for Carboniferous rocks; Morris (1974) calculates a rate of 333 m/m. y. Cline (1966) believes this is the beginning of flysch sedimentation within the Ouachita trough. A southeastern source has.... The stratigraphic units in the area can be divided into three structural packages with different mechanical responses based on their observed style of deformation. The Mazarn-Womble shale units behaved as one macroscopically ductile package. Flexural flow folds...

  2. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  3. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  4. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  5. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  6. Bear Creek Valley Watershed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Highway 95 and the haul road are available to the public during the fall for deer and turkey hunts. All kills made during these hunts are checked for radiation levels prior to...

  7. The Watershed Management Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persyn, Russell A.; Griffin, Molly; Williams, Amy T.; Wolfe, Clint

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    phosphorus loading by 25 percent or to develop a computer model that ac- curately predicts nitrogen and phosphorus loadings for a particular lake. What are water quality models? Water quality models use personal computers and mathematics to represent natural...

  8. NRCS CSREES Watershed Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .E.A.P. Conservation Effects Assessment Project #12;Measuring the Environmental Benefits of Conservation;Conservation Effects Assessment Project Please turn off the ringers on your cell phones, pagers, blackberries The Conservation EffectsThe Conservation Effects Assessment ProjectAssessment Project (CEAP)(CEAP) #12;Scope

  9. Bethel Valley Watershed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    study to find soluble contamination sources that contribute to the contamination of surface and ground waters. Once the remediation activities required by the Bethel Valley...

  10. Watershed Assessment Program Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Proposal to model urban storm-water control practices · Teach advanced graduate course ­ BASINS and SWAT · Monitoring Activities · Modeling Activities · Remote Sensing / GIS · Sources of Funding · What do We Need · Much more monitoring being done by cities and local governments ­ Source water assessment work done

  11. Fourth report on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for White Oak Creek Watershed and the Clinch River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loar, J.M. [ed.] [ed.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a condition of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on April 1, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for White Oak Creek (WOC) and selected tributaries. BMAP currently consists of six major tasks that address both radiological and nonradiological contaminants in the aquatic and terrestrial environs on-site and the aquatic environs off-site. These tasks are (1) toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation monitoring of nonradiological contaminants in aquatic biota, (3) biological indicator studies, (4) instream ecological monitoring, (5) assessment of contaminants in the terrestrial environment, and (6) radioecology of WOC and White Oak Lake. The ecological characterization of the WOC watershed will provide baseline data that can be used to document the ecological effects of the water pollution control program and the remedial action program. The long-term nature of BMAP ensures that the effectiveness of remedial measures will be properly evaluated.

  12. Biomonitoring of fish communities, using the index of Biotic Integrity, as an indicator of the success of soil conservation measures in the Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek watersheds, Macon County, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish communities in two upper Little Tennessee River tributaries, Rabbit Creek and Middle Creek, both located in Macon County, North Carolina, were monitored using IBI methods in 1990 and again in 1992. A single site, each on the lower reaches of its respective creek, was chosen to reflect the influence of conditions throughout the watershed and to provide a measure of water quality exiting the watershed. The Rabbit Creek watershed (Holly Springs community) has a long history of settlement and agricultural use. Dominant land uses today are pasture in the bottom lands and residential development at higher elevations. Much of the upper portion of the Middle Creek watershed on the slopes of Scaly Mountain is devoted to cabbage farming, often on steep slopes and highly erodible soils. From the cabbage growing area, the creek drops 400 feet to the lower valley. Other common land uses include residential, livestock, and forest. Both streams are characterized by heavy sedimentation and frequent high turbidity. Both streams showed marked improvement between 1990 and 1992. In 1990, Rabbit Creek`s IBI score was 31.0, for a bioclass rating of ``poor.`` In 1992, the IBI score was 42.1 for a bioclass rating of ``fair.`` For Middle Creek, the corresponding figures and ratings are 42.1 (fair) and 54.5 (good). Examination of the data for Rabbit Creek shows a reduction in the proportion of pollution-tolerant species, a higher proportion of specialized insectivores, a higher catch rate (reflecting higher total numbers of fish), and an additional intolerant species. In both cases, the data (supported by visual observation) suggests the causative factor is reduced sedimentation.

  13. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restoration actions will focus on restoring the mainstem (Crooked River) and tributary stream restoration and Restore the Crooked and American River Watersheds, a BiOp project. PROPOSED ACTION: The Council staff-the-ground habitat restoration actions that help the AAs meet BiOp established targets for the South Fork Clearwater

  14. Upper Snake Provincial Assessment May 2004 APPENDIX 3-1--OVERVIEW OF THE MAJOR CAUSES LIMITING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Upper Snake­Rock, Portneuf, Blackfoot, Willow, Teton, Beaver­Camas, and the Upper and Lower Henrys Fork province. (Source: ICBEMP 1997.) Major Hydrologic Unit (Watershed)a Snake Headwaters Subbasin Relative province. (Source GAP II, Scott et al. 2002) Focal Habitat Type High Low Medium Very High Very Low Riparian

  15. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

  16. Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

  17. Bill Bradbury Jennifer Anders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business sensitive information 2 Lower Flathead River Before Kerr Dam Significant sight from cultural

  18. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz ISRP 2012-16 October 3, 2012 #12;ISRP Review of the Flathead Lake Draft EIS Contents Background .................................................................................................................................... 17 #12;1 ISRP Review of the Flathead Lake Draft EIS Background In response to the Northwest Power Fish Species Flathead Lake, Montana (hereafter Flathead Lake draft EIS or draft EIS). The draft EIS

  19. Bonneville Project Act, Federal Columbia River Transmission System Act and Other Related Legislation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legislative texts are provided for: Bonneville Project Act which authorizes the completion, maintenance, and operation of Bonneville project for navigation, and for other purposes; Federal Columbia River Transmission system Act which enables the Secretary of the Interior to provide for operation, maintenance, and continued construction of the Federal transmission system in the Pacific Northwest by use of the revenues of the Federal Columbia River Power System and the proceeds of revenue bonds, and for other purposes; public law 88--552 which guarantees electric consumers of the Pacific Northwest first call on electric energy generated at Federal hydroelectric plants in that regions and reciprocal priority, and for other purposes; and public law 78--329 which provides for the partial construction of the Hungary Horse Dam on the South Fork of the Flathead River in the state of Montana, and for other purposes

  20. North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling of a 5000-foot exploratory gas and oil well by Marathon Oil Company is proposed for Section 34, T52N, R106W, near Pagoda Creek in the Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming. An area 75 feet by 80 feet would be cleared of all vegetation and graded nearly flat for the drill pad and reserve pit. The drilling rig, pipe rack, generator, tool house, living facilities, drilling mud pump, pit, and supply platform all would be built on the drill pad. A blooie hole would contain cuttings and dust from the air drilling. Support facilities would include a helicopter staging area along Clocktower Creek approximately one mile south of the Yellowstone Highway and a 2550-foot temporary water pipeline from Pagoda Creek to the well site. Personnel, equipment, and supplies would be trucked to the helicopter staging area and shuttled to the proposed location by helicopters. Lease stipulations prohibit drilling before September 8; therefore, the starting date would be the late fall of the respective year and would have to be completed by the following January 1. Approval of the exploratory well would not include approval of production facilities.

  1. Chemical Sensor Based on Microfabricated Wristwatch Tuning Forks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yanchao

    made of different conducting polymers or composites in combination with multivariate statistical tech-7 single-walled carbon nanotubes,8,9 polyaniline micro/ nanostructures, 10-12 and carbon-polymer composites the mechanical response of a thin (10-µm) polymer wire stretched across the two prongs of a wristwatch quartz

  2. advanced fork system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education (1999), 10, 257-277 257 The Advanced Embedded Training System (AETS): An Intelligent Embedded...

  3. Microsoft Word - CoastMiddleForksWillamette_Wildish__CX.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Wildish Property Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-017-00, Contract BPA-004959 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease,...

  4. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Smart Loan Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residents of Eagle, Gunnison or Pitkin Counties may be eligible for financing through the Energy Smart Program. Loans as low as $1,000 with flexible terms are available for small projects, and...

  5. area forked river: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Websites Summary: Restaurants in the T Bar M area Huisache Grill 303 West San Antonio St D New Braunfels, TX 78130 (830) 620-9001 The Gristmill 1287 Gruene Road...

  6. Upper East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of Energy Office ofStephanie

  7. Clark Fork River Delta Restoration Project Draft Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag" | DepartmentCladding AttachmentDepartmentB O

  8. City of East Grand Forks, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity of Dayton,

  9. Grand Forks County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGove County, Kansas:GrahamBlanc,Grand Electric

  10. Lower East Fork Poplar Creek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetterEconomy andTermsDepartment1 DOEEmissionLowell,2 DOE1East

  11. Three Forks, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLCEnergyoThornwood, New York:

  12. Spanish Fork City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern IL Elec Coop, IncSouthwestern ElectricSpain:

  13. American Fork, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan Blanch GreenAmeren IllinoisInc AEPS

  14. Ash Fork, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansas County,Minnesota:Arthur,Ascent SolarAscoenergyAsh

  15. Coal Fork, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: Energy Resources JumpCloverCounty,

  16. The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part II Availability of Flow and Water Quality Data for the Rio Grande Project Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cruces, NM 88003 (575) 646-4337 i i Acknowledgement This document and the underlying pr oject activities detailed in this report reflect the joint efforts of many people working with the Paso del Norte Watershed Council (PdNWC). The authors... wish to acknowledge and extend our grat itude to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the generous financial support extende d to the PdNWC for development of the Coordinated Water Resources Database and Model Developm ent Project (called Project...

  17. CX-000599: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Flathead Substation Bay Addition - L0307CX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/13/2010Location(s): Flathead County, MontanaOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project SUCCESS STORIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2014 FLATHEAD ELECTRIC CO-OP FLATHEAD ELECTRIC CO-OP Kalispell, Montana * Locally-owned & operated since 1937 * Second largest utility in state * 3,900 miles of line * 48,000...

  19. , 18/10/2013 -> Multitasking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafillou, Peter

    µ fork fork (parent) µ (child) - µ fork pid = fork(); fork µ ( ) µ µ pid - pid (ID) - - pid = 0 ? - 2 6 #12;#include #include main() { int pid = 0; printf("hello world\

  20. Watershed Protection Plan Development for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .20 Rangeland 0.29 Urban 0.93 Wet land 0.05 North Central Texas Water Quality Project Total P Urban 13 Quality Project Clint Wolfe Project Coordinator Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center - Dallas The Texas A&M University System North Central Texas Water Quality Project · Serves 1.7 million people

  1. Watershed and Receiving Water Modeling Introduction ....................................................................................................................................843

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    .EXE / 1.05 FEMWATER model / documentation 1.00 Jul 93 INSTALGC.EXE / 1.16 GCSOLAR model / documentation 1

  2. Plum Creek Watershed Partnership Progress Reporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ft Lift Station SCADA Installation City of Kyle 3 0 4 --- Sanitary Sewer Pipe Replacement City --- --- Sanitary Sewer Pipe Replacement City of Luling 2400 ft 16672 ft 2400 ft 3200 ft Lift Station SCADA

  3. Flood Control and Watershed Management (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Counties and towns are required to issue permits for development within the 100-year floodplain. Development is broadly defined to include any man-made change to land, including grading, filling,...

  4. Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning Short Course to water resource professionals throughout Texas. #31;e Planning Team met quarterly to discuss project status, provide input, and coordinate project activities. Planning Team meeting dates, agendas and sign-in sheet can be found.... Considerable progress was made on the short course agenda from input obtained at the third Planning Team meeting on October 1, 2007 at TCEQ in Austin. #30;e Planning Team and representatives from the TCEQ NPS and TMDL Teams, TWRI, AgriLife Research, TSSWCB...

  5. Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Districts and USDA NRCS Agricultural Land Use Information Soil Surveys Erosion Control Information and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections TNRIS Data from State Agencies Railroad Commission US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Census Data USDA Natural Resources Conservation

  6. Gathering Data to Assess Your Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation Districts and USDA NRCS Agricultural Land Use Information Soil Surveys Erosion Control Information Water and Wastewater Planning and Assessments Population Projections Railroad Commission (RRC) Oil Agencies US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Census Data USDA Natural Resources Conservation

  7. Texas Watershed Planning Short Course Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Kevin

    list of instructors included such national experts as Charlie MacPherson with Tetra Tech, Stuart Lehman with EPA headquarters, Bill Jarocki with EFC, Final Report Methods & Results 15 Tom Davenport with EPA Region 5, and Jeff #30;ornton... Dictson, AgriLife Extension Larry Hauck, TIAER Ann Kenimer, Texas A&M University Brad Lamb, EPA Region 6 Daren Harmel, USDA-ARS Roger Miranda, TCEQ Walter Rast, TSU Tom Davenport, EPA Region 5 Eric Mendelman, TSU-RSI Jeff #30;ornton, Southeastern...

  8. Buck CreekWatershed Protection Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    State Soil and Water Conservation Board (Project 06-11) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Developed Conservation Board (Project 06-11) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Investigating Agencies: Texas A&M Agri the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Buck Creek

  9. The Troy Brook watershed is 16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    bags. Most of the tires were recycled by Bridgestone Retail Operations, and the Departments of Public://greenknightnewsletter.tumblr.com/ or subscribe to RSS http://feeds.feedburner.com/greenknightnewsletter #12;Page 2 Bikes and bottles, tires years. In all, more than 23,000 pounds of debris were removed, including more than 1,500 tires, more

  10. A watershed blueprint: Partners work together

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Arroyo Colorado to regain its healthy condition. Eight years later, the Arroyo Colorado, an ancient channel of the Rio Grande in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, has been the focus of multiple projects; educational and outreach efforts...

  11. Watershed Academy Webcast on Climate Resilience

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and  What you can Learn from Others." This webcast will share findings from the most recent National Climate Assessment report concerning...

  12. SWAT Modeling of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kannan, N.

    leaving protective amounts of crop residue (30 % ground cover/1,360 kg (3,000 lbs) minimum) on the soil surface through the critical eroding period (Dec. 15 to Jan. 1 or six weeks prior to planting) to reduce wind and water erosion during the raising...

  13. Bear Creek Valley Watershed | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteries fromThermalBe aBear Creek

  14. Bethel Valley Watershed | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergy Christopher| DepartmentofofDepartment of

  15. Melton Valley Watershed | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMay 18-19, 2004MW Electrolysis Scale

  16. Montana Watershed Coordination Council | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir|Underground StorageWebpage

  17. Diagenesis of the Clear Fork Formation (Leonardian) in the Monahans field, west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedrick, Carroll Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recognized in thin section for the Scaly Smith ?164, ?163, and ?270. . . . . 24 10. Trace element concentrations from the Scaly Smith ?164. . .. . . . . 26 11. Carbon and oxygen isotopes from the Scaly Smith ?164, Scaly Smith ?163, and Scaly Smith ?270... crystals from the Scaly Smith ?164 have decreasing manganese concentrations from the inclusion-rich core to the clear overgrowth. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes Carbon and oxygen isotopes were determined for one hundred and fourteen samples from the Scaly...

  18. Multi-Signatures in the Plain Public-Key Model and a General Forking Lemma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellare, Mihir

    many potential uses. However, existing schemes impose key setup or PKI requirements that make them. Such a system could be useful for contract signing, co-signing, or distribution of a certificate authority power than executing one 32-bit instruction [4]. Reducing the number of bits to communicate saves power

  19. Fashionable Form: The Narrative Strategies of Silver-Fork Fiction, 1824-1848

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richstad, Josephine Sara

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buoys the reviewer’s credibility); and damned for his lack of creative powers, which in the particular language of the review

  20. DoE/..A South Fork Snake RiverPalisades Wildlife Mitigation Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam; The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land...

  1. A comparison of spent fuel assembly control instruments: The Cadarache PYTHON and the Los Alamos Fork

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bignan, G.; Capsie, J.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires); Rinard, P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices to monitor spent fuel assemblies while stored under water with nondestructive assay methods, have been developed in France and in the United States. Both devices are designed to verify operator's declared values of exposures and cooling-time but the applications and thus the designs of the systems differ. A study, whose results are presented in this paper, has been conducted to compare the features and the performances of the two instruments. 4 refs., 9 figs.

  2. The FERC EBB working group: Put a fork in us, we`re done

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) Order 636 required interstate pipelines to set up electronic bulletin boards for trading released capacity. Their goal was to foster an efficient and competitive secondary market for pipeline capacity. Five working groups were created to address the issues of core capacity, operationally available capacity, customer specific gas flows, communications protocols/operational logistics, and common codes. This paper describes the scope of the working groups and their accomplishments.

  3. Depositional environment of Red Fork sandstones, deep Anadarko Basin, western Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiting, Philip Howard

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of each thin section consisted of a grid point-count of 125 points for composition and 100 points for monocrystalline quartz size. The composi- tional data were normalized with respect to the detrital component of the sample. Grain size... separated by thin limestone beds. All formation contacts within the Cherokee Group are conformable while tne group is bounded below by a major unconformity on top of the Atokan Series. The younger Marmaton Group limestones lie conformably above...

  4. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    feral hog management, grazing management, nutrient management, riparian and stream ecosystem health, septic system operation and maintenance, soil and water testing, wildlife management, and well head protection and management. Utilizing existing...

  5. DEFINING PERCEPTIONS OF WATERSHED MANAGEMENT IN A GREAT PLAINS AND IN AN ANDEAN WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo-Osorio, Diana L

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    interest in the expansion of this study. The innumerable lessons learned during this thesis project and specifically, the lessons learned from using the Q method, are invaluable as I proceed onward to doctoral studies and research. The goal... statements, and the chapter closes with a short summary found in the conclusion. Chapter 4 presents the thesis conclusion as a reflection of what was learned during the process of writing this thesis. This reflection includes personal lessons involving...

  6. Walker Branch WatershedWalker Branch Watershed LongLong--term hydrology, streamterm hydrology, stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    matterOrganic matter dynamics and fooddynamics and food webswebs TracerTracer 3333P &P & 1515N addition,Algae, bryophytes, and effects of light,and effects of light, nutrients andnutrients and herbivoryherbivory Organic

  7. Hydrologic and Ecological Effects of Watershed Urbanization: Implication for Watershed Management in Hillslope Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Chan Yong

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    experienced rapid urbanization. For each study period, an impervious surface map was generated from Landsat TM image by a support vector machine (SVM) with pairwise coupling. SVM more accurately estimated impervious surface than other subpixel mapping methods...

  8. Iskuulpa Watershed ProjectIskuulpa Watershed Project BPA Project # 199506001BPA Project # 199506001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydroelectric Power Project impacts Improve natural salmonid habitat and production #12;Project ActivitiesProject Activities Land purchaseLand purchase HEP evaluationHEP evaluation Rest from livestockRest from livestock;Project ActivitiesProject Activities Land purchaseLand purchase HEP evaluationHEP evaluation Rest from

  9. Water Quality Monitoring in the Buck Creek Watershed and Facilitation of Buck Creek Watershed Partnership 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Dyer, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? 0.9453? 1.1125? ???? ?? 20373? 2.1046? 1.1364? ???? ?? 15811? ???? 3.951? ?? ?? 20376? ?? ?? ?? ?? ??No?data?available?due?to?dry?or?No?flow?conditions? ????No?flow?rate?measured?to?ensure?that?E.?coli?samples?holding?times?were?met? *N...

  10. Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet Fact Sheet B O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BPA funds habitat acquisition at Mission Creek Location: This property is in northwestern Montana's Lake County within the boundaries of the Flathead Indian Reservation. The land...

  11. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Fact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Whitman Union Asotin Wallowa Pend Oreille Stevens Columbia Spokane Garfield Beaverhead Granite Sanders Glacier Flathead Lake Ravalli Lewis And Clark Toole Pondera Mineral Powell...

  12. Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1999 Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) EM Program adopted a watershed approach for performing Remedial Investigations (RIs) and characterizations for ORR because it is an effective system for determining the best methods for protecting and restoring aquatic ecosystems and protecting human health. The basic concept is that water quality and ecosystem problems are best solved at the watershed level rather than at the individual water-body or discharger level. The watershed approach requires consideration of all environmental concerns, including needs to protect public health, critical habitats such as wetlands, biological integrity, and surface and ground waters. The watershed approach provides an improved basis for management decisions concerning contaminant sources and containment. It allows more direct focus by stakeholders on achieving ecological goals and water quality standards rather than a measurement of program activities based on numbers of permits or samples. The watershed approach allows better management strategies for investigations, therefore maximizing the utilization of scarce resources. Feasibility studies (FSs) evaluate various alternatives in terms of environmental standards, the protection of human health and the environment, and the costs of implementation to find the optimum solution among them. Society has to decide how much it is willing to spend to meet the standards and to be protective. Conducting FSs is the process of trading off those criteria to pick that optimum point that society wants to achieve. Performing this analysis at the watershed scale allows those trade-offs to be made meaningfully. In addition, a Land Use Control Assurance Plan for the ORR was prepared to identify the strategy for assuring the long-term effectiveness of land use controls. These land use controls will be relied upon to protect human health and the environment at areas of the ORR undergoing remediation pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and/or the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This plan will be implemented by means of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) incorporating its terms with the United States EPA and TDEC. The majority of projects described in this report are grouped into five watersheds. They are the East Tennessee Technical Park (ETTP) Watershed (formerly the K-25 Site), the Melton Valley (MV) and Bethel Valley (BV) Watersheds at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Bear Creek Valley (BCV) and Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watersheds at the Y-12 Plant.

  13. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the night, as part of hydroelectric power generation by theto manage water for hydroelectric power generation. There

  14. K-AR DATING OF AUTHIGENIC ILLITES: INTEGRATING THE DIAGENETIC HISTORY OF THE FLUVIAL WILLIAMS FORK FORMATION, MESAVERDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ability to date diagenetic reactions in tight gas reservoirs that significantly influence reservoir quality will enhance our ability to characterize and produce these fields. Although diagenetic clays form only a small percent of the sandstone, they have a disproportionately large impact on reservoir

  15. C(re)ek-storation Community Collaboration Site: North Fork of Strawberry Creek by La Loma and Le Conte Avenues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tannenbaum, Sara Rose

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    history of urban stream restoration. Aquatic Conservation:on Codornices Creek”. Restoration of Rivers and Streams.Restoration of Rivers and Streams, Water Resources

  16. Distribution and movement of domestic rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, during pulsed flows in the South Fork American River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact statement for hydropower license. Upper Americanand permitted for hydropower generation and flood control.1):257–268 Hunter MA (1992) Hydropower flow fluctuations and

  17. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT NORTH FORK SKOKOMISH POWERHOUSE AT CUSHMAN NO. 2 DAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Steve; Wilson, Matthew

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to add generating capacity on an in-stream flow release at Tacoma Power's Cushman hydroelectric project, Cushman No. 2 Dam, FERC Project P-460. The flow that is being used to generate additional electricity was being discharged from a valve at the base of the dam without recovery of the energy. A second objective to the project was to incorporate upstream fish passage by use of a fish collection structure attached to the draft tubes of the hydroelectric units. This will enable reintroduction of native anadromous fish above the dams which have blocked fish passage since the late 1920's. The project was funded in part by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act through the Department of Energy, Office of Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind and Water Power Program.

  18. DRAFT Lower Columbia Salmon and Steelhead Recovery and Subbasin Plan UPPER NORTH FORK LEWIS II, 12-1 May 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action to reduce or eliminate all manageable factors or threats. The deterioration of habitat conditions land, 11% is state land, and the remainder is private, most of it in private industrial forestland

  19. Evaluation of SWAT model - subdaily runoff prediction in Texas watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanisamy, Bakkiyalakshmi

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial variability of rainfall is a significant factor in hydrologic and water quality modeling. In recent years, characterizing and analyzing the effect of spatial variability of rainfall in hydrologic applications has become vital with the advent...

  20. Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Environmental & Watershed Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , academia, and industry. During the FY11 period, the Maine Institute supported four (4) research projects, including two student-directed projects: (1) Release for heavy metals from ultramafic rocks; (2

  1. Berry Brook Watershed 2011 Rain Barrel Sale for Dover Residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper sized over flow with tubing to direct water away from the foundation, back into the normal drain

  2. Watershed Restoration through Culture-Based Education and Community Outreach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Margaret Rose

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    branched off and traveled to Thames, Canada. Other Oneidas stayed in the homelands. The map in Figure 2 shows the route the Oneidas took. Today there are three Oneida reservations: Oneida, New York; Oneida, Thames in Ontario, Canada; and Oneida... Club. RESTORATION PROJECTS The Duck Creek Fish Passage project involves the removal of two dams on Duck Creek and enhancement of the fish passage barrier at a third dam. This project will enhance the ability of lake fish in Green Bay to access...

  3. A unifying framework for watershed thermodynamics: constitutive relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    , Department of Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 6907 Nedlands, Australia b equations for mass, mo- mentum, energy and entropy. These equations have been derived by averaging

  4. Future Climate Variability and Watershed Response in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Sonya Rita

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Ground Water Storage Basic Ground Water RecessionActive Ground Water Storage Basic Ground Water RecessionInterception Storage Capacity Fraction of Ground Water to

  5. The prediction of sediment yields from small blackland watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jimmy Ray

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pect rainf'all erosion. The equation is as follous'. A = RKLSCP share A = average annual soil loss in tons psr acre~ R = rainfall Pactor, K = soil erodibility Pactor, LS = length and steepness oP slope factor, 0 = cropping and management factor... and summer. The data utilized mere rocords of' recording raingagos~ runofP records, and records oP depth integrated sediment samples taken during sediment producing storms. The 205 storms selected Por the study varied in magnitude Prom 0. 43 0 2a ~g2...

  6. A postdevelopmental evaluation of Langford Creek Watershed Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rico, Luis

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    amortized over the 50 years estimated useful life of the works of improvement to determine total annual installation costs. The actual operation and maintenance costs were averaged over the period of analysis to determine annual operation and maintenance... costs Actual installation costs were found to exceed the Soil Conser- vation Service estimate by $4, 336 annually while the annual cost of operation and maintenance of the project were $841 less than the work plan estimate. Benefits generated as a...

  7. Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Blackland Research Extension Center Temple, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .bilbe@tceq.texas.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service dboellstorff@tamu.edu Henry Brewer US EPA, Region 6 brewer.henry@epa.gov Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Patricia Carvajal

  8. Establishment of the Northeast Coastal Watershed Geospatial Data Network (NECWGDN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, Robyn [University of Massachusetts Boston] [University of Massachusetts Boston

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of NECWGDN were to establish integrated geospatial databases that interfaced with existing open-source (water.html) environmental data server technologies (e.g., HydroDesktop) and included ecological and human data to enable evaluation, prediction, and adaptation in coastal environments to climate- and human-induced threats to the coastal marine resources within the Gulf of Maine. We have completed the development and testing of a "test bed" architecture that is compatible with HydroDesktop and have identified key metadata structures that will enable seamless integration and delivery of environmental, ecological, and human data as well as models to predict threats to end-users. Uniquely this database integrates point as well as model data and so offers capacities to end-users that are unique among databases. Future efforts will focus on the development of integrated environmental-human dimension models that can serve, in near real time, visualizations of threats to coastal resources and habitats.

  9. The implementation of the Lower Silver Creek watershed project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keenan, Christina; McPherson, Mariah

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measures on Lower Silver Creek Interim Project. San Jose,Valley Water District. May 1978. Lower Silver Creek, LakeCunningham, Thompson Creek Planning Survey consisting of

  10. Gully incision in Gerbode Creek, Rodeo Lagoon watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costantino, Raymond L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a bridge over Gerbode Creek's main stem. Remnants of thefound on the banks of the creek. North Tributary 1 GerbodeD Distance (ft) GERBODE CREEK: NORTHERN TRIBUTARY 2 Depth (

  11. analysis area watersheds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small-scale drinking water treatment Modeling of microbial processes Dr and probabilistic analysis Seismic hazard analysis Dr. Misgana Muleta Water Resources Hydraulics...

  12. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.15 1.15 Petrolia (2008) Unloading 1.15 1.15 Truck Wait 1.329 19.68 0.87 0.87 Thompson & Tyner (2014) Oversize Permit 0.02 0.02 Author's Estimate Total 3.45 3.45 2014...

  13. High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R.

    Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

  14. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Pastures Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape: Are Your Pastures Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian Hays Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor and Extension Range Specialist; and Extension Assistant-Water Conservation; The Texas A&M University...

  15. Rangeland Watershed Management for Texans: Are Your Streams Healthy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Rector, Barron S.; Hays, K. Brian

    2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy rainfall. Determine whether or not they have adequate vegetative cover and whether or not they are eroding. Then classify stream banks into one of four categories (Fig. 1). Are Your Streams Healthy? Larry D. White, Barron S. Rector and K. Brian...

  16. Water Rights Challenges to Coho Recovery in Coastal California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    related to land-use and water extraction can have a greatwater resources, water extraction is likely to shift from

  17. TIMOTHY O. RANDHIR Associate Professor -Watershed Management and Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    million USDA-CSREES project (SDSS- Spatial Decision Support System) of Purdue Univ., Texas A&M Univ, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), multi-attribute decision-making, and nonpoint source pollution. M, biodiversity, urbanization, community science, sus- tainable development, GIS, multi-criteria decision making

  18. Cypress Creek Project Building A Watershed Protection Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    projections · No regional water/WWTP services · Good water quality with some degrading trends · Lack on Environmental Quality www.cypresscreekproject.org #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;WHISKEY IS FOR DRINKIN'& WATER 97,589 (2000) 437,000 (2050) · Water demand ­ Total water use 17% 1990-2004 ­ Withdrawals from

  19. Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest Oregon Watershed Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    --------------------------------------------- Soil Hydraulic Characteristics of a Small Southwest by a high-intensity burn over areas of steep topography. The areal distribution of soil hydraulic of infiltration capacity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and soil moisture characteristics. Also, measures

  20. An economic evaluation of the Sulphur Creek Watershed Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Henry Taylor

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THF. SULPHUR CREEK VIATERSHED PROJECT A Thesis by HENRY TAYLOR BURNS Submitted to the Graduate Colleoe of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillmeni. of the requirements for the degree oi MASTER OF SC ENCE... August 1957 Major Subject: Agricultural Eco, . omics AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE SULPHUR CREEK 0/ATERSHED ?ROJFCT A Thesis by HENRY TAYLOR BURNS Approveo as to style and content by: /@~me::P~+' . J~'. ~&e. -' Read of Deparrner't, (Meeker j . 8...

  1. Integration of stream and watershed data for hydrologic modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koka, Srikanth

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    -resolution datasets are required, vector datasets have an advantage because they would present the same amount of information that raster would, but the vector file size increase is not as significant as that of raster. The evolution of DEMs suggests... can also be attributed with non-spatial information. Only features of one shape type can be collected together for storage. These storage types can be classified as file- based storage (e.g. shapefiles and coverages) or DBMS (Database Management...

  2. An economic evaluation of the Green Creek Watershed Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Roy Mack

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diversified operations. There are many small dairies which scil milk to processor, : and distributors outside the area. Because of the 14 predominance of livestocl enterprises, about 75 percent of the crop- land is used for production of feed and orazing...

  3. Education of Best Management Practices in the Arroyo Colorado Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & grain insect forecast, cotton market outlook, biofuel production in the Valley, boll weevil eradication, and new developments from industry 102 2/8/2007 Pesticide Safety Training CH The training taught principles of IPM, non-chemical alternatives..., Worker Protection Standards, record keeping, personal protection, application equipment, calibration and continuing education units. 12 6/5/2007 Grain Sorghum Field Day CH Sorghum varieties, sorghum insects, sorghum plant physiology, sorghum outlook...

  4. Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND EROSION THROUGH COMPOST Barrie Cogburn (Phone: 512-416-saw the benefits of utilizing compost as an erosion-controltool. The compost alternative, which is comparable in cost

  5. Shale Oil and Gas, Frac Sand, and Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ;Bakken Oil Shale scope · Light, Sweet crude ­ ideal for automotive fuels and mid-size refineries (Midwest

  6. ForestRangelandandWatershedStewardship 1472CampusDelivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lessons From 35 Years of Research on Oil Shale Lands in the Piceance Basin Fort Collins Fort Collins with oil shale extraction. The project involved approximately ten independent field studies, which were established on a 20-ha site located near what was then the focal point of oil shale activity in the Piceance

  7. Directions in Watershed modelling Modelling of temporary streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accumulation sediment related quality dynamics: resuspension transport ·accumulation ·build up of organic and test hydrological modules · To develop and adjust sediment modules to assess accumulation, resuspension

  8. Okanogan Focus Watershed Salmon Creek : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyman, Hilary

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1999 the Colville Tribes and the Okanogan Irrigation District (OID) agreed to study the feasibility of restoring and enhancing anadromous fish populations in Salmon Creek while maintaining the ability of the district to continue full water service delivery to it members.

  9. The Institute for Water & Watersheds Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    timber and salmon to solar panels and semiconductors. But water supply and demand in the state of the United States. In the academic community there is growing recognition that the solutions to future water

  10. Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Environmental & Watershed Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Loss of Metals from Biosolids; The Effect of Background Chloride Concentration on the Formation biosolids stockpiles: The role of dissolved organic matter. Basic Information Title: Metal mobilization from municipal biosolids stockpiles: The role of dissolved organic matter. Project Number: 2004ME29B Start Date

  11. Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G.; Munz, Carrie S. [U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2006 through March 2007 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 26922. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). Funding from USFWS was for work to contribute to a study of potential interactions between introduced Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and wild steelhead O. mykiss. Funding from LCFEG was for work to evaluate the effects of nutrient enrichment in small streams. A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2006 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

  12. Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie [U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2005 through March 2006 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 22095. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2005 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

  13. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management capacity

  14. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " financing · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management

  15. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics: Upland, Transition, Bottomland and Ephemeral Stream. Within these habitat types, stands were grouped into dominance types based on the leading dominant(s). Nine dominance types were found: Post Oak, Post Oak-Hickory, Winged Elm, Cedar Elm..., Overcup Oak, Hackberry-Cedar Elm, Swamp Privet and Water Elm. Post oak was the most widespread upland dominant, while cedar elm dominated the bottomlands. The woody vegetation is best viewed as dominance types along a iv community continuum...

  16. A Progress Report for the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertold, Allen; Flores, Jaime

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?Jan?07? South?Rio?Hondo? NA? NA? 1?Jan?07? ERHWSC? Complete? New?Plant?in?2006? 1?Jan?07? San?Benito? NA? Upgrade?complete?2009? 1?Jan?07? La?Feria?? Complete? New?Plant?in?2009? January?1,?2009:?Upgrades/expansions?completed?for?5?municipal...?wastewater?treatment?facilities?? 1?Jan?09? Pharr? Upgrade:?Currently?Under?Construction? Anticipated?completion?date:?Fall? 2011? 1?Jan?09? Donna? Upgrade:?Currently?Under?Construction? Anticipated?completion?date:? September?2011? 1?Jan?09? Hidalgo? Complete? Upgraded?in?2003...

  17. Nitrogen Loading and Attenuation in the West Falmouth Harbor Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    in nitrogen loading due to the opening of the wastewater treatment plant and increased septic inputs Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) and septic tanks arrive in the form of plumes of higher nitrogen. The treatment plant provides secondary treatment to the incoming wastewater but is not designed to provide

  18. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  19. FSM 2500 Watershed and Air Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOECategorical|FSM 2500

  20. Idaho Watershed Advisory Groups Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITCSolid Waste WebpageInformationGroups Webpage

  1. EPA Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyer County,ECO2LtdLegal Document-Energy

  2. Montana Watershed Protection Section Contacts Webpage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir|Underground

  3. Montana Watershed Restoration Plans Wiki | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana:Northeast AsiaAir|UndergroundRestoration Plans Wiki

  4. Sustainability of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership and Continued Implementation of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, J.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the tidal segment since 1996. The AC tidal segment does not meet the aquatic life use designated by the State of Texas and described in the Water Quality Standards. Additionally, bacteria has always been a parameter of concern for the AC and as of 2006, both...

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Welp Riparian Enhancement Fence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of approximately 1.5 miles of post and wire fence along Valley Creek in Stanley, Idaho. The proposed fence will meet or exceed BPA's minimum requirement of a 35-foot setback from the stream. Fence posts will be driven into the ground with a post ponder. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat through exclusion fencing.

  6. Use of remote sensing to link watershed land use change and wetland vegetation response in a California coastal watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, N. Maggi; Byrd, Kristin B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bare soil (including mudflat), pickleweed (Salicorniaimages, only pickleweed and mudflat areas were classified.1971 and 1931 images, the mudflat/pickleweed boundary was

  7. Low-impact development in the Assabet River Watershed : site hydrologic design and watershed-scal implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedlich, Brian J. (Brian Joseph), 1982-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-Impact Development (LID) is a relatively new approach to stormwater management. It aims to mimic natural hydrology through increased recharge and decreased runoff. LID technologies focus on distributed treatment of ...

  8. Sustainability of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Partnership and Continued Implementation of the Arroyo Colorado Watershed Protection Plan Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores, J.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arroyo Colorado (AC) is an ancient channel of the Rio Grande and is approximately 90 miles long. The headwaters of the AC begins at the Anzalduas Diversion Dam in Mission, TX and flows eastward through southern Hidalgo County, into Cameron...

  9. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

  10. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holter, Flathead Electric Co-op John Morris, Fluid Market Strategies Virginia Harman, Glacier Electric Welker, PECI Dick Adams, PNUCC Lauren Shapton, Portland General Electric Bo Downen, PPC Gurvinder Singh

  11. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Flathead Electric Co-op Virginia Harman, Glacier Electric Coop Theresa Drake, Idaho Power Company Stacy, Portland General Electric Bo Downen, PPC Gurvinder Singh, Puget Sound Energy Eli Morris, Pacificorp Craig

  12. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PUD (Managing Director Energy Resources) Roger Gray ­ Eugene Water and Electric Board (General Manager) Dave Hagen ­ Clearwater Power (General Manager) Mark Johnson ­ Flathead Electric Cooperative (General: Environmental and Public Interest Groups Ralph Cavanagh - Natural Resources Defense Council (Energy Program Co

  13. factsheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    245-acre parcel of land along the Flathead River south of Kalispell, Mont., for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring...

  14. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Regina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creek Chicken Creek— Downstream Chicken Creek— UpstreamFork Strawberry Creek— Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek—Sample Chicken Creek Downstream Chicken Creek Upstream Field

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Suying

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chicken Creek Chicken Creek downstream of routine monitoringCreek Chicken Creek— Downstream Chicken Creek—Upstream ENV-Fork Strawberry Creek— Downstream N. Fork Strawberry Creek—

  16. Health and safety plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This health and safety plan sets forth the requirements and procedures to protect the personnel involved in the Lead Source Removal Project at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. This project will be conducted in a manner that ensures the protection of the safety and health of workers, the public, and the environment. The purpose of this removal action is to address lead contaminated soil and reduce a potential risk to human health and the environment. This site is an operable unit within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. The removal action will contribute to early source actions within the watershed. The project will accomplish this through the removal of lead-contaminated soil in the target areas of the two small arms firing ranges. This plan covers the removal actions at the Former YS-86O Firing Ranges. These actions involve the excavation of lead-contaminated soils, the removal of the concrete trench and macadam (asphalt) paths, verification/confirmation sampling, grading and revegetation. The primary hazards include temperature extremes, equipment operation, noise, potential lead exposure, uneven and slippery working surfaces, and insects.

  17. Report of Flood, Oil Sheen, and fish Kill Incidents on East Fork Poplar Creek at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, B.E.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality and plant opemtion irriiormation provided by the Y-12 Plant strongly suggest that a dechlorinating agent, applied to the raw water released below the North-South Pipes was responsible for the toxicity resulting in the fish kill of July 24. Dissolved oxygen (DO) measurements in upper EFPC indicai e that low oxygen levels (3-5 ppm) occurred for a period of up to 30 min. This slug of low DO water traveling down EFPC to the lake could easily explain the massive fish kill and the resulting observations. Dissolved oxygen levels of 5.2 ppm or lower are documented as causing problems for warmwater fish species (Heath 1995). The presence of other stressors, including a range of petrochemicals, tends to lower resistance to low oxygen conditions. Given the sequence of events in upper EFPC in the few days prior to July 24, where extremely high flows were followed by inputs of a wide range of low concentrations of oils, the sensitivity to low DO conditions might be heightened. The possible toxic impact of ::he oils and other contaminants reaching EFPC as a result of the heavy rainfidl on July 22 doesn't appear significant enough to be the sole cause of the kill on July 24. Even during the height of the kill, a large school of fish remained immediately downstream of the North-South Pipes. If the toxicity of waters flowing through this outlet were the primary cause of the kill, then it would be expected that this school of fish would not have been present immediately below the pipes. Any impact of waters entering from other sources, such as pumping of basements WOUIC1 have produced a staggered pattern of mortality, with fishing dying in different localities at different times and rates. Further, it would be expected that the morta.lhy observed would have continued over several days at least, as more resistant individuals succumbed slowly to the toxic exposure. This would have provided freshly dead or dying fish for the surveys of July 25 and 28. In previous fish kills in this stream section, the impact on the fish community has been judged to be short-term only, with no significant long-term ecological effects. In fact, the numerous fish kills over the past 7 years do not appear to have dampened the growth of the stream fish populations. The magnit~de of these kills was far less than that of the July 24 kill; maximum mortality of 10-20o/0 of th{~ total population above Lake Reality. Because the current kill has tiected a much larger proportion of the resident population, the impacts are expected to extend for a longer period in this situation, perhaps up to a year. Decreased population levels should be evident through the fhll 1997 and spring 1998 samples. Depending on the success rate of reproduction during the summer cf 1998, the recovery of fish populations should be observed in the fdl 1998 population sample. However, complete recovery may take several reproductive seasons to reach the densities seen in 1997. The cyprinid species occurring in upper EFPC have tremendous reproductive capacities and should be able to repopulate this area with little or no long-term ecological impact. Even the redbreast sunfish should, at the worst, only endure a narrowing of its available gene pool, with little if any long-term impacts.

  18. Design of non-serial, non-parallel flexural transmissions as applied to a micro-machined MEMS tuning fork gyroscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Marcel A. C. (Marcel Adam Craig)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement design rules for flexures that emphasize directionality. This work is important for flexure designs that cannot be broken down into equivalent series or parallel components. ...

  19. 1526 JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 17, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2008 A Mode-Matched Silicon-Yaw Tuning-Fork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    in autonomous vehicles [1]. Micromachined vibratory gyroscopes are based on the Cori- olis induced transfer. Small form factor, light weight, and low power consumption make micromachined gyroscopes ideal for use of energy between two vibration modes of a microstructure. They can operate in either mode-matched or split

  20. All talks will be held in the Chateau Roaring Fork Conference Room, 1037 E. Cooper Ave, Aspen, CO, 81611 The Fourteenth Annual Weintraub Meeting on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Brenda L.

    E. Cooper Ave, Aspen, CO, 81611 The Fourteenth Annual Weintraub Meeting on Biological Regulatory Mechanisms October 8-9, 2010 (Aspen, Colorado) THURSDAY

  1. The garden of forking paths: Why multiple comparisons can be a problem, even when there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelman, Andrew

    there is no "fishing expedition" or "p-hacking" and the research hypothesis was posited ahead of time Andrew Gelman of fishing or examining multiple p-values. We discuss in the context of several examples of published papers. Multiple comparisons doesn't have to feel like fishing 1.1. Background There is a growing realization

  2. Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 3, Appendix V-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of appendix V-B which contains the final verification run data package. Validation of analytical data is presented for Ecotek LSI. Analytical results are included of both soil and creek bed samples for the following contaminants: metals; metals (TCLP); uranium; gross alpha/beta; and polychlorinated biphenyls.

  3. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind

  4. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 3 - Social and Environmental Issues in Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the primary materials filling landfills and incinerators. Infrom farm to fork to landfill. National Resource Defense

  5. Unpaving the Way to Creek Restoration in Lower Sausal Creek Watershed: Applying the EU Water Framework Directive to a US Urban Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hong; Wardani, Jane

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per 10,000 sq ft $0.8 per 10,000 sq ft Creek restoration***Daylighting culverted creeks Open channel Engineered channelbased on cost of Peralta Creek restoration project in lower

  6. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  7. Carneros Creek: Assessing restoration implications for a sinuous stream using 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional simulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beagle, Julie; Marzion, Rachael; Matella, Mary

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use History of the Carneros Creek watershed: A component ofplan for the Carneros Creek watershed, Napa County,Lower San Francisquito Creek Watershed Aquatic Habitat

  8. Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Water Resources Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 2009, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketelle R.H.

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP) was established by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) in 1996 to implement a consistent approach to long-term environmental monitoring across the ORR. The WRRP has four principal objectives: (1) to provide the data and technical analysis necessary to assess the performance of completed Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) actions on the ORR; (2) to perform monitoring to establish a baseline against which the performance of future actions will be gauged and to support watershed management decisions; (3) to perform interim-status and post-closure permit monitoring and reporting to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) requirements; and (4) to support ongoing waste management activities associated with WRRP activities. Water quality projects were established for each of the major facilities on the ORR: East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including Bethel Valley and Melton Valley; and the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex or Y-12), including Bear Creek Valley (BCV), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC), and Chestnut Ridge. Off-site (i.e., located beyond the ORR boundary) sampling requirements are also managed as part of the Y-12 Water Quality Project (YWQP). Offsite locations include those at Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC), the Clinch River/Poplar Creek (CR/PC), and Lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR). The Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) South Campus Facility (SCF) is also included as an 'off-site' location, although it is actually situated on property owned by DOE. The administrative watersheds are shown in Fig. A.l (Appendix A). The WRRP provides a central administrative and reporting function that integrates and coordinates the activities of the water quality projects, including preparation and administration of the WRRP Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP). A brief summary is given of the organization of the SAP appendices, which provide the monitoring specifics and details of sampling and analytical requirements for each of the water quality programs on the ORR. Section 2 of this SAP provides a brief overview and monitoring strategy for the ETTP. Section 3 discusses monitoring strategy for Bethel Valley, and Melton Valley background information and monitoring strategy is provided in Section 4. BCV and UEFPC monitoring strategies are presented in Sect. 5 and 6, respectively. Section 7 provides background information and monitoring strategy for all off-site locations.

  9. A distributed converging overland flow model: 3. Application to Natural Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Vijay P.

    . Then we can write 0e Ot -- - -- g(x) xx -- el(x) (A6) 0326 .... g(x) - g(x) - 4(x) Oe _ /(x)l -- f(x)I-- g(x) = g(x) g(x) o- + g'(x) + /(x) Oe e/(x)l + ef'(x)] + f(x)[g(X) x + (A7) From the Taylor series expansion of e(x, t + At), e...(x, t -Jr- At) = e(x, t) 0e (At)2 02e -Jr- O(At a) + /Xt + 2 0 i (A8) Substituting (A6) and (A7) in (A8) and neglecting higher- order terms, we get (x, t + /xt) = (x, t) - /xt g(x) + /(x) + f- g(x) g(x) 0 ' + g'(x) + /(x) + /'(x) +/(x) g(x...

  10. THE H.T. ODUM SYNTHESIS ESSAY Reforming Watershed Restoration: Science in Need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    ;increase in water extractions or diversions (Postel and Richter 2003; Walsh et al. 2005). Over-harvesting waters are continuing to decline in many parts of the world despite major efforts made to restore them of the world, people have relied on the network of freshwater tributaries and tidal waters for recreation

  11. WATERSHED RESTORATION IN THE NORTHERN SIERRA NEVADA: A BIOTECHNICAL APPROACH1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    and wildlife, and to develop a planning process for future projects. A 4-year monitoring pro-gram was initiated and Electric Company, Research and Development Department, San Ramon, California. Abstract: A cooperative facilities located downstream. In response, concerned groups met to develop a restoration plan. A Memorandum

  12. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI ­ high

  13. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  14. Potential impacts of global climate change on Tijuana River Watershed hydrology - An initial analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Tapash; Dettinger, Michael D; Cayan, Daniel R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    run at a daily time step in “water balance mode” at a 1/8 byBased Model of Land Surface Water and Energy Fluxes forwere obtained from the Surface Water Modeling Group at the

  15. Application of the Recovery Potential Screening Tool in the Matagorda Bay Watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Brown, M.; Skow, K.; Engling, A.; Wagner, K.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intensive, thus prioritizing future water quality restoration efforts is a means to efficiently allocate available resources and achieve timely restoration results. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Recovery Potential Screening...

  16. An economic analysis of a large scale ashe juniper clearing project in the Leon River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flack, Rebecca Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ...............................................................................6 Study Objectives .......................................................................................7 Study Area ................................................................................................7 II LITERATURE REVIEW.......................................................................40 6 Distribution for pasture size (ha) represented by LRRP participants.. ..... 40 7 Percentage of total area for each land use category represented by the LRRP...

  17. Great Lakes Spatially Distributed Watershed Model of Water and Materials Runoff Thomas E. Croley II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the service life of reservoirs and lakes, and increase flooding and costs for dredging harbors and treating

  18. Effect of a Rainfall Event on Contaminant Levels in the Brunette River Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , les chlorophénolés, le 4-nonylphénol et les hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques (HAP), les métaux

  19. Bark Beetles and Watersheds Workshop: Impacts to the Hydrologic Cycle and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    --Research Approaches and Results: Water Quantity/Hydrologic Impacts Water and energy balance in a forested stand University Union, Parlor A (3rd Floor) University of Utah Salt Lake City, December 1, 2011 Video Conference

  20. Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Meeting Attendees January 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @ag.tamu.edu Mike Bira EPA Bira.Mike@epamail.epa.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service dboellstorff.henry@epa.gov Chuck Brown Upper Colorado River Authority chuckb@ucratx.org Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute

  1. Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable January 25, 2012 # First Last Organization Email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bira US EPA Region 6 bira.mike@epamail.epa.gov 8 Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service.S. EPA Region 6 brewer.henry@epa.gov 13 Gary Bryant Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant

  2. Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Participants July 27, 2011 First Last Organization Email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @ag.tamu.edu Mike Bira US EPA Region 6 Bira.Mike@epamail.epa.gov Diane Boellstorff Texas AgriLife Extension Service@ucratx.org Gary Bryant Texas AgriLife Extension glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Monica Burrell US EPA Region 6 burrell

  3. Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Galveston Area Council justin.bower@h-gac.com Henry Brewer U.S. EPA, Region 6 brewer.henry@epa.gov Gary Bryant Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 Diane Hyatt Texas Water Develoment board Diane

  4. A Geographical Approach to Tracking Escherichia coli and Nutrients in a Texas Coastal Plains Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harclerode, Cara

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    that phosphate was correlated with mixed urban land use and multi-family residential areas (p=0.003, p=0.009, respectively; R2=0.739), while total phosphorus flux was correlated with single-family residential land use (p=0.019; R2=0.409). Nonpoint sources...

  5. Characterization of Section 404 Permit Mitigation Plans, Coastal Margin and Associated Watersheds, Upper Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, April A.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    (Corps) is directed to enforce Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (1975 amendment) by administering permits for development. Furthermore, a 1990 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Corps and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a...

  6. Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, Danielle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    routes because of Hydroelectric power, Habitat degradation,routes because of Hydroelectric power, Habitat degradation,

  7. Parallel passageways: An assessment of salmon migration in the San Gregorio watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Chris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetative canopy over La Honda Creek was generally greaterI also noticed that La Honda Creek undergoes a geomorphicand riparian habitat of La Honda Creek along the Highway 84

  8. Quantifying E. coli Discharge from Failing Onsite Sewage Facilities in the Dickinson Bayou Watershed, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Derek

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    quality samples were obtained for sixteen rainfall events at the site with OSSFs and twelve events at the site with no OSSFs. Nearly all sampling events had at least one sample with an E. coli concentration greater than the state boundary. However...

  9. African Study Monographs, Suppl.28: 123-141, November 2003 123 WATERSHED, WEDDINGS AND WORKFORCES: MIGRATION,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Rebecca D.

    and timber boom/bust cycles. We superimpose local economic history with demographic data, then using five, timber, conservation and tourism. At first the BaAka were not independent agents in the new colonial and 60s began to pay the BaAka independently of the bilo and so did the logging companies in the 70s

  10. Kinetics and Modeling of Dissolved PhosphorusExport from a Tile-Drained Agricultural Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Mark B.

    of these parameters include humidity, slope, peat area percentage, minor till plain area, carbonate till area, exposed of pollutants such as chemical oxygen demand Y. Xue, M.B. David, and L.E. Gentry, Dep. of Natural Resources

  11. Bioenergy Watershed Restoration in Regions of the West: What are the Environmental/Community Issues?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Huff, D.D.; Kaufmann, M.R.; Shepperd, W.D.; Sheehan, J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the western mountainous regions, wildfire risks are elevated due to both fire suppression activities which have changed the forest structure making it more susceptible to stand-killing fires and the expansion of human structures (houses, light commercial) into these same forests, By providing a market for currently noncommercial but flammable materials (small trees, tops, and branches), new and existing bioenergy industries could be a key factor in reducing the regional forest fuel loads. Although bioenergy would appear to be an ideal answer to the problem in many ways, the situation is complicated and numerous issues need resolution. A public fearful of logging in these regions needs assurance that harvesting for bioenergy is an environmentally and socially responsible solution to the current fuel build up in these forests. This is especially important given that biomass harvesting cannot pay its own way under current energy market conditions and would have to be supported in some fashion.

  12. A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appraisal of the Sausal Creek restoration project, Oakland,Assessment of Sausal Creek: Physical Setting, Habitatmorphology of Sausal Creek, Oakland, California. Water

  13. Attachment B: Jamaica Bay Watershed Protection Plan Update 1. WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    excess algae and sea lettuce to reduce nitrogen and produce biodiesel fuels. Design anticipated to begin Reintroduction of Eel Grass (Zostera marina) Pilot Study Fish habitat/Decreased wetland erosion loss. Design and increase fish habitat. Design anticipated to begin Summer 2008. Contractor by mid-2008; initiate pilot

  14. area watersheds 2002-2003: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Pulhin; Dr. Rex; Victor O. Cruz; Ir. Bambang Dwi Dasanto; Ir. Rini Hidayati; Perdinan Ssi; Raden Maris; Karima Rahadiyan; Dr. Ahmad Parhan Ms; Aiacc As; Rodel D. Lasco; Phd...

  15. Developing a Methodology to Prioritize Texas Watersheds for Environmental Restoration Efforts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, R.; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Jones, C. Allan; Harris, B.L.; Jensen, Ricard W.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of non-native plant species, and others (Jensen, 2003a). As a consequence, competition for waters between human uses and environmental purposes has now increased to such an extent that some habitats and ecosystems that rely on water may be in peril...

  16. Effects of Small Impoundments on Total Watershed Sediment Yield in Northeast Kansas, April through August 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Guy M.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    sediment concentration hydrograph at Dam 38 ................. 48 21. Figure 21: Aerial view of LDMD 5 showing general locations of elevation and turbidity sensors (photo source: Google Earth...) ................................................................................... 49 22. Figure 22: View looking upstream LDMD 5 from the top of the dam. The outflow structure is visible in the foreground. Photo taken April 2011 ........................................... 50 23. Figure 23: View of inflow turbidity sensor...

  17. Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    in Patagonia, Argentina Christopher H. Gammons a,*, Scott A. Wood b , Fernando Pedrozo c , Johan C. Varekamp d, ID, United States c Universidad del Comahue, Bariloche, Argentina d Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, United States e CONICET, Argentina Received 10 January 2005; received in revised form 9 May 2005

  18. Vol5:Ancho/chAquehuiWAtershed LosAlamosNationalLaboratory,NPDESPermitNo.NM0030759

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EP-DIR-PLAN-10007,R.0·March28,2011 site discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdPPP) eP2011-0120 eP2011-0120 site discharge Pollution Prevention Plan (sdKown, EP-ET-ER GIS Team, May 11, 2010, Map# 09-0120-08 State Plane Coordinate System New Mexico, Central

  19. Economic Incentives and Policies to Improve Quality in a Binational Coastal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sediment. For Mexico, upstream pollution damages andcontrol in Mexico consists of pollution prevention of runoffpay for pollution control, often in upstream Mexico. Results

  20. Modeling Low Impact Development at the Small-Watershed Scale: Implications for the Decision Making Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Mijin

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and soluble phosphorus loadings according to the impact of the three types of land use changes (conversion to deforestation, urbanization, and agricultural land) using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model. Bhattarai et al. (2011) investigated water... higher peak flow and nitrogen and phosphorus loads than the other two designs because of high impervious surfaces and low open space and urban forests. Yang and Li (2011) evaluated the impact of two different urban planning types (high-density and low...

  1. Assessing Avian Contribution of Escherichia coli and Nutrient Loads to Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telesford-Checkley, Judlyn Merium

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    .................................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER III: QUANTIFYING THE NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS LOADS DEPOSITED BY CATTLE EGRETS (Bubulcus ibis) IN HERONRIES IN TEXAS ... 58 Synopsis...

  2. Evaluation of inorganic phosphate content of overland runoff from a rural watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cepeda, William Lohr

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S 41 M O fO C 5- 0 O 0 W ll- I 4- 0 0 c 4l l/7 M pk 0 95 c k 0. 3 c k 0. 1 c k 0 S. S. t k = time to peak Pk of hydrograph c k = peak S. S. concen- trati on 0 = hydrograph peak pk 3 4 5 6 t =t/tk Figure 5. -General forms of runoff...). In order to calculate C(t), the shape of the sediment hydrograph was assumed to be as that of Figure 5 (p, 32). C(t) was difined ir terms of C k. pk' time was defined so that the at t* = 1. 0. For convenience, a dimensionless peak of the hydrograph 0...

  3. Forecasting land use change and its environmental impact at a watershed scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but significantly increase losses of oil and grease and certain heavy metals in runoff. The spatial variation, heavy metals, sediment, oil and grease, pesticides, and fecal coliform bacteria. These pollutants

  4. An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chi-Ying

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the 1990s. One of the streams, the Walnut Creek tributary, was restored in 2003. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of stream restoration on housing values. We applied the hedonic pricing method to evaluate the changes in housing value...

  5. Development of an Urban Watershed Rehabilitation Method Using Stakeholder Feedback to Direct Investigation and Restoration Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuelson; Charles D.; Matlock, Marty D.; Kenimer, Ann L.; Neill, William H.; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Whitten, Guy D.; Vedlitz, Arnold; Alston, Letitia T.

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    .....................................................................22 Estimating the Value of Ecosystem Services.....................................................................................................23 Study Area and Estimation Approach... ............................................................................................................24 Land-Use Classification ..................................................................................................................................24 Assignment of Ecosystem Service Values...

  6. Descriptions and Expectations of Recommended BMPs for Improving the Bosque River Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Megan; Gregory, Lucas

    - (Al) and iron- (Fe) based compounds to bind P in animal manure. Chemical agents are typically incorporated into the manure or lagoon effluent prior to application, but can also be applied directly to the field. Aluminum sulfate (alum) is one... manure. Zvomuya et al. (2006) demonstrated that alum may be an effective amendment for immobilizing P and reducing P leaching in coarse-textured soils with a long history of waste application. When incorporated with poultry litter, alum is typically...

  7. Persistence of hydrologic variables and reactive stream solute concentrations in an east Tennessee watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perfect, Ed

    , Knoxville, TN 37996, United States e Center for Environmental Biotechnology, The University of Tennessee, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States b Civil and Environmental Engineering, Knoxville, TN 37996, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 August 2010 Received

  8. Impacts of Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in Central California Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, Danielle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    endangered species using a bioenergetics approach: Caspianendangered species using a bioenergetics approach: Caspianendangered species using a bioenergetics approach: Caspian

  9. Effect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt-dominated watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    restoration activities often seek to directly modify stream channel and riparian zone surface and subsurface: Cookhouse Meadow stream restoration project, 2004). Recently, bio- technical restoration techniquesEffect of geomorphic channel restoration on streamflow and groundwater in a snowmelt

  10. Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    for their assistance in arranging the web-based reviews. #12;3 Stream Restoration from stream restoration. Since most restoration is at the reach scale1 Promoting Successful Restoration through Effective Monitoring

  11. A Watershed Approach to Urban River Restoration: A Conceptual Restoration Plan for Sausal Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ippolito, Teresa; Podolak, Kristen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forum: Evaluating Stream Restoration Projects. EnvironmentalR. Ladson. 2005. Stream restoration in urban catchmentsECONOMICS OF LID COMPARED TO IN- STREAM RESTORATION

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - asotin creek watershed Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Forests and Range, Coast Region Research Section Collection: Renewable Energy 64 Stream Restoration Databases and Case Studies: A Guide to Information Resources and...

  13. Soil erosion and conservation as affcted by land use and land tenure, El Pital Watershed, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somarriba-Chang, Matilde de los Angeles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forage such as tropical kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides (Roxb. ) Benth. ) and cowpea (Vigna sinensis L. ). Trees are dispersed in the grassland and are used as forage, shade, fuelwood, wood, and as posts. These trees were established by natural... and fertility. Many leguminous species, such as velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens L. ), and tropical kudzu, are grown as a cover crop and then plowed into the soil as a green manure. Vegetation barriers Vegetation barriers are usually planted in association...

  14. ESTIMATING POTENTIAL E. COLI SOURCES IN A WATERSHED USING SPATIALLY EXPLICIT MODELING TECHNIQUES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -site wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs) was incorporated into SELECT along with the Pollutant Connectivity (Karthikeyan), and Research Associate (McKee), Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Texas A Laboratory, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, College Station, TX 77845 (E-Mail / Karthikeyan: karthi

  15. Regional regression models of watershed suspended-sediment discharge for the eastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    : Sediment transport Regression Water quality Ungaged GAGES SPARROW s u m m a r y Estimates of mean annual Streamflow (GAGES) database. The resulting regional regression models summarized for major US water resources contaminants including pesticides, met- als, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) readily sorb

  16. Clam Active Biomonitoring and POM Passive Monitoring for Anacostia Watershed Contaminant Point Sources.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    Sources. Final Report to the DC Water Resources Research Center Dr. Harriette L. Phelps June 1 2010) Wells Run had polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from combustion and chlordane exceeding reference not exceed other tidal river sites except for 2X PAHs, (4) the Baltimore Washington Parkway median stream

  17. Sources and Fates of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Rural and Urban Watersheds in Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cioce, Danielle

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to frequent exposure to high sodium irrigation water. The results indicate that sodium is a major driver of DOC in the system. Sound management decisions concerning irrigation water chemistry and urban development might eventually emerge to protect water...

  18. Modeling the Effects of Low Impact Development Practices on Streams at the Watershed Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shannak, Sa'D A

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban growth contributes to increasing storm water runoff which in turn causes an increase in the frequency and severity of flooding. Moreover, increased storm water runoff contributes to changing the character and volume of energy inputs...

  19. Minimization of cost, sediment load, and sensitivity to climate change in a watershed management application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, Margaret J.

    : Multiobjective Differential evolution Robustness to uncertainty Stormwater management Best management practices-scale, multiobjective framework for generating a diverse family of stormwater best management practice (BMP) plans-point source impacts from developed lands, structural Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention ponds

  20. Memo: Estimates of hydrology in small (<80 km2 urbanized watersheds under dry weather and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Johnson, 2004; Hetzel, 2007). The Bay Area Storm Water Management Agencies (BASMAA) that hold National management practices (BMPs) to achieve load reduction and demonstrate at the end of 20 years (2025 Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits have been asked to increase effort and implement best