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Sample records for forests restoration act

  1. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    are areas of degraded but persisting reefs that have been closed to harvest due to wastewater treatment environmental and cultural resources. 10. Farm Pond Tidal Restoration, MA The primary goal of this project

  2. Restoring cottonwood & willow riparian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    for the lower San Joaquin Basin In California's Central Valley, widespread flow regulation and land development. In the lower San Joaquin Basin, alteration of natural flow regimes for flood control, irrigation in degraded river reaches has become an increasingly frequent restoration activity in the lower San Joaquin

  3. Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    information. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers received project funding totaling $ 3,974,000 for fiscal years of Section 108 of the Estuary Restoration Act, Title I of P.L. 106-457 (Act). This report covers the fiscal Register, Vol. 67, No. 232). Funds were authorized to be appropriated to the Army for fiscal years 2001

  4. Riparian Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) Forest Restoration on the Middle Sacramento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) Forest Restoration on the Middle Sacramento River, California1 horticultural restoration program on the floodplain of the middle Sacramento River, California. At nearly all that affect valley oaks on the Sacramento River floodplain will require additional study and more detailed

  5. Population Recovery and Conservation Habitat Restoration Water Use and Hydropower Forests and Fish EAST FORK OWYHEE RIVER SALMON AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Recovery and Conservation · Habitat Restoration · Water Use and Hydropower · Forests........................................................................................................................................... 18 Water Quality Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 18 Nevada Division of Environmental Protection Water Quality Sampling

  6. Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent| OpenOutpatient) JumpHealthy

  7. Colorado Forest Restoration Institute October 14, 2009 4:01 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mica Keralis Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Warner College of Natural Resources 1 #12 collaborative planning References, Resources and Appendices Page 2 7 8 10 12 20 20 21 34 2 #12;Acknowledgements: Introduction Ecological monitoring can be de fined as the collection and analysis of re peated observations

  8. Estuary Restoration Act of 2000 Title I of Estuaries and Clean Waters Act of 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    project information. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers received $200,000 for Fiscal Year 2002 to use for fiscal years 2001 through 2005, to remain available until expended. Additionally, $1 in each of fiscal years 2001 through 2005, for the acquisition, maintenance, and management of restoration

  9. Blood Forests: Post Lacey Act, Why Cohesive Global Governance is Essential to Extinguish the Market for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    317 Blood Forests: Post Lacey Act, Why Cohesive Global Governance is Essential to Extinguish. A Pressing Need for Unified Global Governance............................338 A. Defining Illegal Logging.................................................................................321 A. Disagreement Regarding Defining Illegal Logging ....................321 B. Environmental

  10. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15

    of geographic information systems (GIS) on student motivation and conceptual knowledge. Substantial losses of bottomlands in Texas necessitate restoration to regain the ecosystem services that they provide. Restoration of proper hydrology is the most important...

  11. National Forest Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas:NGEN8Modeling SystemForest

  12. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  14. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  15. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  16. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  17. Clean Water Restoration Act of 2007 (Introduced in Senate) 110th CONGRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . 1870 To amend the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to clarify the jurisdiction of the United States to the Committee on Environment and Public Works A BILL To amend the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to clarify are as follows: (1) To reaffirm the original intent of Congress in enacting the Federal Water Pollution Control

  18. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  19. Opal Creek Forest Preserve Act of 1994. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The legislative text proposes to provide for the establishment and management of the Opal Creek Forest Reserve in Oregon. The purpose of the Act is to protect and preserve the forests and watersheds in the Reserve. And to promote and conduct research regarding old-growth forests and for educators to provide scientifically credible information to the public.

  20. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  1. Strategic light manipulation as a restoration strategy to reduce alien grasses and encourage native regeneration in Hawaiian mesic forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostertag, Rebecca

    specific leaf area. Introduction Conversion of large tracts of forest to pasture for cattle production significant negative biotic and abiotic consequences, including altera- tion of nutrient cycling and loss of biodiversity (Janzen 1988; Silver et al. 2004). After abandonment some of these areas are able to recover

  2. USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2012-12-31

    of this research were to improve the use of ARCHER hyperspectral imagery to classify sub-canopy and open-area vegetation in coniferous forests located in the Southern Rockies and to determine how much fidelity might be lost from a baseline of 1 meter spatial...

  3. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration, site characterization plan: Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility at the Nevada Test Site which will be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Environmental Restoration Division. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and around the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.

  4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan. Area 6 Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 South and North Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to be conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The purposes of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient, sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site; obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste (IDW). The scope of the characterization may include excavation, drilling, and sampling of soil in and around both ponds; sampling of the excavated material; in situ sampling of the soil at the bottom and on the sides of the excavations as well as within subsurface borings; and conducting sample analysis for both characterization and waste management purposes. Contaminants of concern include RCRA-regulated VOCs and metals.

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Site Environmental Restoration Site Characterization Plan, Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-12

    This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of the Area 6 Decontamination Pond Facility (DPF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which will be conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations OffIce (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration Division (ERD). The objectives of the planned activities are to: o Obtain sufficient, ample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies maybe developed for the site. o Obtain sufficient, sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste. All references to regulations contained in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization may include surface radiation survey(s), surface soil sampling, subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), and sampling of soil in and Mound the pond; in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings; and sample analysis for both site . . characterization and waste management purposes.

  6. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    in the wilmot river, prince edward island, canada Theon small wetlands in prince edward island, canada restored

  7. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    the wilmot river, prince edward island, canada The Canadiansmall wetlands in prince edward island, canada restored by

  8. Point No Point Marsh Restoration and Flood Risk Mitigation Feasibility Project 1. Provide the name of all non-Federal interests planning to act as the sponsor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Point No Point Marsh Restoration and Flood Risk Mitigation Feasibility Project 1. Provide the name. This proposal is for a feasibility study for environmental restoration and flood risk mitigation. 3. State Restoration and Flood Risk Mitigation Feasibility Project are: Determine alternative approaches

  9. Protecting and Restoring our Nation's Waters: The Effects of Science, Law, and Policy on Clean Water Act Jurisdiction with a focus on the Arid West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderbilt, Forrest

    2013-01-01

    Mitsch, W. J. (1987). Water pollution from oil and gasnavigable waters” (b)). Water Pollution Control Act of 1948,USC 1251. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments

  10. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service 1996 annual report wetlands research related to the Pen Branch restoration effort on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Kolka, R.K. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States); Trettin, C.C. [USDA Forest Service, Charleston, SC (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the role of the USDA Forest Service and their collaborators (SRTC, SREL, and several universities) in wetlands monitoring and research on the Savannah River Site. This report describes the rationales, methods, and results (when available) of these studies and summarizes and integrates the available information through 1996.

  11. RESTORATION RENOVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    exclusivity with which the various professions involved in restoration tend to func tion. "Ecologists plants and birds, but unless I work with the design professions, this knowledge won't be expressed on the ground." Handel wants to bling those professions together in the journal. "I want in every issue to have

  12. Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Remedial activities and subsequent ecological restoration have converted the site...

  13. NFWF Five Star & Urban Waters Restoration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) is accepting applications for up to $2.1 million to develop community capacity to sustain local natural resources for future generations by providing modest financial assistance to diverse local partnership for wetland, riparian, forest and coastal habitat restoration, urban wildlife conservation, stormwater management as well as outreach, education and stewardship.

  14. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

  15. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  16. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  17. Environmental guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this document, entitled Guidance on Public Participation for US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Activities, to summarize policy and provide guidance for public participation in environmental restoration activities at DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, facilities, and laboratories. While the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has environmental restoration responsibility for the majority of DOE sites and facilities, other DOE Project Offices have similar responsibilities at their sites and facilities. This guidance is applicable to all environment restoration activities conducted by or for DOE under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA); the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) (corrective actions only); and the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). This guidance also is applicable to CERCLA remedial action programs under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 and the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, where DOE is the designated lead. The primary objectives of this guidance document are as follows: acclimate DOE staff to a changing culture that emphasizes the importance of public participation activities; provide direction on implementing these public participation activities; and, provide consistent guidance for all DOE Field Offices and facilities. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on conducting effective public participation activities for environmental restoration activities under CERCLA; RCRA corrective actions under sections 3004(u), 3004(v), and 3008(h); and NEPA public participation activities.

  18. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  19. Hurricane Response and Restoration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Despite all of ISER’s efforts to promote reliability and resiliency in the energy sector, domestic and global events will occur that will disrupt the sector and ISER must always be prepared to respond. In the face of both manmade and natural disasters, ISER applies cutting edge technical solutions and emergency management expertise to help overcome challenges inherent in quickly restoring an incredibly complex U.S. energy system.

  20. Landowners lead successful Buck Creek restoration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutwell, Kathryn S.

    2012-01-01

    manager for Buck Creek, said that in ????, landowners took the initiative to secure the scienti?c information needed to be?er evaluate both water quality in the creek as well as potential sources of bacteria across the watershed. Using funding secured... from the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board?s Clean Water Act provided by the EPA, the Buck Creek restoration e?ort began. Initially, AgriLife sta? collected water quality data and conducted a source survey of the watershed, according...

  1. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  2. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  3. Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    ARTICLE Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests for rehabilitation and increased carbon stores, yet few studies have examined the feasibility of using carbon markets to restore high-graded forests. We evaluated the effectiveness of rehabilitation on 391 ha of high

  4. Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act and Energy Department programs were designed to stimulate the economy while creating new power sources, conserving resources and aligning the nation to once again lead the global energy economy.

  5. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  6. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher

    2007-12-15

    A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

  7. Cost-effective ecological restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    whether the cost-effectiveness index in the all seed mixesRestoration cost-effectiveness (index calculated as percentwith the highest cost-effectiveness index values were drill

  8. eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    eschweizerbartxxx Interactions between alien species and restoration of large-river ecosystems-river ecosystems that are the subject of restoration efforts also typically are heavily invaded by alien species interactions that link alien species and river restoration. Most obviously, restoration may be aimed

  9. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  10. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  11. Reynolda Campus Wake Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Reynolda Campus Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Office of Research than NIH and NSF, such as the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and State

  12. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  13. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  14. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  15. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2015-10-21

    The City of Detroit is undertaking a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to light-emitting diode (LED). Detroit’s well-publicized financial troubles over the last several years have added many hurdles and constraints to this process. Strategies to overcome these issues have largely been successful, but have also brought some mixed results. This document provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far.

  16. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  17. Peatland Restoration Guide Second Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    of Peat Moss Association Natural Resources and Energy #12;IIPeatland Restoration Guide Published in partnership by: Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association 7, Oasis Court St. Albert, AB Canada, T8N 6N2 cspma@peatmoss.com www.peatmoss.com New Brunswick Departement of Natural Resources and Energy PO Box 6000 Fredericton, NB

  18. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  19. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  20. Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    Integrating Soil Ecological Knowledge into Restoration Management Liam Heneghan,1,2 Susan P. Miller that lead to restoration success. The discipline of soil ecology, which emphasizes both soil organisms the outcomes of restoration despite this variability. Here, we propose that the usefulness of this soil

  1. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  2. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  3. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  4. Global Forests Syllabus -1 GLOBAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , and conservation. Another explores ongoing strategies that seek to sustain forests through markets and other (environmental, socioeconomic and political) under which forest products are harvested and transformed. A variety stakeholders & power Reading comments 18 Changing scenarios Reading comments 20 Costs, benefits

  5. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration and harvesting, and the physical properties of stands, trees and timber. Scope of our work Our research focuses expertise in forecasting forest growth is now applied to carbon assessment and management. We also work

  6. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Coporate Plan 2006­2009 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Corporate Plan 2006­2009 1Corporate Plan 2006­2009 #12;Chief Executive Professor Jim Lynch Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Surrey GU10 4LH Tel: 01420 22255 E-mail: research

  7. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  8. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  9. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  10. The Muzzi marsh: a case study and analysis of wetland restoration decision-making in San Francisco Bay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brah, William Joseph

    1982-01-01

    were subject to the requirements of the Act. As to these, the wildlife agen- cies can recommend that the requested permit be denied or that app1icants develop mitigation plans to prevent or lessen damage to wetland habitat and to improve habitat... have learned that they have a better chance in securing approval of a permit if they propose mitigation or restoration programs. Others coun- ter that it is not fair to impose extensive restoration requirements on permit applicants when...

  11. 259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies along a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    259USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Air Pollution and Forest Health Studies of Indus- trial Areas, Kossutha 6, 40-833 Katowice, Poland. Abstract Air pollution, bulk deposition dioxide (SO2 ) air pollution acting directly or indirectly has been one of the major causes for poor

  12. Environmental Restoration and Performance-Based Remediation....

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy Flash Environmental Restoration and Performance-Based Remediation. . . More Documents & Publications Oversight of Performance-based Contracts CRAD, Performance-Based...

  13. Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014 Forest Products Trade between China. Whiletheglobaleconomicdownturnaffectedconsumptioninmanycountries,China'stradewithAfricaremained mostly unaffected. In particular, commodities, such as oil and gas

  14. BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT RESTORATION SITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT RESTORATION SITES Supported financially by English Nature and the Woodland Trust Project: Brash Management on Habitat Restoration Sites Date: March 2003 Project leaders on Sustainable Woodlands & `FACT 7'Project on Environmental Land Management #12;2 BRASH MANAGEMENT ON HABITAT

  15. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appeals Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses...

  16. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16 Forest in Rural Studies 17 International

  17. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing 13 Forest Inventory and Empirical Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16

  18. EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    73: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho EA-1973: Kootenai River Restoration at Bonners Ferry, Boundary County, Idaho Summary Bonneville Power...

  19. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  20. CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry sectors with PEFC C-o-C certification June 2003 Construction 1% Pulp & paper 4% Wood manufacturing% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers 5% Other primary forest industries 6% Sawmilling 39% Timber trade 43% #12;Forest industry sectors

  1. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  2. Forest Estate Modelling (Part 2) Forest Research Institute, Rotorua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    adequate models of growth and yield, and data on costs and prices, it is not too difficult to find "optiForest Estate Modelling (Part 2) O. Garcia Forest Research Institute, Rotorua The Problem Given after centuries of continued forest management, exist in Europe. Some countries still base their forest

  3. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  4. FOREST CERTIFICATION:FOREST CERTIFICATION: BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS ORBIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stewardship Council (FSC) ­ 257 million acres Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC

  5. Ecological Setting of the Wind River Old-growth Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    , which act at the indi- vidual to small groups of trees scale, are wind, snow loads, and droughtEcological Setting of the Wind River Old-growth Forest David C. Shaw,1,2 * Jerry F. Franklin,1,2 Ken Bible,1,2 Jeffrey Klopatek,3 Elizabeth Freeman, Sarah Greene,4 and Geoffrey G. Parker5 1 Wind

  6. PREPUBLICATION COPY Hydrologic Effects of a Changing Forest Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Impacts of Forest Management Water Science and Technology Board Division on Earth and Life Studies of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given

  7. Intergovernmental Personnel Act Assignments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-08-24

    This Manual implements provisions of the Intergovernmental Personnel Act (IPA) within the Department of Energy (DOE) and establishes requirements, responsibilities, and authority for effecting assignments under the Act. Does not cancel other directives.

  8. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rogers, Matt

    2013-05-29

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  9. ACT-ARA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003092IBMPC00 ACT-ARA: Code System for the Calculation of Changes in Radiological Source Terms with Time   

  10. Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Story by Margaret Foust txH2O | pg. 15 Watershed protection plans (WPPs) are one of the approaches stakeholders are using to protect and restore water bodies and watersheds in Texas. WPPs are voluntary and actively involve local... Board (TSSWCB) through a Clean Water Act Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Through the Watershed Protection Plan Development for Buck Creek, the project team has identified specific sources of E. coli...

  11. Power of the people: Restoring impaired water bodies with stakeholder-driven WPPs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foust, Maragaret

    2011-01-01

    Story by Margaret Foust txH2O | pg. 15 Watershed protection plans (WPPs) are one of the approaches stakeholders are using to protect and restore water bodies and watersheds in Texas. WPPs are voluntary and actively involve local... Board (TSSWCB) through a Clean Water Act Nonpoint Source Grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Through the Watershed Protection Plan Development for Buck Creek, the project team has identified specific sources of E. coli...

  12. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  13. The Health of Colorado's Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current and Future Forest Resources #12;Acknowledgements William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International), is the primary author of the 2009 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests. Thanks to the following Colorado

  14. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  15. May 5, 2014 FOREST POLICY, LAWS, AND OWNERSHIP IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Jerry

    the boundaries, or for the purpose of securing favorable conditions of water flows, and to furnish a continuous B. Provision for creation of Forest Reserves 1. 1891: Section 24 of the General Revision Act protests and conflicts about withdrawls!! #12;2 2 C. 1897 Organic Act 1. Provided funding and management

  16. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    : First Author: Yu-Chuan Chen First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Yu-Chuan Chen Hyejung;Computational Statistics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Canonical Forest Yu-Chuan Chen

  17. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Landowners often need professional help after a weather-related disaster has damaged timber stands. A consulting forester can help a landowner develop management strategies that fit the landowner's objectives. This publication includes a checklist...

  18. The fish community of a newly restored southern California estuary: ecological perspective 3 years after restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    The fish community of a newly restored southern California estuary: ecological perspective 3 years 2013 Abstract Bays and estuaries are considered essential fish habitat, yet in many parts of the world in the fish assemblages 3 years after the restoration of the Bolsa Chica Full Tidal Basin (BCFTB

  19. Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests? No. Some forests need burning on the forest floor 2. What are the types of forest fires? Broadly there are two types: low

  20. 267USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Rehabilitation of a Blue Oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    267USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Rehabilitation of a Blue Oak Restoration. Results indicate treeshelters release stunted seedlings and could rehabilitate poorly performing projects attempted to rehabilitate our original planting, in order to evaluate readily available measures applicable

  1. System restoration of a transmission network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, A.; Eppel, M.; Genthe, S.; Schwarzjirg, H.; Stark, J.; Werner, W. [Bayernwerke AG, Karlsfeld (Germany); [Siemens AG, Wien (Austria)

    1995-12-31

    In a large SCADA/EMS-System an Expertsystem for Fault Diagnosis and for System Restoration is integrated. The System Restoration covered by the Expertsystem gives assistance to the operator in any kind of blackout by presenting restoration plans. In case any number of busbars is outaged the system automatically determines the affected network areas and thereby the magnitude of the whole blackout. The restoration of the network is done in phases depending on the kind of blackout and is based on a global utility-strategy-plan. Within this scheme the detailed restoration plan is determined dynamically based on the actual situation and some predefinitions such as load priorities and power plants to be reenergized with priority. The described system covers all cases of blackouts by evaluating a plan based on the individual case. The Expertsystem is a hybrid system using an optimal power flow, too, and is fully integrated in the SCADA/EMS system. The plans of each phase are presented via the common MMI to the operator and supervised due to execution. The system distinguishes between operator wanted deviations and unwanted deviations during execution. Thus the operator at any time can continue as he likes.

  2. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B.; Miller, Karl V.; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  3. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

    1997-05-20

    A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

  4. Process for restoring membrane permeation properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

    1997-05-20

    A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

  5. EA-2006: Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing a programmatic EA for actions recommended by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council to help restore ecological structure, function, and biodiversity within the Columbia River estuary. Activities under this program could include full reconnection of tidal influence through breaching dikes and levees; partial reconnection of tidal influence through culverts, bridges, and tidegates; enhancement of the quantity and quality of tidal channels; removal of invasive species; and restoration of riparian habitat conditions, such as planting native vegetation.

  6. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade: Scenarios and challenges:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European Conference ­ 4 ­ 5 May 2010 ­Phnom Penh 2 Long Ratanakoma (Cambodia) - Climate change, forest conversion

  7. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  8. Restoration of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In topical Report DOE/FE0002068-1 [2] technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In this Task the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. Also, it might have overestimated the injection capacity by enhancing too much the pressure relief due to the relatively close proximity between the injector and the infinite acting boundaries. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48 km by 48 km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case. Potosi Dynamic Model 2013.a gives an average CO2 injection rate of 1.4 MTPA and cumulative injection of 43 Mt in 30 years, which corresponds to 45% of the injection target. This implies that according to this preliminary model, a minimum of three (3) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. The injectivity evaluation of the Potosi formation will be revisited in topical Report 15 during which more data will be integrated in the modeling exercise. A vertical flow performance evaluation could be considered for the succeeding task to determine the appropriate tubing size, the required injection tubing head pressure (THP) and to investigate whether the corresponding well injection rate falls within the tubing erosional velocity limit. After 30 years, the plume extends 15 miles (24 km) in E-W and 14 miles (22 km) in N-S directions. After injection is completed, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 100 years post-injection, the plume extends 17 miles (27 km) in E-W and 15 miles (24 km) in N-S directions. The increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 370 psia around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 30 psia beyond 14 miles (22 km) away from injector. The initial reservoir pressure is restored after approximately 20 years post-injection. This result, however, is associated with uncertainties on the boundary conditions, and a sensitivity analysis could be considered for the succeeding tasks. It is important to remember that the respective plume extent and areal pressure increase corresponds to an injection of 43 Mt CO2. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 Mt be achieved; a much larger plume extent and areal pressure increase could be expected. Re-evaluating the permeability modeling, vugs and heterogeneity distributions, and relative permeability input could be considered for the succeeding Potosi formation evaluations. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  9. Forest Research Wildfires in Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 recorded grassfires and nearly 550 forest fires in South Wales; this equates to eight times more per unit

  10. 2003 Veblen, T.T. Key issues in fire regime research for fuels management and ecological restoration. Pages 259-276 in: P. Omi and L. Joyce (technical eds). Fire,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veblen, Thomas T.

    2003 Veblen, T.T. Key issues in fire regime research for fuels management and ecological restoration. Pages 259-276 in: P. Omi and L. Joyce (technical eds). Fire, Fuel Treatments and Ecological, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 475 p. AN INTRODUCTION TO KEY ISSUES IN FIRE REGIME

  11. A post project appraisal of the restoration/rehabilitation of Alamo Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolko, Darrell

    2003-01-01

    Associates, Ltd. , Alamo Creek: Conceptual Restoration Plan/Basis of Design Summary Alamo Creek Restoration, Phase 1aRestoration/Rehabilitation of Alamo Creek Darrell Smolko UC

  12. JGI's Carbon Cycling Studies on Restored Marshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Theroux, Susanna

    2015-06-02

    DOE Joint Genome Institute Metagenome Program Head, Susannah Tringe, and postdoc, Susie Theroux, discuss the lessons to be learned from studying the microbial diversity of marshes that have been converted to other uses, and are now being restored, as well as the potential impacts on the global carbon cycle.

  13. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  14. Enterprise Campuses Clemson University Restoration Institute (CURI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    .clemson.edu/restoration · www.clemsonenergy.com Facilities SCE&G Energy Innovation Center · Duke Energy eGRID · Wind Turbine partnerships in sustainable energy, advanced materials, logistics and water ecology to develop new technologies-focused challenges. Key technical areas are power systems, electronics energy storage, sustainability, mechatronics

  15. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  16. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  17. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  18. Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-09-01

    Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

  19. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  20. ARM - Recovery Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery Act Recovery Act Logo Subscribe FAQs Recovery Act

  1. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  2. developing and forests: finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ncreif.org/indices/timberland.phtml. T he chief attribute of the forestry asset class is its superior historical risk- return pro le producing growing sites and lower establishment and labour costs than the temperate forests of mature products make Africa an attractive forestry option. Typical emerging market risks as well as environmental

  3. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the unintended consequence of government regulation in the global marketplace has been to shift the supply agendas of industrial associations, environmental organizations, government agencies, and forest landowner, certification has become a focal point for the wide range of social, cultural, environmental and economic

  4. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management problems, such as Planning-Programing-Budgeting, will require automated procedures to col- lect in terms of products and services and alter- native methods of producing them . The out- puts from PPBS- semble forest data up to an economic limit of about 50,000 lines of map data at an average cost of 0

  5. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project SYNTHESES OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE for Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and Restoring Tidal Salt Marsh and Associated Habitats over) Maintaining and Improving Functioning of the South Bay Ecosystem and (2) Restoring tidal salt marsh

  6. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 is the successor to the Science Subgroup. 2 South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs

  7. Methods for Saving and Restoring Register Values across Function Calls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalley, David

    Methods for Saving and Restoring Register Values across Function Calls JACK W. DAVIDSON AND DAVID B The method used to save and restore the values of registers across function calls can affect performance that empirically evaluated six different schemes for saving and restoring registers on CISC machines. The methods

  8. Radiation Management Act (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes The Department of Environmental Quality as the designated official agency of the State of Oklahoma for all regulatory activities for the use of atomic energy and sources of...

  9. Energy and Water Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Energy and Water Act AL-2004-02 provides guidance regarding the implementation of Section 30 I. 304....

  10. Paperwork Reduction Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Paperwork Reduction Act requires that all federal websites request permission from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before collecting information from 10 or more members of the public....

  11. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence of recovery on further...

  12. 1998 Annual Report - Environmental Restoration Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, L.B.

    1998-12-30

    This is a 1998 annual report for Environmental Restoration. Environmental Restoration's accomplishments were significant in 1998. The division, including its support organizations, completed one year without a lost time accident. It also met 111 enforceable agreement milestones on time, with more than 80% ahead of schedule. Funds used to meet these milestones were effectively utilized and $9.63 million in regulatory scope was added. Twelve new, innovative technologies were deployed, enabling ER to achieve significant progress on major field remediation projects, including: Remediation of 25 acres of radioactive burial ground; Removal of 1,300 batteries for recycling; Removal and safe storage of a radioactive underground tank; Extraction of 115,000 pounds of solvent; and Installation of 9 new recirculation wells and a second GeoSiphon Cell for additional removal of solvent Final Records of Decision were made for 9 base unit sites. No Further Action decisions were made for 61 additional sites.

  13. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  14. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  15. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOA Applicantof Years | Department of Energy Add Time

  16. Illegal Logging The US Forest Service, through its International Programs office, actively works around the globe to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development. Ensuing effects on food water and energy security are of great concern to US geopolitical to enforce the recent amendment to the Lacey Act), the Forest Service's International Programs plays Organization; provision of technology and expertise to other domestic agencies tasked with Lacey Act

  17. Strategic planning for power system restorations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Russell W; Van Hententyck, Pascal; Coffrin, Carleton

    2010-10-12

    This paper considers the power system restoration planning problem (PSRPP) for disaster recovery, a fundamental problem faced by all populated areas. PSRPPs are complex stochastic optimization problems that combine resource allocation, warehouse location, and vehicle routing considerations. Furthermore, electrical power systems are complex systems whose behavior can only be determined by physics simulations. Moreover, these problems must be solved under tight runtime constraints to be practical in real-world disaster situations. This work is three fold: (1) it formalizes the specification of PSRPPs; (2) introduces a simple optimization-simulation hybridization necessary for solving PSRPPs; and (3) presents a complete restoration algorithm that utilizes the strengths of mixed integer programming, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search. This paper studied a novel problem in the field of humanitarian logistics, the Power System Restoration Problem (PSRPP). The PSRPP models the strategic planning process for post disaster power system recovery. The paper proposed a multi-stage stochastic hybrid optimization algorithm that yields high quality solutions to real-world benchmarks provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The algorithm uses a variety of technologies, including MIP, constraint programming, and large neighborhood search, to exploit the structure of each individual optimization subproblem. The experimental results on hurricane disaster benchmarks indicate that the algorithm is practical from a computational standpoint and produce significant improvements over existing relief delivery procedures.

  18. Russian: United States Environmental Restoration Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The Russian - United States Environmental Restoration Workshop, held in Washington, D.C., and Richland, Washington, from April 5 through 18, 1993, was the first extended collaborative information exchange between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Russian scientists at the site level. In addition to the Russian scientists, workshop participants included scientists and staff from DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), the US Environmental Training Institute (USETI), universities, and the private sector. The first week (April 5 through 10) of the workshop took place in Washington, D.C., where the Russian and US participants were presented with a US perspective on environmental restoration and remediation issues from representatives in DOE and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The second week (April 11 through 18) occurred in Richland, Washington, where the participants were presented with site-specific environmental restoration and remediation issues related to Hanford Site cleanup. This report is a compilation of the presentations, discussions, and experiences shared during the second week of the workshop in Richland, Washington.

  19. Massachusetts Clean Air Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Act contains regulations to prevent the pollution and contamination of the atmosphere. The Act establishes a contiguous metropolitan pollution control district, comprised of towns in the...

  20. Recovery Act State Memos Virginia

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    * VIRGINIA RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT Virginia has substantial natural resources, including coal and natural gas. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a...

  1. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  2. By Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -intensity lightning fires kept tree density down and the forests were very well adapted to fire because of the healthyBy Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist, Nebraska Forest Service Thinning is an excellent management tool for forest landowners to use to improve forest health and productivity

  3. Are Forest Fires Predictable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-23

    Dynamic mean field theory is applied to the problem of forest fires. The starting point is the Monte Carlo simulation in a lattice of million cells. The statistics of the clusters is obtained by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm. We get the map $p_n\\to p_{n+1}$, where $p_n$ is the probability of finding a tree in a cell, and $n$ is the discrete time. We demonstrate that the time evolution of $p$ is chaotic. The arguments are provided by the calculation of the bifurcation diagram and the Lyapunov exponent. The bifurcation diagram reveals several windows of stability, including periodic orbits of length three, five and seven. For smaller lattices, the results of the iteration are in qualitative agreement with the statistics of the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000.

  4. A systematic approach to evaluate erosion potential at environmental restoration sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veenis, S.J.; Mays, D.C. [Merrick and Co., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1998-12-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is responsible for investigation and remediation of solid waste management units (SWMUs) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and area of concerns (AOCs) under the direction of the Department of Energy. During the investigation and remediation phases, information may be gathered that indicates that conditions may be present at the site which may effect surface water quality. Depending on the constituent found, its concentration, and erosion/sediment transport potential, it may be necessary to implement temporary or permanent mitigative measures.

  5. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  6. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  7. The floodplain large-wood cycle hypothesis: A mechanism for the physical and biotic structuring of temperate forested alluvial valleys in the North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    The floodplain large-wood cycle hypothesis: A mechanism for the physical and biotic structuring Available online 1 December 2011 Keywords: Wood debris Riparian forest Fluvial geomorphology Foundation species Biogeomorphology River restoration A `floodplain large-wood cycle' is hypothesized as a mechanism

  8. Session B--Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes--Gray, Blackwell USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Session B--Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes--Gray, Blackwell USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 49 The Maintenance of Key Biodiversity Attributes Through Ecosystem Restoration Operations1 Robert W. Gray2 and Bruce A. Blackwell3 Abstract The requirement to manage for key

  9. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    AND ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE IN THE PANAMA CANAL WATERSHED Daniella M. Schweizer ABSTRACT Increased global

  10. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    politics and economics as the core of environmental issues (environmental degradation, with the role that politics and economics play on those issues.

  11. Road-crossing restoration on alluvial creeks in the Klamath National Forest, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E

    2008-01-01

    colonization upstream and downstream of the road-crossingsthis data into upstream and downstream bins to estimate thetaken from traps upstream and downstream of the roads.

  12. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    2008. Plan de desarrollo sostenible y gestion integrada deWatershed (Plan de Desarrollo Sostenible y Gestion Integrada

  13. ARM - Recovery Act Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPress Releases Related2ActRecovery Act Instruments

  14. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  15. Radiative forcing of natural forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalcar- bon and energy cycling in the boreal forests, includingand Forest Meteorology, Liu HP, Randerson JT (2008) Interannual variability of surface energy

  16. Health Consequences of Forest Fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; McKee, Douglas; Thomas, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    to Lung Health of Haze From Forest Fires: The SingaporeJim, C.Y. 1999. “The Forest Fires in Indonesia 1997-1998:A Study of the 1997 Forest Fires in South East Asia Using

  17. Using neutrons to fight forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, Hal; Walker, Ronald; Flocchini, R.

    2006-01-01

    USING NEUTRONS TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES Hal Egbert, Ronaldretardant to the scene of forest fires. One system that goesretardant to the scene of forest fires. MAFFS is the acronym

  18. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  19. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Future Forests Program Plan 2013 ­ 2016 (November 2012) #12;2 Summary Mission and vision The mission of Future Forests is to provide management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision

  20. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  1. American Disabilities Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies and labor unions from discriminating against qualified individuals with disabilities in job application procedures, hiring, firing, advancement, compensation, job training, and other terms, conditions, and privileges of employment.

  2. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification (PEFC), the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative

  3. November2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade #12;#12;Timber Trade Flows and Actors in MyanmarNovember2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance Timber Trade Flows and Actors The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade Kevin Woods November 2013 #12;Acknowledgments The author, Kevin

  4. Restoring broken entanglement by separable correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaetana Spedalieri; Stefano Pirandola

    2015-09-04

    We consider two bosonic Gaussian channels whose thermal noise is strong enough to break bipartite entanglement. In this scenario, we show how the presence of separable correlations between the two channels is able to restore the broken entanglement. This reactivation occurs not only in a scheme of direct distribution, where a third party (Charlie) broadcasts entangled states to remote parties (Alice and Bob), but also in a configuration of indirect distribution which is based on entanglement swapping. In both schemes, the amount of entanglement remotely activated can be large enough to be distilled by one-way distillation protocols.

  5. Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

    1997-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

  6. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th, 2010Environment,ReportsEnvironmental Restoration

  7. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ... Bronze Age...

  8. Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xuening

    2013-01-01

    Los Angeles Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests Aof the Thesis Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests bydata emerges, data mining is finally in the spotlight. This

  9. South Fork Salmon River Watershed Restoration, 2008-2009 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaney, Mark D. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management

    2009-04-15

    The watershed restoration work elements within the project area, the South Fork Salmon River Watershed, follow the watershed restoration approach adopted by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management (DFRM) - Watershed Division. The vision of the Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects and strategies that rely on natural fish production and healthy river ecosystems. The Nez Perce Tribe DFRM-Watershed Division strives towards maximizing historic ecosystem productivity and health for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations and the habitat on which all depend on for future generations Originally, this project was funded to create a step/pool stream channel that was appropriate to restore fish passage where the 'Glory Hole Cascade' is currently located at the Stibnite Mine. Due to unforeseen circumstances at the time, the project is unable to move forward as planned and a request for a change in scope of the project and an expansion of the geographic area in which to complete project work was submitted. No additional funds were being requested. The ultimate goal of this project is to work with the holistic, ridge top to ridge top approach to protect and restore the ecological and biological functions of the South Fork Salmon River Watershed to assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered anadromous and resident fish species. FY 2008 Work Elements included two aquatic organism passage (AOP) projects to restore habitat connectivity to two fish-bearing tributaries to the East Fork South Fork Salmon River, Salt and Profile Creeks. The Work Elements also included road survey and assessment activities that move toward road decommissioning to reduce sediment delivery to spawning gravels and rearing habitats by reducing sedimentation from road related, man-made sources. For FY08, the project included the design and implementation of two fish barrier replacement structures mentioned above, the Salt and Profile Creek Bridges. These work elements were to be implemented on Valley County easements within the Payette National Forest. The existing culverts are full or partial barriers to most aquatic life species and all juvenile anadromous and resident fish species. Implementation will reconnect 9.34 miles of habitat, and provide natural stream channels to facilitate complete passage for all aquatic life forms. All designs were completed and a construction subcontract was awarded to construct free span, pre-cast concrete bridges. For 2008, the project statement of work also included all the necessary work elements to manage, coordinate, plan, and develop continuing strategies for restoration and protection activities.

  10. June 2014 ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 32:2 189 Ecological Restoration Vol. 32, No. 2, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disturbance regimes that vary in the kind, frequency, severity, and duration of disturbance. We investigated are characterized by general patterns of perturbation, including the types of disturbance and their frequency ARTICLE Restoration of Heterogeneous Disturbance Regimes for the Preservation of Endangered Species Steven

  11. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  12. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  13. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  14. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  15. Georgia Shore Assistance Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendergrast, C.

    1984-01-01

    The Georgia General Assembly passed the Shore Assistance Act in 1979 in order to fill a regulatory gap in the state's management of its coastal resources. A review of its legislative history, purposes, applications, and effects in terms of the sand sharing system of sand dunes, beaches, sandbars, and shoals concludes that the Act is poorly drafted. In its application on the oceanfront, it betrays its intent and protects the oceanfront owner. It has failed to satisfy the requirements of the public trust in the tidal foreshore. Amendments to clarify its understanding of the functions and values of the sand-sharing system should also conform with the state's duties under the public trust. 139 references.

  16. EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project; Clatsop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon. The...

  17. EA-1974: Wallooskee-Youngs Confluence Restoration Project, Clatsop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed restoration of a tidal marsh in the Columbia River Estuary, near Astoria in Clatsop County, Oregon. The...

  18. EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVALUATION OF HABITAT RESTORATION OBJECTIVES Developed by Mobrand Biometrics, Inc. 2004 "Active given the likely measures at hand and the economic, social and ecological constraints of the Subbasin

  19. Publisher's Note: "Chiral symmetry restoration at large chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Note: "Chiral symmetry restoration at large chemical potential 2 in strongly coupled SU(N) gauge theories" J. Math. Phys. 54, 122301 (2013) Citation Details...

  20. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  1. The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    The Effect of Ozone Stomatal Conductance on Isoprene Emissions above a Northern Hardwood Forest also acts as an antioxidant within a plant, reacting and neutralizing ozone and peroxides, though , and reacts photochemically in the presence of NOx to produce tropospheric ozone. The Model of Emissions

  2. Pollution Control Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act declares the maintenance of reasonable standards of purity of air and water to be the public policy of the state. The Act authorizes the Department of Health and Environmental Control to...

  3. New York Recovery Act Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in New York are supporting a...

  4. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  5. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating Energy, Products, and Land's Note M.T. Goergen Jr. SAF TASK FORCE REPORT Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating EnergyThis Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows Climate­Forest Interactions Biomass Use and Feedstock

  6. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication Volume 6 2003 Number 3 Issue Summary Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the rural community perspective of managing the forest Land, Chadwick D. Oliver Series Editor Mary L. Tyrrell Rural Communities and Forests A summary

  7. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  8. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  9. Recovery Act milestone: Excavation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-TimeRecord-SettingAct Workforcemilestone:

  10. WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DEPUTY CHIEF, ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION DIVISION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , assessing, and restoring the public's coastal natural resources when they are impacted by oil spills the spill is controlled, the oil is cleaned up, the natural resource damages are assessed activities to provide for protection and restoration of natural resources. . NOAA'S ROLES DURING OIL SPILLS

  11. Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment by Ian James Parnell B Project: Use of decision analysis to design a habitat restoration experiment Supervisory Committee costs associated with uncertain outcomes. I used decision analysis to design an example experiment

  12. Restoration of chopped and nodded images in infrared astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boccacci, Patrizia

    Restoration of chopped and nodded images in infrared astronomy M Berteroy, P Boccacciz, F Di, the so­called chopped and nodded images, present large negative values and provide reliable of the problem of restoring the original image from its chopped and nodded version and we investigate

  13. New York State Salt Marsh Restoration and Monitoring Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;New York State Salt Marsh Restoration and Monitoring Guidelines prepared by: Nancy L. Niedowski;The Salt Marsh Restoration and Monitoring Guidelines were prepared under the National OceanicState,Division of CoastalResources,41 State Street,Albany, New York 12231. December 2000 #12;PREFACE All salt marsh

  14. Data Collection and Restoration for Heterogeneous Process Migration *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xian-He

    Data Collection and Restoration for Heterogeneous Process Migration * Kasidit Chanchio Xian-He Sun,sung@cs.iit.edu Abstract This study presents a practical solution for data collec- tion and restoration to migrate- grams. Experimental and analytical results show that (1) a user-level process can be migrated across

  15. LOUISIANA COASTAL AREA (LCA) BARATARIA BASIN BARRIER SHORELINE RESTORATION (BBBS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Island would restore the natural hydrologic function of the systems. The barrier islands influence and on Shell Island in Plaquemines Parish. The plan increases the longevity of the geomorphologic form and function of the Caminada Headland and Shell Island by creating or restoring 1,197 acres of dune and beach

  16. Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling Robert G. Burger Oscar­suited for both caller­ and callee­save reg­ isters, our strategy employs a ``lazy'' save mechanism that avoids saves for all effective leaf routines, an ``eager'' restore mechanism that reduces the effect of memory

  17. Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dybvig, R. Kent

    Register Allocation Using Lazy Saves, Eager Restores, and Greedy Shuffling Robert G. Burger Oscar-suited for both caller- and callee-save reg- isters, our strategy employs a "lazy" save mechanism that avoids saves for all effective leaf routines, an "eager" restore mechanism that reduces the effect of memory

  18. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: • The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. • The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. • The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. • The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. • The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  19. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David A.

    2002-11-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993; Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers, thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin. Adult pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River. In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River. To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2001.

  20. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    to fossil fuel Regenerated forest energy used in the LoggingManaging forests because carbon matters: Integrating energy,Energy from post-consumer residues relevant private forest

  1. A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1 Richard P. Vlosky2 Louisiana Forest Products reviews the history of forest certification, development of different certification schemes

  2. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  3. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  4. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  5. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Polar Till Define-i Our Seasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sun-Eanh Energy Relations Earth-Sun Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Sun Affects Our Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Local Energy Relations

  6. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  7. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  8. Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (DOE/EA-2006)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Public Involvement Contact Link to BPA Home Page EFW - Salmon Swimming Upriver EFW - Forest, Evening Sky EFW - Deer in River Advanced Search About BPA Newsroom Integrated Fish...

  9. Triple acting radial seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebert, Todd A (West Palm Beach, FL); Carella, John A (Jupiter, FL)

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  10. 2011-08 "Restore User Confidence in the Risk Analysis, Communication...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 "Restore User Confidence in the Risk Analysis, Communication, Evaluation, and Reduction (RACER) Database" 2011-08 "Restore User Confidence in the Risk Analysis, Communication,...

  11. Monitoring littoral sediment accretion and erosion at Forest Park Beach, Lake Forest, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trask, C.B.; Chrzastowski, M.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Forest Park Beach, a coastal-development project on the shore of Lake Michigan at Lake Forest, Illinois, consists of a series of segmented, rubble-mound breakwaters that form four beach cells and a small-boat launch basin. The project was designed to have minimal impact on local littoral-transport processes. The 9-hectare footprint extends no more than 107 m lakeward of the preconstruction shoreline; the arcuate plan for the project was designed to facilitate littoral sediment bypass. In order to evaluate the project's impact on littoral processes, the City of Lake Forest is required to conduct a monitoring program to identify any adverse effects such as updrift accretion and downdrift erosion. Annual and semi-annual monitoring has been underway since project completion in 1987. In 1991, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) began independent data collection and review of the annual monitoring data. As of the 1992 ISGS monitoring, the project is allowing for the development of natural bypass by the littoral-sediment stream. A bar occurs in 0.9 to 1.2 m of water on the north side of the project and continues as an accretionary wedge along the lakeward side of the breakwaters for approximately two-thirds of the project length. One adverse impact is that the beach cells are acting as traps for fine sand, with the greatest entrapment in the three northern (updrift) cells. Comparison of 1987 and 1992 profiles from the beach cells indicates nearshore accretion of as much as two meters. To date no detrimental effects to shoreline properties have been documented downdrift of the project.

  12. Recovery Act Workforce Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces Nearly 100 Million for Smart Grid Workforce Training and Development. Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Recovery Act Interoperability Recovery Act SGIG...

  13. Michael R. Maraya (Acting) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    R. Maraya (Acting) About Us Michael R. Maraya (Acting) - Deputy CIO for Enterprise Policy, Portfolio Management & Governance Mike Maraya is the Acting Deputy CIO for Enterprise...

  14. Interactive long-term simulation for power system restoration planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountas, N.A.; Hatziargyriou, N.D. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece)] [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece); Orfanogiannis, C.; Tasoulis, A. [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)] [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)

    1997-02-01

    The problem of restoring a power system following a complete blackout is complex and multi-faceted. Many control actions have to be performed on time, while constraints such as power balance and system stability have to be carefully respected. In this paper, the application of long-term dynamic analysis in studying frequency and voltage responses due to load and generation mismatches in isolated systems or during extension of the existing system in the restoration phase is presented. Simulation results covering the main steps of the Hellenic power system restoration process following a recent total blackout are presented and discussed.

  15. Which Chiral Symmetry is Restored in High Temperature QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Tom Blum; Carleton DeTar; Steven Gottlieb; Urs M. Heller; James E. Hetrick; K. Rummukainen; R. Sugar; D. Toussaint; Matthew Wingate

    1996-11-27

    Sigma models for the high temperature phase transition in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) suggest that at high temperature the SU(N_f) x SU(N_f) chiral symmetry becomes exact, but the anomalous axial U(1) symmetry need not be restored. In numerical lattice simulations, traditional methods for detecting symmetry restoration have sought multiplets in the screening mass spectrum. However, these methods were imprecise and the results, so far, incomplete. With improved statistics and methodology, we are now able to offer evidence for a restoration of the SU(2) x SU(2) chiral symmetry just above the crossover, but not of the axial U(1) chiral symmetry.

  16. Silicone injection restores failing submarine cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilstra, M.

    1995-12-01

    Faced with the prospect of replacing nearly 10 miles of aging undersea cables, Orcas Power & Light Co (Opalco) elected instead to inject silicone into as many of the cables as possible. Silicone injection has been used extensively on underground residential distribution (URD) and feeder cables, but only two underwater cables had previously been injected: a feeder cable for Florida Power Corp under an intercoastal waterway and a cable for Washington Water Power Co under a lake in western Idaho. The compound restores power cables damaged by water treeing and prevents further water damage. Selection criteria included age, type, and whether the cables had ever been spliced. Older, soldered, hand-wrapped splices were avoided as they block the CableCure fluid from flowing through. This makes the cable uninjectable unless the splices are replaced with the molded type. The first cables chosen for injection were between 15 and 30 years old and clear of soldered splices. They also were free from faults. 4 figs.

  17. Coastal Zone Management Act and related legislation: Revision 3. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    In recognition of the increasing pressures upon the nation`s coastal resources, Congress enacted the Coastal Zone Management Act in 1972. Its purpose is to encourage states to preserve, protect, develop, and, where possible, restore or enhance such valuable natural resources as wetlands, floodplains, estuaries, beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs, as well as the fish and wildlife utilizing those habitats. A unique feature of the Act is that participation by states is voluntary. One key provision for encouraging states to participate is the availability of federal financial assistance to any coastal state or territory, including those on the Great Lakes, which is willing to develop and implement a comprehensive coastal management program. Additionally, the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) was passed in 1983. This report contains the legislative history and statues associated with each Act. Regulations for implementation and other guidance are included.

  18. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    because of its Humans and forest fire credibility on allof the 20th century, natural forest fires out forest fuelsto make Sierra Nevada forests more fire resil- ient is an

  19. Final monitoring plan for site restoration at Murdock, Nebraska.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-02-28

    In early 2005, Argonne National Laboratory conducted an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA; Argonne 2005b) to address carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in groundwater and surface water at Murdock, Nebraska, approximately 22 mi east-northeast of Lincoln (Figure 1.1). The EE/CA study was performed for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), as the technical basis for a proposed removal action for the Murdock site. The EE/CA was conducted in compliance with an Administrative Order on Consent issued for Murdock by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1991). Three removal action alternatives were examined through the use of site-specific data and predictive simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport performed with calibrated numerical models. The alternatives were evaluated individually and compared against performance criteria established under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). On the basis of these evaluations, an alternative employing phytoremediation in conjunction with seasonal groundwater extraction and treatment by spray irrigation was recommended by the CCC/USDA to permanently reduce the carbon tetrachloride contaminant levels in groundwater and surface water at the site. The proposed alternative is being implemented in cooperation with the EPA. Under the direction of the CCC/USDA and the EPA, implementation of the chosen removal action occurred in phases, beginning in April 2005. Installation of all the required remediation systems was completed by the end of August 2005. Specific technical objectives of the removal action are as follows: (1) To eliminate pathways for potential human exposure to carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the regulatory limit of 44.2 {micro}g/L in surface water at the site. (2) To minimize or eliminate any detrimental environmental impacts of carbon tetrachloride discharge to the surface waters of a tributary creek located immediately north of the town. (3) To permanently reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the groundwater and surface water at Murdock and hence restore these resources for potential beneficial use. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedy and its ability to achieve the objectives specified for this site, monitoring is required. This document outlines the proposed scope of a long-term program for monitoring of the removal action at Murdock. In this section the specific remedial objectives of the action are summarized, and a brief overview of the chosen remedy is provided. Section 2 summarizes the results of a baseline sampling event that documented the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in selected media at the Murdock site immediately before cleanup activities began. Section 3 recommends a strategy for subsequent monitoring of the removal action at Murdock, as well as criteria for evaluating the performance of the remedial systems and the progress of the restoration effort.

  20. Double acting bit holder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Blommington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN); Ruzzi, Peter L. (Eagan, MN)

    1994-01-01

    A double acting bit holder that permits bits held in it to be resharpened during cutting action to increase energy efficiency by reducing the amount of small chips produced. The holder consist of: a stationary base portion capable of being fixed to a cutter head of an excavation machine and having an integral extension therefrom with a bore hole therethrough to accommodate a pin shaft; a movable portion coextensive with the base having a pin shaft integrally extending therefrom that is insertable in the bore hole of the base member to permit the moveable portion to rotate about the axis of the pin shaft; a recess in the movable portion of the holder to accommodate a shank of a bit; and a biased spring disposed in adjoining openings in the base and moveable portions of the holder to permit the moveable portion to pivot around the pin shaft during cutting action of a bit fixed in a turret to allow front, mid and back positions of the bit during cutting to lessen creation of small chip amounts and resharpen the bit during excavation use.

  1. Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

  2. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  3. NIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    -effectiveness. (2) Precise measurements, calibrations and standards help United States industry and manufacturingNIST Organic Act National Institute of Standards and Technology Act SECTION 1. FINDINGS and measurement standards needed to improve quality and reliability, and (B) new technological processes by which

  4. ISE 2012, Vienna USING RIVER RESTORATION OPERATIONS TO TEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and hydroelectricity since the 19th century. A restoration program of the river started officially in 1998. It has, the Rhône River has been regulated for navigation, irrigation and hydroelectricity since the 19th century

  5. MEETING SUMMARY OF THE ESTUARY HABITAT RESTORATION COUNCIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Restoration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS); · Mr. Paul Cough, Director, Oceans and Coastal Protection the exact amount of FY 2011 funds that would be available for new projects. Paul Cough noted and the other

  6. COMPREHENSIVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION PLAN CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN FLORIDA PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Florida ecosystem while providing for other water- related needs of the region in the 2000 Water Resources incremental restoration of natural processes critical for the development of peat soils and tree islands

  7. Restoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable Energy Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    AC03- 76SF00098. The report “Easing the Natural Gas Crisis:Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increased Deployment ofRestoring Equilibrium to Natural Gas Markets: Can Renewable

  8. Psychrometric Testing Facility Restoration and Cooling Capacity Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, Vincent E.

    2010-10-12

    The Psychrometric Testing Facility at the Riverside Energy Efficiency Laboratory at Texas AandM University has not been operational for several years. The goal of this project was to restore the testing facility to a fully ...

  9. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NEPA National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX)...

  10. DOE model conference on waste management and environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Reports dealing with current topics in waste management and environmental restoration were presented at this conference in six sessions. Session 1 covered the Hot Topics'' including regulations and risk assessment. Session 2 dealt with waste reduction and minimization; session 3 dealt with waste treatment and disposal. Session 4 covered site characterization and analysis. Environmental restoration and associated technologies wee discussed in session 5 and 6. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  11. Conversion of the DOD`s Technical Review Committees into Restoration Advisory Boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, M.C. [Baker Environmental, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States); Peters, J.E. [Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Norfolk, VA (United States). Atlantic Division

    1995-12-31

    The Department of the Navy designed a proactive community relations approach to accompany its environmental investigations, the Installation Restoration (IR) Program. The IR Program process mirrors that of the comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The goal of the IR Program is to identify, investigate, and if necessary, to clean up sites to reduce or eliminate threats to human health and the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the lead agency at private facilities and the Navy is the lead agency at naval installations requiring study. While CERCLA mandates that sites listed on the National Priority List (NPL) fulfill community relations requirements, the Navy guidance states that all installations in the IR Program where a Remedial Investigation is conducted engage in proactive community relations, including non-NPL facilities. A primary part of the community involvement included forming Technical Review Committees (TRCs). TRCs were established to provide technical review of and public involvement in the IR Program. The Navy discovered that the technical nature of the TRCs excluded most of the public, and realized that increased community participation in the IR Program would benefit both the community and the Navy. Thus, the formation of Restoration Advisory Boards (RABs) was mandated in 1994. The additional community participation has enriched the entire community relations program. The partnering between the Navy, the community, the local, state, and federal environmental agencies has benefited the IR Program process.

  12. Proceedings of Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An exchange between the United States and Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Scientists, engineers, elected officials, and industry regulators from the United, States and Germany met in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 16--20, 1993, in the first joint international workshop to discuss uranium tailings remediation. Entitled ``Workshop on Uranium Production Environmental Restoration: An Exchange between the US and Germany,`` the meeting was hosted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The goal of the workshop was to further understanding and communication on the uranium tailings cleanup projects in the US and Germany. Many communities around the world are faced with an environmental legacy -- enormous quantities of hazardous and low-level radioactive materials from the production of uranium used for energy and nuclear weapons. In 1978, the US Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act. Title I of the law established a program to assess the tailings at inactive uranium processing sites and provide a means for joint federal and state funding of the cleanup efforts at sites where all or substantially all of the uranium was produced for sale to a federal agency. The UMTRA Project is responsible for the cleanup of 24 sites in 10 states. Germany is facing nearly identical uranium cleanup problems and has established a cleanup project. At the workshop, participants had an opportunity to interact with a broad cross section of the environmental restoration and waste disposal community, discuss common concerns and problems, and develop a broader understanding of the issues. Abstracts are catalogued individually for the data base.

  13. Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

  14. Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

    2012-05-31

    The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

  15. DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    1 DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Professor in Sustainable Resource Sciences, UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences PARTICIPANTS Tom Gower ­ Professor, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI Rick

  16. Pursuing Carbon and ForestPursuing Carbon and Forest SustainabilitySustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biomass Energy ProductionIn Forest Biomass Energy Production University of WashingtonCommissioner of Public Lands PeterPeter GoldmarkGoldmark''ss Forest Biomass Energy Initiative Pilot Projects 2009Pilot BioaviationBioaviation Fuel 2011Fuel 2011 #12;3 Forest Biomass Energy InitiativeForest Biomass Energy

  17. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

  18. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  19. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry Texas Forest Service College Station, Texas November 2006 #12;Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Texas economy. METHODS This study uses the input-output method to estimate the direct and total economic

  20. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  1. Forest Landowners' Guide to the Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal income tax consid- erations for Forest Land, including capital costs, reforestation tax incentives, timber income and capital gains, government program cost-share payments, tax treatment of other forest

  2. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  3. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  4. Biomass Program Recovery Act Factsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    The Biomass Program has awarded about $718 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds. The projects the Program is supporting are intended to: Accelerate advanced biofuels research, development, and demonstration; Speed the deployment and commercialization of advanced biofuels and bioproducts; Further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation and creating or saving a range of jobs.

  5. Research Report The phonemic restoration effect reveals pre-N400 effect of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutas, Marta

    ) investigation of the phonemic restoration effect found that the processing of coughs replacing high versus low

  6. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The price development of the forest industry's end products, such as paper, has been negative for several

  7. Forests and The Texas Economy. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    , while maintain ing a healthy forest environment, requires the cooperation and understanding of many individuals, groups, and organizations. This document provides a unique statistical base for understanding the current status of forestry in Texas... or wood-based industry is a part of the manufactur ing industry that is a vital component of Texas' diverse econ omy (Figures 5-1 to 5-3). As indicated below, Texas is one of the top producers of forest products in the country: ? Texas is one...

  8. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  9. 4, 27472779, 2004 Boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  10. Forest Research No. 37 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research No. 37 May 2007 Contents m Editorial m Direct sowing ­ useful or useless details Forest Research - © Crown copyright 2007 Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are the epitome. ©AndreaKiewitt EcoThe Biodiversity and Conservation Newsletter of Ecology Division Forest Research type

  11. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  12. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  13. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  14. 7, 49254979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in the European free troposphere A. Petzold et al. Title forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP Experiment in summer 2004 A. Petzold1 , B. Weinzierl1 , H Correspondence to: A. Petzold (andreas.petzold@dlr.de) 4925 #12;ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes

  15. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  16. 6, 32273264, 2006 Forest fire smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3227­3264, 2006 Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Modeling of trace gases from the 1998 North Central Mexico forest fire smoke plume, as measured Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  17. Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest.nfs.unl.edu Dr. Scott Josiah State Forester & Director (402) 472-1467 sjosiah2@unl.edu Don Westover Wildland Fire

  18. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http://www.icfpa.org/_documents/ICFPAStatement1.pdf #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3

  19. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12

  20. Revegetation manual for the environmental restoration contractor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLendon, T.; Redente, E.F.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide guidance and general guidelines for the revegetation of remediation waste sites and other disturbed areas on the Hanford Site. Specific revegetation plans will be developed using guidance from this manual. Locations, resources, and funding will dictate the specific revegetation design at each disturbed area. Disturbances have occurred to some of the ecological communities of the Hanford Site. Many of these disturbances are the result of operations of the Hanford Site, including Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 waste sites on small portions of the Hanford Site. There were, however, extensive disturbances to the native vegetation prior to operations of the facility. These resulted from cultivation, grazing, fire, and the introduction of exotics. Revegetation planning must take into account these early disturbances, as well as the later ones.

  1. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Requests |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ID. You must either have your request notarized or 1) acknowledge that you understand the criminal penalty in the Privacy Act for requesting or obtaining access to records under...

  2. Assessing the extent of agriculture/pasture and secondary succession forest in the Brazilian Legal Amazon using SPOT VEGETATION data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    influence on the observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and consequent climatic Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal. c Remote Sensing Department, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos vegetation cover in the past, acting as a source of carbon. On the contrary, the secondary succession forest

  3. Forest Roads June 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    or encroach on streamside management zones (SMZs). Best Management Practices (BMP) compliance checks and streamside management zones will also be covered. This course is designed for foresters, timber buyers with numerous classroom and field exercises designed to improve the skills used in timber ac- cess road planning

  4. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    , and recreation. Some disturbances can be functions of both nat- ural and human conditions (e.g., forest fire ignition and spread) (Figure 2). Virginia H. Dale (e-mail: vhd@ornl.gov) is a senior scientist and Paul J. Hanson is a research scientist...

  5. Mapping forests with Lidar provides flexible, accurate data with many uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi; Tommaso, Stefania Di

    2015-01-01

    to develop inputs for forest fire behavior modeling, and tovegetation inputs for forest fire behavior modeling canopy (across public forests. Forest fire behavior models need a

  6. Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron

    2003-07-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.

  7. Texas Clean Air Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act is designed to safeguard the state's air resources from pollution by requiring the control and abatement of air pollution and emissions of air contaminants, consistent with the protection...

  8. Tennessee Air Quality Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tennessee Air Quality Act (AQA) delegates the power to maintain air quality in the State to the Department of Environment and Conservation. Under the Department of the Environment and...

  9. Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s...

  10. Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wisconsin has substantial natural resources, including biomass and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA)is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy...

  11. National Environmental Policy Act RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    National Environmental Policy Act Review Module March 2010 CD- N -0 OFFICE O National E C CD-1 OF ENVIRO Standa Environm Rev Critical Deci CD-2 M ONMENTA ard Review mental P view...

  12. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvesting inServicesRecovery Act » Recovery Act

  13. The Wilderness Act and Climate Change Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biber, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Letter from Abigail R. Kimbell, Chief, U.S. Forest Serv. ,Service Chief Abigail R. Kimbell “characterized the Agency’s

  14. Repulsive and restoring Casimir forces with left-handed materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaping Yang; Ran Zeng; Shutian Liu; Hong Chen; Shiyao Zhu

    2008-03-24

    We investigate repulsive Casimir force between slabs containing left-handed materials with controllable electromagnetic properties. The sign of Casimir force is determined by the electric and magnetic properties of the materials, and it is shown that the formation of the repulsive force is related to the wave impedances of two slabs. The sign change of the Casimir force as a function of the distance is studied. Special emphasis is put on the restoring Casimir force which may be found to exist between perfectly conducting material and metamaterial slabs. This restoring force is a natural power for the system oscillation in vacuum and also can be used for system stabilization.

  15. Materials and methods for autonomous restoration of electrical conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaiszik, Benjamin J; Odom, Susan A; Caruso, Mary M; Jackson, Aaron C; Baginska, Marta B; Ritchey, Joshua A; Finke, Aaron D; White, Scott R; Moore, Jeffrey S; Sottos, Nancy R; Braun, Paul V; Amine, Khalil

    2014-03-25

    An autonomic conductivity restoration system includes a solid conductor and a plurality of particles. The particles include a conductive fluid, a plurality of conductive microparticles, and/or a conductive material forming agent. The solid conductor has a first end, a second end, and a first conductivity between the first and second ends. When a crack forms between the first and second ends of the conductor, the contents of at least a portion of the particles are released into the crack. The cracked conductor and the released contents of the particles form a restored conductor having a second conductivity, which may be at least 90% of the first conductivity.

  16. Environment, Environmental Restoration, and Waste Management Field Organization Directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This directory was developed by the Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) from an outgrowth of the Departments efforts to identify and establish the regulatory response lead persons in the Field Organizations. The directory was developed for intemal EH-231 use to identify both the DOE and DOE contractor Field Organizations in the Environment, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management areas. The Field Organization directory is divided into three substantive sections: (1) Environment; (2) Environmental Restoration; and (3) Waste Management which are organized to correspond to the management hierarchy at each Field Organization. The information provided includes the facility name and address, individual managers name, and telephone/fax numbers.

  17. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  18. Project risk and appeals in U.S. Forest Service planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.; Seesholtz, David N.

    2013-09-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires U.S. Forest Service planning processes to be conducted by interdisciplinary teams of resource specialists to analyze and disclose the likely environmental impacts of proposed natural resource management actions on Forest Service lands. Multiple challenges associated with these processes have been a source of frustration for the agency. One of these challenges involves administrative appeals through which public entities can challenge a Forest Service decision following a NEPA process. These appeals instigate an internal review process and can result in an affirmation of the Forest Service decision, a reversal of that decision, or additional work that re-initiates all or part of the NEPA process. We examine the best predictors of appeals and their outcomes on a representative sample of 489 Forest Service NEPA processes that were decided between 2007 and 2009. While certain factors associated with pre-existing social contexts (such as a history of controversy) or pre-determined elements of a proposed action (such as the extraction of forest products) predispose certain processes to a higher risk of appeals, other practices and process-related strategies within the control of the agency also appear to bear meaningful influence on the occurrence of appeals and their outcomes. Appeals and their outcomes were most strongly related to programmatic, structural (turnover of personnel in particular), and relationship risks (both internal and external) within the processes, suggesting the need for greater focus within the agency on cultivating positive internal and external relationships to manage the risk of appeals. -- Highlights: ? We examined appeals and their outcomes on 489 U.S. Forest Service NEPA processes. ? Project type, context, team turnover, and personal relationships predicted appeals. ? External relationship management and staff turnover best predicted appeal outcomes. ? Positive internal and external relationships appear to reduce appeal risks.

  19. Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary & Secondary Forest Products Industry Center #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 2 Abitibi Paper Co. Camp 40 Thunder Bay, Ontario #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 3 Accidents in Forest Products Industry Accident Statistics Primary industry

  20. Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Interim Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Press Release Aug 16, 2001 Kathleen Carlson Appointed Interim Acting Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs...

  1. Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) Data Resources Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act (FITARA) Data Resources FITARA Resources Available for...

  2. Chaotic Dynamics of Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-25

    In the thermodynamic limit, a probabilistic cellular automaton can be approximated by a deterministic nonlinear map. Here we construct such a map for the forest fire problem. The construction is based on the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, performed on a square lattice of million cells. The results of the calculation are analyzed by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm (HKA). The only parameter of the map describes the probability that a tree appears at an empty cell during one time step. The obtained map seems to be non-differentiable at the percolation threshold. The Lyapunov exponent for the map is positive. Also, we found the cycle of length three by means of the method of symbolic dynamics. The results are illustrated by the experimental data on the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000. Although these data are fortunately far from thermodynamic limit, their qualitative character is reproduced for smaller lattices.

  3. Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest. Final in north central BC. Using ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS), buffers 25m deep were created

  4. Wetlands restoration panel worries over loss of money for monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , monitor pollution, provide real-time water level data and assess the survival rates of endangered species "adaptive management," which governs Everglades restoration projects. "Adaptive management" allows decision management is totally dependent on data," said John Marshall, chairman of the Florida Environmental Institute

  5. Expanding public involvement in the restoration of federal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.W.; Rouse, N.V. [ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Lawley, S.B. [SOUTHNA VFACENGCOM, North Charleston, SC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In February of 1994, the Navy released a guidance document entitled Establishment of Restoration Advisory Boards. This guidance recommends that all Navy facilities with practicing Technical Review Committees (TRCs) transition these committees into Restoration Advisory Boards, or RABS. Subsequently, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in concert with the Department of Defense (DOD), issued similar draft guidance that also strongly recommends this transition to RABs be accomplished. The intent of creating RABs is to increase community participation in the federal facility environmental restoration process. The RAB`s mission is to provide an avenue for early, two-way communication between the affected community and the environmental decision makers. The Navy strongly believes that implementing RABs will accelerate cleanups by ensuring that the affected communities have a voice early in the restoration process. The Navy is implementing this guidance at a number of Navy facilities, including bases that have been targeted for closure. This paper discusses DOD and Navy policy and joint EPA and DOD guidelines for implementing RABs, techniques to recruit additional community members, the process for selecting RAB members, orientation of RAB members, and RAB operational considerations. It also provides insight into what the Navy has learned by establishing RABs.

  6. Improving Habitat Injured by Spill Response: Restoring the Night Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on reverse side). The project involves multiple components: ·Foreachconservationsiteidentified,assessments Horizon oil spill, such as heavy equipment operation and lighting the beaches at night, caused significant is to restore beach nesting habitat for sea turtles by replacing harmful artificial lighting. Methods

  7. Optimal Reconfiguration for Supply Restoration with Informed A* Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rintanen, Jussi

    costs. Index Terms--Smart Grid, power supply restoration, reconfig- uration, search methods. I part of the future vision of Smart Grids. We address the reconfiguration problem for outage recovery]. Fully automatic and efficient reconfiguration is increasingly important for the Smart Grid, the future

  8. Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carried out to determine whether changes in carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide emissions from a bog stores of soil carbon that need to be protected to avoid the release of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and stores of carbon may be lost if they are planted with trees. The number of bogs being restored

  9. Environmental Restoration Program Roadmap: Strategic program plan. Addendum 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-11

    This Addendum to the Portsmouth (PORTS) Environmental Restoration (ER) Roadmap expands on the FY 1992 strategic plan for PORTS by providing human resource loading, ADS linkages to resolution activities, and technology development information. Each of these topics is presented in a separate section.

  10. Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project 5 October 2012 ABSTRACT: The study area encompasses the Neuse River Basin, the third-largest river basin in North Carolina. The Basin, upstream of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. At New Bern the river broadens dramatically and changes

  11. Photo courtesy of the Penobscot River Restoration Trust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sea-run fish species from this watershed. Improving access to habitat on this river is particularly in the U.S. Dams on the river and the decline of sea-run fish have contributed to a loss of recreational.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Maine Sea Grant Long-term Improve river flow and restore sea-run fish

  12. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  13. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    recreational opportunities and store carbon, all while providing us a valuable renewable resource and important forest products, it also provides an economic motivation for forest landowners to keep their land products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  14. Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect on forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ecosystem's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy, sustain life10/13/2010 1 Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect

  15. Terms of Reference AFF Forest certification experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the review develop training modules on forest certification (One expert, for all regions and also, identify opportunities and challenges, analyse institutional and technical training needs and based

  16. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  17. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees Local economy Less people visiting = less spending Forest Fires Ski Resort Concerns Forest Fires of a forest fire. Vail Eagle County Vail $500,000 for thinning -2008 Helicopter to remove beetle infected

  18. Physiological responses of a black spruce forest to weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    a black spruce forest to weather Michael L. Goulden, • Bruceresponses of the forest to weather. The annual rates ofgross forest CO 2 exchange to weather is required before the

  19. Forest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    forests tend to yield more water. Further reading: Bales RC,et al. 2011. Forests and Water in the Sierra Nevada: SierraForest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra

  20. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T.analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects ofnet effect of a boreal forest fire on climate, on the basis

  1. A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    A key extensional metamorphic complex reviewed and restored: The Menderes Massif of western Turkey of the Menderes Massif in western Turkey, and subsequently a map-view restoration of its Neogene unroofing history

  2. ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

  3. Posterior composite restoration update: focus on factors influencing form and function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohaty, Brenda S.; Ye, Qiang; Misra, Anil; Sene, Fabio; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-05-15

    that impact the formation of a durable seal at the restoration–tooth interface. This paper presents an update of existing technology and underscores the mechanisms that negatively impact the durability of posterior composite restorations in permanent teeth....

  4. An Economic Analysis of Stream Restoration in an Urban Watershed: Austin, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chi-Ying

    2012-07-16

    associated with housing and environmental characteristics. Repeat ground photography was utilized to assess stream restoration activities at spatial and temporal scales. Our results suggest that the stream restoration project resulted in significant positive...

  5. Resveratrol restored Nrf2 function, reduced renal inflammation, and mitigated hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javkhedkar, AA; Quiroz, Y; Rodriguez-Iturbe, B; Vaziri, ND; Lokhandwala, MF; Banday, AA

    2015-01-01

    doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00308.2014. Resveratrol restored Nrf2Lokhandwala MF, Banday AA. Resveratrol restored Nrf2 func-in blood pressure, the resveratrol-treated group showed no

  6. Forest Restoration in a Changing World: Lessons from Diverse Ecosystems Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi, Weimin

    the central and southwest China, Taiwan, the middle Ural of Russia, the Highlands of Eastern Mizoram of India from five countries (Denmark, India, China, Russia, and the United States). It includes 8 original

  7. Emotion, Power Relations, And Restorative Justice: A Review of Compulsory Compassion by Annalise Acorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribet, Beth

    2006-01-01

    about indigenous criti- cism of restorative justice praxis,between domination and eroti- cism is her central organizing

  8. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  9. Seismic data restoration via data-driven tight frame Jingwei Liang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqun

    Seismic data restoration via data-driven tight frame Jingwei Liang1 , Jianwei Ma2 , and Xiaoqun Zhang3 ABSTRACT Restoration/interpolation of missing traces plays a crucial role in the seismic data regularization method for seismic data restoration. The main idea of the data-driven tight frame (TF

  10. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andsurface energy exchange in the Amazonian terra firme forestvapour, energy, and CO 2 exchange. The rates of whole-forest

  11. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  12. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community...

  13. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  14. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  15. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  16. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  17. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource...

  18. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  19. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  20. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  1. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  2. Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbu, Lungten

    2002-01-01

    in 1953 sums up in support of forest grazing by stating that "grazing on the commercial timberland offers few complications as long as grazing is managed so that forage is not damaged. If forage is not damaged, there will be no damage to timber... and Development in the Philippines”, Proceedings of a workshop "on Integration of Ruminants into Plantation Systems in Southeast Asia " at Lake Toba, North Sumatra, Indonesia ACIAR proceedings No 64, Editors-B.F. Mullen and H.M. Shelton 5. Chamling, K...

  3. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynam- ics of a central Amazonian rain forest.

  4. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  5. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  7. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  8. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community Tyrrell Sustaining Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community viability and sustainable forestry #12;Issue SummaryPage 3 | Contents Contents

  9. New England Forests: The Path to Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    on forests for the quality and abundance of our region's outstanding drinking water. Forests cool and clean could be more certain that our wood is harvested sustainably and is not contributing to environmental fossil fuels extracted from deep within the earth at great cost to our environment and the climate

  10. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paper products. The Texas forest sector also produces many value-added forest products such as millwork, wood kitchen cabinets, prefabricated wood buildings, wood furniture, and various paper products in terms of total industry output, value-added, employment, and labor income. Total industry output

  11. Riparian Forest Grows Trees fall in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Forest Grows Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave the littoral zone "Life" Cycle of Coarse Woody Habitat #12;Riparian Forest Grows What factors drive the species composition and stand factors drive the species composition and stand structure? Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave

  12. Flagging Aberrant Sites and Assemblages in Restoration Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    describe a technique to flag those sites and assemblages that tend to develop aberrantly. We use data on a chronosequence of rehabilitating dune forests. Using this technique, we show that a bird assemblage on one habitation. In essence, the technique uses a permutation test to identify ecological variables

  13. Assessment and evaluation of technologies for environmental restoration. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uzochukwu, G A

    2000-06-30

    Nuclear and commercial non-nuclear technologies that have the potential of meeting the environmental restoration objectives of the Department of Energy are being evaluated. A detailed comparison of innovative technologies available will be performed to determine the safest and most economical technology for meeting these objectives. Information derived from this effort will be matched with the multi-objective of the environmental restoration effort to ensure that the best, most economical, and the safest technologies are used in decision making at USDOE-SRS. Technology-related variables will be developed and the resulting data formatted and computerized for multimedia systems. The multimedia system will be made available to technology developers and evaluators to ensure that the safest and most economical technologies are developed for use at SRS and other DOE sites.

  14. Environmental Restoration Strategic Plan. Remediating the nuclear weapons complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    With the end of the cold war, the US has a reduced need for nuclear weapons production. In response, the Department of Energy has redirected resources from weapons production to weapons dismantlement and environmental remediation. To this end, in November 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (renamed the Office of Environmental Management in 1994). It was created to bring under a central authority the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes at DOE sites and inactive or shut down facilities. The Environmental Restoration Program, a major component of DOE`s Environmental Management Program, is responsible for the remediation and management of contaminated environmental media (e.g., soil, groundwater, sediments) and the decommissioning of facilities and structures at 130 sites in over 30 states and territories.

  15. Two decades of prairie restoration at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betz, R.F.; Lootens, R.J.; Becker, M.K.

    1996-12-31

    Successional Restoration is the method being used to restore the prairie at Fermilab on the former agricultural fields. This involves an initial planting, using aggressive species that have wide ecological tolerances which will grow well on abandoned agricultural fields. Collectively, these species are designated as the prairie matrix. The species used for this prairie matrix compete with and eventually eliminate most weedy species. They also provide an adequate fuel load capable of sustaining a fire within a few years after a site has been initially planted. Associated changes in the biological and physical structure of the soil help prepare the way for the successful introduction of plants of the later successional species. Only after the species of the prairie matrix are well established, is the species diversity increased by introducing species with narrower ecological tolerances. These species are thus characteristic of the later successional stages.

  16. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  17. Recovery Act State Memos Tennessee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Developsfor UCNIEnvironmental Impact StatementRecovery Act Smart

  18. Recovery Act State Memos California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI | Department8Recovery ActCalifornia For

  19. Alternative experimental evidence for chiral restoration in excited baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Ya. Glozman

    2007-09-25

    Given existing empirical spectral patterns of excited hadrons it has been suggested that chiral symmetry is approximately restored in excited hadrons at zero temperature/density (effective symmetry restoration). If correct, this implies that mass generation mechanisms and physics in excited hadrons is very different as compared to the lowest states. One needs an alternative and independent experimental information to confirm this conjecture. Using very general chiral symmetry arguments it is shown that strict chiral restoration in a given excited nucleon forbids its decay into the N \\pi channel. Hence those excited nucleons which are assumed from the spectroscopic patterns to be in approximate chiral multiplets must only "weakly" decay into the N \\pi channel, (f_{N^*N\\pi}/f_{NN\\pi})^2 << 1. However, those baryons which have no chiral partner must decay strongly with a decay constant comparable with f_{NN\\pi}. Decay constants can be extracted from the existing decay widths and branching ratios. It turnes out that for all those well established excited nucleons which can be classified into chiral doublets N_+(1440) - N_-(1535), N_+(1710) - N_-(1650), N_+(1720) - N_-(1700), N_+(1680) - N_-(1675), N_+(2220) - N_-(2250), N_+(?) - N_-(2190), N_+(?) - N_-(2600), the ratio is (f_{N^*N\\pi}/f_{NN\\pi})^2 ~ 0.1 or much smaller for the high-spin states. In contrast, the only well established excited nucleon for which the chiral partner cannot be identified from the spectroscopic data, N(1520), has a decay constant into the N\\pi channel that is comparable with f_{NN\\pi}. This gives an independent experimental verification of the chiral symmetry restoration scenario.

  20. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Environmental Restoration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order 13514Construction Management FAQS JobRestoration FAQS Job

  1. Restoration Monitoring-A Simple Photo Monitoring Method | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy ResponseEnergy Restoration

  2. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  3. Restoration and analysis of amateur movies from the Kennedy assassination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breedlove, J.R.; Cannon, T.M.; Janney, D.H.; Kruger, R.P.; Trussell, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the evidence concerning the assassination of President Kennedy comes from amateur movies of the presidential motorcade. Two of the most revealing movies are those taken by the photographers Zapruder and Nix. Approximately 180 frames of the Zapruder film clearly show the general relation of persons in the presidential limousine. Many of the frames of interest were blurred by focus problems or by linear motion. The method of cepstral analysis was used to quantitatively measure the blur, followed by maximum a posteriori (MAP) restoration. Descriptions of these methods, complete with before-and-after examples from selected frames are given. The frames were then available for studies of facial expressions, hand motions, etc. Numerous allegations charge that multiple gunmen played a role in an assassination plot. Multispectral analyses, adapted from studies of satellite imagery, show no evidence of an alleged rifle in the Zapruder film. Lastly, frame-averaging is used to reduce the noise in the Nix movie prior to MAP restoration. The restoration of the reduced-noise average frame more clearly shows that at least one of the alleged gunmen is only the light-and-shadow pattern beneath the trees.

  4. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  5. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  6. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  7. Environmental restoration and waste management site specific plan for Oak Ridge Operation Office Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-18

    The Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) occupies 748 security-fenced acres located on a 3,400-acre tract in McCracken County, Kentucky, which was previously part of the Kentucky Ordnance Works. The principle objective on-site process at PGDP is the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. The process produces enriched uranium, which is used for nuclear fuel in commercial power plants and for military purposes. This document provides an overview of the major environmental and waste management concerns at PGDP, requirements for implementation, organization/management, corrective activities, environmental restoration, waste management options, compliance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), reporting and data management, quality assurance and federal, state and local interactions. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks MOHAMED HEFEEDA Simon Fraser University, Canada Forest fires cost millions of dollars in damages and claim many human lives for early detection of forest fires. We first present the key aspects in modeling forest fires. We do

  9. Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors by New Forests Asset Management Pty Limited ("New Forests"). The material in this report is from sources believed by New Forests to be reliable, but the information is not warranted and may contain errors

  10. Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23November 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23­November 12, 2014 Forests, Foraging and Fires Catherine, Shannon Durbin is fascinated by the conflict between the role of fire in maintaining healthy forests beauty of forest fires." In the installation Thank You, Fog, Spencer Finch presents 60 photographs made

  11. LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start Title: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan: Date_of_Release: File Type: MS Word Local Name: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan Category: Overview: 004s001 Revision: a Doc_info_end #12;LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 4 TO SECURE THE LBTO ENCLOSURE

  12. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  13. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  14. Educational Needs of Southern Forest Landowners October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use tax rolls to develop forest landowner databases. Once developed, newsletters, pamphlets, brochures

  15. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Decontamination and Dismantlement Requirements at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhns, Douglass Jack; Reese, Craig Lyle

    1999-03-01

    In 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that it was necessary to remediate a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) site to address the risk of subsurface petroleum contamination to human health and the environment. This cleanup project was conducted utilizing the Non-time Critical Removal Action process. Due to the close proximity (above the contaminated soil) of a number of above ground storage tanks and a building, the CERCLA project team worked closely with the D&D group to ensure all requirements for each program were met. Lessons learned and regulatory requirements will be discussed in the paper, including the factors unknown to many ER personnel regarding the steps required to be completed prior to the dismantlement of structures. The paper will summarize the background associated with the site, why the removal action was conducted, the scope of the removal action, and the results. The emphasis of the paper will discuss the integration between ER and D&D requirements and processes. In the current environment where ER and D&D activities are commingled, it is imperative that ER and D&D personnel are aware of the requirements imposed upon each program. By working together and building upon the strengths of each program, the INEEL’s 1997 removal action was a tremendous success.

  16. Integration of Environmental Restoration and Decontamination and Dismantlement Requirements at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Reese; D. J. Kuhns

    1999-02-01

    In 1997, the Environmental Restoration Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) determined that it was necessary to remediate a Comprehensive Environmental Response and Liability Act (CERCLA) site to address the risk of subsurface petroleum contamination to human health and the environment. This cleanup project was conducted utilizing the Non-time Critical Removal Action process. Due to the close proximity (above the contaminated soil) of a number of above ground storage tanks and a building, the CERCLA project team worked closely with the D&D group to ensure all requirements for each program were met. Lessons learned and regulatory requirements are discussed in the paper, including the factors unknown to many ER personnel regarding the steps required to be completed prior to the dismantlement of structures. The paper summarizes the background associated with the site, why the removal action was conducted, the scope of the removal action, and the results. The emphasis of the paper is to discuss the integration between ER and D&D requirements and processes. In the current environment where ER and D&D activities are commingled, it is imperative that ER and D&D personnel are aware of the requirements imposed upon each program. By working together and building upon the strengths of each program, the INEEL?s 1997 removal action was a tremendous success.

  17. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2007-02-01

    The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

  18. Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn

    2006-07-01

    The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

  19. an Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 20091 (Recovery Act) provides protections for cert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Tin-Yau

    ors, subcontractors, grantees, or professional membership organizations acting in the interest ry Act vernmen ctors, sububbbbbcoonttraactctorors,s,s,s,s grantees, or proofofofofofesesesessisisis

  20. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Practices · Tools and Resources FERPA Overview #12;Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 · FERPAFamily Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) An Overview Bart Quinet University Registrar Vanderbilt University #12;· Background · Key Concepts · Annual Notification · Education Records · Public vs

  1. Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanneschlager, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Congress is currently debating amendments to the Clean Air Act which would strengthen and enhance the current Clean Air Act. The bill would guarantee a reduction of 10 million tons of sulfur dioxide from 1980 levels; would sharply reduce pollutants...

  2. Personal Health Information Act (PHIA) and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    Personal Health Information Act (PHIA) and Research Dalhousie Research Ethics Board Presented Information Act ­ Provincial privacy legislation under the Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness health information for planning or research. · Follows the pattern of protection adopted by various

  3. District of Columbia Recovery Act State Memo

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation’s energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in the District of Columbia...

  4. Aquatic macrophyte and animal communities in a recently restored brackish marsh: possible influences of restoration design and the invasive plant species Myriophyllum spicatum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Michael Thomas

    2012-07-16

    been lost since the 1930s and losses in the Lower Neches watershed have been some of the most extensive. Restoration is a way to mitigate these losses and can be accomplished in many ways. Each restoration design creates different aquatic habitats...

  5. Williamson Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: EnergyMaryland:MeadowWikiSysop'sOhio:Florida: EnergyAct Jump to:

  6. WIPP - Privacy Act of 1974

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentat LENA|UpcomingVisit UsNews ThisPrivacy Act Quick Links

  7. Recovery Act State Memos Nevada

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI | Department8Recovery ActCalifornia ForNevada

  8. Sikes Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbH Jump to: navigation,ShowSikes Act Jump to:

  9. Recovery Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow YourDepartment ofAugustPastRecovery Act

  10. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

  11. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  12. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Small and Medium Sized Primary Forest Products Processors Author: Smith, Robert L.; Cesa , Edward T

  13. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-american-wood-fuel-european-power/Energy & Sustainability a seafaring protest during a forest industry conference. Participants at this week's Mid-Atlantic Forest

  14. The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one). Many forests, however, have been degraded over the past century by misguided fire management, as well fire regimes in some forest types (Covington and Moore 1994; Schoennagel et al. 2004). Key structural

  15. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalwhereas latent energy fluxes in spruce forests, with theirenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:

  16. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    stand age on the bo- real forest energy balance, Agr. Forestenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:diox- ide and energy fluxes, Agr. Forest Meteorol. , 96,

  17. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    EFFECTS ON SURFACE ENERGY EXCHANGE forest: Evidence from1998), Energy balance storage terms in a mixed forest,and energy exchanges of a boreal black spruce forest, J.

  18. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  19. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  20. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Integrated Market-Based Value-Added Forest Sector Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder analysis Sustainability Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder

  1. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  2. Working Paper #7 Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    -rich communities. Further, secondary forest products wages often exceed average wages of other jobs in rural areas companies (12). In addition, export oriented timber related #12;3 companies may offer rural communities

  3. Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre (Including the Advanced Wood Processing;Building Emergency Response Plan 17/05/2013 Page 1 Table of Contents Emergency Telephone Numbers ......................................................................................................................... 5 Life Safety Systems and Building Features

  4. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  5. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  6. The Ecohydrological Implications of a Restored Rangeland in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Patrick 1989-

    2012-04-22

    .stroh@anglia.ac.uk 3 Institute of Zoology, Poznan? University of Life Science, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625 Poznan?, Poland 4 NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Benson Lane, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford OX10 8BB, U.K. ? 2010 Society... for Ecological Restoration International doi: 10.1111/j.1526-100X.2010.00740.x the intensive arable land use that is prevalent today. The remaining undrained habitat is now located within a few isolated nature reserves on the southern fringes of the original...

  7. Universal scaling of forest fire propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Porterie; Pierre, Clerc Jean; Nouredine, Zekri; Zekri, Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we use a variant of the Watts-Strogatz small-world model to predict wildfire behavior near the critical propagation/nonpropagation threshold. We find that forest fire patterns are fractal and that critical exponents are universal, which suggests that the propagation/nonpropagation transition is a second-order transition. Universality tells us that the characteristic critical behaviour of propagation in real (amorphous) forest landscapes can be extracted from the simplest network model.

  8. Protect and Restore the Upper Lochsa : Annual Progress Report, May 2008 – April 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Rebecca; Forestieri, David

    2009-08-13

    The Upper Lochsa watersheds included in the project contain critical spawning and rearing habitat for anadromous and resident fish (Clearwater National Forest 1999). Species that depend on the tributary habitat include spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Snake River summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentes), and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Steelhead and bull trout populations are currently listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing. Both out-of-basin and in-basin factors threaten fish populations in the Lochsa Drainage (Clearwater Subbasin Plan 2003). Out-of-basin factors include the hydroelectric system and ocean conditions, while in-basin factors include a variety of management activities leading to habitat degradation. This project is implemented under Bonneville Power Administration's Fish and Wildlife program in order to meet National Marine Fisheries Service requirements to offset losses caused by the operation of the hydrosystem by improving tributary habitats to promote increased productivity of salmon and steelhead. The Clearwater Subbasin Plan (2003) defines limiting factors to fisheries in the area as watershed disturbances, habitat degradation, sediment, temperature, and connectivity.

  9. Effective chiral restoration in the hadronic spectrum and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2006-05-18

    Effective chiral restoration in the hadronic spectrum has been conjectured as an explanation of multiplets of nearly degenerate seen in highly excited hadrons. The conjecture depends on the states being insensitive to the dynamics of spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking. A key question is whether this concept is well defined in QCD. This paper shows that it is by means of an explicit formal construction. This construction allows one to characterize this sensitivity for any observable calculable in QCD in Euclidean space via a functional integral. The construction depends on a generalization of the Banks-Casher theorem. It exploits the fact that {\\it all} dynamics sensitive to spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking observables in correlation functions arise from fermion modes of zero virtuality (in the infinite volume limit), while such modes make {\\it no} contribution to any of the dynamics which preserves chiral symmetry. In principle this construction can be implemented in lattice QCD. The prospect of a practical lattice implementation yielding a direct numerical test of the concept of effective chiral restoration is discussed.

  10. Recovery Act Federal Register Notices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a grant from the Department of Energy's Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program. More Congressional Testimony Recovery Act Recovery Act Interoperability Recovery Act SGIG...

  11. Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo Connecticut Recovery Act State Memo The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful downpayment on the nation's energy...

  12. Lessons and Experiences from a Stream Restoration Project in the Piedmont of North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Thomas; Hajnos, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Supervisor, North Carolina Ecosystem Enhancement Program,in Yadkin County, North Carolina. The purpose of this studywestern Piedmont of North Carolina. Stream restoration in

  13. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01

    increase in California, flood risk might increase. Risk-damages (EAD) used in flood risk analysis (USACE 2008). Byapproach for reducing flood risks and restoring ecological

  14. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01

    simultaneously reduce flood risk and restore ecologicalincrease in California, flood risk might increase. Risk-damages (EAD) used in flood risk analysis (USACE 2008). By

  15. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    Post-Project Assessment of the Alamo Creek Restoration (EastBerkeley campus, East Alamo Creek at the Windemereand stepping- stones. East Alamo Creek Case Study: This

  16. CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Endangered Species. For further information please contact: R. Juge Gregg, Washington, DC, rjgregg for ecosystem services provided by forests such as watershed protection, biodiversity and carbon storage. Forest NGOs and investment institutions. For further information, please contact: Kerstin Canby, kcanby

  17. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  18. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  19. Forest sector: A world bank policy paper. Sector forestal: Documento de politica del banco mundial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Forests are the most extensive terrestrial ecosystem, and nearly 500 million people depend on forests for their livelihood. Since the World Bank issued its forestry sector policy paper in 1978, there has been growing concern about the accelerated rate of destruction of the remaining primary forests in various parts of the world. The policy paper identifies two key challenges: to slow the alarmingly rapid rates of deforestation, especially (although not exclusively) in the tropical moist forests, and to ensure adequate planting of new trees to meet the rapidly growing demand for fuelwood in developing countries. The Bank intends to move vigorously to promote the conservation of natural forests and the sustainable development of managed forestry resources.

  20. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn; Tohtz, Joel

    2008-11-12

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  1. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  2. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Sandra R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2013-01-01

    bon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.in forests. For example, forest fires burn an aver- age of ?type included: burn, forest fire, prescribed fire,

  3. Prepared by: Ryan Nadel In August this year, the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (IUFRO) hosted its 23rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for people; Climate change and forestry; Bio-Energy; Forest Biodiversity Conservation; Forests and water

  4. Massachusetts Endangered Species Act Regulations (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The regulations that accompany the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act list three categories of animals and plants in need of protection: endangered, threatened, and species of special concern....

  5. Integrated Solid Waste Management Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act affirms the state's support for alternative waste management practices, including waste reduction and resource recovery. Each county and municipality is required to file an integrated...

  6. Americans with Disabilities Act Signed (1990)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination and ensures equal opportunity for persons with disabilities in employment, State and local government services, public...

  7. with Disabilities Act Requirements Workplace ADA Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination in public places against individuals with disabilities. As an employer installing...

  8. Remarks from the Acting Deputy Secretary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Remarks as prepared for delivery by Acting Deputy Secretary of Energy Jeffrey Kupfer; State of Environmental Justice in America; May 22, 2008; Washington, DC.

  9. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2010-01-01

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  10. Faces of the Recovery Act: 1366 Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEXINGTON, MA - At 1366 Technologies, Ely Sachs and Frank van Mierlo are using ARPA-E Recovery Act funding to dramatically reduce the costs of solar panel production.

  11. TAP Webinar: Davis-Bacon Act Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar, held on Nov. 18, 2014, offered information for Energy Department grantees, sub-grantees, and their contractors on complying with Davis-Bacon Act requirements.

  12. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act.

  13. National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Environmental Policy Act: Little Information Exists on NEPA Analyses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: National Environmental...

  14. Recovery Act Progress Update: Reactor Closure Feature

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A Recovery Act Progress Update. Decommissioning of two nuclear reactor sites at the Department of Energy's facilities has been approved and is underway.

  15. Path Planning Algorithm for Extinguishing Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M P Sivaram

    2012-01-01

    One of the major impacts of climatic changes is due to destroying of forest. Destroying of forest takes place in many ways but the majority of the forest is destroyed due to wild forest fires. In this paper we have presented a path planning algorithm for extinguishing fires which uses Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks (WSANs) for detecting fires. Since most of the works on forest fires are based on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and a collection of work has been done on coverage, message transmission, deployment of nodes, battery power depletion of sensor nodes in WSNs we focused our work in path planning approach of the Actor to move to the target area where the fire has occurred and extinguish it. An incremental approach is presented in order to determine the successive moves of the Actor to extinguish fire in an environment with and without obstacles. This is done by comparing the moves determined with target location readings obtained using sensors until the Actor reaches the target area to extinguish f...

  16. Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems Aligning National Environmental Policy Act Process with Environmental Management Systems...

  17. Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

  18. Does one observe chiral symmetry restoration in baryon spectrum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. D. Cohen; L. Ya. Glozman

    2002-01-25

    It has recently been suggested that the parity doublet structure seen in the spectrum of highly excited baryons may be due to effective chiral symmetry restoration for these states. We review the recent developments in this field. We demonstrate with a simple quantum-mechanical example that it is a very natural property of quantum systems that a symmetry breaking effect which is important for the low-lying spectrum of the system, can become unimportant for the highly-lying states; the highly lying states reveal a multiplet structure of nearly degenerate states. Using the well established concepts of quark-hadron duality, asymptotic freedom in QCD and validity of the operator product expansion in QCD we show that the spectral densities obtained with the local currents that are connected to each other via chiral transformations, very high in the spectrum must coincide. Hence effects of spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry in QCD vacuum that are crucially important for the low-lying spectra, become irrelevant for the highly-lying states. Then to the extent that identifiable hadronic resonances still exist in the continuum spectrum at high excitations this implies that the highly excited hadrons must fall into multiplets associated with the representations of the chiral group. We demonstrate that this is indeed the case for meson spectra in the large $N_c$ limit. All possible parity-chiral multiplets are classified for baryons and it is demonstrated that the existing data on highly excited $N$ and $\\Delta$ states at masses of 2 GeV and higher is consistent with approximate chiral symmetry restoration. However new experimental studies are needed to achieve any definitive conclusions.

  19. Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing a broader scientific foundation for river restoration: Columbia River food webs Robert J 31, 2012 (received for review August 6, 2012) Well-functioning food webs are fundamental emphasis on restoring habitat structure--without explicitly considering food webs--has been less successful

  20. One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

  1. Autonomic restoration of electrical conductivity using polymer-stabilized carbon nanotube and graphene microcapsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Autonomic restoration of electrical conductivity using polymer-stabilized carbon nanotube the use of microcapsules containing suspensions of polymer-stabilized carbon nanotubes and/or graphene. Simultaneous release of carbon nanotubes and/or graphene suspensions from capsule cores restored conductivity

  2. Natural recovery and restoration in giant panda habitat after the Wenchuan earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural recovery and restoration in giant panda habitat after the Wenchuan earthquake Jindong Zhang in revised form 20 January 2014 Accepted 21 January 2014 Keywords: Earthquake Restoration Natural recovery Reserve in Sichuan, China after the catastrophic Wenchuan earthquake (magnitude 8.0) in 2008, which caused

  3. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

  4. COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING AN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING;#12;COMPILATION AND REVIEW OF COMPLETED RESTORATION AND MITIGATION STUDIES IN DEVELOPING AN EVALUATION FRAMEWORK-R-5 Investments Research Program April 1995 #12;#12;Compilation and Review of Completed

  5. Seeing differently... Optogenetics, holography, and vision restoration Lecturer: Inna Reutsky-Gefen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seeing differently... Optogenetics, holography, and vision restoration Lecturer: Inna Reutsky-electrode arrays might restore basic vision. Such implants electrically stimulate the retinal ganglion cells, just limitations. In this lecture I will present a non-invasive alternative to artificial stimulation

  6. A CONVEX VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR RESTORING BLURRED IMAGES WITH MULTIPLICATIVE NOISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    A CONVEX VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR RESTORING BLURRED IMAGES WITH MULTIPLICATIVE NOISE YIQIU DONG, multiplicative noise, primal-dual method, total variation regularization, variational model. AMS subject for an overview of those noise models and the restoration methods. However, multiplicative noise is a different

  7. A CONVEX VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR RESTORING BLURRED IMAGES WITH RICIAN NOISE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    A CONVEX VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR RESTORING BLURRED IMAGES WITH RICIAN NOISE LIYUAN CHEN AND TIEYONG ZENG Abstract. In this paper, a new convex variational model for restoring images degraded by blur and Rician noise is proposed. The new method is inspired by previous works in which the non- convex

  8. Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Using Long-Term Census Data to Inform Restoration Methods for Coastal Dune Vegetation Elise S Barrier Island . Coastal ecology . Dune zone . Disturbance . Dune vegetation . Storm response Introduction), with varied results. Restoration strategies can be difficult to implement successfully in coastal dune systems

  9. The Nature of Urban Soils and Their Role in Ecological Restoration in Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavao-Zuckerman, Mitchell

    The Nature of Urban Soils and Their Role in Ecological Restoration in Cities Mitchell A. Pavao in and around cities. This article highlights the varied impacts of cities on soils and their implications for restora- tion planning and expectations of restoration ``success.'' Urban soils exist in different

  10. Ecological restoration is increasingly being regarded as one of the primary means of repairing environmen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suski, Cory David

    of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois in Urbana. © 2008 American to the field of restoration ecology. Physiological metrics (e.g., gas exchange, energy transfer and metabolism the development and implementation of effective restoration strategies that recognize the role of habitat quality

  11. LITHUANIAN FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Studies on forestry, technology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................20 3.3. Calculation of forest fuel cost production in Rokiskis forest enterprise Final report Financed by Swedish Energy Agency Girionys ­ 2002 http..................................................................................................22 3.5. Cost effecting factors

  12. Global forest governance --Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global forest governance -- Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland Technical, global environmental problems are complex issues. Political decision makers increasingly depend will draw upon an alternative, broader conception of `global forest governance'. After pointing out

  13. FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK. of the Interior, University of Vermont, National Park Service, Rubenstein School of Environment Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller and Natural Resources National Historical Park #12;Forest Monitoring at the Marsh

  14. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  15. Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials and The Forest Products Industry: University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension with support from: Sustainable Forestry Initiative N............................................................................................................................2 Road Access

  16. ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION ACT Basic Training ­ May 8, 2009 PURPOSE: The ACT Basic Training is designed to help staff who are new to Assertive Community Treatment

  17. Recovery Act: Local Energy Assurance Planning Initiatives | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will help ensure local governments can recover and restore power quickly following any energy supply disruptions. PRESS RELEASES February 19, 2010 Secretary Chu Announces Over...

  18. One-dimensional general forest fire processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressaud, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional generalized forest fire process: at each site of $\\zz$, seeds and matches fall according some i.i.d. stationary renewal processes. When a seed falls on an empty site, a tree grows immediately. When a match falls on an occupied site, a fire starts and destroys immediately the corresponding connected component of occupied sites. Under some quite reasonable assumptions on the renewal processes, we show that when matches become less and less frequent, the process converges, with a correct normalization, to a limit forest fire model. According to the nature of the renewal processes governing seeds, there are four possible limit forest fire models. The four limit processes can be perfectly simulated. This study generalizes consequently a previous result of the authors where seeds and matches were assumed to fall according to Poisson processes.

  19. NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (EXCERPT) Act 451 of 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ACT (EXCERPT) Act 451 of 1994 PART 85 FERTILIZERS in the same order given in this subdivision. Indication of grade does not apply to peat or peat moss or soil

  20. Forest Stewardship Council FSC, A.C. All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % in the UK have started to shift to eco-friendly options such as FSC. Source: Publishers World #12;Forest

  1. INTRODUCTION: The success of a forest residual based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    to hydro power, but not at the expense of hydro power." These findings demonstrate that while family forest

  2. Japanese Large Corporations' Use of Forest Certification in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,107 (April 2011), PEFC: 205 (June 2011), SGEC: 409 (June 2011) As a major importer of forest products, Japan

  3. JAPAN GOING TOWARD FOREST CERTIFICATION September 24, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )........................................................... 4 PEFC (Pan-European Forest Certification Certificates (3 companies, 15th Sep. 2004) ................................... 8 PEFC COC Certificates (2

  4. Forest Certification Programs in North and South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and principles Tree Farm / SFI - PEFC mutual recognition FSC small forests program All U.S. systems revised

  5. Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

  6. National Construction Safety Team Act Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    National Construction Safety Team Act Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008 Summary This annual report to Congress for FY 2008 is required by the National Construction Safety Team Act. NIST completed its federal report. The ICC Codes are widely adopted and used as the basis for state and local construction codes

  7. National Construction Safety Team Act Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    National Construction Safety Team Act Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007 Introduction In October 2002, the President signed into law the National Construction Safety Team (NCST) Act (P.L. 107 National Construction Safety Teams for deployment after events causing the failure of a building

  8. Faces of the Recovery Act: Sun Catalytix

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nocera, Dave

    2013-05-29

    BOSTON- At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dan Nocera talks about Sun Catalytix, the next generation of solar energy, and ARPA-E funding through the Recovery Act. To learn about more ARPA-E projects through the Recovery Act: http://arpa-e.energy.gov/FundedProjects.aspx

  9. Policy on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Policy on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act I. Purpose and Scope The university has developed this policy to comply with requirements of the federal Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The policy applies to university activities throughout the world. II. Definitions For purposes of this Policy, Anything of Value

  10. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick Requirements for Uranium Operations (Clean Air Act) Subpart W Requirements (continued) · Radon emission standard of 20 pCi/m2/sec -- annual reporting requirements, notification in advance of testing · The radon

  11. The effect of expertise on the quality of forest standards implementation: The case of FSC forest certification in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental norms and standards in a specific local context. They interpret abstract global standards through environmental governance project. We then describe the FSC certification procedure and identify key actors Experts Forest certification Forest management assessment Environmental auditing The central question

  12. Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo1 , Bithika Khargharia2 , Bernard P. Zeigler2 , Maria J. Vasconcelos3 Abstract In this paper we discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform and non-uniform environmental

  13. PNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 -2036 MORE TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papers, tissues and packaging · Timber is a natural, renewable, energy efficient resource. · ForestPNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 - 2036 · MORE TREES · MORE INVESTMENT · MORE JOBS · MORE RURAL DEVELOPMENT PNG Forest Industry Development Plan 2001-2036 1 http://www.pomcci.org.pg/hiri2001/PNGFIA.doc #12

  14. Marketing a National Forest: The Resource Manager's Dilemma1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marketing a National Forest: The Resource Manager's Dilemma1 Howard A. Clonts Jeffrey R. Hibbert 2 Forest in Alabama were surveyed to develop appropriate marketing strategies. Cluster analysis showed marketing strategies. Forest based recreation is continually gaining participants. Opportunities to pursue

  15. Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Forest fires, explosions, and random trees Edward Crane HIMR, UoB 13th January 2014 #12 and James Martin at the University of Oxford. Edward Crane (HIMR, UoB) Forest fires, explosions, and random trees 13th January 2014 2 / 20 #12;Overview This talk is about the mean field forest fire model

  16. Prediction of Forest Fires using Data Mining Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLeod, Ian

    Prediction of Forest Fires using Data Mining Methods By Hye Rin Kim Supervised by Dr. McLeod Master's Project July 2009 #12;Contents 1 Executive Summary 2 2 Introduction 2 2.1 Forest Fire Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 5 Conclusion 13 6 References 14 1 #12;1 Executive Summary Forest fires are a major environmental

  17. Dead Wood: From Forester's Bane to Environmental Boon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dead Wood: From Forester's Bane to Environmental Boon1 Jack Ward Thomas2 Abstract Forest managers is the first rule of intelligent tinkering." Dead wood, standing and down, is one of those "cogs and wheels wood in managed forests. Much of this new information will be discussed at this conference. What

  18. Research Summary Consultation and community involvement in forest planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary Consultation and community involvement in forest planning: research in Cranborne of the Forestry Commission's `Long-Term Forest Plan' process. It also builds on various investigations into stakeholder analysis and the use of participatory tools in relation to Forest Design Plans (FDPs). The NFNF

  19. FOREST VALUES IN NORTHERN ONTARIO: PUBLIC TRADEOFFS AND SUSTAINABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOREST VALUES IN NORTHERN ONTARIO: PUBLIC TRADEOFFS AND SUSTAINABILITY by Jeff Moore H Management PROJECT TITLE: Forest Values in Northern Ontario: Public Tradeoffs and Sustainability REPORT NO. To ensure sustainability for the forests of northern Ontario, critical minimum levels of natural, social

  20. What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    What can I do with a degree in Forest Engineering? ENGINEERING Planning your career Choosing a career involves more than just finding out what is open to you. Knowledge about yourself is central.canterbury.ac.nz/liaison/best_prep.shtml What is Forest Engineering? Forest engineering is a hybrid of engineering, forestry and management

  1. FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, W.J.

    FOREST FIRES AND OIL FIELDS AS PERCOLATION PHENOMENA. William J. Reed #3; JUNE, 1999. Abstract A probability distribution derived from percolation theory is #12;tted to large datasets on the sizes of forest forest #12;res and oil #12;elds as percolation phenomena as well as suggesting the consideration of a new

  2. Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Levels and Sources of Forest Fire Prevention Knowledge of California Hunters William S. Folkman U;Folkman, William S. 1963. Levels and sources of forest fire prevention knowl- edge of California hunters-managerial occupations. Their level of knowl- edge about forest fire prevention is generally high, but their knowledge

  3. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T. Randerson,1 * H. Liu,2 M. G. Flanner,1 S measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black the concept of radiative forcing (12) to assess quantitatively the net effect of a boreal forest fire

  4. Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Forest Management Helps Save Chadron State Park from Fire OVER THE PAST HALF-CENTURY, wildfire has Creek Fire on its deadly rampage across the Pine Ridge. The good news is that due to active forest no infrastructure and its forest survived the fire intact. About 90 percent of the Park burned, with the majority

  5. forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    forest ecology Using Fire to Increase the Scale, Benefits, and Future Maintenance of Fuels limited to affect fire severity and the Forest Service has predominantly focused on suppression, and institutional barriers to increased fire use that we discuss. Keywords: fire policy, fire suppression, forest

  6. APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntaimo, Lewis

    APPLICATIONS Forest Fire Spread and Suppression in DEVS Lewis Ntaimo Department of Industrial. Speedway Tucson, AZ 85721 In this article, the authors discuss modeling and simulation of forest fire to obtain timely simulation-based predictions of forest fire spread and suppression in uniform

  7. Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 2006 Research Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    in 2009, based on research done by Vogt et al. The Landscape Fragmentation Tool maps the types Forest Fragmentation in Connecticut: 1985 ­ 2006 Research Summary About the Project Forest for the fragmentation of Connecticut's forests, and how fragmentation has progressed over time, CLEAR researchers

  8. Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advisory Committee on Forest Research Paper 2001/02 Report of Visiting Group ­ Forest Research Environmental Research Branch 29 ­ 30 October 2001 1. Review Procedures On the invitation of Mr Jim Dewar, Chief visited the Alice Holt Research Station of Forest Research on 29 and 30 October 2001. Secretarial support

  9. DWARF MISTLETOE CONTROL IN RESIDENTIAL FORESTS-1/ John G. Laut-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DWARF MISTLETOE CONTROL IN RESIDENTIAL FORESTS-1/ 2/ John G. Laut- Abstract: Residential forests-pressure. These people demand answers to questions about tree manage- ment -- not necessarily forest management people-pressures present new problems with new dimensions that demand new potential . solutions

  10. Forest Products Market Information Systems in the UNECE region.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Products Market Information Systems in the UNECE region. L. Farquharson August 2007 #12;#12;A report into Forest Products Market Information Systems_____________________________ 1 1. EXECUTIVE____________________________________________________15 #12;2 ____________________________ A report into Forest Products Market Information Systems 2 1

  11. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  12. TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES& A&comprehensive&analysis&of®ulating& and&cultural&services&provided&by&Texas'&forests& & & & & & October&2013 June 2009 #12;#12;Texas&Statewide&Assessment&of&& Forest&Ecosystem&Services& A&comprehensive&analysis&of&the®ulating&and&& cultural&services&provided&by&Texas

  13. SCIENCE AND FOREST CONCESSIONS Bastiaan Louman, Fernando Carrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of experience with forest concessions while Guatemala ventured into its first community concession in 1994. Peru. In Guatemala 14 concessions exist that cover a total of 512,786 has of forest while in Peru the process has of concessions in Bolivia, Guatemala and Peru include the costs of forest management, slow and difficult

  14. Simulating the Future Forested Landscapes of the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeled 1. Small gap (wind, disease, other) 2. Private land development 3. Forest management, especially Lennette, Landscape Modeling · Jonathan Thompson, Analysis · Justin Goodwin, Analysis #12;Topics 1. Types to 2095). #12;Present 2096 PUBLIC & TRIBAL LANDS PRIVATE LANDS Urban Forest Urban Non-Forest Low

  15. Impact of Biomass Harvesting on Forest Soil Productivity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Biomass Harvesting on Forest Soil Productivity in the Northern Rocky Mountains Woongsoon; Keyes, Christopher R.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah. 2015. Impact of biomass harvesting on forest soil of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 35 p. Abstract Biomass harvesting extracts

  16. Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training Needs in Louisiana's Value-Added Forest Products Industry Richard VloskyRichard VloskyLSU Agricultural Center England Air ParkEngland Air Park--January 18, 2005January 18, 2005 Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;Outline · Industry Development

  17. FIEA Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    FIEA ­ Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship Forest Industry, including any NZQA Unit Standards that you have completed. NOTES: 1. The Regulations for this award be received by the Dunedin office of Forest Industry Engineering Association by 1 March 2012

  18. Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and N. M. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Energy and Nutrient Dynamics of Forest Floors in Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners. http://www.jstor.org #12;497 ENERGY AND NUTRIENT DYNAMICS OF FOREST FLOORS IN THREE MINNESOTA FORESTS and subsequent utilization by heterotrophs is a major pathway of energy flow. Forest floors can also

  19. Session K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285 Estimating Forest Fuels in the Southwest Using Forest Inventory Data1 objective of this study was to demonstrate the linkages between forest inventory data and hazardous fuelSession K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen

  20. 73-20-1. Short title. This act may be cited as the "Watershed District Act".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    District Act [73-20-1 NMSA 1978] is to secure the federal assistance provided in Public Law 566 of the 83rd73-20-1. Short title. This act may be cited as the "Watershed District Act". History: 1953 Comp., § 45-5-19, enacted by Laws 1957, ch. 210, § 1. Cross references. -- For provisions of the Water Project

  1. Hangman Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coeur d'Alene Tribe

    2003-10-01

    Progress has been made in defining the level of work that needs to be accomplished in the Hangman Watershed in order to restore a viable riparian system and hydrology. The end goal is to use wildlife habitat to protect streams and provide water for instream fish habitats. In order to define the most expedient means of attaining that goal an Instream Flow/Watershed Hydrology Study was initiated. The study is intended to be comprehensive in order to determine the potential of increasing base flow with Hangman Watershed Streams and predict available fish habitats for the range of flow level possibilities. The Study Plan and work for the first field season was contracted and the Plan and end of field season reports are included with this Annual Report. The initial draft of the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan was completed and presented to the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority Wildlife Committee. The Committee felt that the Basin Hydrology Study needed to be closer to completion before the bulk of wildlife monitoring should be implemented. The extent of the landscape that must be restored in order to facilitate the needed stream flows may not be large enough to affect the population levels of the Plan's target species. The main result of the Committee review of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan however, was that since the Hangman Restoration Project is not a HU driven wildlife mitigation project than the Wildlife Committee does not have a role to play since their focus is wildlife HU crediting projects. Further work on the wildlife portion of the Monitoring and Evaluation Plan is suspended until the crediting issues surrounding the Hangman Restoration Project are settled. Certain aspects of the Plan, such as the land bird, amphibian, reptile and beaver monitoring can be implemented in the spring of the coming year because monitoring these species and groups needs to be accomplished regardless of crediting status and baseline data is needed for these. Data from the Hangman Creek Watershed from portions upstream and east of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation were included in the Second Iteration of the Habitat Prioritization Plan. These data were gathered both by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe and Idaho's Department of Environmental Quality. The addition of this portion of the Watershed in the Prioritization Plan fills a gap that the lack of data left in the first draft of the Plan. The streams in these upper headwaters support remnant salmonid populations and are close enough to be integrated with the streams and trout populations on the Reservation. The addition of this area strengthens the base from which the Hangman Restoration Project can work to secure and expand resident fish populations. An extensive 2-year search for historic photos of the upper portion of the Hangman Watershed was completed during this annual funding cycle. The disappointing result is that few photographs were acquired. One excellent panoramic view of the Upper Hangman Watershed from Tekoa Mountain was recovered and photos of this view were taken for comparison. The task of finding historic photos has been removed from future Scopes of Work, however search for photos will continue as part of the Project's public outreach. The notable exception to the lack of historic photos is the purchase, digitizing and GIS registry of 1947 aerial photo coverage of the entire Hangman Creek Watershed east of the Washington/Idaho State Boarder. In addition, 1933 aerial photo coverage of most of this same area is being registered to our GIS system. These 1933 photos were available to the Tribe prior to the initiation of this Project; however these photos are being registered partly as a result of requests made from this Project. The process of developing a map of potential vegetation types for the Hangman Watershed has benefited from establishment of an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Geologic Survey to hire a Scientific Advisor. The Scientific Advisor has assisted with the design of a scheme to sample remnant native vegetation within an

  2. 16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR building rating system in the world: USGBC's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Richard P. Vlosky, Ph.D. Director Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Crosby Land & Resources

  3. 18 December 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USFSA/bulletins/e3831c USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 12/16/2014 02:57 PM EST USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 2014 Farm Bill Program Generates Renewable Energy of dead or diseased trees from National Forests and Bureau of Land Management lands for renewable energy

  4. 31 March2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , including leaving forests untouched, burning wood for energy, and using various solid wood products31 March2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR fuels Earth, Energy & Environment A Yale University-led study has found that using more wood and less

  5. 11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTORT/FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    market signals for forest products, including energy. As stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTORT it's time to get the policy right on biomass energy carbon accounting The clock is ticking

  6. 2 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; and continues to be one of the top ten manufacturing sectors in the state. The report analyzes data collected products such as lumber, structural panels, paper and pulp. Manufacturing of secondary forest products like and visit TexasForestInfo.com for additional information on economic impacts of the Texas forest sector

  7. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP Fracking gets green light in largest national forest on East Coast US will allow a form of natural gas drilling known as fracking to occur in parts of the largest national forest on the East Coast. The U.S. Forest Service originally planned to ban fracking in the 1.1 million-acre George

  8. 27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of its landmass to combat climate change and soil erosion, the State Forestry Administration said27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR of the new forested land was low-quality, and pointed out that while new trees are planted rapidly, data

  9. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  10. Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    Wake Forest University Medical Waste Management Plan June 15, 2009 Rev.1 1 Biohazard Waste without a permit from the Solid Waste Section. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulate Bloodborne Pathogens and Exposure Control Plans. Under state regulations a solid waste generator

  11. Directory of Tennessee's forest industries 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A directory of primary and secondary forest industries is presented. Firm names and addresses are listed by county in alphabetical order. The following information is listed for each industry: type of plant, production and employee size class, products manufactured, and equipment. For the primary industries, the major species of trees used are listed. (MHR)

  12. GIS, SPATIAL STATISTICAL GRAPHICS, AND FOREST HEALTH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symanzik, Jürgen

    1 GIS, SPATIAL STATISTICAL GRAPHICS, AND FOREST HEALTH. James J. Majure, Noel Cressie, Dianne Cook, and Jürgen Symanzik ABSTRACT This paper discusses the use of a geographic information systems (GIS), Arcview, into a geographic information system (GIS), Arcview 2.1 (ESRI 1995), and its use in the statistical analysis of spa

  13. Tree Improvement Forest Health, Productivity & Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · Foresters maintain orchards to supply seed from select native hardwood trees for use in urban landscapes tax base. · The Lost Pines seed source was preserved off-site in a TFS drought- hardy loblolly orchard and is now providing source appropriate seed to aid in the Lost Pines Recovery Effort. · Seed orchards

  14. The Compiler Forest Mihai Budiu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Gordon

    The Compiler Forest Mihai Budiu1 , Joel Galenson1,2 , and Gordon D. Plotkin1,3 1 Microsoft Research the problem of writing compilers targeting complex ex- ecution environments, such as computer clusters composed of machines with multi-core CPUs. To that end we introduce partial compilers. These compilers can

  15. United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

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    of the USDA Forest Service, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, University of California at Davis, University at Davis, the University of Nevada at Reno, and the Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada. #12;Lake Tahoe Senator Harry Reid, President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore

  16. Publications Forest Research publishes a wide range

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    in tourism The impact of trees on the well-being of residents on two inner-London social housing estates for recreation and nature tourism ­ European COST Action E33 Forest School: a marvellous opportunity to learn for health and well-being in Scotland: research to understand and overcome barriers to accessing woodlands

  17. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

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    Standard Guidelines #12;© Crown Copyright 2011 You may re-use this information (not including logos) free, visit: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/doc/open-government-licence or write to the Information Policy Team; ecosystem services; environment; forestry; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL002/FC

  18. Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology

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    Pringle, Anne

    Meetings Bridging mycorrhizal genomics, metagenomics and forest ecology 6th New Phytologist of easily cultured saprotrophic fungi (among the first three published genomes were the models Saccharomyces or biotechnological interest, genomics is now poised to rapidly permeate the fields of fungal ecology and evolution

  19. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

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    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  20. @ SOUTH ES'T FOREST SERVICE

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    -01 EX^er LUMBER GRADE RECOVERY FROM HAWA ROBUSTA EUCALYPTUS LOGS Roger G.Skolmen USDA forest Service Research Note PW-204 1970 Lumber has been produced from plantation-grown robusta eucalyptus (Eucalyptus grade yield of Hawaii-grown timber, 30 robusta eucalyptus logs were shipped lo a Michigan sawmill