Sample records for forest system lands

  1. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  2. Toward A National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Phenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service; Spruce, Joe [NASA Stennis Space Center; Gasser, Gerry [NASA Stennis Space Center; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a statistical clustering method for delineating homogeneous ecoregions as a basis for identifying disturbances in forests through time over large areas, up to national and global extents. Such changes can be shown relative to past conditions, or can be predicted relative to present conditions, as with forecasts of future climatic change. This quantitative ecoregion approach can be used to predict destinations for populations whose local environments are forecast to become unsuitable and are forced to migrate as their habitat shifts, and is also useful for predicting the susceptibility of new locations to invasive species like Sudden Oak Death. EFETAC and our sister western center WWETAC, along with our NASA and ORNL collaborators, are designing a new national-scale early warning system for forest threats, called FIRST. Envisioned as a change-detection system, FIRST will identify all land surface cover changes at the MODIS observational scale, and then try to discriminate normal, expected seasonal changes from locations having unusual activity that may represent potential forest threats. As a start, we have developed new national data sets every 16 days from 2002 through 2008, based on land surface phenology, or timing of leaf-out in the spring and brown-down in the fall. Changes in such phenological maps will be shown to contain important information about vegetation health status across the United States. The standard deviation of the duration of fall can be mapped, showing places where length of fall is relatively constant or is variable in length from year to year.

  3. National Forest Land Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

  4. Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2 Abstract: Soil Taxonomy, the United States system of soil classification, can be used for land evaluation for selected structure, and rainfall intensity. This paper describesthe taxonomy and systemfor classify- ing soilsand

  5. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    -have the potential 10 increase biomass supply. Unlike metals, concrete, and plastic, forest products store carbon sources. Expanding forest biomass use for biofuels and energy generation will competeanagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land Management Policy

  6. Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffines, R.L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

  7. 5 Putting Science into Action on Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Putting Science into Action on Forest Service Lands William M. Block u.s. Forest Service, Rocky into Action on Forest Service Lands t':: Research and Development, National Forest Systems, State and Private Forestry, International Programs

  8. Aboveground tree biomass on productive forest land in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarie, J.; Mead, D.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total aboveground woody biomass of trees on forest land that can produce 1.4 cubic meters per hectare per year of industrial wood in Alaska is 1.33 billion metric tons green weight. The estimated energy value of the standing woody biomass is 11.9 x 10 Btu's. Statewide tables of biomass and energy values for softwoods, hardwoods, and species group are presented.

  9. Tracking changes in the susceptibility of forest land infested with gypsy moth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gansner, D.A.; Quimby, J.W.; King, S.L.; Arner, S.L.; Drake, D.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report questions the forest land subject to intensive outbreaks of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) which become less susceptible to defoliation. A model for estimating the lifelihood of gypsy moth defoliation has been developed and validated. It was applied to forest-inventory plot data to quantity trends in the susceptibility of forest land in south-central Pennsylvania during a period of intensive infestation. Results show that even though susceptibility of the region's forest apparently has declined, the potential for future infestations remains relatively high.

  10. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  11. Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Public Lands for Cannabis Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallery, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    citizens began to grow marijuana on public lands because itand successfully grow and harvest marijuana crops. 36 TheMarijuana National Forest • Mallery T he remoteness of Cannabis grow

  12. Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

  13. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Kuiper, J. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Carr, A. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) completed an assessment of the potential for solar and wind energy development on National Forest System (NFS) public lands managed by the US Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service (USFS). This report provides an update of the analysis in the NREL report, and extends the analysis with additional siting factors for solar and wind energy. It also expands the scope to biomass and geothermal energy resources. Hydropower is acknowledged as another major renewable energy source on NFS lands; however, it was not analyzed in this project primarily because of the substantially different analysis that would be needed to identify suitable locations. Details about each renewable energy production technology included in the study are provided following the report introduction, including how each resource is converted to electrical power, and examples of existing power plants. The analysis approach was to use current and available Geographic Information System (GIS) data to map the distribution of the subject renewable energy resources, major siting factors, and NFS lands. For each major category of renewable energy power production, a set of siting factors were determined, including minimum levels for the renewable energy resources, and details for each of the other siting factors. Phase 1 of the analysis focused on replicating and updating the 2005 NREL analysis, and Phase 2 introduced additional siting factors and energy resources. Source data were converted to a cell?based format that helped create composite maps of locations meeting all the siting criteria. Acreages and potential power production levels for NFS units were tabulated and are presented throughout this report and the accompanying files. NFS units in the southwest United States were found to have the most potentially suitable land for concentrating solar power (CSP), especially in Arizona and New Mexico. In total, about 136,032 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for CSP development, potentially yielding as much as 13,603 megawatts (MW) of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. For photovoltaic solar power (PV), the top NFS units were more widely distributed than CSP. Notably, more than 150,000 acres in Comanche National Grassland in Colorado were found to be potentially suitable for PV development, accounting for more than 25% of the potentially suitable NFS lands combined. In total, about 564,698 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for PV development, potentially yielding as much as 56,469 MW of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. NFS units most suitable for wind power are concentrated in the northern Great Plains. In total, about 3,357,792 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for wind development, potentially yielding as much as 67,156 MW of electricity, assuming 50 acres per MW. Of that area, 571,431 acres (11,429 MW) are located within the Bankhead?Jones Farm Tenant Act Land in Montana. NFS lands in Alaska have considerable wind resources, but other siting factors eliminated almost the entire area. The southwest coast of Chugach National Forest, near Seward, Alaska, maintains the majority of the remaining acreage. NFS units with highly suitable biomass resources are located from Idaho to Louisiana. In total, about 13,967,077 acres of NFS lands are potentially highly suitable for biomass from logging and thinning residue development. Of that, 1,542,247 acres is located in Fremont?Winema National Forest in Oregon. Not surprisingly, most NFS units have at least some level of potentially suitable biomass resources. In general, biomass resources such as these could significantly offset consumption of coal and petroleum?based fuels. NFS units deemed potentially highly suitable for enhanced geothermal system (EGS) development were distributed widely from California to Virginia, accounting for some 6,475,459 acres. Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri has the largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed

  14. Evaluation of erosion and cover re-establishment following site preparation on east Texas forest lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Timothy Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    damage following mechanical site prepara- tion. (uantitative data characterizing the rate of recovery of soi. l protective cover, used in combination with erosion data, gives planners and forest managers an indication of the total impact of mechanical...EVALUATION OF EROSION AND COVER RE-ESTABLISHMENT 1'OLLOWING SITE PREPARATION ON EAST TEXAS FOREST LANDS A Thesis by Timothy Allen Blume Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uniuersity in partial fullfillment of the requir ment...

  15. Table 1. Annual estimates and uncertainty Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 23.5 16,486 3.6 19.0 All Species 26,915 1.3 100.0 86,707 2.0 100.0 Proportion of total sawtimber,000.000acres) Year Timberland Forest land 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Oak/pine Elm

  16. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  17. Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974- Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in agricultural and forest reserve areas.

  18. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  19. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    TR- 117 1981 Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas, Interim Report M.G. DeHaven W.H. Blackburn R.W. Knight A.T. Weichert...

  20. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  1. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  2. Factors affecting the availability of wood energy from nonindustrial private forest lands in the Northeast. Forest Service Resource Bulletin (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, J.J.; Gilbert, A.H.; Birch, T.W.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the factors that affect the availability of fuelwood from NIPF lands in the Northeastern United States (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania). It is part of a comprehensive wood-for-energy study entitled 'The Production, Consumption, and Marketing of Wood for Energy in the Northeast (Northeast Regional Study 142).'' The study is designed to: (1) Estimate the demand for wood energy in the Northeast by consuming sectors, state, and region; (2) Analyze the managment and supply of wood for energy processing as well as marketing structures; (3) Identify goals and effectiveness of actual and alternative local, state, and Federal forest policies and contrast these with the objectives of forest owners with regard to the use of wood for energy. The objective of the study is to analyze the supply of wood energy, that is, to identify and describe the factors that influence NIPF owners to harvest, or permit the harvest, of fuelwood from their land.

  3. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  4. Pacific northwest region vegetation and inventory monitoring system. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, T.A.; Schreuder, H.T.; Hazard, J.W.; Oswald, D.D.; Teply, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid sampling strategy was adopted for broad-scale inventory and monitoring of forest and range vegetation on National Forest System lands in the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. This paper documents the technical details of the adopted design and discusses alternative sampling designs that were considered. The design is flexible and can be used with many types of maps. The theory of point and change estimation is described, as well as estimates of variation that assess the statistical precision of estimates.

  5. Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought impacts and promoting recovery J response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Land classification based on the land's potential: soils response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Grassland Shrubland ­ high wind erosion Knowledge

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

  7. Table 1. Annual estimates and uncertainty, and Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in live trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 15,510 1.9 3.6 Net volume of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 14,088 2.0/beech/birch Elm/ash/cottonwood Oak/pine Aspen / birch White/red pine Forest land (1,000,000 acres

  8. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by year.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000,000 ft3 ) 15,552 1.8 3.9 Net volume of growing-stock trees (1,000,000 ft3 ) 13,903 2.0 1.6 Annual net Area(1,000,000acres) Year Forest Land Timberland 0 1 2 3 4 Oak/hickory Maple/beech/birch Elm

  9. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James A. Burger

    2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

  10. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  11. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  12. Principles of Forest Stewardship1 1As per the Foresters Act S.4(2)(b) "to advocate for and uphold principles of stewardship of forests, forest lands, forest resources and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and resilience of the ecosystem. Ecological integrity refers to the wholeness of ecosystems, as well. Ecological Integrity 4 2. Information and Understanding 4 3. Forest Management Goals and Objectives 4 4 and landscape levels which maintains and protects ecosystem function, integrity and resilience. It is based upon

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  14. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

  15. Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Public Lands for Cannabis Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallery, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest • Mallery hemp including fibers, oil, andthe government encouraged hemp production, a fibrous form ofdeferment, for farmers to grow hemp to meet wartime fiber

  16. A robust guidance system for aircraft approach and landing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ren-Jye

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system (GS) to assist pilots during approach and landing. This GS consists of three modules: the Guidance Manager (GM), the Guidance Executive (GE) and the Guidance Display (GD). Modular design allows parallel development of these modules and the GS...

  17. The Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS) How-To Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  18. Factors affecting the use of soil conservation practices on non-industrial private forest lands in East Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyasena, Abegunawardana Vidana Gamage

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 5 767. 0 Other 77. 0 Federal total 732. 0 National forest 655. 0 753. 0 718. 0 618. 0 100. 0 828. 4 775. 1 625. 2 149. 9 795. 7 736. 8 595. 0 141. 8 12, 718. 3 12, 924. 3 12, 512. 5 Indian 4. 0 1. 0 3. 7 3. 0 State County... in the 37 easterr. counties (Blackburn, et al. 1978). The location of these counties is displayed in Figure 1. The total land area of these 37 counties is 19. 4 million acres. Over half of this acreage is classified as commercial (Table A-3). Pine...

  19. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  20. Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Á Land-use change Á Naturalness Á Logging Á Great Lakes Á Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

  1. Biofuels, land and water : a systems approach to sustainability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, M. C.; Wang, M.; Wu, M.; Snyder, S. W.; LaFreniere, L.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a strong societal need to evaluate and understand the sustainability of biofuels, especially because of the significant increases in production mandated by many countries, including the United States. Sustainability will be a strong factor in the regulatory environment and investments in biofuels. Biomass feedstock production is an important contributor to environmental, social, and economic impacts from biofuels. This study presents a systems approach where the agricultural, energy, and environmental sectors are considered as components of a single system, and environmental liabilities are used as recoverable resources for biomass feedstock production. We focus on efficient use of land and water resources. We conducted a spatial analysis evaluating marginal land and degraded water resources to improve feedstock productivity with concomitant environmental restoration for the state of Nebraska. Results indicate that utilizing marginal land resources such as riparian and roadway buffer strips, brownfield sites, and marginal agricultural land could produce enough feedstocks to meet a maximum of 22% of the energy requirements of the state compared to the current supply of 2%. Degraded water resources such as nitrate-contaminated groundwater and wastewater were evaluated as sources of nutrients and water to improve feedstock productivity. Spatial overlap between degraded water and marginal land resources was found to be as high as 96% and could maintain sustainable feedstock production on marginal lands. Other benefits of implementing this strategy include feedstock intensification to decrease biomass transportation costs, restoration of contaminated water resources, and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.

  2. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  3. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  4. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

  5. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  6. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  7. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    by discussions with Brigid Barry, David Bowden, Lauren Coad, Nigel Collar, Paul Donald, Rob Ewers, Vicky Jones, Val Kapos, Eric Keys, Deborah Lawrence, Tasso Leventis, Ken Norris, Debbie Pain, Hugo Rainey, B. L. Turner and Juliet Vickery. Thanks to John... in a wildlife protected area, although I ended up working only in forest reserves. I thank Moses Sam and Phil Marshall for interesting discussions, and Kofi Affum-Baffo, Francis Agurgo, Edward Obiaw and Oheneba Amponsah Agyemang of the Resource...

  8. The KamLAND Full-Volume Calibration System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND Collaboration; Berger, B. E.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Decowski, M. P.; Dwyer, D. A.; Elor, G.; Frank, A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Galloway, M.; Gray, F.; Heeger, K. M.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Keefer, G.; Lendvai, C.; McKee, D.; O'Donnell, T.; Piepke, A.; Steiner, H. M.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Ebihara, T.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Owada, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Tamae, K.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Leonard, D. S.; Luk, K.-B.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Zhang, C.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.

    2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully built and operated a source deployment system for the KamLAND detector. This system was used to position radioactive sources throughout the delicate 1-kton liquid scintillator volume, while meeting stringent material cleanliness, material compatibility, and safety requirements. The calibration data obtained with this device were used to fully characterize detector position and energy reconstruction biases. As a result, the uncertainty in the size of the detector fiducial volume was reduced by a factor of two. Prior to calibration with this system, the fiducial volume was the largest source of systematic uncertainty in measuring the number of antineutrinos detected by KamLAND. This paper describes the design, operation and performance of this unique calibration system.

  9. A land based radar polarimeter processing system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronke, Chester William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assignments 4 Indicator Circuit Read Port Assignments. 5 Interpretation of Indicator Circuit Data . 6 RF Head Common Control Port Signal Assignments . 7 iSBC-80/24 Parallel I/O Summary. 8 iSBX-311 Analog Input Signal Assignments 9 Memory Map... Polarimeter Antennas 2 Azimuthal Angle of Radar Polarimeter Boom. 3 Block Diagram of the Radar Polarimeter System. 4 Block Diagram of Radar Hardware. 10 5 Microwave Transceiver Circuit Transfer Switches Controlled by RDADS. 12 6 Block Diagram...

  10. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Copyright ? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society and Crown Copyright. KEY WORDS land use; land cover; Earth system models; integrated assessment models; research priorities Received 12 January 2009; Revised 9 March 2010; Accepted 14 March 2010 1. Introduction 1... biogeophysical, socio- economic and human decision-making perspectives. The Earth System Modeling (ESM) and the Integrated Assessment Modeling (IAM) communities play an impor- tant role in understanding and quantifying Earth system analysis and, specifically...

  11. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  12. An application of ratio and regression estimation to a forest land ownership project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minaldi, David Lynn

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -1) . i st st i st st i=1 (41) If'g =y +b (X -x ), and st st st E(g) = Y - Cov (b, x ), an expression for the combined stratified st st unbiased estimator of the population mean Y is showr. to be k 1=1 i st st (b -b ) (42) If the estimator of b... of landowners is further divided into the following sub cia s s e s: 1% = SUBCLASS SIZE (BY ACR. ) 0 ? 9 10 ? 19 20 ? 29 30 - 39 34 where k is the number of the subclass. An estimate of the mean land acreage, x, is calculated using Table 2. TABLE 2...

  13. Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1 David A. Cleaves,2 Service's National Forest System prescribed burning activity and costs are examined. Fuels management officers from 95 National Forests reported costs and acreage burned for 4 types of prescribed fire

  14. Optimum combination of leasing systems on public lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, S.L.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonus bidding for oil and gas leases on public lands has been a reasonably satisfactory system for capturing the average rent available while being neutral with respect to economic decisions such as abandonment. However, it places a heavy burden of risk and uncertainty on the lessee. There is some reason to believe that social gains are to be had from shifting some of the risk and uncertainty to the lessors (governmental units). Profit-share or royalty bidding tends to accomplish such a shift. However, optimality seems to call for a combination of bonus bidding and profit-share (or royalty) bidding, the latter on wildcat tracts and the former on drainage tracts. Profit-share bidding is somewhat superior to royalty bidding, and the best definition of ''profit'' for the purpose is profits in excess of a normal return on investment. The combination suggested above may be especially desirable in a program of accelerated leasing of public lands. 2 figs.

  15. Design of an Automatic Landing System for the Meridian UAV using Fuzzy Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, David Andrew

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    antennas attached below the wings. Fuzzy logic is determined the ideal application for an automatic landing controller based on its ability to control uncertain and nonlinear systems. Using fuzzy logic, a longitudinal automatic landing controller...

  16. Geospatiotemporal Data Mining in an Early Warning System for Forest Threats in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Mills, Richard T [ORNL; Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL; Vulli, Srinivasa S [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Forest Service (USFS)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the potential of geospatiotemporal data mining of multi-year land surface phenology data (250~m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) in this study) for the conterminous United States as part of an early warning system to identify threats to forest ecosystems. Cluster analysis of this massive data set, using high-performance computing, provides a basis for several possible approaches to defining the bounds of ``normal'' phenological patterns, indicating healthy vegetation in a given geographic location. We demonstrate the applicability of such an approach, using it to identify areas in Colorado, USA, where an ongoing mountain pine beetle outbreak has caused significant tree mortality.

  17. FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING SYSTEM THESIS ABSTRACT FOREST FUEL REDUCTION AND ENERGYWOOD PRODUCTION USING A CTL / SMALL CHIPPER HARVESTING concerning mechanical forest fuel reduction. This study examined and measured the feasibility of harvesting

  18. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  19. GEOSPATIOTEMPORAL DATA MINING IN AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR FOREST THREATS IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Richard

    GEOSPATIOTEMPORAL DATA MINING IN AN EARLY WARNING SYSTEM FOR FOREST THREATS IN THE UNITED STATES F) for the conterminous United States as part of an early warning system to identify threats to forest ecosystems. Cluster States (CONUS) as part of a two tier system: An early warning system that monitors continental-scale ar

  20. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  1. Interactions of fire regimes and land use in the central Rio Grande Valley. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baisan, C.H.; Swetnam, T.W.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present evidence of dramatic modifications of pre-existing ecological systems by human activities. Our research group at the Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research has conducted extensive studies of fire history in forested ecosystems at more than 60 sites throughout Arizona and New Mexico. Our studies suggest that most of these areas existed in a semi-natural state, litte affected by human populations, before the introduction of large numbers of livestock around the turn of the 20th century. Natural dynamics of biomass accumulation, climatic regimes, and lightning ignitions can account for fire frequencies documented at most sites studied. Recognizable human impacts before the 20 century were probably limited to high use areas and high value resources.

  2. Statewide Forest Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resource Assessment (assessment). The assessment and strategy identify important forest lands and provideColorado Statewide Forest Resource Strategy #12;June 2010 Acknowledgments The Colorado State Forest Forest Resource Strategy. We also offer our thanks and acknowledgement to Greg Sundstrom, assistant staff

  3. Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate Mark Williamson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    Analytic solutions for the land temperature in an Earth system model of intermediate complexity. Analytic solutions for the temporal evolution of the land temperature are obtained for an Earth system and atmosphere radiation balance in a developing EMIC project named GENIE (Grid Enabled Integrated Earth system

  4. Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noun, R.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

  5. Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife) and functions, promoting forest health, allowing sustainable levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational

  6. all weather landing systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences...

  7. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

  8. Ionospheric Threat Parameterization for Local Area Global-Positioning-System-Based Aircraft Landing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Ionospheric Threat Parameterization for Local Area Global-Positioning-System-Based Aircraft Landing of user separation. The method of data analysis that produced these results is described, and a threat space that parameterizes these possible threats to user integrity is defined. Certain configurations

  9. Modeling the influences of land reclamation on groundwater systems: A case study in Shekou peninsula, Shenzhen, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modeling the influences of land reclamation on groundwater systems: A case study in Shekou form 16 February 2010 Accepted 18 April 2010 Available online 24 April 2010 Keywords: Land reclamation of land has been reclaimed around the Shekou peninsula, Shenzhen, China. Land reclamation may have

  10. A robust guidance system for aircraft approach and landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Ren-Jye

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft approach and landing are very demanding and risky operational phases compared to other routine flight phases. Statistics show that large percentages of aircraft accidents, especially general aviation (GA) aircraft, occur during these phases...

  11. Using soft-systems methods to evaluate the outputs from multi-objective land use planning tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    of soft-systems based analysis of land-use planning tool outputs is recommended, not only for evaluating? This paper reports on a soft-systems based evaluation of the multi-objective land-use planning tools within-off between objectives. The paper then details the soft- systems-based evaluation strategy. Land managers

  12. Estimating lake susceptibility to acidification due to acid deposition. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, D.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Forest System lands contain a wide variety of surface waters ranging from small, sensitive, remote wilderness lakes to large, heavily used recreational reservoirs. The USDA Forest Service is responsible for the management and protection of these diverse water resources. Considerations of impacts on water quantity and quality are an integral part of most land-use decisions made by Forest Service land managers. The paper describes a graphical method of using lake chemistry data and rates of sulfur (and nitrogen) deposition to estimate the likelihood of lakes becoming acidified if subjected to increased levels of deposition.

  13. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: • The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. • The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. • The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. • The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. • The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  14. Hydration of the lower stratosphere by ice crystal geysers over land convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaykin, S.

    The possible impact of deep convective overshooting over land has been explored by six simultaneous soundings of water vapour, particles and ozone in the lower stratosphere next to Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) during ...

  15. Certification as a new private global forest governance system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : the first estimations of deforestation rates expressed in "football fields per minute", traditional forest released into the atmosphere every year are caused by deforestation, and the deforestation rate is highest

  16. Forest certification is a system for identifying well-managed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest management conducted by an accredited certifying organization and based on internationally) is a nongovernmental, international organization that accredits third-party certifiers and facilitates development recognized principles and criteria with locally developed and approved standards. It is similar

  17. A survey of the needs of land information system users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunig, Melissa Margaret

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of VLSSTE-:: Gf Sr ZEiiCE Deceml&er 1976 Major Suhject: Forestry A SURVEY OF THE NEEDS OF LAND INFORMATION SYS. EM USERS A Thesis MELISSA MARGARET GRUNIG Approved as to style and content by: Dr. R. G. Merri eld (Chairman of Committee) Dr. R. G. Merr...

  18. Forest density mapping in the lower 48 states: A regression procedure. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Z.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station's Forest Inventory and Analysis (SO-FIA) research unit conducted a project to map the distribution of forest lands for the entire United States. Forest types and forest densities were mapped, and a new forest type group map for the country was produced (Powell and others, in press; Zhu and Evans 1992). The project supported the 1993 Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment Update program, by which the Forest Service was required to provide statistics on current forest land and rangeland conditions.

  19. Protection of Forest Resources (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road...

  20. Moving towards pro-poor systems of land administration: Challenges for land and asset distribution in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deininger, Klaus

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resources to finance public services, discourage speculation, and generate incentives for effective land use (Bird and Slack

  1. PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducation Programs Business Enclave PIA -IndustryLand

  2. Research Summary The EU Emissions Trading System: Opportunities for Forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is currently the world's largest carbon market. It does not cover carbon sequestration by forests at present. Although the EU ETS does not currently cover forestry carbon sequestration and there is no indication. o Consider potential opportunities associated with the EU ETS and carbon sequestration that may

  3. Control System Architecture for a Remotely Operated Unmanned Land Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed for the control of industrial robots and automated manufacturing systems. In this application, RCS

  4. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  5. Progress in the Development of a S-RETGEM-Based Detector for an Early Forest Fire Warning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ­ 1 ­ Progress in the Development of a S-RETGEM-Based Detector for an Early Forest Fire Warning for an early forest fire detection system. Tests show that it is one hundred times more sensitive than the best System G. Charpak a , P. Benaben a , P. Breuil a , P. Martinengo b , E. Nappi c , V. Peskov b,d a Ecole

  6. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  7. System analysis of shallow land burial. Volume 2: technical background. Technical report, 26 November 1979-23 January 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, D.; Buckley, D.; Donelson, S.; Dura, V.; Hecht, M.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is volume two of a three volume set detailing the activities and results of the System Analysis of Shallow Land Burial Project. Activities under four project tasks are described: Task 1 - Identify Potential Radionuclide Release Pathways, Task 2 - Systems Model for Shallow Land Burial of Low-Level Waste, Task 3 - Sensitivity and Optimization Study and Task 4 - Reference Facility Dose Assessment.

  8. Producing and Marketing Wild Simulated Ginseng in Forest and Agroforestry Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Producing and Marketing Wild Simulated Ginseng in Forest and Agroforestry Systems Andy Hankins plant. Wild harvest has depleted the natural population to such a degree that it has become threatened with extinction in certain regions (Convention on InternationalTrade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora

  9. Comparing object oriented and traditional designs for a forest pest management decision support system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, J. M

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed for a forest pest management decision support system (DSS) to simulate the pattern of functional reusability during system evolution. Each design model was constructed using the Nexpert Object expert system development shell. The 00 design used... CONTROL PLAN PEST SURVEY ES POPULATION DBMS PIANT SPATIAL ANIMAL INSEC'I POPULATION COMPUTER LIFE STAGE PLANT POPULATION~ TOP~ BIOLOGICAL SIMULATION~ WEATHER TREE PHYSICAL~~ SOIL MANAGEMENT FIRE SPATIAL QUERY SUITABILITY QUERY SIMULATION QUERY...

  10. Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Lauren

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

  11. Subsurface drip systems for land application of residential wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Byron Anthony

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    classification of the most restrictive soil layer ranging between 4. 12 I/m /day (0. 1 gal/ft /day) for class IV (clay) soils to 20. 6 Vm /day (0. 50 gaV ft /day) for class Ia (sand/gravel) soils (TNRCC, 1997). Texas's design criteria for hydraulic loading... gallons) of wastewater per day. The soil type used for designing the subsurface drip system is a sandy clay loam (type III, 30 TAC Chapter 285, 1997). From the TNRCC (1995) regulations, the hydraulic application rate is 8. 15 I/m /day (0. 20 gal/ft /day...

  12. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  13. Timber resource statistics for the north coast resource area of California, 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, K.L.; Bassett, P.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of timber resource statistics for the North Coast Resource Area of California, which includes Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, and Sonoma Counties. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest Research Station as part of a State wide multiresource inventory. The inventory sampled private and public lands except reserved areas and National Forests. The National Forest System provided data from regional inventories of North Coast National Forests. Area information for parks and other reserves was obtained directly from the organizations managing these areas. Statistical tables summarize all ownerships and provide estimates of land area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and harvest. Estimates of periodic change of volume and area on timber land are presented for all ownerships outside National Forests.

  14. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Nancy Marek Project Manager Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn

  15. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Pennsylvania John Gordon InterForest Rose Harvey The Trust for Public Land Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology and Director

  16. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  17. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This abstract outlinse a project that is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process, and transport woody biomass from southern pine...

  18. Development of a Decision Support Geographic Information System for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jason Samuel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions, and geologic characteristics. This study describes the development, accuracy, and application of a decision support geographic information system (DSGIS) for land restoration programs in the Leon, Lampasas, and Bosque River watersheds...

  19. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  20. Toward a National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Canopy Phenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service; Spruce, Joe [NASA Stennis Space Center; Gasser, Gerry [NASA Stennis Space Center; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagine a national system with the ability to quickly identify forested areas under attack from insects or disease. Such an early warning system might minimize surprises such as the explosion of caterpillars referred to in the quotation to the left. Moderate resolution (ca. 500m) remote sensing repeated at frequent (ca. weekly) intervals could power such a monitoring system that would respond in near real-time. An ideal warning system would be national in scope, automated, able to improve its prognostic ability with experience, and would provide regular map updates online in familiar and accessible formats. Such a goal is quite ambitious - analyzing vegetation change weekly at a national scale with moderate resolution is a daunting task. The foremost challenge is discerning unusual or unexpected disturbances from the normal backdrop of seasonal and annual changes in vegetation conditions. A historical perspective is needed to define a 'baseline' for expected, normal behavior against which detected changes can be correctly interpreted. It would be necessary to combine temperature, precipitation, soils, and topographic information with the remotely sensed data to discriminate and interpret the changing vegetation conditions on the ground. Conterminous national coverage implies huge data volumes, even at a moderate resolution (250-500m), and likely requires a supercomputing capability. Finally, such a national warning system must carefully balance the rate of successful threat detection with false positives. Since 2005, the USDA Forest Service has partnered with the NASA Stennis Space Center and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to develop methods for monitoring environmental threats, including native insects and diseases, wildfire, invasive pests and pathogens, tornados, hurricanes, and hail. These tools will be instrumental in helping the Forest Service's two Environmental Threat Assessment Centers better meet their Congressional mandate to help track the health of the Nation's forests and rangelands. We envision two scales of forest monitoring: (1) a strategic, satellite-based monitoring of broad regions to identify particular locations where threats are suspected (i.e., early warning), and (2) a fine-scale, tactical tier consisting of airborne overflights and on-the-ground monitoring to check the validity of warnings from the upper tier. The tactical tier is already largely in place within the Forest Service and its State collaborators, consisting of aerial detection surveys (sketch mapping from aircraft), ground surveys, and trapping programs. However, these efforts are expensive and labor-intensive, can be dangerous, and may not provide sufficient broad-area coverage. Far from replacing the tactical tier, the national system will rely on the finer-scale efforts to confirm, validate, and attribute causes of detected forest disturbances. One important objective of the national warning system will be to help direct the focus of the tactical tier, making their efforts more cost efficient and effective.

  1. Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

  2. The impacts of climate, land use, and demography on fires during the 21st century simulated by CLM-CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M; Randerson, J. T; Lawrence, P. J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model of wetland extent and peat accumulation: results forof carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesialosses in Alaskan forests and peat- lands, Nature Geosci. ,

  3. Selecting a Consulting Forester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-038 5-06 Selecting a Consulting Forester Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A consulting forester is an independent... forest management experience does the for- ester have and in what capacity? ? In what professional or forestry-related organizations is the forester an active member? Recognized professional organizations include the Association of Consulting...

  4. North Dakota`s forest resources, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugen, D.E.; Piva, R.J.; Kingsley, N.P.; Harsel, R.A.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third inventory of North Dakota`s forests reports 44.1 million acres of land, of which 673 thousand acres are forested. This paper contains detailed tables related to area, volume, growth, removals, mortality, and ownership of North Dakota`s forests.

  5. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and scientific experts in sustainable forest management. Our scientists, mathematical modellers and survey staff and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management and land-use management, whose work focuses on the use of applied science for tree, woodland and forest

  6. The Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    to the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC; i.e., the followThe Community Land Model and Its Climate Statistics as a Component of the Community Climate System carried out with the new version of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). This paper reports

  7. MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land and water management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jeff

    9 MoistureMap: A soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system for sustainable land soil moisture monitoring, prediction and reporting system (MoistureMap) for Australia uncertainty at 1km resolution, by assimilating (i) low-resolution passive microwave-derived surface soil

  8. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethanol Systems Ethan Warner1, Yimin Zhang1, Helena Chum2 , Robin Newmark1 Biofuels represent technological learning, sugarcane and corn ethanol industries have achieved steady improvements in resource Scope Abstract Conclusions The GHG savings and land energy productivity of both ethanol systems have

  9. Forests 2011, 2, 86-111; doi:10.3390/f2010086 ISSN 1999-4907

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deforestation and land use change to forest conservation and sustainability. Even though REDD+ is not primarily the late 1980s, including discourse regarding forests. Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest financial mechanism for shifting the incentives from deforestation and land use change to forest

  10. Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

  11. Forest Landscape Description and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Forest Landscape Description and Inventories a basis for landplanning and design Pacific Southwest landscape description and inventories ­ a basis for land plan- ning and design. Berkeley, Calif., Pacific SW. Illustrates their application in two inventories made to aid managers and landscape architects in planning

  12. Forest Fire Model as a Supercritical Dynamic Model in Financial Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Deokjae; Lee, Jeho; Kahng, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, large-scale cascading failures in complex systems have garnered substantial attention. Such extreme events have been treated as an integral part of the self-organized criticality (SOC). Recent empirical work has suggested that some extreme events systematically deviate from the SOC paradigm, requiring a different theoretical framework. We shed additional theoretical light on this possibility by studying financial crisis. We build our model of financial crisis on the well-known forest fire model in scale-free networks. Our analysis shows a non-trivial scaling feature indicating supercritical behavior, which is independent of system size. Extreme events in the supercritical state result from bursting of a fat bubble, seeds of which are sown by a protracted period of a benign financial environment with few shocks. Our findings suggest that policymakers can control the magnitude of financial meltdowns by keeping the economy operating within reasonable duration of a benign environment.

  13. UNCORRECTED 2 Models of natural and human dynamics in forest landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monticino, Michael

    protected areas, though they differ in the specifics of vegetation and land 23 use. In the Texas sitesUNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Models of natural and human dynamics in forest landscapes: 3 Cross natural and human systems across sites and cultures through a process of simplification and 17 abstraction

  14. Forest statistics for Michigan's eastern upper peninsula unit, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) is a continuing endeavor as mandated by the Renewable Resources Research Act of 1978. The objective of FIA is to periodically inventory the Nation's forest land to determine its extent, condition, and volume of timber, growth, and removals. Up-to-date resource information is essential to frame forest policies and programs.

  15. PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providing brief explanations of alternative management practices. An on-site survey of recreationists to forest management on public land, the present study used survey methodologies to examine stakeholder254 PUBLIC ACCEPTABILITY OF FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AT MORGAN-MONROE STATE FOREST Shannon C

  16. amazon forest results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there has been significant degradation in forest cover over recent decades as a result of logging, conversion to crop, plantation, and pasture land, or disasters (natural or man...

  17. Automate Monitoring System for the Dynamics of Lands Based on Aerial Photos Assessed by Artificial Neural Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    24 Automate Monitoring System for the Dynamics of Lands Based on Aerial Photos Assessed by Artificial Neural Techniques Ioan Ilean Department of Computer Science "1Decembrie 1918" University Alba. In this project an application of artificial neural networks to human-centered earth science information

  18. THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE PREDICTION SYSTEM) ARCHIVE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Elisabeth

    THE PRECIPITATION REGIME OF DRONNING MAUD LAND, ANTARCTICA, DERIVED FROM AMPS (ANTARCTIC MESOSCALE. Manning2) 1) Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Innsbruck, Austria 2) Mesoscale the temporal and spatial distribution of precipitation in DML using AMPS (Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System

  19. European rules, American lands The archaeological heritage protection system in the French West Indies (F.W.I.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    those historical changes for the B.E.S. to take a look at the situation of the archaeological heritageEuropean rules, American lands The archaeological heritage protection system in the French West other French metropolitan department. That includes the heritage protection legal frame. In a certain

  20. Estimating forest structural characteristics with airborne lidar scanning and a near-real time profiling laser systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Kaiguang

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for realtime remote sensing platforms, e.g., to provide timely information for urgent applications. This study aims to develop an airborne profiling LiDAR system, featured with on-the-fly data processing, for near real- or real- time forest inventory...

  1. In this issue: New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    In this issue: · New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation · Florida's Outstanding Tree Farmers Quantifies Economic Impact of Private, Working Forests · New Longleaf Book for Landowners and Foresters · Get Landowners and Resource Professionals Volume 16, No. 4 Spring 2010 New Tax Incentives for Land

  2. Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Simulated watershed responses to land cover changes using the Regional Hydro-Ecological Simulation Old Main Hill, Logan, UT, 84322-8200, USA Abstract: In this work, we used the Regional Hydro

  3. Land O'Lakes Shaves Gas Usage through Steam System In-Plant Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Twelve participants from 6 different facilities learned and practiced energy efficiency assessment skills during the recent in-plant training at a Land O'Lakes dairy plant in Carlisle, Pennsylvania...

  4. Trace Metal Retention in the Incorporation Zone of Land-Applied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , with agricultural, forest, and range lands as well as land reclamation sites increasingly used for land applicationTrace Metal Retention in the Incorporation Zone of Land-Applied Sludge T A M M O S . S T E E N H U, Ithaca, New York 14853 Recycling nutrients in wastewater sludge (biosolids) via land application

  5. Land Tenure Center 50th Anniversary Celebration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    + implementation. Jon Unruh will summarize land tenure obstacles to the implementation of carbon sequestration that clarifying tenure and carbon rights will be necessary for effective REDD+ implementation. REDD stands 2011 Madison workshop on Land Tenure and Forest Carbon Management. Barney Barnes will summarize

  6. Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Matthew Earl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    in hydrologic restoration as gradients are created that support a diverse community. Tree seedlings were subjected to experimental flooding regimes typical of floodplain forests in rural and urban settings. Growth rates of seedlings varied over time and differed...

  7. Forest fire management in Portugal : developing system insights through models of social and physical dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Ross D. (Ross Daniel)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing forest fires is a serious national problem in Portugal. Burned area has increased steadily over the past several decades, with particularly devastating years in 2003 and 2005. Ignitions also spike dramatically in ...

  8. ForestDevelopment Community Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    in Africa as a basis for developing applied integrated, multiple use forest resource management for timber and non-timber forest products from these systems, and for forest rehabilitation af- ter degradation from to Fusarium circinatum. Forestry companies worldwide have tried to hybridise P. radiata with other Pinus

  9. Land use implications of future energy system trajectories – the case of the UK 2050 Carbon Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konadu, D. Dennis; Mourão, Zenaida Sobral; Allwood, Julian M.; Richards, Keith S.; Kopec, Grant; McMahon, Richard; Fenner, Richard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of „biodiversity protection and food production, before low-carbon energy/GHG sequestration?. This is consistent with 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36... Highlights ? The Carbon Plan could result in significant land use change for bioenergy by 2050 ? Higher Nuclear; less efficiency pathway has the highest land use change impact ? Higher Renewables; more energy efficiency pathway has the lowest...

  10. Forests and The Texas Economy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in tree mortality caused by pine bark beetles and the con version of timberland to other uses. The effects of pro jected land use changes are illustrated in Figure 10-1. The future of the forest industry sector depends on the sol ution to timber growth... organizations interested in forestry in Texas. As an indication of the economic and social importance of forests, both the public and private sectors are well represented. The forest products industry, an important component of the forestry sector...

  11. WISDOM number two / page 7 IN THE FOREST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Thomas D.

    a decision support tool for land managers that met the needs of the BLM managers perfectly. The ForestERA project was in the final stages of a 2 million acre analysis of forest and fire risk management jurisdictions, they could accomplish for- est management planning to address fire risks. Luckily, the Forest

  12. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

  13. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  14. A Critical Review of the State-of-the-Art in Autonomous Land Vehicle Systems and Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DURRNAT-WHYTE, HUGH

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the current state-of-the-art in Autonomous Land Vehicle (ALV) systems and technology. Five functional technology areas are identified and addressed. For each a brief, subjective, preface is first provided which envisions the necessary technology for the deployment of an operational ALV system. Subsequently, a detailed literature review is provided to support and elaborate these views. It is further established how these five technology areas fit together as a functioning whole. The essential conclusion of this report is that the necessary sensors, algorithms and methods to develop and demonstrate an operationally viable all-terrain ALV already exist and could be readily deployed. A second conclusion is that the successful development of an operational ALV system will rely on an effective approach to systems engineering. In particular, a precise description of mission requirements and a clear definition of component functionality is essential.

  15. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    that encompasses land-use change processes such as forest regrowth resulting from abandon- ment of agricultural & Hall 1998), the sink is thought to be largely in the world's forests, which are large reservoirs

  16. Spatial data infrastructures for the Amazon: a first step towards a global forest information system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    of deforestation caused by human actions. Deforestation is particularly intense in countries with large million km2 , 17% of the original forest has been cleared, according to the Brazilian deforestation, current information on global deforestation is extremely patchy. There is much disagreement

  17. A Physically Based Runoff Routing Model for Land Surface and Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Wu, Huan; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A new physically based runoff routing model, called the Model for Scale Adaptive River Transport (MOSART), has been developed to be applicable across local, regional, and global scales. Within each spatial unit, surface runoff is first routed across hillslopes and then discharged along with subsurface runoff into a ‘‘tributary subnetwork’’ before entering the main channel. The spatial units are thus linked via routing through the main channel network, which is constructed in a scale-consistent way across different spatial resolutions. All model parameters are physically based, and only a small subset requires calibration.MOSART has been applied to the Columbia River basin at 1/ 168, 1/ 88, 1/ 48, and 1/ 28 spatial resolutions and was evaluated using naturalized or observed streamflow at a number of gauge stations. MOSART is compared to two other routing models widely used with land surface models, the River Transport Model (RTM) in the Community Land Model (CLM) and the Lohmann routing model, included as a postprocessor in the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model package, yielding consistent performance at multiple resolutions. MOSART is further evaluated using the channel velocities derived from field measurements or a hydraulic model at various locations and is shown to be capable of producing the seasonal variation and magnitude of channel velocities reasonably well at different resolutions. Moreover, the impacts of spatial resolution on model simulations are systematically examined at local and regional scales. Finally, the limitations ofMOSART and future directions for improvements are discussed.

  18. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellenceOfficeOhio:OpowerOrchardCity,Protectio Program | Open

  19. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  20. Stennis Space Center Use of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    of MODIS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center Prototypical Early Warning System (EWS) results ­ Posting of NRT results on-line for use by USFS Forest Monitoring Products in Developing a Forest Threat Early Warning System Stennis Space Center

  1. How well do we know northern land cover? Comparison of four global vegetation and wetland products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data (GLCC.AVHRR), (2) the Global Land Cover Classification.AVHRR database underestimates evergreen needleleaf forest in favor of mixed forest; and (3) at high latitudes impacts of climate change on land- atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, carbon and green- house gases [e

  2. A comparison of undiscovered oil and gas resource estimates, Los Padres National Forest in the Ventura Basin Province, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, K.J.; Valin, Z.C. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bain, D.M. [Consultant, Daily City, CA (United States); Hopps, T.E. [Consultant, Santa Paula, CA (United States); Friehauf, J.S.F. [Forest Service, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent assessments of the undiscovered oil and gas resources of Los Padres National Forest lands in the Ventura Basin Province using different methodologies and personnel show remarkable coincidence of estimated resources. The 1989 U.S. Geological Survey assessment was part of a National appraisal. In the Ventura Basin Province, two separate plays were assessed and a percentage of resources from these plays was allocated to Federal lands. By this allocation, the undiscovered oil and gas resources of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from <10-140 MMBO (means probability 60 MMBO, million barrels of oil) and 10-250 BCFG (mean probability 110 BCFG, billion cubic feet of gas). In 1993, the U.S. Forest Service completed an oil and gas assessment of the entire 1.8 million-acre Los Padres National Forest as part of a Reasonably Foreseeable Oil and Gas Development Scenario. In those areas of the forest considered to have high potential for the occurrence of oil and gas deposits, a deposit simulation model was used. This method is based on a fundamental reservoir engineering formula in the USGS computer program, FASPU (Fast Appraisal System for Petroleum-Universal). By this method, the undiscovered oil and gas resource of this part of the Los Padres National Forest are estimated to range from 0-182 MMBO (mean probability 56 MMBO) and 9-233 BCFG (mean probability 103 BCFG). An additional 6 MMBO (mean probability) is allocated to forest lands with medium potential within this province but not to any specific prospects. The remarkable coincidence of estimate resources resulting from such different assessment methods and personnel is noteworthy and appears to provide an increased measure of confidence in the estimates.

  3. 159L I t e R A t U R e C I t e D American Forest and Paper Association. 2009. Our industry-paper. Washington, DC: American Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water and people: drinking water supply and forest lands in the Northeast and Midwest United States. NA.]. 2008. Mapping U.S. forest biomass using nationwide forest inventory data and moderate resolution159L I t e R A t U R e C I t e D American Forest and Paper Association. 2009. Our industry

  4. Session K--Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas--Ffolliott, Gottfried, DeBano USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 271

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Session K--Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas--Ffolliott, Gottfried, DeBano USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 271 Fuel Loadings in Forests, Woodlands, and Savannas to increase the loadings of downed woody fuels. Ecologists and land managers are reintroducing fire

  5. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  6. Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Model (CLM) is the land component within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) (formerly known earth system model b

  7. Experiments and a model of pilot system failure detection during simulated Lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaderka, Justin David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future complex systems, such as those found in piloted aircraft and spacecraft, will undoubtedly utilize significant automation to enhance pilot capabilities and enable novel mission scenarios. Off-nominal conditions may ...

  8. Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

  9. From Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    : Crystalline solar photovoltaic modules Land use: ~200 acres Over 164,000 Panels #12;Sustainability ForestFrom Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar Farm - Amherst December 13, 2012 #12;Solar Energy Land intensive Growing number of facilities Little research

  10. Preliminary Systems Design Study assessment report. Volume 5, Land disposal compliance and hydrogen generation restricted concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayberry, J.L.; Feizollahi, F.; Del Signore, J.C.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The System Design Study (SDS), part of the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examined techniques available for the remediation of hazardous and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the INEL. Using specific technologies, system concepts for treating the buried waste and the surrounding contaminated soil were evaluated. Evaluation included implementability, effectiveness, and cost. The SDS resulted in the development of technology requirements including demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities needed for implementing each concept.

  11. Quantifying landscape pattern in the Ouachita National Forest: an ecological application of GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Delayne Marie

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to changing the structure and function of these forested landscapes has not been adequately analyzed or considered in land management and planning. Consideration of landscape ecological principles should be a crucial part of land management and planning within...

  12. Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

  13. BIOTECHNOLOGY: WORKING WITH NATURE TO IMPROVE FOREST RESOURCES AND PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    . Effective management of forested lands is central to our quality of life and the sustainability and health that can contribute to forest sustainability include genetic engineering and phytoremediation. Genetic implications is phytoremediation, the use of genetically modified trees for soil remediation. Phytoremediation

  14. Building Curiosity Landing System Drop Test [00:00:06]Hi, I'm Savannah McCoy and I'm the rover verification and validation lead.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Building Curiosity ­ Landing System Drop Test [00:00:06]Hi, I'm Savannah McCoy and I'm the rover verification and validation lead. [00:00:11]My job is to run system-level tests on the rover's structure build two rovers in parallel. One's the flight rover [00:00:22]and one's the test rover, or DTM

  15. Survey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest--are in the process of revising their management plan. Since one of their missions has beenSurvey of Rare Plants San Juan Public Lands in Dolores and Montezuma Counties, Colorado Colorado #12;EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The San Juan Public Lands agencies--Bureau of Land Management and San Juan

  16. Extension Note Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based harvesting systems led to the development of the "Site Degradation Guidelines for the Vancouver Forest Region to validate soil disturbance guidelines, were lacking at that time. Early attempts had been made to assess, and to measure tree growth over the longer term as an indication of site productivity. The first trial

  17. Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

  18. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 735?747, 2009 www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/13/735/2009/ ? Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Quantifying the effect of land... al. (1999). These studies, which generally in- dicate that deforestation causes an increase in the mean an- nual discharge, have concentrated on the impacts of forest management on water yield (Siriwardena et al., 2006).While field experiments can...

  19. By Rebecca Barnard, Forest Certification Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - administered land. Third party and annual surveillance audits maintain or improve the DNR's forest management that their products Continued on page 4 Chain of Custody Market Outlook 2 Certification Web sites 5 Stumpage Prices 6 percent long-run trend level by mid-2009. However, energy and fuel prices have increased to levels well

  20. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  1. Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . This would require a 10-fold increase in biomass supply, . . . how much land? Future Biofuel Production Flexibility Program for Bioenergy Producers Section 9011: Biomass Crop Assistance Program Section 9012: Forest of fuel a year; 30% would be about 95 billion gallons, which would require 1 billion tons of biomass

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PDF documents. Download Acrobat Reader. Forest Products Case Studies Advanced Quality Control System for the Thermomechanical Pulping Process Improves Quality and Reduces...

  3. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  4. Progress in the development of a S RETGEM-based detector for an early forest fire warning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charpak, Georges; Breuil, P; Martinengo, P; Nappi, E; Peskov, V; 10.1088/1748-0221/4/12/P12007

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a prototype of a Strip Resistive Thick GEM photosensitive gaseous detector filled with Ne and ethylferrocene vapours at a total pressure of 1 atm for an early forest fire detection system. Tests show that it is one hundred times more sensitive than the best commercial ultraviolet flame detectors and therefore, it is able to reliably detect a flame of 1.5x1.5x1.5 m3 at a distance of about 1km. An additional and unique feature of this detector is its imaging capability, which in combination with other techniques, may significantly reduce false fire alarms when operating in an automatic mode. Preliminary results conducted with air filled photosensitive gaseous detectors are also presented. The approach main advantages include both the simplicity of manufacturing and affordability of construction materials such as plastics and glues specifically reducing detector production cost. The sensitivity of these air filled detectors at certain conditions may be as high as those filled with Ne and...

  5. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  6. SUNSHINE: A light environment simulation system based on hemispherical photographs. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.R.; Somers, G.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer simulation system uses hemispherical photographs to estimate the amount of solar radiation a horizontal surface receives. The system reduces the cost and time of manual analysis to obtain radiation estimates from hemispherical photographs. The radiation on the horizontal surface is calculated from images of photographs input into a computer by an electronic scanner. Two programs are used, EDIT-TIF to edit and preprocess the image and SUNSHINE to calculate the diffuse and direct radiation. Use of the two programs in the SUNSHINE simulation system is described step by step. The theory and operation of the programs are discussed.

  7. The large-scale cross-correlation of Damped Lyman alpha systems with the Lyman alpha forest: first measurements from BOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Arnau, Eduard [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (IEEC/UB), Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Carithers, Bill; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Rollinde, Emmanuel [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Université Paris 6 et CNRS, 98bis blvd. Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Rich, James [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: font@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and The Fermi Institute, Chicago University, 5640 So. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurement of the large-scale cross-correlation of Ly? forest absorption and Damped Lyman ? systems (DLA), using the 9th Data Release of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The cross-correlation is clearly detected on scales up to 40h{sup ?1}Mpc and is well fitted by the linear theory prediction of the standard Cold Dark Matter model of structure formation with the expected redshift distortions, confirming its origin in the gravitational evolution of structure. The amplitude of the DLA-Ly? cross-correlation depends on only one free parameter, the bias factor of the DLA systems, once the Ly? forest bias factors are known from independent Ly? forest correlation measurements. We measure the DLA bias factor to be b{sub D} = (2.17±0.20)?{sub F}{sup 0.22}, where the Ly? forest redshift distortion parameter ?{sub F} is expected to be above unity. This bias factor implies a typical host halo mass for DLAs that is much larger than expected in present DLA models, and is reproduced if the DLA cross section scales with halo mass as M{sub h}{sup ?}, with ? = 1.1±0.1 for ?{sub F} = 1. Matching the observed DLA bias factor and rate of incidence requires that atomic gas remains extended in massive halos over larger areas than predicted in present simulations of galaxy formation, with typical DLA proper sizes larger than 20 kpc in host halos of masses ? 10{sup 12}M{sub ?}. We infer that typical galaxies at z ? 2 to 3 are surrounded by systems of atomic clouds that are much more extended than the luminous parts of galaxies and contain ? 10% of the baryons in the host halo.

  8. Multifaceted Value Profiles of Forest Owner Categories in South Sweden: The River Helge a Catchment as a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    -industrial forest land owners and municipalities included all value categories, the forest companies focused on wood including non-timber forest products as well as ecological, social, and cultural dimensions at multiple goods (e.g., timber and fish) can readily be converted into market goods. In contrast, many

  9. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Resources and Management Centre for The Centre for Forest Resources and Management aims the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration-energy development, forest resource forecasting, genetic improvement, woodland regeneration and creation, management

  10. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  11. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  12. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  13. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  14. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  15. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  16. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  17. Timber management and use-value assessment. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sendak, P.E.; Huyler, N.K.

    1994-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes timber management activity and estimates timber harvest from forest land enrolled in Vermont`s Use Value Appraisal (UVA) Forest Land property tax program. Data were compiled from the mandatory management plans and annual conformance reports filed for each property enrolled in the Program. Overall, 31 percent of the UVA properties reported a commercial harvest during 1989. The harvest on enrolled lands represented 18 percent and 24 percent, respectively, of the reported total sawlog and pulpwood-fuelwood harvest in Vermont in 1989, while enrolled lands represented about 16 percent of the total timberland in the State.

  18. Status of precommercial-sized softwoods in Louisiana, 1991. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on precommercial-sized softwoods in seedling- and sapling-sized stands are presented and discussed. Inadequate levels of softwood stocking in NIPF (Nonindustrial private forest) lands could diminish long-term supplies of softwood in the State.

  19. Overview of the Michigan DNR Forest Certification Program By Dennis Nezich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Overview of the Michigan DNR Forest Certification Program By Dennis Nezich January 27, 2011 OF CERTIFICATION: The scope of certification includes 3.9 million acres of state land within the Michigan State

  20. The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  1. Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Bethany

    COMMENTARY Can remote sensing of land cover improve species distribution modelling? Remote sensing- guish among broad classes of vegetation. However, the applicability of remote sensing to classification like from remote sensing ­ a map of tree species ­ and what can be delivered ­ a map of forest types

  2. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  3. Research Note NRS-136 This publication provides an overview of forest resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of live trees (1,000 ft 3/ year) 619,902 2.0 -1.1 Annual mortality of live trees (1,000 ft 3 /year) 296/beech/birch Elm/ash/cottonwood Aspen/birch Area of Forest Land (1,000 acres) Forest-typeGroup Large Medium Small

  4. Modeling the age of tropical moist forest fragments in heavily-cleared lowland landscapes of Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    of Colombia Andres Etter a,b,c,*, Clive McAlpine a,b , David Pullar b , Hugh Possingham a a The Ecology Centre-00, Bogota´, Colombia Received 31 August 2004; received in revised form 7 December 2004; accepted 7 December deforestation; Forest fragment age; Land use drivers; Colombia www.elsevier.com/locate/foreco Forest Ecology

  5. Simulating the Long-term Response of Tropical Wet Forests to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    abandoned. The simulated recovery time in those secondary forests depends on both the size of cleared area into rem- nants surrounded by secondary vegetation, land- use areas, or roads. It is important to develop of forest remnants. We also performed simula- tions of secondary succession after the landscape had been

  6. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... forests can be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence...

  7. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  8. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  9. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP): A Model-Data Comparison System for Evaluation of Coupled Biosphere-Atmosphere Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, Jim [University of California, Irvine; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Mahowald, Natalie [Cornell University; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Running, Steven [University of Montana, Missoula; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to capture important climate feebacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in new efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, now often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results, suggesting that a more rigorous set of offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are warranted. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) provides a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). C-LAMP provides feedback to the modeling community regarding model improvements and to the measurement community by suggesting new observational campaigns. C-LAMP Experiment 1 consists of a set of uncoupled simulations of terrestrial carbon models specifically designed to examine the ability of the models to reproduce surface carbon and energy fluxes at multiple sites and to exhibit the influence of climate variability, prescribed atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen (N) deposition, and land cover change on projections of terrestrial carbon fluxes during the 20th century. Experiment 2 consists of partially coupled simulations of the terrestrial carbon model with an active atmosphere model exchanging energy and moisture fluxes. In all experiments, atmospheric CO{sub 2} follows the prescribed historical trajectory from C{sup 4}MIP. In Experiment 2, the atmosphere model is forced with prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and corresponding sea ice concentrations from the Hadley Centre; prescribed CO{sub 2} is radiatively active; and land, fossil fuel, and ocean CO{sub 2} fluxes are advected by the model. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3) in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): The CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons against Ameriflus site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) site measurements, and other datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). The C-LAMP diagnostics package was used to validate improvements to CASA and CN for use in the next generation model, CLM4. It is hoped that this effort will serve as a prototype for an international carbon-cycle model benchmarking activity for models being used for the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report. More information about C-LAMP, the experimental protocol, performance metrics, output standards, and model-data comparisons from the CLM3-CASA and CLM3-CN models are available at http://www.climatemodeling.org/c-lamp.

  10. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  11. School Land Board (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

  12. Land Reclamation Act (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to balance surface mining interests with the conservation of natural resources and land preservation. This Act authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the...

  13. Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project Collaboration Case Study #12;Uncompahgre Mesas Forest Restoration Project 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  14. Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2010 Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Collaboration Case Study #12;Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland at Colorado State University, to conduct case studies of two collaborative forest health efforts

  15. Forest Inventory and Analysis Research The Nation's Forest Census

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census The U.S. Forest Inventory Monitoring Symposium November 4, 2008 #12;Forest Inventory and Analysis Research F I A The Nation's Forest Census FIA Program Perspectives · Only comprehensive forest inventory for each of the 50 States, Puerto

  16. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  17. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  18. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  19. Cluster Analysis-Based Approaches for Geospatiotemporal Data Mining of Massive Data Sets for Identification of Forest Threats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Richard T [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Kumar, Jitendra [ORNL] [ORNL; HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate methods for geospatiotemporal data mining of multi-year land surface phenology data (250 m2 Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) values derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) in this study) for the conterminous United States (CONUS) as part of an early warning system for detecting threats to forest ecosystems. The approaches explored here are based on k-means cluster analysis of this massive data set, which provides a basis for defining the bounds of the expected or normal phenological patterns that indicate healthy vegetation at a given geographic location. We briefly describe the computational approaches we have used to make cluster analysis of such massive data sets feasible, describe approaches we have explored for distinguishing between normal and abnormal phenology, and present some examples in which we have applied these approaches to identify various forest disturbances in the CONUS.

  20. New Virtue in Virtuous Forests: Community Woodlands in Scotland a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? · Positive values ­ Virtues, belong to both the land, and the people who invest the value. · Always enacted are the constellations of meanings -- meanings of existence, entitlement, relationship and power which are constituted From Forests for People Social Benefits Case Studies Report (Evans and Franklin 2008) -new research

  1. Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina J A V I E R H O U S P A N, Argentina, Catedra de Climatologia Agricola, Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Argentina Abstract Land cover changes may affect climate and the energy balance

  2. In this issue: Congratulations Mike Adams: 2009 Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    of the finest examples of sustainable, multiple- use forest management in Florida, earning Mr. Adams the title-use management objectives for the property incorporate timber, wildlife habitat, soil and water conservation St. Johns County in 1989. Land management practices started that year with removal and control

  3. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pulppaperprofile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment...

  4. acidified forested catchment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forest management systems, and fora for collaborative planning. Keywords Economic sustainability Vermont, University of 6 Long-term changes in precipitation and stream water...

  5. Albedo estimates for land surface models and support for a new paradigm based on foliage nitrogen concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Ollinger, S. V. [University of Hew Hampshire; Richardson, A. D. [University of Hew Hampshire; Martin, M. E. [University of New Hampshire; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Dail, D. B. [University of Maine; Scott, N. A. [Queens University, Kingston, ON, Canada; Arkebauer, T. J. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Baldocchi, D. D. [University of California, Berkeley; Clark, K. L. [USDA Forest Service; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Davis, K. J. [Pennsylvania State University; Desai, Desai Ankur R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Dragoni, Danilo [Indiana University; Goulden, M. L. [University of California, Irvine; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Katul, G. G. [Duke University; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Pawu, K. T. [University of California, Davis; Schmid, H. P. [IFU, FZK IMK, Institute of Meteorology & Climate, Garmisch Partenkirchen, Germany; Stoy, P. C. [University of Edinburgh; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation albedo is a critical component of the Earth s climate system, yet efforts to evaluate and improve albedo parameterizations in climate models have lagged relative to other aspects of model development. Here, we calculated growing season albedos for deciduous and evergreen forests, crops, and grasslands based on over 40 site-years of data from the AmeriFlux network and compared them with estimates presently used in the land surface formulations of a variety of climate models. Generally, the albedo estimates used in land surface models agreed well with this data compilation. However, a variety of models using fixed seasonal estimates of albedo overestimated the growing season albedo of northerly evergreen trees. In contrast, climatemodels that rely on a common two-stream albedo submodel provided accurate predictions of boreal needle-leaf evergreen albedo but overestimated grassland albedos. Inverse analysis showed that parameters of the two-stream model were highly correlated. Consistent with recent observations based on remotely sensed albedo, the AmeriFlux dataset demonstrated a tight linear relationship between canopy albedo and foliage nitrogen concentration (for forest vegetation: albedo 50.0110.071%N, r250.91; forests, grassland, and maize: albedo50.0210.067%N, r250.80). However, this relationship saturated at the higher nitrogen concentrations displayed by soybean foliage. We developed similar relationships between a foliar parameter used in the two-stream albedo model and foliage nitrogen concentration. These nitrogen-based relationships can serve as the basis for a new approach to land surface albedo modeling that simplifies albedo estimation while providing a link to other important ecosystem processes.

  6. Forest Lifeautumn | winter 2004 the forest!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    valley, near the spectacular Cornish coast Outdoor delights on your doorstep Come to the heart of Britain, rivers and streams, dramatic mountains, deep valleys and peaceful forest glades - they're all of exciting news, events, information and a great competition. Happy reading! In this issue of Forest Life we

  7. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Working Party 1.01.08 ­ Ecology and Silviculture of Spruces; co-hosted by the EU Interreg Project Forest of Alberta, Canada "Ecology and Silviculture of White Spruce in the Canadian Boreal Forest for Multiple Forest Integrity; Why Spruce is a Good Option" Kristina Blennow, SLU, Sweden "Perception of Risks

  8. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lead to a more efficient model to achieve and document high levels of forest stewardship by Oregon comes from well-managed forests. For wood products companies that do business with the likes of Home by the State of Oregon to be less competent or protective of forest resources than those landowners who become

  9. Forest ecology Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Forest ecology Introduction Forest ecology is a part of ecology that is con- cerned with forests as opposed to grasslands, savan- nas, or tundra. Ecology is the study of the processes of interaction among organisms and between organ- isms and their environment. Ecology is often subdi- vided into physiological

  10. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  11. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  12. Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Ian P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

  13. Wilderness designation of Bureau of Land Management lands and impacts on the availability of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakes, E.H.; Voelker, A.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1964 Congress mandated the establishment of the National Wilderness Preservation System - a collection of federal lands dedicated to the preservation of selected parts of our once vast wilderness. Because wilderness management precludes many traditional land uses, controversy has plagued the efforts of land-management agencies to select and recommend areas for wilderness inclusion. This study examines potential impacts on the supply of energy resources from the possible withdrawal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of some part of the 24.3 million acres of public lands now under study for inclusion in the wilderness system. Except for uranium, the energy-resource potential of the total WSA-acreage is low. Wilderness designation of some WSAs is therefore not expected to cause serious impacts on the future availability of energy resources. Because the significance of land withdrawals by the BLM will depend to some extent on the availability of other federal lands for mineral activities, an up-to-date estimate of the current and future status-of-access to western federal lands for mineral activities was prepared. Overall conclusions of the report are that (1) the inclusion of some BLM land in the National Wilderness Preservation System will not interfere with the nation's required supply of energy resources, (2) there is sufficient federal land currently available in the West for mineral activities, (3) the availability of western federal land for mineral activities will increase in the future, (4) the administration should continue to support the major land-review programs, and (5) the administration should accelerate the review process for WSAs in regions that have a high energy-resource potential.

  14. QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

  15. Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    Civilization's hierarchical system and the Spanish exploitation. The Mayan Civilization involved communally by Mexico, on the southeast by Honduras and El Salvador, and on the southwest by the Pacific Ocean in 1523 lead to ruthless exploitation of Mayan land. Geography, amount and accessibility of arable land

  16. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  17. Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla Grundy (University of Zimbabwe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla and a variety of other ecosystem services. However the expansion of agricultural land and the curing of tobacco is accelerating deforestation and forest degradation rates. These structural changes to the ecosystem threaten

  18. I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Forests, Carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forests) and fossil fuel reserves, summarised in Figure 2 as a simplified global carbon budget. Forests as a result of land clearance and deforestation. All plant material contains carbon (normally around 50 considering the contribution made by woodland to the carbon balance at any scale, the rate at which CO2

  19. Enhancing and celebrating the Blackdown Hills The Neroche Scheme, named after a medieval forest and an Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scheme, ranging from land management to the arts, from public access to heritage interpretation of public forest. · 75 hectares of conifers cleared to create new open spaces for grazing and broadleaf is characterised by low-intensity livestock farming and a large area of public forest, containing wet heath

  20. Appendix 33 Forest Resources of the Flathead National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ponderosa pine, and aspen forest types also occur. #12;2 Figure 3--Area by forest type and habitat type Grand fir Aspen Ponderosa pine Forest type refers to the predominant tree species in a stand, based

  1. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - Implications and challenges of decentralized China's collective forest management Heng Sok (National Forest:00-10:30 Moderator: Heng Sok (Forestry Administration, Cambodia) Session: Forests and the market for timber products

  2. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment A Foundation for Strategic Discussion and Private Forestry Redesign Initiative 2 National Guidance for Statewide Forest Resource Assessments 4 The Colorado Statewide Resource Assessment and all appendices are available online on the Colorado State Forest

  3. Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foothills Model Forest Business Strategy 2007 ­ 2012 November 2006 #12;Page ii TABLE OF CONTENTS FOOTHILLS MODEL FOREST Business Strategy for April 2007 to March 2012 1.0 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................... 4 2.4 Foothills Model Forest Values

  4. Forest Road Building Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading...

  5. Opportunities for Future Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .V.Birnie * Forest Research 1 #12;This document has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the ISO 9001

  6. Land Tenure History and Issues in the Republic of Korea Justin Maloney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    agrarian, with a feudal land system. Peasant unrest over land rights and high rents was common, and many, but remained a feudal system. Following World War II, the country was split into North and South, with both a feudal land tenure system to a modern open-market system and the large- scale industrialization

  7. Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Analytical Studies on the Impact of Land Reclamation on Ground Water Flow by Jiu J, Jiaol, Subhas Nandy2, and Hailong LP Abstract Land reclamation has been a common practice to produce valuable land of the ground water system caused by reclamation. Introduction Land reclamation has played a significant role

  8. Assistant Professor Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural, Forest, and Environmental Sciences (SAFES), within the College of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohnhoff, David

    Assistant Professor ­ Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering The School of Agricultural Professor level in the area of Agricultural Machine Systems Engineering. The position is a 9-month.S. News and World Report. The successful candidate will be expected to develop a nationally

  9. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  10. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    1976 . Disturbance during logging stimulates re- generation of koa. USDA Forest Servo Res. Note PSW-306 and distribution of Acacia koa re- genera tion after logging were studied on a 500-acre (202-ha) tract of koa forest heavily infested with Passi- /1ora mol/issima vines on the island of Hawaii. Koa seedling density

  11. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  12. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  13. MODIS Collection 5 global land cover: Algorithm refinements and characterization of new datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    information is required to parameterize land surface processes in regional-to-global scale Earth system models

  14. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  15. Tongass National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two long-term timber contracts in the Tongass National Forest require private companies to harvest prescribed amounts of timber within agreed upon time frames during the 50-year contract life. This report has reviewed the accuracy of Forest Service figures for the volume of timber actually harvested under the two contracts, timber deleted from the private companies' operating plans, and backlogged timber. The author was unable to verify the first two figures because the Forest Service had not complied with all of its internal controls and because documentation and records were incomplete. The author was able to verify the figure for backlogged timber. While the Forest Service has tried to better account for timber prepared for harvesting through improved internal controls, this report believes additional actions are needed to ensure that forest supervisors comply with the internal controls for documenting harvested timber volumes and the information needed to support and report changes in timber sale activities is accurately reported.

  16. Initial results from the Pawnee Eddy Correlation system for dry acid-deposition research. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stedman, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pawnee Grassland Eddy Correlation Dry Deposition Project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with: previously observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO/sub 2/ and NOx; micrometeorological theory; micrometeorological site characteristics.

  17. Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Peter J. Lawrence, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000. E-mail: lawrence@ucar.edu 1 MAY 2012 L A W R E N C E E T A L . 3071 DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00256.1 #2; 2012 American Meteorological Society et al. 2009) and through changes in energy... and 0.58 grid levels. The 3072 J O U R N A L O F C L I M A T E VOLUME 25 harmonized land use transitions were based around the four simplified land classes of primary vegetation (un- disturbed natural vegetation), secondary vegetation (re- growth...

  18. Response of a depleted sagebrush steppe riparian system to grazing control and woody plantings. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clary, W.P.; Shaw, N.L.; Dudley, J.G.; Saab, V.A.; Kinney, J.W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To find out if a depleted riparian system in the sagebrush steppe of eastern Oregon would respond quickly to improved management, five management treatments were applied for 7 years, ranging from ungrazed to heavily grazed treatments, including, in some cases, planting of woody species. While the results varied, all treatments were too limited to significantly restore the damaged areas within the 7-year span. Although some improvements were made in woody plant densities, little meaningful change occurred in the frequencies of herbaceous wetland plants, densities of small wildlife, or stream channel morphology. We concluded the restoration would take many years, possibly decades, without increased revegetation efforts and continued reductions in grazing in this riparian system damaged over 150 years.

  19. Potential impacts of tighter Forest Service log export restrictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal law restricts the export of unprocessed timber cut from national forests in the western half of the United States. Also, purchasers of national forest timber are restricted from substituting timber harvested from federal lands for privately owned timber that they export. GAO reviewed the magnitude of and the potential impacts from extending the substitution restriction to cover third parties who subsequently acquire Forest Service timber from the original purchasers - an export industry practice commonly referred to as third-party substitution. According to the Forest Service and timber industry associations, third-party substitution approximates 100 million board feet annually in the western United States. They said that if the practice were banned, some companies could acquire national forest timber at lower prices because of decreased demand and competition, and the lower prices would result in less government revenues. Also, a ban could disrupt traditional log markets and business practices. The Forest Service believes it could not enforce a ban on third-party substitution without additional legal authority and staff.

  20. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  1. Land cover dynamics following a deforestation ban in northern Costa Rica This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeFries, Ruth S.

    Land cover dynamics following a deforestation ban in northern Costa Rica This article has been) 034017 (9pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/3/034017 Land cover dynamics following a deforestation ban.iop.org/ERL/8/034017 Abstract Forest protection policies potentially reduce deforestation and re

  2. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  3. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  4. Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl at Western Economics Association Meetings, July 5-8, 2001, San Francisco #12;2 Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Alterations in agricultural and forestry (AF) land use and

  5. ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    that undisturbed neotropical forests remove a significant portion of human-derived CO2 emissions fromW ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon indicate that CO2 doubling enhances the production of woody tissue per unit leaf area by about 25% (ref. 5

  6. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  7. RESULTS OF THE TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR A NOVEL BIOMASS GASIFICATION-BASED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM FOR THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Sunil Ghose; Jim Patel

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) entered into Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41108 with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for an Agenda 2020 project to develop an advanced biomass gasification-based power generation system for near-term deployment in the Forest Products Industry (FPI). The advanced power system combines three advanced components, including biomass gasification, 3-stage stoker-fired combustion for biomass conversion, and externally recuperated gas turbines (ERGTs) for power generation. The primary performance goals for the advanced power system are to provide increased self-generated power production for the mill and to increase wastewood utilization while decreasing fossil fuel use. Additional goals are to reduce boiler NOx and CO{sub 2} emissions. The current study was conducted to determine the technical and economic feasibility of an Advanced Power Generation System capable of meeting these goals so that a capital investment decision can be made regarding its implementation at a paper mill demonstration site in DeRidder, LA. Preliminary designs and cost estimates were developed for all major equipment, boiler modifications and balance of plant requirements including all utilities required for the project. A three-step implementation plan was developed to reduce technology risk. The plant design was found to meet the primary objectives of the project for increased bark utilization, decreased fossil fuel use, and increased self-generated power in the mill. Bark utilization for the modified plant is significantly higher (90-130%) than current operation compared to the 50% design goal. For equivalent steam production, the total gas usage for the fully implemented plant is 29% lower than current operation. While the current average steam production from No.2 Boiler is about 213,000 lb/h, the total steam production from the modified plant is 379,000 lb/h. This steam production increase will be accomplished at a grate heat release rate (GHRR) equal to the original boiler design. Boiler efficiencies (cogeneration-steam plus air) is increased from the original design value of 70% to 78.9% due to a combination of improved burnout, operation with lower excess air, and drier fuel. For the fully implemented plant, the thermal efficiency of fuel to electricity conversion is 79.8% in the cogeneration mode, 5% above the design goal. Finally, self-generated electricity will be increased from the 10.8 MW currently attributable to No.2 Boiler to 46.7MW, an increase of 332%. Environmental benefits derived from the system include a reduction in NOx emissions from the boiler of about 30-50% (90-130 tons/year) through syngas reburning, improved carbon burnout and lower excess air. This does not count NOx reduction that may be associated with replacement of purchased electricity. The project would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions from the generation of electricity to meet the mill's power requirements, including 50,000 tons/yr from a net reduction in gas usage in the mill and an additional 410,000 tons/yr reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions due to a 34 MW reduction of purchased electricity. The total CO{sub 2} reduction amounts to about 33% of the CO{sub 2} currently generated to meet the mills electricity requirement. The overall conclusion of the study is that while significant engineering challenges are presented by the proposed system, they can be met with operationally acceptable and cost effective solutions. The benefits of the system can be realized in an economic manner, with a simple payback period on the order of 6 years. The results of the study are applicable to many paper mills in the U.S. firing woodwastes and other solid fuels for steam and power production.

  8. Lands & Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receiveLand ManagementLands

  9. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  10. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  11. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  12. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  13. County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  15. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  16. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  17. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    and increasing deadwood, increasing recreation activities in forests, climate change, ... ) need for multi and Merlo, 2005 - Mediterranean Forest Values:37-68 133 ha-1 (overall average value in 18 Mediterranean

  18. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

  19. Forest Clearing in the Ecuadorian Amazon: A Study of Patterns Over Space and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    on a farm (finca) leads to more deforestation; (2) rates of forest clearing surrounding four primary to deforestation; and deforestation rates W. Pan (&) Department of International Health, The Johns Hopkins to increase agricultural intensification. Keywords Deforestation Á Ecuador Á Land use Á Population policy Á

  20. Land Use and Water Efficiency in Current and Potential Future U.S. Corn and Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Systems (Poster), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE89 002669 RFandEndLand Use

  1. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  2. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  3. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

  4. Mensuration protocol National Forest Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NFI: Mensuration protocol for the National Forest Inventory June 2010 E. D. Mackie, R. W. Matthews and A. Brewer1 FR Biometrics Division 1 IFOS, Forestry Commission #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI or square boundary. In the case of a section 2 #12;National Forest Inventory (NFI): Mensuration Protocol

  5. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  6. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

  7. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  8. atlantic forest state: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 credits FORT 110* Forest Inventories (3) FORT 140 Forest Surveying (3) FORT 160 to Forestry 1 FORT 105 - Forest Mensuration* 3 FORT 110 - Forest...

  9. Preliminary assessment of the impacts of deep foundations and land reclamation on groundwater flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Preliminary assessment of the impacts of deep foundations and land reclamation on groundwater flow are increasing. Land reclamation from the sea and high-rise buildings are common approaches to satis- fying in a groundwater system due to land reclamation and con- struction of building foundations in a coastal area

  10. Montana State University 1 M.S.in Land Resources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    , bioremediation, land reclamation, restoration ecology, fluvial systems ecology and restoration, riparian ecologyMontana State University 1 M.S.in Land Resources and Environmental Sciences The M.S. program in Land Resources and Environmental Sciences is designed to provide outstanding graduate training

  11. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation SYSTEMÃ?KOLOGIE ETHZ., 2008. IPCC estimates for emissions from land-use change, notably deforestation Systems Ecology Report. Photo by Nathalie Baumgartner (2005) #12;A. Fischlin Emissions from land-use change (deforestation) 1

  12. International Conference MANAGING FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    speeches 1305-1310 Welcome by Chair of IUFRO Group 1.01.08 Ulf Johansson, SLU, Sweden 1310-1325 Opening-1440 The challenges of sustainability delivering multiple ecosystem services in a private sector commercial forest of Edinburgh, UK 1600-1620 Early thinning of energy wood in dense mixtures of Norway spruce and birch

  13. Terrain relative localization for lunar entry, descent, and landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Matthew J., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As exploration of the solar system continues, the need for the capability to land a spacecraft very accurately on a planetary body has become apparent. Due to limitations on the achievable accuracy of inertial navigation ...

  14. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  15. Soil-site relationships to photodelineated forest types 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Dale Robert

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to as the Southeastern Evergreen Forest (Braun, 1950). The forest is a mixed woodland dominated by loblolly pine and numerous hardwoods such as southern red oak, post oak, water oak, sweetgum, blackgun, and winged elm. The forest type map of the study sites within... Department at Texas A(M University and the Statistical Analysis System written by Anthony Barr and James Goodnight at North Carolina State University. The Texas A(M IBM 360, Model 65 computer was utilized for all mathematical and statistical analysis...

  16. Policy message Access to land and land rights,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    agriculture can reduce land deg- radation, support agricultural development, and mitigate rural poverty conservation tech- niques by producing food, fodder, fibre, or fuel. · Sustainable farming practices produce

  17. What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information about forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is the National Forest Inventory? The National Forest Inventory is a record of key information is the information gathered? Data for the National Forest Inventory is being collected using ground surveys, aerial representative picture of the state of Britain's forests and woodland. National Forest Inventory #12;Has

  18. FCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 Forest operations and red squirrels in Scottish forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts on red squirrels. The survey, forest design and operational planning practices set outFCS Guidance Note 33: Forest operations and red squirrels: November 2006 1 Forest operations Guidance Note: Forest operations and wildlife in Scottish forests. This note sets out further advice on how

  19. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receiveLand Management About

  20. Old growth in northwestern California National Forests. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beardsley, D.; Warbington, R.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates old-growth forest area and summarizes stand characteristics of old growth in northwestern California National Forests by forest type. Old-growth definitions for each forest type are used.

  1. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  2. An Assessment of Land Availability and Price in the Coterminous United States for Conversion to Algal Biofuel Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistic economic assessment of land-intensive alternative energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) requires information on land availability and price. Accordingly, we created a comprehensive, national-scale model of these parameters for the United States. For algae-based biofuel, a minimum of 1.04E+05 km2 of land is needed to meet the 2022 EISA target of 2.1E+10 gallons year-1. We locate and quantify land types best converted. A data-driven model calculates the incentive to sell and a fair compensation value (real estate and lost future income). 1.02E+6 km2 of low slope, non-protected land is relatively available including croplands, pasture/ grazing, and forests. Within this total there is 2.64E+5 km2 of shrub and barren land available. The Federal government has 7.68E+4 km2 available for lease. Targeting unproductive lands minimizes land costs and impacts to existing industries. However, shrub and barren lands are limited by resources (water) and logistics, so land conversion requires careful consideration.

  3. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  4. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  5. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

  6. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  7. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bioenergy program” land-use baseline (i.e. , one in which prices,BIOENERGY POLICIES ON CLIMATE AND CLIMATE IMPACTS POLICY ACTION ENERGY SYSTEMS MATERIALS LAND USE, ECOSYSTEMS ECONOMIC SYSTEM (PRICES)Prices, yields, supply curves, and land uses can change over time, year-by-year, in the “with bioenergy

  8. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  9. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  10. Soft-Landing of Peptide IOns Onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    self-assembled monolayer surfaces (SAMs). Peptide ions are particularly attractive model systems that provide important insights on the behavior of soft landed proteins, while...

  11. Land Mine Detection at TJNAF | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    technology development Application currently being supported by: US Army, Advance Energy Systems, Inc. Impactbenefit to spin-off field: Detection of buried land mines and...

  12. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  13. Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Channel Revised Fourth Edition Kelp Forests of the Santa Barbara Research Program Santa Barbara Coastal Long Term Ecological Research Program #12;Kelp Forests of the Santa

  14. Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redo, Daniel J.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 62 Forest clearance (1986-2001) during the neoliberal period ....................... 373 63 Forest clearance (2005-2008) near Tres Cruces ......................................... 375 64 Forest clearance (2005-2008) in Nuevo M...

  15. Bus Rapid Transit Impacts on Land Uses and Land Values in Seoul, Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Kang, Chang Deok

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an ambitious campaign of land reclamation, taking valuablehub of Seoul’s ambitious land reclamation and redevelopment

  16. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Paper Company Sara Kendall Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme Berlyn Professor

  17. Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

  18. Deregulating 'the rural'; threatening land management regime. Experiences of space in the Tuscan countryside

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orsini, Stefano

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research the relationships between landownership and the use of rural land are investigated and analyzed through an empirical study, conducted in Tuscany, which was based on interviews with landowners. Through the development of farmers' typologies, the results highlight a general process of decoupling form land, which appears through disinvestments in farming activity and changing the intended uses of rural land and buildings. The dynamic of liberalization (and urbanization) of rural space arises challenges to the future of land management system, which seems to be going to suffer a radical restructuring. Another relevant and connected issue emerges by this case study, that is the volatility of rural land development practices.

  19. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  20. Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narolski, Steven W.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

  1. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  2. Hydraulic Geometry and Microtopography of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands and Implications for Restoration, Columbia River, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Coleman, Andre M.; Borde, Amy B.; Sinks, Ian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrologic reconnection of tidal channels, riverine floodplains, and main stem channels are among responses by ecological restoration practitioners to the increasing fragmentation and land conversion occurring in coastal and riparian zones. Design standards and monitoring of such ecological restoration depend upon the characterization of reference sites that vary within and among regions. Few locales, such as the 235 km tidal portion of the Columbia River on the West Coast U.S.A., remain in which the reference conditions and restoration responses of tidal freshwater forested wetlands on temperate zone large river floodplains can be compared. This study developed hydraulic geometry relationships for Picea sitchensis (Sitka spruce) dominated tidal forests (swamps) in the vicinity of Grays Bay on the Columbia River some 37 km from the Pacific Coast using field surveys and Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Scaling relationships between catchment area and the parameters of channel cross-sectional area at outlet and total channel length were comparable to tidally influenced systems of San Francisco Bay and the United Kingdom. Dike breaching, culvert replacement, and tide gate replacement all affected channel cross-sectional geometry through changes in the frequency of over-marsh flows. Radiocarbon dating of buried wood provided evidence of changes in sedimentation rates associated with diking, and restoration trajectories may be confounded by historical subsidence behind dikes rendering topographical relationships with water level incomparable to reference conditions. At the same time, buried wood is influencing the development of channel morphology toward characteristics resembling reference conditions. Ecological restoration goals and practices in tidal forested wetland regions of large river floodplains should reflect the interactions of these controlling factors.

  3. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Environmental Pre-Law provides a solid undergraduate-use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Specialization: Environmental Pre-Law Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest Resources

  4. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  5. Development of a Single-Pass Cut-and-Chip Harvest System for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest...

  6. Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

  7. Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

  8. Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

  9. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  10. The Future of Forest Certification in A Roundtable Discussion by Forest Stakeholders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and respect people's rights. · Multiple forest certification upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services they provide. Rather than remain mired in win

  11. For Immediate Release: January 30, 2008 Sustaining Virginia's Forests through Forest Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and products processed in ways that sustain forest health, minimize energy wastes, follow local laws, and the people and communities that depend upon them. One strategy is forest certification. Certification of forests and forest products is touted as a strategy for sustaining forests and the life support services

  12. Federal and state forestry cost-share assistance programs: Structure, accomplishments, and future outlook. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, T.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost-share assistance programs have been an effective policy mechanism for increasing productivity on nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) lands. In light of reduced harvests from Federal lands, timber productivity on these lands has become increasingly important to ensure sufficient timber supplies in the future. Productivity of other forest resources has also been enhanced through these programs. Four Federal programs, the Forestry Incentives Program, the Agricultural Conservation Program, the Stewardship Incentives program, and the Conservation Reserve Program, provided cost-share assistance for tree planting on 467,000 acres in 1993. During the course of this study, the provisions of the individual State programs, funding levels, accomplishments, and outlook for continuation or expansion, were examined. Federal programs were reviewed as well, with respect to their interaction with State-level programs. The results of the study are presented in this paper.

  13. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Element of SFM Reference number Good forestry practice requirement Reference #12;UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and people Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;ii Forests

  14. Guidelines on local European forest energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    fellings, ... and · Biodisel, bioethanol and oil from crops (forest) · cutting 20% of the GHS gas emissions

  15. legal_land_01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MATRIXED 50% TO APS UPGRADE ARE LISTED IN HOME DIVISION WITH NAME IN PARENTHESIS 912014 ACCELERATOR SYSTEMS DIVISION A. ZHOLENTS DIVISION DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE SECRETARY A....

  16. Forest Certification Standards From Around The World Weigh In As Global Pressure Mounts for US Green Building Council to Accept Multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green Building Council to Accept Multiple Forest Certification Programs Thursday, 22 July 2010 Forest recognition to one forest certification brand, green building standards may help drive demand for these brands told USGBC that in order to increase the use of wood in buildings, all credible certification systems

  17. EVOLUTIONARY COMPUTATION AND POST-WILDFIRE LAND-COVER MAPPING WITH MULTISPECTRAL IMAGERY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumby, Steven P.; Koch, S. W. (Steven W.); Hansen, L. A. (Leslie A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande Los Alamos wildfire devastated approximately 43,000 acres (17,500 ha) of forested land, and destroyed over 200 structures in the town of Los Alamos. The need to monitor the continuing impact of the fire on the local environment has led to the application of a number of advanced remote sensing technologies. During and after the fire, remote-sensing data was acquired fiorn a variety of aircraft- and satellite-based sensors, including Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+). We now report on the application of a machine learning technique io the automated classification of land cover using multispectral imagery. We apply a hybrid gertelic programminghupervised classification technique to evolve automatic feature extraction algorithms. We use a software package we have developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, called GENIE, to carry out this evolution. We use multispectral imagery fiom the Landsat 7 ETM+ instrument fiom before and after the wildfire. Using an existing land cover classification based on a Landsat 5 TM scene for our training data, we evolve algorithms that distinguish a range of land cover categories, along with clouds and cloud shadows. The details of our evolved classification are compared to the manually produced land-cover classification. Keywords: Feature Extraction, Genetic programming, Supervised classification, Multi-spectral imagery, Land cover, Wildfire.

  18. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

  19. Modeling the interaction between land surface and groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    % of GW for irrigation. Groundwater was managed separately. GW systems and land surface intimately and human factors on GW systems. GW irrigation capacity and efficiency based on a watershed scale. How much-ground water models Irrigation efficiency Materials and methods Development of SGWM #12;Background Groundwater

  20. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  1. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest...

  2. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  3. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  4. Special Issue: High Elevation Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . They yield raw material for rustic homes, exquisite paneling, and life-giving energy. They capture, purify gathering, hunting, and places to wow visitors. (For the purpose of this report, high country forests

  5. Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has expanded dramatically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastication of forest biomass for wildfire hazard reduction and forest health improvement has or tree spacing is adequate to allow sufficient room for equipment operation. b. Carefully review

  6. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  7. Remote sensing and forest damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, N.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

  8. Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

  9. Land-use transition for bioenergy and climate stabilization: model comparison of drivers, impacts and interactions with other land use based mitigation options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popp, Alexander; Rose, Steven K.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Dietrich, Jan P.; Wise, Marshall A.; Stehfest, Eike; Humpenoder, Florian; Kyle, G. Page; Van Vliet, Jasper; Bauer, Nico; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; Klein, David; Kriegler, Elmar

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is a model comparison assessing the drivers and impacts of bioenergy production on the global land system and the interaction with other land use based mitigation options in the context of the EMF 27 project. We compare and evaluate results from three integrated assessment models (GCAM, IMAGE, and ReMIND/MAgPIE). All three models project that dedicated bioenergy crops and biomass residues are a potentially important and cost-effective component of the energy system. But bioenergy deployment levels and feedstock composition vary notably across models as do the implications for land-use and greenhouse gas emissions and the interaction with other land use based mitigation measures. Despite numerous model differences, we identify a few that are likely contributing to differences in land-use and emissions attributable to energy crop deployment.

  10. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  11. Solar energy at Forest Research Solar Power at Alice Holt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar energy at Forest Research Solar Power at Alice Holt research station provides a renewable to install a solar photovoltaic system to meet some of the research station's energy needs. #12;In January dioxide emissions, when compared with traditional forms of energy generation. · The solar installation

  12. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  13. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  14. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /November/December 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience MethODs & techNicaL aDvaNces MethODs & techNicaL a of the GFP- or YFP-expressing balancers has specific advantages, but all share a common draw- back a Tubby1 (Tb1 ) dominant transgene. Flies heterozygous for these FM7a and CyO derivatives exhibit

  15. FAOFAO''s Support tos Support to National Forest Monitoring and AssessmentNational Forest Monitoring and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and trees outside forests Uses and users of resources Improving information management systems Long term Qualityinformation National policy making Sustainable resources management CapacityBuilding Support to sectoral (nfp agents Health condition Stem quality Commercial height Total height Year since cut Diameter height Dbh

  16. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling International Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology

  17. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Institute of Sustainable Forestry Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest Ecology Graeme The Forestland Group Ralph Grossi American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home

  18. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Farmland Trust Philip Janik USDA Forest Service Ron Jarvis The Home Depot Thomas Jorling Chadwick Oliver Director Gary Dunning Executive Director Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture and Forest

  19. Department of Forest Resourcesand Environmental Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    , MF, MNR, and PhD). Its research areas include Forest Ecology and Management, Forest Biometrics on a perception-based score plus a citation-and-publication-based composite index. The National Research Council

  20. KELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grazing Rates on Kelp Assimilation of Kelp-derived Organic Carbon in Kelp Forest Food Webs | 33 IntertidalKELP FOREST FOOD WEBS IN GWAII HAANAS: Ecosystem-Level Effects of Predator Depletion and Recovery

  1. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINLAND SOURCES 2007 - Forest industry production Print Home Finland Government Authorities Local » Turnover » Profit » Energy Year 2006 » Shipping Business services Infrastructure Economy Education strategy of the EU's Forest-Based Industries Technology Platform provides a good basis for preparing

  2. National Forest Inventory Description of attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory Description of attributes Woodland_S: Woodland source (a) NFI base map have been mapped in accordance with the NFI mapping rules. National Forest Inventory #12;(f) 2010 AP

  3. Forests and biodiversity UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL001/FC-GB(MMJ)/JTCP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal

  4. Relating forest biomass to SAR data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeToan, T.; Beaudoin, A. (Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements CNRS- Univ. Paul Sabatier Toulouse (FR)); Riom, J.; Guyon, D. (Lab. de Bioclimatologie INRA, Bordeaux (FR))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experiment defined to demonstrate the use of radar to retrieve forest biomass. The SAR data, after calibration, has been analyzed together with ground data collected on forest stands from young stage (8 yrs) to nature stage (46 yrs). The dynamic range of the radar backscatter intensity from forest was found maximum at P-band and decreases with increasing frequencies. Also, cross-polarized backscatter intensity yields the best sensitivities to variations of forest biomass. L-band data confirmed past results on good correlation with forest parameters. The most striking observation has been the strong correlation of P-band backscatter intensity to forest biomass. In order to develop algorithms to infer forest biomass from spaceborne SAR's, the experimental results will be compared with observations on other forest ecosystems and will be interpreted by theoretical modeling.

  5. Forest plantations in the Midsouth, USA. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosson, J.F.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plantation forestry is one means of controlling the temporal and spatial aspects of stand regeneration after harvest. Intensive plantation forestry can ultimately reduce harvesting pressure and disturbance on natural stands and and stands intended to be set aside for esthetics, recreation, or watershed protection. Reported here is the status of forest plantations in the Midsouth States. It is important to know if plantations are meeting their fullest potential and what shortcomings, if any, need to be addressed. Information gathered includes plantation area, forest type, ownership, volume, site class, and stockings. Additionally, comparisons were made to see if there was a difference between plantation and natural-stand volumes.

  6. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  7. Addressing land-based discrimination in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , feudalism was based on ownership of land, the dominant mode of production. Political power was dominated by absolute kings and feudal overlords. Wealth and position in society was derived from the land ownership

  8. Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

  9. Sustainable Eco-Systems under Land Retirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallender, Wesley W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water content [-], ? r - residual water content [-], ? , n -water content (? s ) and residual water content (? r ) wereparameters: ? r (residual soil water content), ? s (

  10. A land based radar polarimeter processing system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronke, Chester William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this document to my father for his Iong years of hard work and commitment to our family. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to express my thanks to the following people: Dr. A. J. B 1 ancha rd and Or. B. R. Jean for their k now 1 edge a nd guidance. Gary Warren... Assignments 4 Indicator Circuit Read Port Assignments. 5 Interpretation of Indicator Circuit Data . 6 RF Head Common Control Port Signal Assignments . 7 iSBC-80/24 Parallel I/O Summary. 8 iSBX-311 Analog Input Signal Assignments 9 Memory Map...

  11. Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

  12. GIS IN LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT On-Campus Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    GIS and geospatial analysis using real-world spatial data. Learning about GIS is fun and a creative process that all, the ArcGIS geographic information system (GIS) and geospatial methods as applied to land resource will be able to independently conduct your own GIS projects and find solutions to geospatial problems. OTHER

  13. GIS IN LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Distance Education Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    : In this course you will gain ample hands-on experience in using ArcGIS and geospatial analysis using real information system (GIS) and geospatial methods as applied to land resource management issues. GOOD TO KNOW projects and find solutions to geospatial problems. OTHER INFORMATION: The course counts towards the ICGIS

  14. Simulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    a series of micro-basins that function similarly to a multi-reservoir river system for water management arrangements for water management, and integration of geospatial information into "sustainability scenariosSimulating Sustainability: Conjunctive Land and Water Management in the Upper Santa Cruz River

  15. Assessing Urban Forest Effects and Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Scranton area. The Authors DAVID J. NOWAK is a research forester and project leader, ROBERT E. HOEHN III

  16. Relationships between forest management policies and outdoor recreation opportunities supplied on private forest lands in East Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestridge, Kenneth Wayne

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ~ 2. Landowners pfho Responded to Questionnaire 14 3. Distribution of Landowners and Acreage by Bmership Type. and Ownership Size. 15 4. Analysis of. Variance for Acres Leased to Hunters and Hunting Clubs 18 5, Distributi. on of . Acres Open..., yet there was an inc ease in the number of facilities established while the number of acres open for public use remained constant. These com- parisons understandably raise questions as to the reasons for the trend, yet no!!e of the AFP1 surveys...

  17. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of Special Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Conditions Affecting Viewing, and professor and chairman of the University's Department of Landscape Architecture, at Berkeley. He earned eneralizations about esthetics and protection of "natural beauty" are of small help to the land manager. He needs

  18. Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department ofEarth Sciences, The University ofHong Kong, P. R. China Abstract JJ.Jiao Land reclamation has played;Bouchardetal., 1998;Schofield etal., 1992). While reclamation provides valuable land, it also creates various

  19. Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations and Their Impacts on The Private College of Forest Resources continued its Denman Forestry Issues Series on May 30, 2001. Alumni landowners. Policy analysts and speakers representing the Washington Farm Forestry Assn., Washington Forest

  20. UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Forests and climate change #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number Legal of SFM Reference number #12;Forests and climate change Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry

  1. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July ­ September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

  2. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 3, October - December 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 03 ISSN: 2218-8045 October - December 2010 Editor-in-Chief Dr. Abid

  3. SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    #12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April ­ June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April ­ June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

  4. Global integration for metals, mining and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as coils, bars and sheets. · Forest and paper companies own or lease forests, cut timber, process woodBeyond the familiar Global integration for metals, mining and forest and paper companies Industrial commitment by IBM Global Business Services to provide analysis and viewpoints that help companies realize

  5. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages

  6. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices;1 Sustainability 10 Years after Rio The Forest and Paper Industry's Messages Sustainability has become an essential

  7. Forests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; forestry; soil; sustainable forest management; UK Forestry Standard. FCGL006/FC-GB(MMJ)/JCTP-2.5K/NOV11 for sustainable forest management Good forestry practice requirement Element of SFM Reference number LegalForests and soil UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Requirements

  8. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's FinancialForest Products Forest Products

  9. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  10. Forest Fuels ReductionForest Fuels Reduction Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    the initial fuels reduction treatments leave the site with regard to long-term forest vegetation and soil are the productivity and cost rates for alternative choices of equipment for mechanical fuels reduction; what reduction operations for existing markets and new markets? (eg. biomass energy) Research Rationale

  11. Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

  12. Trade-offs of different land and bioenergy policies on the path to achieving climate targets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have shown that bioenergy and land-use are potentially important elements in a strategy to limit anthropogenic climate change. But, significant expansion of bioenergy production can have a large terrestrial footprint. In this paper, we test the implications for land use, the global energy system, carbon cycle, and carbon prices of meeting a specific climate target, using a single fossil fuel and industrial sector policy instrument—the carbon tax, but with five alternative bioenergy and land-use policy architectures. We find that the policies we examined have differing effects on the different segments of the economy. Comprehensive land policies can reduce land-use change emissions, increasing allowable emissions in the energy system, but have implications for the cost of food. Bioenergy taxes and constraints, on the other hand, have little effect on food prices, but can result in increased carbon and energy prices.

  13. Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts’ Crumbles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

  14. Land Tenure (to the End of the Ptolemaic Period)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katary, Sally

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for highly successful land reclamation in the Fayum,successful large-scale land reclamation (Kehoe 2010: 316).

  15. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  16. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Watershed Science & Management Watershed Science & Management prepares students to address the many management issues associated with water

  17. COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPARING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES UNDER COMMUNITY-BASED AND CONVENTIONAL TENURES IN BRITISH OF MASTER OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT In the School of Resource and Environmental Management © David Mealiea 2011 of Canada, this work may be reproduced, without authorization, under the conditions for Fair Dealing

  18. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Progress of Slash Breakdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 with slash are based in part on information on its rate of breakdown and decay. Slash changes in structure. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AG P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY LOGGING SLASH: its breakdown and decay at two forests

  19. INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey that integrates demography with market-based factors such as transportation costs and accessibility. In essence and Resource Use in the Amazon (SBR-95-11965)," and also by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  20. Stewardship of public school land by the General Land Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zechiel, Tod Peter

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (a V. Nrelnh Nnl da (L Nr(PN Huis I. Veil Ill(en S. Hncnf th hraa( 4 hn Ihpr. i ha Ner(n J. (Irasr ~ Veiler N. Irene Caryn @riot( S. ladler laali ~ N. Seal Nalrnvl lie J. R Ie Saa Nrrcn J Mf((ay Satan 1. Srpp ~ (luhorttlls liar ll ~ 9(5/bh... AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RANGELAND The Area Under Stewardshi p Climate of the Trans-Pecos Vegetational Associations of the Trans-Pecos Uses of the Range Resources OPERATIONS OF THE ALPINE FIELD OFFICE Responsibi 1ities Assisting the Land Management Division...

  1. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  2. Estimation of turbulent surface heat fluxes using sequences of remotely sensed land surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, Sayed Mohyeddin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluxes of heat and moisture at the land-surface play a significant role in the climate system. These fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and influence the characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (e.g. ...

  3. After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind L-5508 11/08 Kenneth A. Cearley, Extension Wildlife Specialist, The Texas A&M System; and Chuck Kowaleski, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department T he Conservation...

  4. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  5. Fire dynamics during the 20th century simulated by the Community Land Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloster, S.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Thornton, P. E.; Hoffman, F. M.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Oleson, Keith W.; Lawrence, David M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is an integral Earth System process that interacts with climate in multiple ways. Here we assessed the parametrization of fires in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN) and improved the ability of the model to reproduce ...

  6. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). Western Ecology Division; Gaston, G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR (United States). National Research Council; Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  7. An update on land-ice modeling in the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, William H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass loss from land ice, including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets as well as smaller glacier and ice caps, is making a large and growing contribution to global sea-level rise. Land ice is only beginning to be incorporated in climate models. The goal of the Land Ice Working Group (LIWG) is to develop improved land-ice models and incorporate them in CESM, in order to provide useful, physically-based sea-level predictions. LJWG efforts to date have led to the inclusion of a dynamic ice-sheet model (the Glimmer Community Ice Sheet Model, or Glimmer-CISM) in the Community Earth System Model (CESM), which was released in June 2010. CESM also includes a new surface-mass-balance scheme for ice sheets in the Community Land Model. Initial modeling efforts are focused on the Greenland ice sheet. Preliminary results are promising. In particular, the simulated surface mass balance for Greenland is in good agreement with observations and regional model results. The current model, however, has significant limitations: The land-ice coupling is one-way; we are using a serial version of Glimmer-CISM with the shallow-ice approximation; and there is no ice-ocean coupling. During the next year we plan to implement two-way coupling (including ice-ocean coupling with a dynamic Antarctic ice sheet) with a parallel , higher-order version of Glimmer-CISM. We will also add parameterizations of small glaciers and ice caps. With these model improvements, CESM will be able to simulate all the major contributors to 21st century global sea-level rise. Results of the first round of simulations should be available in time to be included in the Fifth Assessment Report (ARS) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  8. A Conceptual Framework for Estimating Bioenerg-Related Land-Use Change and Its Impacts over Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainability of Biomass Based Fuel Use,” Energy Policy L.Energy and Carbon Budgets of Wood Fuel Coppice Systems,” BiomassBiomass Fuels and Forest-Management Strategies: How Do We Calculate the Greenhouse-Gas Emissions Benefits? ,” Energy

  9. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  10. source: American Forest & Paper Association Test Your Knowledge of Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beex, A. A. "Louis"

    years ago Question 4: Timber growth in the United States exceeds harvest and losses due to insects the SFI program, member companies reforested 1.3 million acres by planting, seeding, & natural regeneration bringing the three year total for reforested company lands to: a) 3.3 million b) 2.7 million c) 3

  11. COLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference onCFRI Conference on W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENTCOLORADO STATEWIDE FOREST RESOURCE ASSESSMENT CFRI Conference on.outcomes on the ground.outcomes on the ground. o Foundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide Forest Resource AssessmentsFoundation = Statewide

  12. 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 Colorado Forest Health Report 2013 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Caring Timm Schaubert, Outreach Division Supervisor. Thanks also to William M. Ciesla, Forest Health;A January 2014 2013 Colorado Forest Health Report As your new Colorado State Forester, it is my

  13. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  14. Forest management certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to the Montreal Process, certification systems lay out a set of criteria for sustainable management. Consumers. Each captures unique aspects of forestry and natural- resources management, offers indoor and outdoor.va.nrcs.usda.gov NRCS's natural resources conservation programs help people reduce soil erosion, enhance water supplies

  15. Forested tract-size profile of South Carolina`s NIPF landowners. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information gathered from 3078 permanent forest survey sample plots showed that nearly 0.9 million acres, or 10 percent of the nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) timberland in South Carolina is in forested tracts 10 acres or less. Forested tracts ranging from 11 to 100 acres accounted for the largest proportion of NIPF timberland. Forested tract size varied significantly by NIPF-ownership group. By NIPF-ownership group, the other corporate group recorded the highest average forested tract size of 3,802 acres. Volume of softwood growing stock as significantly higher in the larger tract size categories. Hardwood growing-stock volume per acre was significantly higher in the largest and smallest forested tract-size classes. Softwood growing-stock removals exceeded growth across all forested-parcel categories, whereas hardwood growing-stock growth surpassed hardwood removals in two tract-size classes.

  16. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  17. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  18. Land and Renewable Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a rich and thorough analysis to determine what areas of public lands are best suited for solar, wind, and geothermal project development and assess the associated environmental,...

  19. Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho The Bonneville Power Administration is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage two parcels of land in northern Idaho to preserve,...

  20. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  1. Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

  2. Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

  3. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  4. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  5. China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

  6. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contracts with logging companies covering more than 15 million hectares of forest," the report stated with logging companies instead giving villages gifts of salt and beer worth less than $100. "In a contextIllegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests

  7. EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote) or the United States Forest Service (USFS) via the Southern Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (SFIA

  8. Forest biomass as a source of renewable energy in Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuerker, M.F.; Ayaz, H.; Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Turkey illegal cutting takes place, which cannot be controlled. Legal cuttings have also been done by several state forest enterprises. As a result, the amount of wood raw material produced by forest enterprises legally and by forest villagers illegally has exceeded the potential capacity of the forest. According to the research related to Macka and other Turkish state forests, the state forests have been decreasing day by day. This is because the amount of wood raw material taken from the forests has exceeded the production potential of the forest. That study concluded that the Macka and other Turkish forests will be exhausted after 64 and 67 years, respectively. This study also examined both establishing and exploiting energy forests near the forest villages and producing fuel briquettes manufactured using the residues of agriculture, forestry, and stock breeding to diminish the demand for illegal fuel wood cutting from the state forests.

  9. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas...

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    versions of the calculation tools are available at the NCASI web site. Estimating Product Sequestration AF&PA, again working with the International Council of Forest and Paper...

  11. 10/17/2011 Hardwood Bottomland Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Management Manual Natural Flooding · Infuses forest with nutrients and organic matter · Flooding can slow: ­ Drier floodplains ­ Higher nutrient pooling ­ Greater herbaceous biomass ­ Lower water tables ­ Lower

  12. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for biodiversity conservation, water protection, recreational needs, climate change mitigation management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision; · Communication of ne

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and...

  14. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  15. The relationship between land use and organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau, Washington and Idaho, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, M.D.; Gruber, S.J. [Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors analyzed streambed sediment and fish in the Central Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington and Idaho for organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls ({Sigma}PCB). The objective was to assess the effects of land use on the occurrence and distribution of these compounds; land uses in the study area included forest, dryland and irrigated farming, and urban. The authors detected 16 organochlorine compounds in streambed sediment and fish tissue; fish usually had more compounds and a greater frequency of detection. The most frequently detected compound was {Sigma}DDT (sum of six isomers), which was found in 52% of bed sediment samples and 94% of whole fish composite samples. The other commonly detected compounds were dimethyl tetrachloroterephthalate (DCPA), dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and {Sigma}chlordane. Forest was the only land use with no detections of organochlorine compounds in either fish or bed sediment. Hexachlorobenzene was the only organochlorine pesticide detected at concentrations that differed significantly among land uses: concentrations were higher in the dryland farming areas than in the irrigated farming or urban areas. In agricultural areas irrigated by surface water, {Sigma}DDT concentrations in both streambed sediment and fish tissue were related to the percentage of land irrigated by water delivered via furrows (gravity irrigation), although {Sigma}DDT was not detectable in bed sediments until gravity irrigation exceeded 30%. Because of the relation between gravity irrigation and soil erosion, the study supports the importance of controlling soil erosion in order to reduce the overall loading of organochlorine compounds to surface waters.

  16. 2012 Landes Bioscience. Do not distribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wasting disease of North American cervids Stacie J. Robinson,1, * Michael D. Samuel,2 Katherine I. O'Rourke3 and Chad J. Johnson4 1 Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology; University of Wisconsin; Madison

  17. Land Reform and Exclusion of Poor Jagat Basnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    141 CHAPTER 6 Land Reform and Exclusion of Poor People Jagat Basnet 6.1 Land Questions Firstly, by land reform, it is widely understood to be a process of confiscating someone's land and award Planning Commission (NPC). Land reform is an important factor for improving the economic status

  18. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    errors/bars provided in figures and tables represent 68 percent confidence intervals 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4/American elm/red maple White oak/red oak/hickory Area (1,000 acres) Small Medium Large #12;Table 2. ­ Top 10

  19. Table 1. Annual estimates, uncertainty, and change Figure 1. Area of timberland and forest land.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,444.8 12.6 -4.4 3,144.0 4.6 10.3 5,452.0 8.3 2.0 Other softwood species Other hardwood species All species.3 3 American elm 247.1 9.0 12.2 198.4 22.9 20.2 4 Green ash 244.0 11.5 8.8 420.3 17.8 17.6 5 Osage

  20. Vadose zone transport in dry forests of central Argentina: Role of land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    on residual moisture flux approach (cumulative chloride versus cumulative water curves) suggested maximum of water below root zone, displacement of solutes, and rising water tables, affecting, in most extreme 78% to 99% of the chloride stock was leached, and total water storage was 30% higher than in the dry

  1. Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Public Lands for Cannabis Cultivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallery, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disease Registry - ToxFAQs™: DDT, DDE, and DDD." ATSDR Home.Disease Registry - ToxFAQs™: DDT, DDE, and DDD." ATSDR Home.Diphenyl-Trichloroethane (DDT). DDT was banned in the United

  2. U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the Chesapeake Bay for 30 years and have, specific to the topic of this hearing, been engaged in several relevant of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee of the Chesapeake Bay Program which last year released the report (Exhibit 1). While annual Bay water temperatures have varied in relation to large-scale climate cycles

  3. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartmentWind SitingVerification Body BecomeCommerce |Committee

  4. Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <Glacial EnergyEnergyGlobal Green EnergyEnergy

  5. Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki HomeASN PowerApplications | Open EnergyEnergy

  6. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLCInsulation IncentivesEshone EnergyEstero,

  7. The European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody biomass from the forests in the EU can be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biomass from the forests in the EU can be significantly increased The supply of woody biomass from and recycled wood) for the 27 EU member states. As with woody biomass from forests, the supply of woody biomassThe European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody

  8. atlantic forest landscape: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of pub- lic preferences, park Standiford, Richard B. 8 Forests and landscape UK Forestry Standard Guidelines Renewable Energy Websites Summary: for sustainable forest...

  9. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  10. amazonian forest regrowth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 2 Plant species...

  11. amazonian forest french: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  12. amazonian forest culture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  13. amazonian forests implications: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mortality, tropical forest, vegetation between remotely-sensed indices and forest inventory data on tree mortality. There were differences Malhi, Yadvinder 3 Effects of...

  14. area determines forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has been inadequate to accurately determine forest carbon stocks, much less the effects logging is known to be widespread, the exact areas of tropical forest subject to logging...

  15. amazon forest biomass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such as wind, solar - and biomass. Part of Our Rural Economy - forest product companies now can 162 Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Environmental Sciences...

  16. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  17. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  18. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  19. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy - LCA Issues and Challenges Breakout Session 2D-Building Market Confidence and...

  20. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets...

  1. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  2. 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    427 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development: Factors Affecting Land Users' Efforts for Sustainable Development: Foundations, Experiences, and Perspectives 428 North-South perspectives 21 the concept of sustainable develop- ment and a clearer focus on operational implications, Hurni and colleagues

  3. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  4. Practice Note Planning for brownfield land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practice Note Planning for brownfield land regeneration to woodland and wider green infrastructure 1FCPN022 Gail Atkinson and Kieron Doick March 2014 The regeneration of brownfield land to green of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt

  5. APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIELD INVESTIGATION IN EARLY APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING MISSIONS Abstract and Techi~icalSection E. M.Shoemaker, U. S-investigator November 1965 #12;APOLLO MANNED 1,UNAR I,ANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIETADINi

  6. Heilougjiang adopts measures to strengthen land management-each square millimeter of land is utterly cherished and rationally used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Peiquan; Liu, Y.

    1983-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on how a Chinese province with a large area of land and a small population has adopted a series of measures to strengthen land management, to stop the illegal occupying of land, and to protect land resources. Investigations of land resources and of the state of land use, as well as soil surveys, have been launched in order to determine the rights of land ownership and use. Many counties and cities have experimented with dividing farm areas into districts and comprehensive land planning, established land files, trained key personnel in land management skills, and have launched scientific land research. Illegal occupation, waste and destruction of land have risen with the increase in population and construction. Per capita cultivated acreage has declined to 4.1 mu. An effort has been made to reach the people in urban and rural areas with this message: ''Cherish every square millimeter of land utterly and use it rationally''.

  7. Changing national forest values: A content analysis. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengston, D.N.; Xu, Z.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This evolution of forest values is currently being widely discussed and debated in the forestry community. It is often claimed that a fundamental shift in forest values has taken place in recent decades. Gordon argued that a shift in public values is part of the explanation for the declining influence of the multiple-use sustained-yield paradigm of forest management. It is increasingly recognized that the values people hold about forest ecosystems are an important part of the social underpinning of ecosystem management, the emerging forest management paradigm. In either case, values play a critical role in identifying ecosystem management goals, setting the context for decisionmaking, and guiding our choices.

  8. Attributing land-use change carbon emissions to exported biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saikku, Laura, E-mail: laura.saikku@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, P.O Box 65, 00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Soimakallio, Sampo, E-mail: sampo.soimakallio@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland); Pingoud, Kim, E-mail: kim.pingoud@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, 02044 VTT (Finland)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a simple, transparent and robust method is developed in which land-use change (LUC) emissions are retrospectively attributed to exported biomass products based on the agricultural area occupied for the production. LUC emissions account for approximately one-fifth of current greenhouse gas emissions. Increasing agricultural exports are becoming an important driver of deforestation. Brazil and Indonesia are used as case studies due to their significant deforestation in recent years. According to our study, in 2007, approximately 32% and 15% of the total agricultural land harvested and LUC emissions in Brazil and Indonesia respectively were due to exports. The most important exported single items with regard to deforestation were palm oil for Indonesia and bovine meat for Brazil. To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions effectively worldwide, leakage of emissions should be avoided. This can be done, for example, by attributing embodied LUC emissions to exported biomass products. With the approach developed in this study, controversial attribution between direct and indirect LUC and amortization of emissions over the product life cycle can be overcome, as the method operates on an average basis and annual level. The approach could be considered in the context of the UNFCCC climate policy instead of, or alongside with, other instruments aimed at reducing deforestation. However, the quality of the data should be improved and some methodological issues, such as the allocation procedure in multiproduct systems and the possible dilution effect through third parties not committed to emission reduction targets, should be considered. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO{sub 2} emissions from land use changes are highly important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attribution of land use changes for products is difficult. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple and robust method is developed to attribute land use change emissions.

  9. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  10. Human spatial orientation perceptions during simulated lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Torin Kristofer

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During crewed lunar landings, astronauts are expected to guide a stable and controlled descent to a landing zone that is level and free of hazards by either making landing point (LP) redesignations or taking direct manual ...

  11. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , comprising a total value of £1.4 billion (2 billion), the bulk of which is produced by European forest tree stock in an inactive condition for extended periods, and to ensure plant quality where supply. #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2004­2005 41 Assessing seedling quality Despite

  12. Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment and Strategy www.csfs.colostate.edu Colorado Forest resource assessments had to be completed by June 2010 ­ required to receive S&PF funds in the future (2008;Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Resource Assessment and Strategy Partners Colorado Division

  13. Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Climate change cripples forests October 1, 2012 Southwestern US trees face rising drought, and several other partner organizations. 3:01 Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connection Described in a paper published in Nature Climate Change this week, "Temperature as a potent driver of regional forest

  14. Functional Differential Equations in Sustainable Forest Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    regulation. The sustainability of harvesting a given constant volume in a simplified forest model is studied regulation model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5.2 A different discretization) Frederiksberg, Denmark Abstract This article deals with the dynamics of the volume control method in forest

  15. Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada's National Forest Inventory An Interagency Collaboration Mark Gillis and Michael Brady: · Timber supply analysis · Management unit planning Management Inventory #12;· Canada's NFI-2001 ­ NFI 2006... National Inventory #12;Canada's National Forest Inventory (1976-2001) ­ compilation

  16. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Contribution of forest management artefacts to plant diversity at a forest scale.3% were within 4 m of an artefact and 8.4% were located on an artefact. The artefact contribution to total included or not in the artefact contribution. Road verges were the least frequent artefacts but provided

  18. Insect Science (2010) 17, 117, DOI 10.1111/j.1744-7917.2009.01310.x Arthropods and biofuel production systems in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insect Science (2010) 17, 1­17, DOI 10.1111/j.1744-7917.2009.01310.x REVIEW Arthropods and biofuel 000 ha of US crop and forest lands to meet federally-mandated targets for renewable biofuels that inhabit them. We review the literature on dedicated biofuel crops and biomass harvest from forests to look

  19. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  20. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  1. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19Comment, Nonpoint Source Pollution, Groundwater, and theat 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,

  2. arid land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

  3. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Measurement Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MA Miller; R Avissar; LK Berg; SA Edgerton; ML Fischer; TJ Jackson; B. Kustas; PJ Lamb; G McFarquhar; Q Min; B Schmid; MS Torn; DD Tuner

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) will be conducted from June 8 to June 30, 2007, at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Data will be collected using eight aircraft equipped with a variety of specialized sensors, four specially instrumented surface sites, and two prototype surface radar systems. The architecture of CLASIC includes a high-altitude surveillance aircraft and enhanced vertical thermodynamic and wind profile measurements that will characterize the synoptic scale structure of the clouds and the land surface within the ACRF SGP site. Mesoscale and microscale structures will be sampled with a variety of aircraft, surface, and radar observations. An overview of the measurement platforms that will be used during the CLASIC are described in this report. The coordination of measurements, especially as it relates to aircraft flight plans, will be discussed in the CLASIC Implementation Plan.

  4. Making land fly : the institutionalization of China's land quota markets and its implications for urbanization, property rights, and intergovernmental politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates China's land quota markets, a recent land policy innovation that virtually transfers urbanization permission from the countryside to cities. To circumvent national government's quota restrictions ...

  5. Sustaining the Landscape: A Method for Comparing Current and Desired Future Conditions of Forest Ecosystems in the North Cumberland Plateau and Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druckenbrod, D.L.

    2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project initiates an integrated-landscape conservation approach within the Northern Cumberlands Project Area in Tennessee and Kentucky. The mixed mesophytic forests within the Cumberland Plateau and Mountains are among the most diverse in North America; however, these forests have been impacted by and remain threatened from changes in land use across this landscape. The integrated-landscape conservation approach presented in this report outlines a sequence of six conservation steps. This report considers the first three of these steps in two, successive stages. Stage 1 compares desired future conditions (DFCs) and current prevailing conditions (CPCs) at the landscape-scale utilizing remote sensing imagery, remnant forests, and descriptions of historical forest types within the Cumberland Plateau. Subsequently, Stage 2 compares DFCs and CPCs for at-risk forest types identified in Stage 1 utilizing structural, compositional, or functional attributes from USFS Forest Inventory and Analysis data. Ecological indicators will be developed from each stage that express the gaps between these two realizations of the landscape. The results from these first three steps will directly contribute to the final three steps of the integrated-landscape conservation approach by providing guidance for the generation of new conservation strategies in the Northern Cumberland Plateau and Mountains.

  6. Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest inventory Charles T. Scott & Jeffrey H. Gove Volume 2, pp 814­820 in Encyclopedia, Chichester, 2002 #12;Forest inventory Forest inventory is an accounting of trees and their related by a comprehensive survey of all households in the country. Similarly, forest inventories seek to enumerate

  7. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  8. Vectorizing the Community Land Model (CLM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Kitabata, Hideyuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan; White III, James B [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe our extensive efforts to rewrite the Community Land Model (CLM) so that it provides good vector performance on the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We present the technical details of the old and new internal data structures, the required code reorganization, and the resulting performance improvements. We describe and compare the performance and scaling of the final CLM Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) on the IBM Power4, the Earth Simulator, and the Cray X1. At 64 processors, the performance of the model is similar on the IBM Power4, the Earth Simulator, and the Cray X1. However, the Cray X1 offers the best performance of all three platforms tested from 4 to 64 processors when OpenMP is used. Moreover, at low processor counts (16 or fewer), the model performs significantly better on the Cray X1 than on the other platforms. The vectorized version of CLM was publicly released by the National Center for Atmospheric Research as the standalone CLM3.0, as a part of the new Community Atmosphere Model Version 3.0 (CAM3.0), and as a component of the Community Climate System Model Version 3.0 (CCSM3.0) on June 23, 2004.

  9. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  10. Biomass Energy and Competition for Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

  11. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality ............................................. DESCRIPTION OF BRIDGE CREEK BASIN ........................ PHYSICAL SETTING'T. ................................ 5.1 CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ....................................... 5.1.1 Bridge Creek basin upstream

  12. Hydroelectric Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes the leasing of state lands for the development of hydroelectric resources. It provides regulations for the granting and duration of leases, as well as for the inspection of...

  13. Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation may elect to lease its lands for the development of mineral interests (defined herein as petroleum, natural gas, coal, ore, rock and any other...

  14. Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels,...

  15. Land and its uses - actual and potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, F.T.; Bell, B.G.; Holz, M.C.B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book discusses information on the following topics: identification of ecological factors characterizing the range of terrestrial habitats (urban, rural); land classifications; water resources; conservation and landscape; remote sensing; and case studies.

  16. Saltstone Disposal Facility Closure Cap Configuration and Degradation Base Case: Institutional Control to Pine Forest Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.A.

    2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Performance Assessment (PA) for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) is currently under revision. As part of the PA revision and as documented herein, the closure cap configuration has been reevaluated and closure cap degradation mechanisms and their impact upon infiltration through the closure cap have been evaluated for the institutional control to pine forest, land use scenario. This land use scenario is considered the base case land use scenario. This scenario assumes a 100-year institutional control period following final SDF closure during which the closure cap is maintained. At the end of institutional control, it is assumed that a pine forest succeeds the cap's original bamboo cover. Infiltration through the upper hydraulic barrier layer of the closure cap as determined by this evaluation will be utilized as the infiltration input to subsequent PORFLOW vadose zone contaminant transport modeling, which will also be performed as part of the PA revision. The impacts of pine forest succession, erosion, and colloidal clay migration as degradation mechanisms on the hydraulic properties of the closure cap layers over time have been estimated and the resulting infiltration through the closure cap has been evaluated. The primary changes caused by the degradation mechanisms that result in increased infiltration are the formation of holes in the upper GCL by pine forest succession and the reduction in the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the drainage layers due to colloidal clay migration into the layers. Erosion can also result in significant increases in infiltration if it causes the removal of soil layers, which provide water storage for the promotion of evapotranspiration. For this scenario, infiltration through the upper GCL was estimated at approximately 0.29 inches/year under initial intact conditions, it increased to approximately 11.6 inches/year at year 1000 in nearly a linear fashion, and it approached an asymptote of around 14.1 inches/year at year 1800 and thereafter. At year 1800, it was estimated that holes covered approximately 0.3 percent of the GCL due to root penetration, and that this resulted in an infiltration near that of typical background infiltration (i.e. as though the GCL were not there at all). This demonstrated that a very small area of holes essentially controlled the hydraulic performance of the GCL.

  17. 31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the materials from the forests through the supply chain. Brian Condon, the wood procurement manager for Bio pointed out they have foresters working every day making sure the biomass plant is maintaining31 October 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR

  18. Impacts of disturbance initiated by road construction in a subtropical cloud forest in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico Lydia P. Olandera,* , F.N Scatenab , Whendee L. Silverc a Department Forestry, USDA Forest Service, Call Box 25000, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, 00928-2500, USA c Ecosystem tropical forests, were evaluated in the subtropical cloud forests of Puerto Rico. The vegetation, soil

  19. Kenya's forests: going up in smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, G.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Closed forest and commercially valuable woodland account for at most 11,406 square miles in Kenya (about 5.2% of the country's area). Plantation forests, mainly of exotic conifers, cover more than 550 square miles, and it is hoped that exotic plantation species will entirely replace dependence on the indigenous forests for pulp, sawn timber and other roundwood. However, reliance on charcoal as a fuel has led to widespread deforestation, particularly along highways and within 20 miles of towns and major villages. Deforestation is likely to increase with increasing population pressure.

  20. MARS IN A MINUTE: How Do You Land on Mars? How do you land on Mars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to land safely! Here are some options: 1. With a small- to mid-size rover, use a cushion of airbags along

  1. Wildlife Supplement Table 1. Land protection status by habitat type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponderosa pine forest and woodlands 4739 High 13 Low 1341 None 3385 Subalpine parkland 4394 High 2883 Low

  2. 188 Forest health surveillance in Victoria Australian Forestry 2008 Vol. 71 No. 3 pp. 188195

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available for sustainable timber production (VictorianAssociation of Forest Industries 2008). Native forestForests. While several companies manage plantations in Victoria, HVP Plantations (formerly Hancock Victoria

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerating forest fire Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large areas of the Pacific Summary: change, nutrition and sustainability, fire effects, restoration, and forest-stream linkages... forests. Many dense, young forests were...

  4. agricultural land based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparing a Conservation Plan INTRODUCTION Conservation of land, water and other natural features. Examples of goals...

  5. A resource complex for Sandy Neck Beach : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier beach system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...

  6. Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Linking MODFLOW with an Agent-Based Land-Use Model to Support Decision Making by Howard W. Reeves1 improve water resources management by illustrating the nonlinear behavior of the coupled system (Pahl systems arise from the decisions of many individuals and groups (Holland 1995; Batty 2005). For the agent

  7. Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado Statewide Forest Products Industry Profile Economic Sustainability and Ecological and Comparisons · Production and Processing · Sales and Markets · Economic and Ecological Contributions Sawmills · 1/4 for Roundwood (post and pole, vigas, house logs), furniture, excelsior etc. ­ Sawmill

  8. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarvis The Home Depot Michael Jenkins Forest Trends Aban Kabraji The World Conservation Union (IUCN) Eva Mary Tyrrell Executive Director Barbara Ruth Program Coordinator Mark Ashton Professor of Silviculture

  9. Geospatial Analysis School of Forest Resources &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Geospatial Analysis GIS 4121 School of Forest Resources & Conservation Geomatics Program _______________________________________________________________________________________ 1 GIS 4121 Geospatial Analysis INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Hartwig Henry Hochmair (FLREC Fort Lauderdale) Dr MATERIALS: de Smith, MJ, Goodchild, MF, & Longley, PA (2010). Geospatial Analysis (3rd ed.). Leicester

  10. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  11. Robust scheduling in forest operations planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Lui Cheng

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest operations planning is a complex decision process which considers multiple objectives on the strategic, tactical and operational horizons. Decisions such as where to harvest and in what order over different time ...

  12. Fuel-supply structure of wood-fired power plants in the Northeast: Loggers' perspective. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huyler, N.K.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study gauges loggers' perceptions of the impact of large biomass demand centers (electrical power generation) on the forest resource base in the Northeast. The loggers who supply these demand centers are business people with large capital investments in highly mechanized harvesting systems. Most of the loggers surveyed strongly believed that the post-harvest stand has improved as a result of fuel-wood chipping; however, the impact of chip harvesting on the forest resource base was not clear.

  13. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  14. Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB). Users' manual and technical documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, S; Dunn, JB; Wang, M (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Calculator for Land Use Change from Biofuels Production (CCLUB) calculates carbon emissions from land use change (LUC) for four different ethanol production pathways including corn grain ethanol and cellulosic ethanol from corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. This document discusses the version of CCLUB released May 31, 2012 which includes corn, as did the previous CCLUB version, and three cellulosic feedstocks: corn stover, miscanthus, and switchgrass. CCLUB calculations are based upon two data sets: land change areas and above- and below-ground carbon content. Table 1 identifies where these data are stored and used within the CCLUB model, which is built in MS Excel. Land change area data is from Purdue University's Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) model, a computable general equilibrium (CGE) economic model. Section 2 describes the GTAP data CCLUB uses and how these data were modified to reflect shrubland transitions. Feedstock- and spatially-explicit below-ground carbon content data for the United States were generated with a surrogate model for CENTURY's soil organic carbon sub-model (Kwon and Hudson 2010) as described in Section 3. CENTURY is a soil organic matter model developed by Parton et al. (1987). The previous CCLUB version used more coarse domestic carbon emission factors. Above-ground non-soil carbon content data for forest ecosystems was sourced from the USDA/NCIAS Carbon Online Estimator (COLE) as explained in Section 4. We discuss emission factors used for calculation of international greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in Section 5. Temporal issues associated with modeling LUC emissions are the topic of Section 6. Finally, in Section 7 we provide a step-by-step guide to using CCLUB and obtaining results.

  15. Geographic InformationGeographic Information Systems for ForestersSystems for Foresters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    C LeB LrA PbB PbC PdC W gB W s B Legend Farmington Milton GsC AdB AdB GlB GlB AdB AdB GsB LeB AdB GsB LrA AdB PdC W sB PdC PbC W gB PbB NUTE'S RD MCKEAG NEY RD N EW S M ilton W oodlot Milton & FarmA AdB PdC WsB PdC PbC WgB PbB NUTE'S RD MCKEAGNEY RD N EW S Milton Woodlot Milton & Farmington, NH May

  16. THE BOSS Ly{alpha} FOREST SAMPLE FROM SDSS DATA RELEASE 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bailey, Stephen; Carithers, William; Schlegel, David J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bartsch, Leslie E. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S.; Bolton, Adam S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kirkby, David; Margala, Daniel; Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yeche, Christophe; Borde, Arnaud [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Pieri, Matthew M. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Weinberg, David H. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian [APC, Universite Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rueA. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard, E-mail: lee@mpia.de [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); and others

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the BOSS Lyman-{alpha} (Ly{alpha}) Forest Sample from SDSS Data Release 9, comprising 54,468 quasar spectra with z{sub qso} > 2.15 suitable for Ly{alpha} forest analysis. This data set probes the intergalactic medium with absorption redshifts 2.0 < z{sub {alpha}} < 5.7 over an area of 3275 deg{sup 2}, and encompasses an approximate comoving volume of 20 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}. With each spectrum, we have included several products designed to aid in Ly{alpha} forest analysis: improved sky masks that flag pixels where data may be unreliable, corrections for known biases in the pipeline estimated noise, masks for the cores of damped Ly{alpha} systems and corrections for their wings, and estimates of the unabsorbed continua so that the observed flux can be converted to a fractional transmission. The continua are derived using a principal component fit to the quasar spectrum redward of rest-frame Ly{alpha} ({lambda} > 1216 A), extrapolated into the forest region and normalized by a linear function to fit the expected evolution of the Ly{alpha} forest mean flux. The estimated continuum errors are {approx}< 5% rms. We also discuss possible systematics arising from uncertain spectrophotometry and artifacts in the flux calibration; global corrections for the latter are provided. Our sample provides a convenient starting point for users to analyze clustering in BOSS Ly{alpha} forest data, and it provides a fiducial data set that can be used to compare results from different analyses of baryon acoustic oscillations in the Ly{alpha} forest. The full data set is available from the SDSS-III DR9 Web site.

  17. Saltstone Disposal Facility Mechanically Stabilized Earth Vault Closure Cap Degradation Base Case: Institutional Control To Pine Forest Scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, MA

    2004-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the current Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) Performance Assessment (PA) revision, the closure cap configuration was reevaluated and closure cap degradation mechanisms and their impact upon infiltration through the closure cap was evaluated for the existing SDF concrete vaults (i.e. vaults 1 and 4) for the base case land use scenario (i.e. institutional control to pine forest scenario) and documented in Phifer and Nelson (2003). The closure cap configuration was modified from a compacted kaolin barrier layer concept to a geosynthetic clay layer (GCL) barrier layer concept. The degradation mechanisms developed included pine forest succession, erosion, and colloidal clay migration. These degradation mechanisms resulted in changes in the hydraulic properties of the closure cap layers and resulting increases in infiltration through the closure cap over time.

  18. Land application of thin stillage from a grain sorghum feedstock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, Joseph Wendell

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee; Dr. John M. Sweeten Thin sti 1 1 age is the wastewater from alcohol production after the wet solids have been separated from the waste- water stream. Because of thin sti 1 1 age's high organic content, it may be utilized in a land application... system. Thin sti 1 1 age from a grain sorghum feedstock was applied to crops in the field and greenhouse using sprinkler and surface irrigation methods. Application rates varied from 150 to 593 m stil lage/ha-yr, adding 334 to 1040 kg N/ha- yr. Soil...

  19. Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the amount and type of precipitation that falls across the western United States. Research shows a trend1 Our Forests in the [Water] Balance Water: Brought by a forest near you Water is a crucial, industry, energy, recreation, and the natural resources we manage and care about. While most citizens

  20. Managing Sierra Nevada Forests Appendix: Examples of Forest Structures That May

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    these following Bull et al.'s (1997)3 focus on five conditions: live trees with decay, hollows or brooms, snags, and brush. 1 Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, Eldorado--Live tree with hollow structure. The tree has an old dead top with cavity nests and a new healthy top