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Sample records for forest land assessment

  1. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Protectio Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land Protectio...

  2. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  3. U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands assessments of the impacts of climate change. Notably, these include: the report Global Warming and the Free House, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States. By the way, this last national assessment

  4. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Eunyoung, E-mail: eykim@kei.re.kr [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Environment Institute, 215 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-gu, Seoul 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Wonkyong, E-mail: wksong79@gmail.com [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)] [Suwon Research Institute, 145 Gwanggyo-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dongkun, E-mail: dklee7@snu.ac.kr [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Landscape Architecture and Rural System Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should consider the distances at which impacts occur in the vicinity of the forest ecosystem, and these considerations should include the impacts on forest vegetation and bird species. Impacts can be mitigated by considering the distances at which these influences occur. In particular, this paper presents an integrated environmental impact assessment system to be applied in the SEIA process. The integrated assessment system permits the assessment of the cumulative impacts of land development on multiple scales. -- Highlights: • The model is to assess the impact of forest fragmentation across multiple scales. • The paper suggests the type of forest fragmentation on a regional scale. • The type can be used to evaluate the location and size of a land development. • The paper shows the influence distance of land development on a local scale. • The distance can be used to mitigate the impact at an EIA process.

  5. Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Department - Forest Land

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | Open Energy Information Oregon Department of Land

  6. Chennai Urban Land Market Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowall, David E; Monkkonen, Paavo

    2007-01-01

    for 2003 and 2004 land price data (Tables 13 and 14), adding25 Table 12: Price Gradient Regression Results for35 Table 15: Average Price of Land in Residential Plots and

  7. Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2 Abstract: Soil Taxonomy, the United States system of soil classification, can be used for land evaluation for selected purposes. One use is forest establish- ment in the tropics, andthe soil family category is especially

  8. An environmental and social assessment of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in forest certification: FSC,PEFC,SFI and CSA 5 The assessment I Objective,comprehensive,and performance Table 1: The number of hectares certified under the FSC,PEFC,SFI and CSA Box 2: Governments and industry the PEFC Sweden and FSC Sweden standard Table 3: Comparison between the SFI and FSC USA standard Box 4

  9. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  10. TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES& A&comprehensive&analysis&of®ulating& and&cultural&services&provided&by&Texas'&forests& & & & & & October&2013 June 2009 #12;#12;Texas&Statewide&Assessment&of&& Forest&Ecosystem&Services& A&comprehensive&analysis&of&the®ulating&and&& cultural&services&provided&by&Texas

  11. Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  13. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E.; Kuiper, J.; Carr, A.; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13

    In 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) completed an assessment of the potential for solar and wind energy development on National Forest System (NFS) public lands managed by the US Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service (USFS). This report provides an update of the analysis in the NREL report, and extends the analysis with additional siting factors for solar and wind energy. It also expands the scope to biomass and geothermal energy resources. Hydropower is acknowledged as another major renewable energy source on NFS lands; however, it was not analyzed in this project primarily because of the substantially different analysis that would be needed to identify suitable locations. Details about each renewable energy production technology included in the study are provided following the report introduction, including how each resource is converted to electrical power, and examples of existing power plants. The analysis approach was to use current and available Geographic Information System (GIS) data to map the distribution of the subject renewable energy resources, major siting factors, and NFS lands. For each major category of renewable energy power production, a set of siting factors were determined, including minimum levels for the renewable energy resources, and details for each of the other siting factors. Phase 1 of the analysis focused on replicating and updating the 2005 NREL analysis, and Phase 2 introduced additional siting factors and energy resources. Source data were converted to a cell?based format that helped create composite maps of locations meeting all the siting criteria. Acreages and potential power production levels for NFS units were tabulated and are presented throughout this report and the accompanying files. NFS units in the southwest United States were found to have the most potentially suitable land for concentrating solar power (CSP), especially in Arizona and New Mexico. In total, about 136,032 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for CSP development, potentially yielding as much as 13,603 megawatts (MW) of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. For photovoltaic solar power (PV), the top NFS units were more widely distributed than CSP. Notably, more than 150,000 acres in Comanche National Grassland in Colorado were found to be potentially suitable for PV development, accounting for more than 25% of the potentially suitable NFS lands combined. In total, about 564,698 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for PV development, potentially yielding as much as 56,469 MW of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. NFS units most suitable for wind power are concentrated in the northern Great Plains. In total, about 3,357,792 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for wind development, potentially yielding as much as 67,156 MW of electricity, assuming 50 acres per MW. Of that area, 571,431 acres (11,429 MW) are located within the Bankhead?Jones Farm Tenant Act Land in Montana. NFS lands in Alaska have considerable wind resources, but other siting factors eliminated almost the entire area. The southwest coast of Chugach National Forest, near Seward, Alaska, maintains the majority of the remaining acreage. NFS units with highly suitable biomass resources are located from Idaho to Louisiana. In total, about 13,967,077 acres of NFS lands are potentially highly suitable for biomass from logging and thinning residue development. Of that, 1,542,247 acres is located in Fremont?Winema National Forest in Oregon. Not surprisingly, most NFS units have at least some level of potentially suitable biomass resources. In general, biomass resources such as these could significantly offset consumption of coal and petroleum?based fuels. NFS units deemed potentially highly suitable for enhanced geothermal system (EGS) development were distributed widely from California to Virginia, accounting for some 6,475,459 acres. Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri has the largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed

  14. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  15. Factors affecting the use of soil conservation practices on non-industrial private forest lands in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piyasena, Abegunawardana Vidana Gamage

    1983-01-01

    in in 1952, 1962, 1970 and 1977 (1000 Acres) 3. Acres of Commercial Forest Land in East Texas by Forest Type and Ownership Category, 1975 4. The Response Rate to the Questionnaire. 5. Sex Distribution of Respondents. 37 52 6. Education Level... 1. The Study Area 2. Demand Functions For The Conservation Effort by a Landowner and the Society. 27 3. The Erodability Classification for East Texas. . . . . . . 4. The Forest Land Regeneration Methods in East Texas. . 5. The Common Timber...

  16. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C...

  17. Effects of land use history on hurricane damage and recovery in a neotropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    with high pre-hurricane basal area lost many large trees, whereas the basal area hardly changed in systemsEffects of land use history on hurricane damage and recovery in a neotropical forest M. Uriarte1M@ecostudies.org) Received 22 October 2001; accepted in revised form 27 July 2003 Key words: Hurricane effect, Human

  18. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  19. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    in life cycle assessment (LCA). Some production processes,support impacts of land use in LCA. J Clean Prod 8(4):313–010-0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for

  20. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  1. Issues in using landscape indicators to assess land changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Landscape indicators, when combined with information about environmental conditions (such as habitat potential, biodiversity, carbon and nutrient cycling, and erosion) and socioeconomic forces, can provide insights about changing ecosystem services. They also provide information about opportunities for improving natural resources management. Landscape indicators rely on data regarding land cover, land management and land functionality. Challenges in using landscape indicators to assess change and effects include (1) measures of land management and attributes that are reliable, robust and consistent for all areas on the Earth do not exist, and thus land cover is more frequently utilized; (2) multiple types of land cover and management are often found within a single landscape and are constantly changing, which complicates measurement and interpretation; and (3) while causal analysis is essential for understanding and interpreting changes in indicator values, the interactions among multiple causes and effects over time make accurate attribution among many drivers of change particularly difficult. Because of the complexity, sheer number of variables, and limitations of empirical data on land changes, models are often used to illustrate and estimate values for landscape indicators, and those models have several problems. Recommendations to improve our ability to assess the effects of changes in land management include refinement of questions to be more consistent with available information and the development of data sets based on systematic measurement over time of spatially explicit land qualities such as carbon and nutrient stocks, water and soil quality, net primary productivity, habitat and biodiversity. Well-defined and consistent land-classification systems that are capable of tracking changes in these and other qualities that matter to society need to be developed and deployed. Because landscapes are so dynamic, it is crucial to develop ways for the scientific community to work together to collect data and develop tools that will enable better analysis of causes and effects and to develop robust management recommendations that will increases land s capacity to meet societal needs in a changing world.

  2. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    storage and releases, water fluxes from the soil and into the atmosphere, and solar energy copture with traditional forest products, but it may also produce benefits through competition and market efficiency. Short to heart the finding of the Intergovernmental Panel on Oimote OlOnge in its Fourth Assessment Report when

  3. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EAInvervar HydroElectricColorado: EnergyLamartine NavarroAssessment

  4. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    467 DOI 10.1007/s11367-010-0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA CouplingGIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use Part 1:while life cycle assessment (LCA) does not conventionally

  5. Toward A National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Phenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HargroveJr., William Walter; Spruce, Joe; Gasser, Gerry; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2009-12-01

    We are using a statistical clustering method for delineating homogeneous ecoregions as a basis for identifying disturbances in forests through time over large areas, up to national and global extents. Such changes can be shown relative to past conditions, or can be predicted relative to present conditions, as with forecasts of future climatic change. This quantitative ecoregion approach can be used to predict destinations for populations whose local environments are forecast to become unsuitable and are forced to migrate as their habitat shifts, and is also useful for predicting the susceptibility of new locations to invasive species like Sudden Oak Death. EFETAC and our sister western center WWETAC, along with our NASA and ORNL collaborators, are designing a new national-scale early warning system for forest threats, called FIRST. Envisioned as a change-detection system, FIRST will identify all land surface cover changes at the MODIS observational scale, and then try to discriminate normal, expected seasonal changes from locations having unusual activity that may represent potential forest threats. As a start, we have developed new national data sets every 16 days from 2002 through 2008, based on land surface phenology, or timing of leaf-out in the spring and brown-down in the fall. Changes in such phenological maps will be shown to contain important information about vegetation health status across the United States. The standard deviation of the duration of fall can be mapped, showing places where length of fall is relatively constant or is variable in length from year to year.

  6. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal in a coupled integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Vittorio, Alan; Chini, Louise M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Truesdale, John E.; Craig, Anthony P.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Hurtt, George; Thornton, Peter E.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-11-27

    Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and the IPCC AR5 parallel process assumes consistent climate scenarios across Integrated Assessment and Earth System Models (IAMs and ESMs). To facilitate consistency, CMIP5 used a novel land use harmonization to provide ESMs with seamless, 1500-2100 land use trajectories generated by historical data and four IAMs. However, we have identified and partially addressed a major gap in the CMIP5 land coupling design. The CMIP5 Community ESM (CESM) global afforestation is only 22% of RCP4.5 afforestation from 2005 to 2100. Likewise, only 17% of the Global Change Assessment Model’s (GCAM’s) 2040 RCP4.5 afforestation signal, and none of the pasture loss, were transmitted to CESM within a newly integrated model. This is a critical problem because afforestation is necessary for achieving the RCP4.5 climate stabilization. We attempted to rectify this problem by modifying only the ESM component of the integrated model, enabling CESM to simulate 66% of GCAM’s afforestation in 2040, and 94% of GCAM’s pasture loss as grassland and shrubland losses. This additional afforestation increases vegetation carbon gain by 19 PgC and decreases atmospheric CO2 gain by 8 ppmv from 2005 to 2040, implying different climate scenarios between CMIP5 GCAM and CESM. Similar inconsistencies likely exist in other CMIP5 model results, primarily because land cover information is not shared between models, with possible contributions from afforestation exceeding model-specific, potentially viable forest area. Further work to harmonize land cover among models will be required to adequately rectify this problem.

  7. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06

    in low-yielding farming systems, but there was considerable turnover between these systems and forests, with widespread generalists replacing narrowly endemic forest-dependent species. Species most dependent on forest as a natural habitat, those...

  8. Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Zhenghong

    2009-05-15

    of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol...

  9. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company Ranch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of the 4-S Land and Cattle Company Ranch Preparedof the 4-S Land and Cattle Company (4-S Ranch) was conductedirrigated pasture for beef cattle by an active program of

  10. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  11. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux form 25 April 2007; accepted 29 April 2007 Abstract Wood density is an important variable in estimates of forest biomass and greenhouse-gas emissions from land-use change. The mean wood density used in estimates

  12. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  13. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  14. Random Forest-Based Protein Model Quality Assessment (RFMQA) Using Structural Features and Potential Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jooyoung

    Random Forest-Based Protein Model Quality Assessment (RFMQA) Using Structural Features and Potential Energy Terms Balachandran Manavalan, Juyong Lee, Jooyoung Lee* Center for In Silico Protein in protein structure prediction. In this study, we present the first application of random forest based model

  15. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  16. Assessing the effect of modified accessibility on land cover change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, James E

    2009-11-26

    Policies taken towards transportation influence patterns of land cover change and in recent years, significant investments have been made in rail infrastructure in England. The introduction of high speed rail services, ...

  17. Overview of Forest Observations in the GEOSS Work Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    do Iguaçu, Brazil #12;GEOSS societal benefits and land cover and forest observations Climate Land change & GHG emis. Water+energy exchanges Climate Land change & GHG emis. Water+energy exchanges Weather environment cond. Services + accounting Energy Bio-energy/biomass Wind/hydro power assess. Energy Bio-energy

  18. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  19. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

  20. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  1. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  2. Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember CorpSunviePty Ltd Jump to:Land-use

  3. Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    347 Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types in Santa Cruz County left with tough decisions on how to treat tree damage and mortality compounded by the Pine Mountain a method for evaluating damage and mortality. Qualitative criteria for evaluating stand damage focused

  4. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  5. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    2002) Handbook on life cycle assessment, operational guideEnvironmental management—life cycle assessment—requirementsThe purpose of life cycle assessment is to synthesize a

  6. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  7. A state-impact-state methodology for assessing environmental impact in land use planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Longgao; Yang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Longqian; Potter, Rebecca; Li, Yingkui

    2014-04-01

    The implementation of land use planning (LUP) has a large impact on environmental quality. There lacks a widely accepted and consolidated approach to assess the LUP environmental impact using Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA). In this paper, we developed a state-impact-state (SIS) model employed in the LUP environmental impact assessment (LUPEA). With the usage of Matter-element (ME) and Extenics method, the methodology based on the SIS model was established and applied in the LUPEA of Zoucheng County, China. The results show that: (1) this methodology provides an intuitive and easy understanding logical model for both the theoretical analysis and application of LUPEA; (2) the spatial multi-temporal assessment from base year, near-future year to planning target year suggests the positive impact on the environmental quality in the whole County despite certain environmental degradation in some towns; (3) besides the spatial assessment, other achievements including the environmental elements influenced by land use and their weights, the identification of key indicators in LUPEA, and the appropriate environmental mitigation measures were obtained; and (4) this methodology can be used to achieve multi-temporal assessment of LUP environmental impact of County or Town level in other areas. - Highlights: • A State-Impact-State model for Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment (LUPEA). • Matter-element (ME) and Extenics methods were embedded in the LUPEA. • The model was applied to the LUPEA of Zoucheng County. • The assessment shows improving environment quality since 2000 in Zoucheng County. • The method provides a useful tool for the LUPEA in the county level.

  8. An international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Randerson, James T [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Bonan, Gordon [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Fung, Inez [University of California, Berkeley

    2009-12-01

    The need to capture important climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCMs) has resulted in efforts to include atmospheric chemistry and land and ocean biogeochemistry into the next generation of production climate models, called Earth System Models (ESMs). While many terrestrial and ocean carbon models have been coupled to GCMs, recent work has shown that such models can yield a wide range of results (Friedlingstein et al., 2006). This work suggests that a more rigorous set of global offline and partially coupled experiments, along with detailed analyses of processes and comparisons with measurements, are needed. The Carbon-Land Model Intercomparison Project (C-LAMP) was designed to meet this need by providing a simulation protocol and model performance metrics based upon comparisons against best-available satellite- and ground-based measurements (Hoffman et al., 2007). Recently, a similar effort in Europe, called the International Land Model Benchmark (ILAMB) Project, was begun to assess the performance of European land surface models. These two projects will now serve as prototypes for a proposed international land-biosphere model benchmarking activity for those models participating in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). Initially used for model validation for terrestrial biogeochemistry models in the NCAR Community Land Model (CLM), C-LAMP incorporates a simulation protocol for both offline and partially coupled simulations using a prescribed historical trajectory of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Models are confronted with data through comparisons against AmeriFlux site measurements, MODIS satellite observations, NOAA Globalview flask records, TRANSCOM inversions, and Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) site measurements. Both sets of experiments have been performed using two different terrestrial biogeochemistry modules coupled to the CLM version 3 in the Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3): the CASA model of Fung, et al., and the carbon-nitrogen (CN) model of Thornton. Comparisons of the CLM3 offline results against observational datasets have been performed and are described in Randerson et al. (2009). CLM version 4 has been evaluated using C-LAMP, showing improvement in many of the metrics. Efforts are now underway to initiate a Nitrogen-Land Model Intercomparison Project (N-LAMP) to better constrain the effects of the nitrogen cycle in biosphere models. Presented will be new results from C-LAMP for CLM4, initial N-LAMP developments, and the proposed land-biosphere model benchmarking activity.

  9. Readiness assessment plan for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility (Trench 31)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-11-22

    This document provides the Readiness Assessment Plan (RAP) for the Project W-025 (Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility) Readiness Assessment (RA). The RAP documents prerequisites to be met by the operating organization prior to the RA. The RAP is to be implemented by the RA Team identified in the RAP. The RA Team is to verify the facility`s compliance with criteria identified in the RAP. The criteria are based upon the {open_quotes}Core Requirements{close_quotes} listed in DOE Order 5480.31, {open_quotes}Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes}.

  10. DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    1 3 DOI 10.1007/s00382-014-2430-z Clim Dyn The energy balance over land and oceans: an assessment ocean to land transports), and revisit the global mean energy balance. Keywords Global energy balance The energy balance of the Earth is a fundamental determinant of the climatic conditions on our planet. Thanks

  11. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity impacts . Bioethanol . Evenness . Geographicto produce a liter of bioethanol depends on where thethen assessed for three bioethanol feedstocks at different

  12. Ecosystem management aligns different uses of the land with ecological parameters and goals of environmental quality. An important USDA Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    -aged timber harvest on old-growth forests and their associated wildlife, such as the California spotted owl" for special needs, will sustain all key resources (soil, water, vegetation, and wildlife) and functions, promoting forest health, allowing sustainable levels of commodity extraction, and supporting recreational

  13. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  14. The Resurgence of Land Reform Policy and Agrarian Movements in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rachman, Noer Fauzi

    2011-01-01

    2006. Tafsir(an) Land Reform dalam Alur Sejarah Indonesia:Bibingka Strategy in Land Reform Implementation: Autonomous2006a. “Redistributive Land Reform in ‘Public (Forest) Land?

  15. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin; Perlack, Robert D; Blackwelder, D. Brad; Muth, David J.; Hess, J. Richard

    2008-08-01

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  16. The response of understory herbaceous plants to nitrogen fertilization in forests of different land-use history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraterrigo, Jennifer

    Sciences, Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, NC 28754, USA c Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin colonization. We examined the response of six forest herb taxa (Arisaema triphyllum, Cimicifuga racemosa

  17. Use of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cancer and environmental contaminants, focusing primarily on agricultural chemical exposure assessmentUse of land surface remotely sensed satellite and airborne data for environmental exposure assessment in cancer research SUSAN K. MAXWELLa , JAYMIE R. MELIKERb AND PIERRE GOOVAERTSc a U.S. Geological

  18. Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo NewYanbu,InformationAbakusLLCApplications |

  19. TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE LAND MANAGEMENT IN THE DRYLANDS: SCIENTIFIC CONNECTIONS IN MONITORING AND ASSESSING DRYLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    ; Accepted 29 November 2010 ABSTRACT The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and its sister in land management undertaken to address dryland degradation and desertification can simultaneously reduce words: resilience; sustainable land management; desertification; land degradation; climate change

  20. Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, Kathy; Janetos, Anthony; van Vuuren, Detlef P.; Pongtatz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2010-01-01

    for integration into ESMs and IAMs. A key application will be for the detection and attribution of historical climate change; previous detection and attribution studies have been unable to include land-cover change credibly in their range of potential drivers... Index time series, fire observations, night-time lights, hot-spot detection, etc.), a new level of data products and information on land dynamics will soon become available for different time periods since about 1990 (Herold et al., 2008b). 4. Moving...

  1. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

  2. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    assessment. To assess desertification potential, Núñez etAssessing potential desertification environmental impact in

  3. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

  4. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  5. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses April 2001, Discussion Paper 01-19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedjo, Roger; Sohngen, Brent; Mendelsohn, Robert

    2001-04-05

    This study develops cumulative carbon ''supply curves'' for global forests utilizing a dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and particular time points within that century, the curves are not traditional Marshallian supply curves or steady-state supply curves. Rather, the focus is on cumulative carbon cost curves (quasi-supply curves) at various points in time over the next 100 years. The research estimates a number of long-term, cumulative, carbon quasi-supply curves under different price scenarios and for different time periods. The curves trace out the relationship between an intertemporal price path for carbon, as given by carbon shadow prices, and the cumulative carbon sequestered from the initiation of the shadow prices, set at 2000, to a selected future year (2010, 2050, 2100). The timber supply model demonstrates that cumulative carbon quasi-supply curves that can be generated through forestry significantly depend on initial carbon prices and expectations regarding the time profile of future carbon prices. Furthermore, long-run quasi-supply curves generated from a constant price will have somewhat different characteristics from quasi-supply curves generated with an expectation of rising carbon prices through time.The ?least-cost? curves vary the time periods under consideration and the time profile of carbon prices. The quasi-supply curves suggest that a policy of gradually increasing carbon prices will generate the least costly supply curves in the shorter periods of a decade or so. Over longer periods of time, however, such as 50 or 100 years, these advantages appear to dissipate.

  6. Carbon Density and Anthropogenic Land Use Influences on Net Land-Use Change Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Rothwell, Andrew J.

    2013-10-08

    We examine historical and future land-use emissions using a simple mechanistic carbon-cycle model with regional and ecosystem specific parameterizations. Our central estimate of net terrestrial land-use change emissions, exclusive of climate feedbacks, is 250 GtC over the last three hundred years. This estimate is most sensitive to assumptions for preindustrial forest and soil carbon densities. We also find that estimates are sensitive to the treatment of crop and pasture lands. These sensitivities also translate into differences in future terrestrial uptake in the RCP4.5 land-use scenario. This estimate of future uptake is lower than the native values from the GCAM integrated assessment model result due to lower net reforestation in the RCP4.5 gridded land-use data product

  7. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    explicit manner, while life cycle assessment (LCA) does notand system extension of life-cycle assessment studies. J Ind2002) Handbook on life cycle assessment, operational guide

  8. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  9. Risk assessment involving the land disposal of animal waste on Central Texas dairies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas Chadwick

    1999-01-01

    Land disposal of animal waste is an increasing problem for dairies in central Texas Once isolated, many producers now and themselves surrounded by towns and subdivisions. Many of these new neighbors are showing an increasing concern about potential...

  10. Assessing Perpetual Conservation Easements as a Tool for Land Protection: The Private Landowner Perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroman, Dianne A

    2014-09-29

    Perpetual conservation easements have become one the primary tools used for long-term land protection and are credited with helping protect endangered species, preventing habitat fragmentation, maintaining ecosystem functions ...

  11. Integrating Multiple Geographic Information Systems to Create a Versatile Land Evaluation Site Assessment Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Grady

    2008-11-19

    GIS in Urban Planning Integrating Multiple Geographic Information Systems to Create a Versatile Land Suitability Analysis Model Grady Morrison Undergraduate Department of Geography University of Kansas gmorrisn@ku.edu Impervious Surface...

  12. How many people can China feed? : assessing the impact of land and water constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Amy Beth, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    Land and water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in China, threatening the nation's ability to feed its growing population. The limitations of these resources must be considered simultaneously to determine China's ...

  13. Assessing Effects of Changing Land Use Practices on Sediment Loads in Panther

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    coastal California. We compute land use statistics, analyze suspended sediment discharge rating curves operations are limited, and improved standards for newly constructed and upgraded roads. In July 2000 not require long-term road inspection and maintenance, the TMDL include

  14. Changes in surface albedo after fire in boreal forest ecosystems of interior Alaska assessed using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Evan A; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance, Agric. For.energy exchange depends on stand age in a boreal forest fireenergy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest

  15. Changes in surface albedo after fire in boreal forest ecosystems of interior Alaska assessed using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Evan A; Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T

    2008-01-01

    emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959 – 1999, Can. J.change on Canadian forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 31,on stand age in a boreal forest fire chronose- quence, J.

  16. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  17. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration and harvesting, and the physical properties of stands, trees and timber. Scope of our work Our research focuses expertise in forecasting forest growth is now applied to carbon assessment and management. We also work

  18. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  19. Simulating the Future Forested Landscapes of the Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeled 1. Small gap (wind, disease, other) 2. Private land development 3. Forest management, especially Lennette, Landscape Modeling · Jonathan Thompson, Analysis · Justin Goodwin, Analysis #12;Topics 1. Types to 2095). #12;Present 2096 PUBLIC & TRIBAL LANDS PRIVATE LANDS Urban Forest Urban Non-Forest Low

  20. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  1. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating Energy, Products, and Land's Note M.T. Goergen Jr. SAF TASK FORCE REPORT Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating EnergyThis Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows Climate­Forest Interactions Biomass Use and Feedstock

  2. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication Volume 6 2003 Number 3 Issue Summary Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the rural community perspective of managing the forest Land, Chadwick D. Oliver Series Editor Mary L. Tyrrell Rural Communities and Forests A summary

  3. DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a complementary document to the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada issued in November 2008, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has now released a report that provides an initial estimate of the potential to store carbon dioxide underneath millions of acres of Federal lands.

  4. Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nominelli, Gregg R.

    2012-12-17

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

  5. Forest Landowners' Guide to the Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal income tax consid- erations for Forest Land, including capital costs, reforestation tax incentives, timber income and capital gains, government program cost-share payments, tax treatment of other forest

  6. Inequalities in Taxation of Farm Lands and City Property Due to Scope and Method of Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.)

    1932-01-01

    complete and equitable assessment of the property taxed. The chief aim, therefore, of real estate assessment is to arrive at such a * Baldwin's Texas Statutes, Chapter 6. Articles 7141, 7149, and 7179. 8 BULLETIN NO. 458, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT...

  7. Assessing the health equity impacts of regional land-use plan making: An equity focussed health impact assessment of alternative patterns of development of the Whitsunday Hinterland and Mackay Regional Plan, Australia (Short report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Colleen; Harris, Patrick; Mallett, John

    2011-07-15

    Health service and partners completed an equity focussed health impact assessment to influence the consideration of health and equity within regional land-use planning in Queensland, Australia. This project demonstrated how an equity oriented assessment matrix can assist in testing regional planning scenarios. It is hoped that this HIA will contribute to the emerging interest in ensuring that potential differential health impacts continue to be considered as part of land-use planning processes.

  8. Pursuing Carbon and ForestPursuing Carbon and Forest SustainabilitySustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biomass Energy ProductionIn Forest Biomass Energy Production University of WashingtonCommissioner of Public Lands PeterPeter GoldmarkGoldmark''ss Forest Biomass Energy Initiative Pilot Projects 2009Pilot BioaviationBioaviation Fuel 2011Fuel 2011 #12;3 Forest Biomass Energy InitiativeForest Biomass Energy

  9. Assessment of model estimates of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across Northern Eurasia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rawlins, M. A.; McGuire, A. D.; Kimball, J. S.; Dass, P.; Lawrence, D.; Burke, E.; Chen, X.; Delire, C.; Koven, C.; MacDougall, A.; et al

    2015-07-28

    A warming climate is altering land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, with a potential for increased vegetation productivity as well as the mobilization of permafrost soil carbon stores. Here we investigate land-atmosphere carbon dioxide (CO2) cycling through analysis of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) and its component fluxes of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) and soil carbon residence time, simulated by a set of land surface models (LSMs) over a region spanning the drainage basin of Northern Eurasia. The retrospective simulations cover the period 1960–2009 at 0.5° resolution, which is a scale common among many global carbon and climate modelmore »simulations. Model performance benchmarks were drawn from comparisons against both observed CO2 fluxes derived from site-based eddy covariance measurements as well as regional-scale GPP estimates based on satellite remote-sensing data. The site-based comparisons depict a tendency for overestimates in GPP and ER for several of the models, particularly at the two sites to the south. For several models the spatial pattern in GPP explains less than half the variance in the MODIS MOD17 GPP product. Across the models NEP increases by as little as 0.01 to as much as 0.79 g C m?² yr?², equivalent to 3 to 340 % of the respective model means, over the analysis period. For the multimodel average the increase is 135 % of the mean from the first to last 10 years of record (1960–1969 vs. 2000–2009), with a weakening CO2 sink over the latter decades. Vegetation net primary productivity increased by 8 to 30 % from the first to last 10 years, contributing to soil carbon storage gains. The range in regional mean NEP among the group is twice the multimodel mean, indicative of the uncertainty in CO2 sink strength. The models simulate that inputs to the soil carbon pool exceeded losses, resulting in a net soil carbon gain amid a decrease in residence time. Our analysis points to improvements in model elements controlling vegetation productivity and soil respiration as being needed for reducing uncertainty in land-atmosphere CO2 exchange. These advances will require collection of new field data on vegetation and soil dynamics, the development of benchmarking data sets from measurements and remote-sensing observations, and investments in future model development and intercomparison studies.« less

  10. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Interim Report) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Knight, R. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    1982-01-01

    The commercial forestlands of East Texas and Louisiana are the most water-efficient producing areas of the two states. Current and projected water shortages for Texas makes this water-rich area extremely important to future ...

  11. Assessment of Stormflow and Water Quality from Undisturbed and Site Prepared Forest Land in East Texas (Final Report) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeHaven, M. G.; Blackburn, W. H.; Nieber, J. L.; Crawley, W. W.; Weichert, A. T.

    1983-01-01

    by shearing and windrowing, 2) clearcutting - followed by roller chopping and 3) undisturbed control. Following treatment, the sheared and windrowed sites exposed 57% of the surface soil compared to 16% for the chopped watersheds. During 1981, the first year...

  12. We are fishing out the oceans, killing off the wild animals, cutting down the forests, denuding the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    the mountains, using up the fresh water, even turning land into desert. We are polluting the oceans, the fresh water, the land, the air. We waste most of the energy coming from the sun and from the earth. Instead of using the energy to make capital investments that benefit the whole earth, such as pollution remediation

  13. ECOWAS ? GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of land area amounts from multiple sources. Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 6 * Forest resources - Logging residues - Forest thinnings (fuel treatments) -...

  14. Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

  15. 18 December 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/USFSA/bulletins/e3831c USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 12/16/2014 02:57 PM EST USDA Improves Forest Health by Harvesting Biomass for Energy 2014 Farm Bill Program Generates Renewable Energy of dead or diseased trees from National Forests and Bureau of Land Management lands for renewable energy

  16. Management of Giant Sequoia on Mountain Home Demonstration State Forest1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Demonstration State Forest is a 4,800 acre tract of forest land in Tulare County managed. It reads "The Mountain Home Tract Forest in Tulare County shall be developed and maintained, pursuant

  17. Downscaling Global Land Cover Projections from an Integrated Assessment Model for Use in Regional Analyses: Results and Evaluation for the US from 2005 to 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Le Page, Yannick LB; Huang, Maoyi; Wolf, Julie; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-06-05

    Projections of land cover change generated from Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) and other economic-based models can be applied for analyses of environmental impacts at subregional and landscape scales. For those IAM and economic models that project land use at the sub-continental or regional scale, these projections must be downscaled and spatially distributed prior to use in climate or ecosystem models. Downscaling efforts to date have been conducted at the national extent with relatively high spatial resolution (30m) and at the global extent with relatively coarse spatial resolution (0.5 degree).

  18. National forests and public lands of Nevada Enhancement Act of 1987 and the Nevada-Florida Land Exchange Authorization Act of 1987. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Public Lands, National Parks and Forests of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session on S. 59, S. 854, June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Each of these measures is cosponsored by the two Nevada Senators, Senators Hecht and Reid, and there were companion measures pending in the House. A version of S. 59 - the so-called Nevada Interchange bill - passed the House last year. Primarily because of a dispute over language regarding federal reserved water rights, that measure did not pass the Senate. The Aerojet land exchange embodied in S. 854 proved to be fairly controversial. While the exchange is supported by the entire Nevada congressional delegation as well as the Governor, a number of conservation groups presented testimony in opposition to this proposed exchange. Texts of both bills are first included, followed by 26 statements of various recreation and conservation officials as well as local, state, and federal government official.

  19. Quantifying the effect of land use and land cover changes on green water and blue water in northern part of China 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, X.; Ren, L.; Yuan, F.; Singh, V. P.; Fang, X.; Yu, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2009-06-12

    ) and runoff. The LULC data showed that from 1980 to 1996 grass land and water body had decreased and forest land and crop land had increased. This change caused the evaporation from vegetation interception and vegetation transpiration to increase, whereas...

  20. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  1. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    recreational opportunities and store carbon, all while providing us a valuable renewable resource and important forest products, it also provides an economic motivation for forest landowners to keep their land products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  2. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for geothermal leasing in the West, including Alaska. The draft PEIS considers all public lands and national forests with geothermal...

  3. I think that I shall never see {hor_ellipsis} a lovely forestry policy: Land use programs for conservation of forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.F.; Richards, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Forestry programs are frequently invoked as having potential for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Most studies have attempted to quantify the potential impact of forest programs on carbon uptake and the potential costs of such programs. In this paper, we will attempt instead to focus on the institutional issues of the implementation of forestry programs for carbon sequestration. In particular, we explore the challenges for implementing forest programs that are: of increasing technological complexity; and in settings that depart significantly from the idealized conditions of economic models. We start in Section 1 by examining a suite of instruments that are commonly employed to implement a given policy. Section 2 examines a relatively simple case -- a tree-planting program in the US -- and demonstrates that there are significant difficulties involved in implementing a carbon sequestration program, even in a well-developed market economy. Section 3 focuses on other technologies in the US and why the choice of policy instruments and program design is more difficult than for the simple tree-planting case. Section 4 considers implementation of forestry policies in other countries where the economies may bear less resemblance to the ideal market economy than the US. In those settings, the choice of policy instruments may be very sensitive to non-market considerations that are often missed in conventional policy and cost analysis.

  4. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  5. Final Report and Strategic Plan on the Feasibility Study to Assess Geothermal Potential on Warm Springs Reservation Lands. Report No. DOE/GO/15177

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates

    2007-05-17

    In 2005 the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council authorized an evaluation of the geothermal development potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises obtained a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct a geological assessment and development estimate. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises utilized a team of expert consultants to conduct the study and develop a strategic plan. The resource assessment work was completed in 2006 by GeothermEx Inc., a consulting company specializing in geothermal resource assessments worldwide. The GeothermEx report indicates there is a 90% probability that a commercial geothermal resource exists on tribal lands in the Mt. Jefferson area. The geothermal resource assessment and other cost, risk and constraints information has been incorporated into the strategic plan.

  6. From land use to land cover: Restoring the afforestation signal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    integrated assessment - earth system model and the implications for CMIP5 RCP simulations Climate projections depend on scenarios of fossil fuel emissions and land use change, and...

  7. Assessing the extent of agriculture/pasture and secondary succession forest in the Brazilian Legal Amazon using SPOT VEGETATION data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    influence on the observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and consequent climatic Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal. c Remote Sensing Department, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos vegetation cover in the past, acting as a source of carbon. On the contrary, the secondary succession forest

  8. Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-02-16

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

  9. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  10. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  11. Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

    1994-11-30

    This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

  12. 16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    16 July 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR building rating system in the world: USGBC's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Richard P. Vlosky, Ph.D. Director Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Crosby Land & Resources

  13. 27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of its landmass to combat climate change and soil erosion, the State Forestry Administration said27 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR of the new forested land was low-quality, and pointed out that while new trees are planted rapidly, data

  14. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  15. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  16. A top-down assessment of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01

    Land, water and energy use are key measures of the sustainability of uranium production into the future. As the most attractive, accessible deposits are mined out, future discoveries may prove to be significantly, perhaps unsustainably, more intensive consumers of environmental resources. A number of previous attempts have been made to provide empirical relationships connecting these environmental impact metrics to process variables such as stripping ratio and ore grade. These earlier attempts were often constrained by a lack of real world data and perform poorly when compared against data from modern operations. This paper conditions new empirical models of energy, water and land use in uranium mining, milling, and refining on contemporary data reported by operating mines. It shows that, at present, direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 1% of the electrical energy produced by the once-through fuel cycle. Projections of future energy intensity from uranium production are also possible by coupling the empirical models with estimates of uranium crustal abundance, characteristics of new discoveries, and demand. The projections show that even for the most pessimistic of scenarios considered, by 2100, the direct energy use from uranium production represents less than 3% of the electrical energy produced by the contemporary once-through fuel cycle.

  17. Are double trailers cost effective for transporting forest biomass on steep terrain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora-Cristales, Rene; Sessions, John

    2015-01-01

    productivities of forest biomass harvesting operations: Ain road assessment for biomass opera- tions in steepinterference in forest biomass recovery operations on steep

  18. Land-Use Change and Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-07-01

    This publication describes the Biomass Program’s efforts to examine the intersection of land-use change and bioenergy production. It describes legislation requiring land-use change assessments, key data and modeling challenges, and the research needs to better assess and understand the impact of bioenergy policy on land-use decisions.

  19. Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

  20. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  1. Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1998-06-01

    Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

  2. USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-187. 2003. 327 VII. Assessment Area Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , there is some variation at the county level because the available county level projections from the State ASSESSMENT AREA SUMMARY · The proportion of LEP students in 1990 was highest in Imperial, Los Ange- les, Monterey, Orange, and San Francisco Counties. Across regions, SCAG showed the highest proportion

  3. Z .The Science of the Total Environment 262 2000 263 286 Assessing the consequences of global change for forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayres, Matthew.P.

    Z .The Science of the Total Environment 262 2000 263 286 Assessing the consequences of global , and competitors. Because of their short life cycles, mobility, reproductive potential, and physiological. Changes in temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, and atmospheric CO concentra-2 tions can alter

  4. Environmental Assessment for Lease of Land for the Development of a Research Park at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico - Final Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1997-10-07

    As part of its initiative to fulfill its responsibilities to provide support for the incorporated County of Los Alamos (the County) as an Atomic Energy Community, while simultaneously fulfilling its obligations to enhance the self-sufficiency of the County under authority of the Atomic Energy Community Act of 1955 and the Defense Authorization Act, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease undeveloped land in Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the County for private sector use as a research park. The Proposed Action is intended to accelerate economic development activities within the County by creating regional employment opportunities through offering federal land for private sector lease and use. As a result of the proposed land lease, any government expenditures for providing infrastructure to the property would be somewhat supplemented by tenant purchase of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) expertise in research and development activities. The presence of a research park within LANL boundaries is expected to allow private sector tenants of the park to be able to quickly and efficiently call upon LANL scientific expertise and facility and equipment capabilities as part of their own research operations and LANL research personnel, in turn, would be challenged in areas complementary to their federally funded research. In this way a symbiotic relationship would be enjoyed by both parties while simultaneously promoting economic development for the County through new job opportunities at the Research Park and at LANL, new indirect support opportunities for the community at large, and through payment of the basic building space leases. A ''sliding-scale'' approach (DOE 1993) is the basis for the analysis of effects in this Environmental Assessment (EA). That is, certain aspects of the Proposed Action have a greater potential for creating adverse environmental effects than others; therefore, they are discussed in greater detail in this EA than those aspects of the action that have little potential for effect. The Proposed Action would result in an increase of as many as 1,500 new direct jobs and, as many as 2,565 indirect jobs could be created from the development of a research park. Lease of the tract would not reduce the size of LANL or change its site boundary. However, approximately 30 ac (12 ha) of a 60-ac (24-ha) tract would be changed from an undeveloped to a developed status. Under the No Action Alternative, no transfer or lease of Federal lands would occur. LANL would not have the benefit of its research personnel working on a variety of complementary research efforts beyond their federally funded responsibilities. No new jobs would be created from proposed development activities. Undeveloped lands would remain in their current condition. Two hypothetical accidents were analyzed that evaluated a potential chemical release and radiological doses to the public from hypothetical accidents at the proposed Research Park. Neither accident scenario resulted in potentially serious health effects for workers or the public at the proposed Research Park. The cumulative effects of the Proposed Action as well as reasonably foreseeable related actions could result in potential adverse health effects. Environmental effects would be limited to the loss of a small amount of wildlife habitat. Additional economic development would be expected to occur.

  5. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. This publication provides an overview of forest resources in New Hampshire based on inventories conducted by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This publication provides an overview of forest resources in New Hampshire based on inventories of Agriculture RESOURCEUPDATE FS-29 Forests of New Hampshire, 2013 Forest Service | December 2014 1 Overview Currently, New Hampshire is home to nearly 4.8 million acres of forest land (Table 1). Since the 1997

  7. A tiered approach for the human health risk assessment for consumption of vegetables from with cadmium-contaminated land in urban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swartjes, Frank A. Versluijs, Kees W.; Otte, Piet F.

    2013-10-15

    Consumption of vegetables that are grown in urban areas takes place worldwide. In developing countries, vegetables are traditionally grown in urban areas for cheap food supply. In developing and developed countries, urban gardening is gaining momentum. A problem that arises with urban gardening is the presence of contaminants in soil, which can be taken up by vegetables. In this study, a scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables from cadmium-contaminated land. Starting from a contaminated site, the procedure follows a tiered approach which is laid out as follows. In Tier 0, the plausibility of growing vegetables is investigated. In Tier 1 soil concentrations are compared with the human health-based Critical soil concentration. Tier 2 offers the possibility for a detailed site-specific human health risk assessment in which calculated exposure is compared to the toxicological reference dose. In Tier 3, vegetable concentrations are measured and tested following a standardized measurement protocol. To underpin the derivation of the Critical soil concentrations and to develop a tool for site-specific assessment the determination of the representative concentration in vegetables has been evaluated for a range of vegetables. The core of the procedure is based on Freundlich-type plant–soil relations, with the total soil concentration and the soil properties as variables. When a significant plant–soil relation is lacking for a specific vegetable a geometric mean of BioConcentrationFactors (BCF) is used, which is normalized according to soil properties. Subsequently, a ‘conservative’ vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor is calculated as basis for the Critical soil concentration (Tier 1). The tool to perform site-specific human health risk assessment (Tier 2) includes the calculation of a ‘realistic worst case’ site-specific vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. -- Highlights: • A scientifically-based and practical procedure has been developed for assessing the human health risks from the consumption of vegetables. • Uptake characteristics of cadmium in a series of vegetables is represented by a vegetable-group-consumption-rate-weighted BioConcentrationFactor. • Calculations and measurement steps are combined.

  8. The effect of expertise on the quality of forest standards implementation: The case of FSC forest certification in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental norms and standards in a specific local context. They interpret abstract global standards through environmental governance project. We then describe the FSC certification procedure and identify key actors Experts Forest certification Forest management assessment Environmental auditing The central question

  9. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  10. Assessment of microbial processes on radionuclide mobility in shallow land burial. [West Valley, NY; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, P.; Tate, R.L. III; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-07-01

    The impact of microbial metabolism of the organic substituents of low level radioactive wastes on radionuclide mobility in disposal sites, the nature of the microbial transformations involved in this metabolism and the effect of the prevailing environmental parameters on the quantities and types of metabolic intermediates accumulated were examined. Since both aerobic and anaerobic periods can occur during trench ecosystem development, oxidation capacities of the microbial community in the presence and absence of oxygen were analyzed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites were reviewed. Several deficiencies in available data were determined. Further research needs are suggested. This assessment has demonstrated that the biochemical capabilities expressed within the low level radioactive waste disposal site are common to a wide variety of soil bacteria. Hence, assuming trenches would not be placed in sites with such extreme abiotic conditions that all microbial activity is precluded, the microbial populations needed for colonization and decomposition of the organic waste substances are readily provided from the waste itself and from the soil of existing and any proposed disposal sites. Indeed, considering the ubiquity of occurrence of the microorganisms responsible for waste decomposition and the chemical nature of the organic waste material, long-term prevention of biodecomposition is difficult, if not impossible.

  11. Temperate Deciduous Forests Peter B Reich and Lee Frelich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    forests, and also have been more severely impacted by land use change and air pollution. Temper- ate have also been subject to bio- logical invasions and to elevated levels of air pollution, including

  12. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  13. Mountain Caribou in Managed Forests: Recommendations for Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    by the program. Financial support for the production of the second edition of Mountain Caribou in managed forestsMountain Caribou in Managed Forests: Recommendations for Managers Second Edition Susan K. Stevenson, Lands and Parks. #12;iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The first edition of this report, Mountain Caribou in managed

  14. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T. Randerson,1 * H. Liu,2 M. G. Flanner,1 S measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black the concept of radiative forcing (12) to assess quantitatively the net effect of a boreal forest fire

  15. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

  16. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the...

  17. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  18. By Rebecca Barnard, Forest Certification Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - administered land. Third party and annual surveillance audits maintain or improve the DNR's forest management that their products Continued on page 4 Chain of Custody Market Outlook 2 Certification Web sites 5 Stumpage Prices 6 percent long-run trend level by mid-2009. However, energy and fuel prices have increased to levels well

  19. A comparison of automated land cover/use classification methods for a Texas bottomland hardwood system using lidar, spot-5, and ancillary data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernon, Zachary Isaac

    2009-05-15

    Bottomland hardwood forests are highly productive ecosystems which perform many important ecological services. Unfortunately, many bottomland hardwood forests have been degraded or lost. Accurate land cover mapping is crucial for management...

  20. Assessment Ranges for Other Categories (per acre)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of the current use law. For the entire law, rules, and informational handbook, contact the UNH Cooperative or equivalent, documenting the land's conformance with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative Standard (SFI) or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)-US Forest Management Standards; or 3. A forest stewardship plan signed

  1. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  2. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  3. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  4. Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

  5. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  6. Reynolda Campus Wake Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Reynolda Campus Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Office of Research than NIH and NSF, such as the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and State

  7. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  8. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  9. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 911 A Case Study of Habitat Conservation Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Henning C. Stabins2 Abstract Forest practices on private industrial timberlands have steadily progressed and Management of Dead Wood in Western Forests, November 2-4, 1999, Reno, Nevada. 2 Director, Fish and Wildlife.hicks@plumcreek.com and henning.stabins@plumcreek.com) #12;Habitat Conservation Plans and Industrial Forest Lands Case Study

  10. Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel A

    1999-01-01

    risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentalF. and Riley, F. S. 1984. Land Subsidence in the San Joaquinand Miller, R. E. 1975. Land subsidence due to ground water

  11. Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentelObserved and simulated land subsidence for extenso meter 1 .and Miller, R. E. 1975. land subsidence due to ground water

  12. Terry Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel: Name: Rm. Tel: Location:TerrachanicsTerry Land

  13. Land transformation and occupation impacts of farming practices for the production of soybean in Mato Grosso, Brazil, using life cycle impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Mato Grosso, Brazil, using life cycle impact assessment Michael J. Lathuillière1 (mlathuilliere services in LCA Int J of Life Cycle Assess 18 1188­1202 Macedo M N et al 2012 Decoupling of deforestation cycle assessment (LCA) according to ISO 14044:2006. Data from the 110 farms in Mato Grosso represent

  14. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  15. Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

    2012-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

  16. Agriculture, Land Use, Energy and Carbon Emission Impacts of Global Biofuel Mandates to Mid-Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page

    2014-02-01

    Three potential future scenarios of expanded global biofuel production are presented here utilizing the GCAM integrated assessment model. These scenarios span a range that encompasses on the low end a continuation of existing biofuel production policies to two scenarios that would require an expansion of current targets as well as an extension of biofuels targets to other regions of the world. Conventional oil use is reduced by 4-8% in the expanded biofuel scenarios, which results in a decrease of in CO2 emissions on the order of 1-2 GtCO2/year by mid-century from the global transportation sector. The regional distribution of crop production is relatively unaffected, but the biofuels targets do result in a marked increase in the production of conventional crops used for energy. Producer prices of sugar and corn reach levels about 12% and 7% above year 2005 levels, while the increased competition for land causes the price of food crops such as wheat, although not used for bioenergy in this study, to increase by 1 to 2%. The amount of land devoted to growing all food crops and dedicated bioenergy crops is increased by about 10% by 2050 in the High biofuel case, with concurrent decreases in other uses of land such as forest and pasture. In both of the expanded biofuels cases studied, there is an increase in net cumulative carbon emissions for the first couple of decades due to these induced land use changes. However, the difference in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels expansion decline by about 2035 as the reductions in energy system emissions exceed further increases in emissions from land use change. Even in the absence of a policy that would limit emissions from land use change, the differences in net cumulative emissions from the biofuels scenarios reach zero by 2050, and are decreasing further over time in both cases.

  17. Harvesting the Greenhouse through Altered Land Management: Economic Potential and Market Design Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Harvesting the Greenhouse through Altered Land Management: Economic Potential and Market Design: Economic Potential and Market Design Challenges Carbon sequestration in agricultural and forest soils in market design to achieve meaningful AF participation. GHG Emission Mitigation in AF -- Concept

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory Investigates Fenton Hill to Support Future Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Supporting future land use for the U.S. Forest Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program (CAP) completed sampling soil at Fenton Hill in the Jemez Mountains this month.

  19. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  20. Precipitation Variability over the Forest-to-Nonforest Transition in Southwestern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    Prior research has shown that deforestation in the southwestern Amazon enhances the formation of nonprecipitating shallow cumulus clouds, while deep cumulus convection was favored over forested land. The research presented ...

  1. On linking an Earth system model to the equilibrium carbon representation of an economically optimizing land use model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Calvin, Katherine V.; Jones, Andrew D.; Mao, Jiafu; Patel, Pralit L.; Shi, Xiaoying; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2014-01-01

    Human activities are significantly altering biogeochemical cycles at the global scale, posing a significant problem for earth system models (ESMs), which may incorporate static land-use change inputs but do not actively simulate policy or economic forces. One option to address this problem is a to couple an ESM with an economically oriented integrated assessment model. Here we have implemented and tested a coupling mechanism between the carbon cycles of an ESM (CLM) and an integrated assessment (GCAM) model, examining the best proxy variables to share between the models, and quantifying our ability to distinguish climate- and land-use-driven flux changes. CLM’s net primary production and heterotrophic respiration outputs were found to be the most robust proxy variables by which to manipulate GCAM’s assumptions of long-term ecosystem steady state carbon, with short-term forest production strongly correlated with long-term biomass changes in climate-change model runs. By leveraging the fact that carbon-cycle effects of anthropogenic land-use change are short-term and spatially limited relative to widely distributed climate effects, we were able to distinguish these effects successfully in the model coupling, passing only the latter to GCAM. By allowing climate effects from a full earth system model to dynamically modulate the economic and policy decisions of an integrated assessment model, this work provides a foundation for linking these models in a robust and flexible framework capable of examining two-way interactions between human and earth system processes.

  2. From Watersheds to the Web: Online Tools for Modeling Forest Soil Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    one cause of land degradation worldwide. The most famous example of wind erosion in the SUMMARY Forest outcomes. US is the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, when extended drought combined with poor farming practices and road construction are the main agents of surface erosion in the Rockies, with activities such as forest

  3. From Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    : Crystalline solar photovoltaic modules Land use: ~200 acres Over 164,000 Panels #12;Sustainability Forest wildlife friendly solar habitats Show wildlife use will not impact solar efficiency Recommend bestFrom Forest to Solar Farm: An Evaluation of Habitat Availability on a Solar Farm

  4. thesis abstract: Assessing the effect of land-cover changes on species distributions: application of habitat models to conservation of Mediterranean bird communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallecillo, Sara

    2010-01-01

    ISSN 1948-6596 news and update thesis abstract Assessing theThe general aim of my thesis was to identify the ecologicalmain results from my PhD thesis derived in four manuscripts,

  5. Inter-regional comparison of land-use effects on stream metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernot, Melody [Ball State University; Sobota, Daniel [Oregon State University; Hall, Robert [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Dodds, Walter [Kansas State University; Webster, Jackson [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Tank, Jennifer [University of Notre Dame, IN; Ashkenas, Linda [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL; Dahm, Cliff [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Gregory, Stanley [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Grimm, Nancy [Arizona State University; Hamilton, Stephen [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Johnson, Sherri [Oregon State University; McDowell, William [University of Hew Hampshire; Meyer, Judy [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory; Poole, Geoffrey C. [Montana State University; Valett, H. Maurice [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Arango, Clay [University of Notre Dame, IN; Beaulieu, Jake [University of Notre Dame, IN; Burgin, Amy [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Crenshaw, Chelsea [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Helton, Ashley [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Johnson, Laura [University of Notre Dame, IN; Merriam, Jeffrey [University of New Hampshire; Niederlehner, Bobbie [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); O'Brien, Jon [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Potter, Jody [University of New Hampshire; Sheibley, Rich [Arizona State University; Thomas, Suzanne [Marine Biological Laboratory; Wilson, Kym [Kansas State University

    2010-01-01

    Rates of whole-system metabolism (production and respiration) are fundamental indicators of ecosystem structure and function. Although first-order, proximal controls are well understood, assessments of the interactions between proximal controls and distal controls, such as land use and geographic region, are lacking. Thus, the influence of land use on stream metabolism across geographic regions is unknown. Further, there is limited understanding of how land use may alter variability in ecosystem metabolism across regions. 2. Stream metabolism was measured in nine streams in each of eight regions (n = 72) across the United States and Puerto Rico. In each region, three streams were selected from a range of three land uses: agriculturally influenced, urban-influenced, and reference streams. Stream metabolism was estimated from diel changes in dissolved oxygen concentrations in each stream reach with correction for reaeration and groundwater input. 3. Gross primary production (GPP) was highest in regions with little riparian vegetation (sagebrush steppe in Wyoming, desert shrub in Arizona/New Mexico) and lowest in forested regions (North Carolina, Oregon). In contrast, ecosystem respiration (ER) varied both within and among regions. Reference streams had significantly lower rates of GPP than urban or agriculturally influenced streams. 4. GPP was positively correlated with photosynthetically active radiation and autotrophic biomass. Multiple regression models compared using Akaike's information criterion (AIC) indicated GPP increased with water column ammonium and the fraction of the catchment in urban and reference land-use categories. Multiple regression models also identified velocity, temperature, nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic carbon, GPP, coarse benthic organic matter, fine benthic organic matter and the fraction of all land-use categories in the catchment as regulators of ER. 5. Structural equation modelling indicated significant distal as well as proximal control pathways including a direct effect of land-use on GPP as well as SRP, DIN, and PAR effects on GPP; GPP effects on autotrophic biomass, organic matter, and ER; and organic matter effects on ER. 6. Overall, consideration of the data separated by land-use categories showed reduced inter-regional variability in rates of metabolism, indicating that the influence of agricultural and urban land use can obscure regional differences in stream metabolism.

  6. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  7. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  8. Global Forests Syllabus -1 GLOBAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , and conservation. Another explores ongoing strategies that seek to sustain forests through markets and other (environmental, socioeconomic and political) under which forest products are harvested and transformed. A variety stakeholders & power Reading comments 18 Changing scenarios Reading comments 20 Costs, benefits

  9. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Coporate Plan 2006­2009 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Corporate Plan 2006­2009 1Corporate Plan 2006­2009 #12;Chief Executive Professor Jim Lynch Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Surrey GU10 4LH Tel: 01420 22255 E-mail: research

  10. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  11. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  12. limate change is expected to result in serious ecological, social and economic effects for U.S. forests. Many tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    .geobabble.org/ ~hnw/global/treeranges3/ climate_change/ Species input data: Forest Inventory and Analysis (Figure 1a Assessments of Forest Tree Genetic Degradation Risk from Climate Change (SO-EM-09-01) Spatial Assessments of Forest Tree Genetic Degradation Risk from Climate Change (SO-EM-09-01) Kevin M. Potter1, William W

  13. UW Madison PhD position: land use change and biodiversity protection in Position Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    UW Madison PhD position: land use change and biodiversity protection in Russia Position Description change, and its effects on biodiversity in Russia. Russia has undergone dramatic changes in land use opportunities for biodiversity conservation. On the other hand, forest exports are rising, and harvesting rates

  14. Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Land Use Policy Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Land Use Policy Manuscript Draft Manuscript Number: Title the Corredor Bioceánico of southeastern Bolivia to determine if rates of agriculturally- driven forest) such research is accelerating. The determinants of land change are diverse, and no other facet has received more

  15. Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Land use and habitat gradients determine bird community diversity and abundance in suburban, rural, with reserves slightly below rural. Although reserves were like rural lands in diversity of bird communities bird communities, but differed in grassland and savanna bird communities. The extensive rural forests

  16. Fire impact on forest soils evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fire impact on forest soils evaluated using near-infrared spectroscopy and multivariate calibration_vergnoux@hotmail.com Abstract The assessment of physico-chemical properties in forest soils affected by fires was evaluated Introduction The Mediterranean region is seriously affected by forest fires. Each year more than 50,000 fires

  17. A model analysis of N and P limitation on carbon accumulation in Amazonian secondary forest after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alternate land-use abandonment DARRELL A. HERBERT*, MATHEW WILLIAMS and EDWARD B. RASTETTER Marine in residual fuel and belowground necromass relative to soil organic matter (SOM) N:P produced a simul- taneous- nificantly. Associated with the practice of forest conversion to alternate land-use is an export of C

  18. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200498 Recent advances in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the interactions between the forestry land use component and the terrestrial water, carbon and nitrogen cycles environmental, ecological and land-use change. Therefore considerable understanding of the biological, biophysical and physical processes influencing the life cycle of trees and the forest ecosystem is required

  19. Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina J A V I E R H O U S P A N, Argentina, Catedra de Climatologia Agricola, Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Argentina Abstract Land cover changes may affect climate and the energy balance

  20. Increasing carbon storage in intact African tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide1,2 . The role of tropical forests is critical dioxide concentrations, may be the cause of the increase in carbon stocks13 , as some theory14 and models2 with estimates of fossil fuel emissions, ocean carbon fluxes and carbon released from land-use change, indicate

  1. Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    to manage global warming (Wiedinmyer, 2010) As land managers consider increased burning, air quality our understanding of pollutant emission rates associated with prescribed forest burns. Methods Site tracer and pollutant dispersion patterns. Modeling The WindTrax stochastic particle dispersion model

  2. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of climate change," Patrick O'Shea, chief research officer at the University of Maryland, said that will monitor changes in forests over time. Scientists hope the combined data will reveal more about land use, biodiversity and climate change effects. NASA officials estimate that engineers will complete GEDI by 2018

  3. Voluntary Associations and Their Involvement in Collaborative Forest Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiaying

    2012-02-14

    . This dissertation was aimed at gaining a better understanding of outdoor recreation and environmental voluntary associations and their involvement in collaborative forest management. Five objectives guided this study: (1) assessing the organizational characteristics...

  4. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    appeared at this time. Both of these groups of plants had life cycles, involving two generations. One of the year these mosses will produce tiny sporophytes. Prior to this generation, the tiny plants producedPrimitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after

  5. Quantifying landscape pattern in the Ouachita National Forest: an ecological application of GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Delayne Marie

    1998-01-01

    Human induced land use changes are contributing to raphics. serious ecological impacts in National Forests. Although these types of human activities are being looked upon with great concern, the contribution of human development and disturbance...

  6. Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

  7. Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014 Forest Products Trade between China. Whiletheglobaleconomicdownturnaffectedconsumptioninmanycountries,China'stradewithAfricaremained mostly unaffected. In particular, commodities, such as oil and gas

  8. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appeals Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses...

  9. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16 Forest in Rural Studies 17 International

  10. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing 13 Forest Inventory and Empirical Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16

  11. Spatial Scaling of Land Cover Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Spatial networks of land cover are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. Continuous field proxies for human settlements, agriculture and forest cover have similar spatial scaling properties spanning 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Progressive segmentation of these continuous fields yields spatial networks with rank-size distributions having slopes near -1 for a wide range of thresholds. We consider a general explanation for this scaling that does not require different processes for each type of land cover. The same conditions that give rise to scale-free networks in general can produce power law distributions of component sizes for bounded spatial networks confined to a plane or surface. Progressive segmentation of a continuous field naturally results in growth of the network while the increasing perimeters of the growing components result in preferential attachment to the larger components with the longer perimeters. Progressive segmentation of two types of random continuous field results in progr...

  12. Development of a total landed cost and risk analysis model for global strategic sourcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feller, Brian (Brian C.)

    2008-01-01

    Total landed cost and supply chain risk analysis are methods that many companies use to assess strategic sourcing decisions. For this project, landed cost is defined as those costs associated with material movement from a ...

  13. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  14. CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry sectors with PEFC C-o-C certification June 2003 Construction 1% Pulp & paper 4% Wood manufacturing% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers 5% Other primary forest industries 6% Sawmilling 39% Timber trade 43% #12;Forest industry sectors

  15. Can land management and biomass utilization help mitigate global warming?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlamadinger, B.; Lauer, M.

    1996-12-31

    With rising concern about the increase of the CO{sub 2} concentration in the earth`s atmosphere there is considerable interest in various land-use based mitigation options, like afforestation of surplus agricultural land with or without subsequent harvest; improved forest management; strategies that rely on wood plantations managed in short rotation or agricultural crops with high yields to produce bioenergy, timber and other biomass products. In the first step of this study, the net carbon benefits of such strategies will be calculated per unit of land, i.e., per hectare, because it is assumed that land is the limiting resource for such strategies in the future, and thus, the benefits per unit land need to be optimized. For these calculations a computer model has been developed. The results take into account the time dependence of carbon storage in the biosphere and are shown graphically both for land and for plantation systems with constant output of biomass over time. In the second step, these results will be combined with data on available land for Austria. The potential contribution of each of the above strategies towards mitigating the Austrian CO{sub 2} emissions will be demonstrated. A comparison to other renewable mitigation options, like solar thermal or photovoltaics, will be drawn in terms of available land resources and overall CO{sub 2} reductions.

  16. Forest Estate Modelling (Part 2) Forest Research Institute, Rotorua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    adequate models of growth and yield, and data on costs and prices, it is not too difficult to find "optiForest Estate Modelling (Part 2) O. Garcia Forest Research Institute, Rotorua The Problem Given after centuries of continued forest management, exist in Europe. Some countries still base their forest

  17. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  18. FOREST CERTIFICATION:FOREST CERTIFICATION: BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS ORBIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stewardship Council (FSC) ­ 257 million acres Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC

  19. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  20. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 923 Management of Dead Wood: Perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the timber industry 1 An abbreviated version of this paper was presented at the Symposium on the Ecology lands, giving neither protection to the public domain nor to legitimate lumber industry, these laws industry at all, fraud is really a necessity. Besides these defects, the land system in relation to forests

  1. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  2. The Health of Colorado's Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current and Future Forest Resources #12;Acknowledgements William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International), is the primary author of the 2009 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests. Thanks to the following Colorado

  3. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  4. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence of recovery on further...

  5. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    : First Author: Yu-Chuan Chen First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Yu-Chuan Chen Hyejung;Computational Statistics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Canonical Forest Yu-Chuan Chen

  6. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Landowners often need professional help after a weather-related disaster has damaged timber stands. A consulting forester can help a landowner develop management strategies that fit the landowner's objectives. This publication includes a checklist...

  7. Preliminary Assessment SHALLOW LAND DISPOSAL AREA, PARKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ............................................................................................................................................1 2.0 SITE DESCRIPTION, OPERATIONAL HISTORY AND WASTE CHARACTERISTICS....2 2.1 LOCATION........................................................................................................................................2 2.3 OPERATIONAL HISTORY AND WASTE CHARACTERISTICS ......................................................................................................................................................13 DOE LETTER 25 MAY 2000

  8. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  9. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  10. Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests? No. Some forests need burning on the forest floor 2. What are the types of forest fires? Broadly there are two types: low

  11. Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpenGilliamOhio:Change |

  12. Forest Inventory & Analysis Forests Resource Status & Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to supporting sustainable, environmentally-based, economic development. TFS Response · In 2001, TFS began a benchmark for measuring sustainability, as well as the success of land management practices. Economic Impact of forestland, all of which provide a myriad of economic, environmental and social benefits. The bulk

  13. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  14. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium: Climate Change and the Urban Forest Matt Kuharic, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks (DNRP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Report · 2013: 660 new acres added to open space taxation programs (Public Benefit Rating System (PBRS Climate Action Plan Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions · Transportation and Land Use · Energy · Forests, promote public health, and are resilient to changing climate conditions. County Operations Goal: King

  15. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  16. Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl at Western Economics Association Meetings, July 5-8, 2001, San Francisco #12;2 Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Alterations in agricultural and forestry (AF) land use and

  17. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Agriculture

  18. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Saskatchewan #12;Keywords (Subject): Land Use, Soils, Vegetation

  19. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade: Scenarios and challenges:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European Conference ­ 4 ­ 5 May 2010 ­Phnom Penh 2 Long Ratanakoma (Cambodia) - Climate change, forest conversion

  20. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  1. Contrasting responses of forest ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2: Implications for the global C cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norby, Richard J [ORNL; DeLucia, E. H. [University of Illinois; Moore, D J [University of Illinois

    2005-01-01

    In two parallel but independent experiments, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology was used to expose plots within contrasting evergreen loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and deciduous sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) forests to the level of CO2 anticipated in 2050. Net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) increased in both forests. In the year 2000, after exposing pine and sweetgum to elevated CO2 for approximately 5 and 3 years, a complete budget calculation revealed increases in net ecosystem production (NEP) of 41% and 44% in the pine forest and sweetgum forest, respectively, representing the storage of an additional 174 gC m-2 and 128 gC m-2 in these forests. The stimulation of NPP without corresponding increases in leaf area index or light absorption in either forest resulted in 23-27% stimulation in radiation-use efficiency, defined as NPP per unit absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. Greater plant respiration contributed to lower NPP in the loblolly pine forest than in the sweetgum forest, and these forests responded differently to CO2 enrichment. Where the pine forest added C primarily to long-lived woody tissues, exposure to elevated CO2 caused a large increase in the production of labile fine roots in the sweetgum forest. Greater allocation to more labile tissues may cause more rapid cycling of C back to the atmosphere in the sweetgum forest compared to the pine forest. Imbalances in the N cycle may reduce the response of these forests to experimental exposure to elevated CO2 in the future, but even at the current stimulation observed for these forests, the effect of changes in land use on C sequestration are likely to be larger than the effect of CO2-induced growth stimulation.

  2. Forest Research Wildfires in Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 recorded grassfires and nearly 550 forest fires in South Wales; this equates to eight times more per unit

  3. REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS (SUR 5385) Instructor: Scot E. Smith, Professor, Geomatics Program, School of Forest Resources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    · Land Use/Land Cover determination · Non-destructive testing using thermal Infrared · Non-destructive testing using ground penetrating radar · Environmental Assessment Case Studies: Detection of the Burmese

  4. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  5. Post-Soviet farmland abandonment, forest recovery, and carbon sequestration in western Ukraine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    Post-Soviet farmland abandonment, forest recovery, and carbon sequestration in western Ukraine T O of Forest Management, Ukrainian National Forestry University, vul. Gen. Chuprynky, 103, 79031 Lviv, Ukraine fluxes in western Ukraine (57 000 km2 ) and to assess the region's future carbon sequestration potential

  6. VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010 Litter flammability, fire ignition hazard] #12;VI International Conference on Forest Fire Research D. X. Viegas (Ed.), 2010-mail: aminata.ndiaye-boubacar@cemagref.fr Abstract Assessing the flammability of litters in fire

  7. R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessments and mitigate climate change. Large amounts of carbon (C) are stored in deep mineral forest soils, but are often not considered in accounting for global C fluxes because mineral soil C is commonly thought to be relatively

  8. Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    Managing United States Public Lands in Response to Climate Change: A View From the Ground Up and resource managers, it is not yet clear how issues related to climate change will be incorporated into on in which climate change or carbon management may intersect other use goals: forests, biofuels, and grazing

  9. Effects of land use changes on streamflow generation in the Rhine basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    , afforestation. In this study, we investigate the effect of projected land use change scenarios on river at various spatial scales. The variable infiltration capacity (VIC) (version 4.0.5) model is used, and infiltration capacity to decrease [Clark, 1987]. In addition, forests strongly affect snow accumulation

  10. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  11. Future land use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

  12. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  13. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  15. developing and forests: finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ncreif.org/indices/timberland.phtml. T he chief attribute of the forestry asset class is its superior historical risk- return pro le producing growing sites and lower establishment and labour costs than the temperate forests of mature products make Africa an attractive forestry option. Typical emerging market risks as well as environmental

  16. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the unintended consequence of government regulation in the global marketplace has been to shift the supply agendas of industrial associations, environmental organizations, government agencies, and forest landowner, certification has become a focal point for the wide range of social, cultural, environmental and economic

  17. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management problems, such as Planning-Programing-Budgeting, will require automated procedures to col- lect in terms of products and services and alter- native methods of producing them . The out- puts from PPBS- semble forest data up to an economic limit of about 50,000 lines of map data at an average cost of 0

  18. Impact of a major ice storm on an old-growth hardwood forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lechowicz, Martin J.

    , and Martin J. Lechowicz Abstract: We quantified the amount of woody biomass and volume lost in an old in northeastern North America. The woody biomass lost is the greatest recorded for any ice storm. The impact of this ice storm ranks among that of the most damaging windstorms and hurricanes recorded in forested land

  19. 74634 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 242 / Monday, December 17, 2012 / Notices Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the necessary information for use by both the FS and BLM in developing their separate annual reports to Congress for viewing by the public. Congress also makes the agency reports available for use by organizations both­7 (16 U.S.C. 2104 Note) requires the Forest Service (FS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to report

  20. Loggers and Forest Fragmentation: Behavioral Models of Road Building in the Amazon Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    in the landscape, the importance of legal and institutional constraints on economic behavior, and the power of GIS biodiversity and forest fragmentation implied by island biogeography (Whittaker 1998). Roads and market are transformed into human artifacts by the urban and ag- ricultural use of land. Although roads appear

  1. PARCELIZATION AT THE WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE: EFFECTS ON FOREST OPERATIONS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Operations and Harvesting; mboldin@clemson.edu Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, ClemsonPARCELIZATION AT THE WILDLAND-URBAN INTERFACE: EFFECTS ON FOREST OPERATIONS1 Matthew C implies a land use change. Parcelization is known to have an effect on wildfire outbreak, habitat

  2. Finding GIS data: Land cover and land use in Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houser, Rhonda

    2006-12-08

    classes with no key to indicate class descriptions. The student understands how human actions modify the physical environment. The student helps create both a hard copy and digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student... helps create a digital pie chart that shows relative land cover class areas. The student helps create a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class areas. The student creates e a pie chart by hand that shows relative land cover class...

  3. Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Lucia; Kiani, Naria; O'Brien-Kovari, Lilly; Ordower, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Stumped by Detroit's Vacant Land Process?Illustrating the Role of the Detroit Land Bank AuthorityLos Angeles STUMPED BY DETROIT’S VACANT LAND PROCESS?

  4. Sandia Energy - Bureau of Land Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bureau of Land Management Home Climate & Earth Systems Sustainable Subsurface Energy Development Program Leadership Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Land ManagementMaelyn...

  5. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  6. By Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -intensity lightning fires kept tree density down and the forests were very well adapted to fire because of the healthyBy Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist, Nebraska Forest Service Thinning is an excellent management tool for forest landowners to use to improve forest health and productivity

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE Estimation of forest harvesting-induced stream temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinch, Scott G.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Estimation of forest harvesting-induced stream temperature changes coastal British Columbia, Canada, were analyzed to assess the thermal effects of clearcut harvesting with no riparian buffer on a fish-bearing headwater stream. The approach used time series of daily mean water

  8. Key canopy traits drive forest productivity Peter B. Reich*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    -to-ecosystem scaling and its potential application to assessing terrestrial ecosystem metabolism. Important advances. Herein, presenting data for 128 cold temperate and boreal forests across a regional gradient of 600 km the metabolism of terrestrial ecosystems [1,3,8,9,11,19,21]. Such tools are critically needed, as challenges

  9. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to read and learn about our activities at the department during 2008.These include education,research,environmental, Forest in rural studies and International forestry and, last but not least,Environmental monitoring-chancellor for Environmental monitoring and assessment at SLU · Mats Nilsson was appointed asVice head of Environmental

  10. Are Forest Fires Predictable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-23

    Dynamic mean field theory is applied to the problem of forest fires. The starting point is the Monte Carlo simulation in a lattice of million cells. The statistics of the clusters is obtained by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm. We get the map $p_n\\to p_{n+1}$, where $p_n$ is the probability of finding a tree in a cell, and $n$ is the discrete time. We demonstrate that the time evolution of $p$ is chaotic. The arguments are provided by the calculation of the bifurcation diagram and the Lyapunov exponent. The bifurcation diagram reveals several windows of stability, including periodic orbits of length three, five and seven. For smaller lattices, the results of the iteration are in qualitative agreement with the statistics of the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000.

  11. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  12. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  13. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  14. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  15. Radiative forcing of natural forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalcar- bon and energy cycling in the boreal forests, includingand Forest Meteorology, Liu HP, Randerson JT (2008) Interannual variability of surface energy

  16. Health Consequences of Forest Fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; McKee, Douglas; Thomas, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    to Lung Health of Haze From Forest Fires: The SingaporeJim, C.Y. 1999. “The Forest Fires in Indonesia 1997-1998:A Study of the 1997 Forest Fires in South East Asia Using

  17. Using neutrons to fight forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, Hal; Walker, Ronald; Flocchini, R.

    2006-01-01

    USING NEUTRONS TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES Hal Egbert, Ronaldretardant to the scene of forest fires. One system that goesretardant to the scene of forest fires. MAFFS is the acronym

  18. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  19. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Future Forests Program Plan 2013 ­ 2016 (November 2012) #12;2 Summary Mission and vision The mission of Future Forests is to provide management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision

  20. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  1. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification (PEFC), the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative

  2. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  3. November2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade #12;#12;Timber Trade Flows and Actors in MyanmarNovember2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance Timber Trade Flows and Actors The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade Kevin Woods November 2013 #12;Acknowledgments The author, Kevin

  4. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ... Bronze Age...

  5. Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xuening

    2013-01-01

    Los Angeles Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests Aof the Thesis Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests bydata emerges, data mining is finally in the spotlight. This

  6. Simulating the Biogeochemical and Biogeophysical Impacts of Transient Land Cover Change and Wood Harvest in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM4) from 1850 to 2100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Peter J.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Meehl, Gerald A.; O’ Neill, Brian C.; Oleson, Keith W.; Levis, Samuel; Lawrence, David M.; Kluzek, Erik; Lindsay, Keith

    2012-05-01

    To assess the climate impacts of historical and projected land cover change in the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4), new time series of transient Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4) plant functional ...

  7. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  8. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  9. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  10. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100Nationalquestionnaires 0serialIndustrial ConsumptionRibbon The|Rich land

  11. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate studentScienceLaboratory program Labs and Field SiteLand

  12. Linkages among land use, macronutrient levels, and soil erosion in northern Vietnam: A plot-scale study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Linkages among land use, macronutrient levels, and soil erosion in northern Vietnam: A plot, Japan e Forest Resources and Environmental Management Faculty, Vietnam Forestry University, Xuan Mai, Chuong My, Hanoi, Vietnam f Science Devision, Department of Science, IT, Innovation and the Arts, GPO Box

  13. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  14. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  15. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  16. The land-atmosphere water flux in the tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andfrom a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach.measurements of energy partition for Amazonian forest. Quar-

  17. Snow process modeling in the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    Snow process modeling in the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS): 1. Evaluation of model-simulated snow cover extent Justin Sheffield,1 Ming Pan,1 Eric F. Wood,1 Kenneth E. Mitchell,2) and consists of two parts: (1) assessment of land surface model simulations of snow cover extent and (2

  18. REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayagüez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

  19. Predicting Ground Water Nitrate Concentration from Land Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    to assess the effects of land use on ground water quality. Exploratory data analysis was applied to historic-foot radius of a well are reliable predictors of nitrate concentration in ground water. Similarly with highly permeable materials to evaluate potential effects of development on ground water quality

  20. Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America Yanping He,1 Adam Hugh of the probability distributions of surface wind speeds (SWS) is essential for surface flux estimation, wind power estimation, and wind risk assessments. The two-parameter Weibull distribution is the most widely used

  1. Application of Remote Sensing Technology and Ecological Modeling of Forest Carbon Stocks in Mt. Apo Natural Park, Philippines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Ligaya Rubas

    2015-01-23

    This dissertation work explored the application of remote sensing technology for the assessment of forest carbon storage in Mt. Apo Natural Park. Biomass estimation is traditionally conducted using destructive sampling with high levels...

  2. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  3. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  4. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  5. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    to fossil fuel Regenerated forest energy used in the LoggingManaging forests because carbon matters: Integrating energy,Energy from post-consumer residues relevant private forest

  6. A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1 Richard P. Vlosky2 Louisiana Forest Products reviews the history of forest certification, development of different certification schemes

  7. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  8. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  9. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  10. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Polar Till Define-i Our Seasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sun-Eanh Energy Relations Earth-Sun Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Sun Affects Our Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Local Energy Relations

  11. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  12. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  13. Land O'Lakes Shaves Gas Usage through Steam System In-Plant Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Twelve participants from 6 different facilities learned and practiced energy efficiency assessment skills during the recent in-plant training at a Land O'Lakes dairy plant in Carlisle, Pennsylvania...

  14. Evaluation of landsat TM generated forest-type map for tax appraisal purposes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Gretchen

    2000-01-01

    A tax appraisal system of private timberland based on the productivity value of the timber relies on current, accurate information about the land being assessed. Historically, such information has been supplied by aerial photos and field surveys...

  15. Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts’ Crumbles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

    2012-04-02

    The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

  16. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  17. National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing (NLCD). The NLCD is a 21-class land cover classification of the entire United States. It is derived from

  18. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    because of its Humans and forest fire credibility on allof the 20th century, natural forest fires out forest fuelsto make Sierra Nevada forests more fire resil- ient is an

  19. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST-' FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (measured as a deposit) was used through- out the tests. The aerosols were assessed by two different methods toxic than malathion to larch casebearer larvae. METHODS Insects Overwintering 2nd and 3rd instar larch to the selection of a mixture of Superior Spray Oil 7N5 and tnpropylene glycol monomethylether in the ratio 911 (v

  20. Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

  1. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    1 DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Professor in Sustainable Resource Sciences, UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences PARTICIPANTS Tom Gower ­ Professor, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI Rick

  3. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

  4. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  5. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry Texas Forest Service College Station, Texas November 2006 #12;Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Texas economy. METHODS This study uses the input-output method to estimate the direct and total economic

  6. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  7. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  8. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  9. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The price development of the forest industry's end products, such as paper, has been negative for several

  10. NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment Overview and Preliminary Results NASA Cold Land Processes Field Experiment Overview and Preliminary Results NASA Cold Land ProcessesNASA Cold Land Processes Field properties using active and passive microwave remote sensing. NASA DC-8 Airborne Laboratory with AIRSAR

  11. Forests and The Texas Economy. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    , while maintain ing a healthy forest environment, requires the cooperation and understanding of many individuals, groups, and organizations. This document provides a unique statistical base for understanding the current status of forestry in Texas... or wood-based industry is a part of the manufactur ing industry that is a vital component of Texas' diverse econ omy (Figures 5-1 to 5-3). As indicated below, Texas is one of the top producers of forest products in the country: ? Texas is one...

  12. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  13. 4, 27472779, 2004 Boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  14. Forest Research No. 37 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research No. 37 May 2007 Contents m Editorial m Direct sowing ­ useful or useless details Forest Research - © Crown copyright 2007 Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are the epitome. ©AndreaKiewitt EcoThe Biodiversity and Conservation Newsletter of Ecology Division Forest Research type

  15. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  16. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  17. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  18. 7, 49254979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in the European free troposphere A. Petzold et al. Title forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP Experiment in summer 2004 A. Petzold1 , B. Weinzierl1 , H Correspondence to: A. Petzold (andreas.petzold@dlr.de) 4925 #12;ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes

  19. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  20. 6, 32273264, 2006 Forest fire smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3227­3264, 2006 Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Modeling of trace gases from the 1998 North Central Mexico forest fire smoke plume, as measured Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  1. Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest.nfs.unl.edu Dr. Scott Josiah State Forester & Director (402) 472-1467 sjosiah2@unl.edu Don Westover Wildland Fire

  2. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http://www.icfpa.org/_documents/ICFPAStatement1.pdf #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3

  3. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12

  4. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  5. Microbial Nitrate Processing in Shallow Groundwater in a Riparian Forest Peter M. Groffman,* Galen Howard, Arthur J. Gold, and William M. Nelson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    in microbial ecology is the source of energy to support groundwater microbial activity (Korom, 1992; StarrMicrobial Nitrate Processing in Shallow Groundwater in a Riparian Forest Peter M. Groffman,* Galen forest. Limiting factors for denitrification were assessed, and microbial and root biomass and potential

  6. Use of fourier transforms to define landscape scales of analysis for disturbances: a case study of thinned and unthinned forest stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in size, shape, and frequency. Specific disturbance agents generate can- opy gaps that often haveUse of fourier transforms to define landscape scales of analysis for disturbances: a case study National Forest, Disturbance impact, Forest diseases, Impact assessment, Remote sens- ing, South Dakota

  7. US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

    1993-08-01

    This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

  8. Project risk and appeals in U.S. Forest Service planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.; Seesholtz, David N.

    2013-09-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires U.S. Forest Service planning processes to be conducted by interdisciplinary teams of resource specialists to analyze and disclose the likely environmental impacts of proposed natural resource management actions on Forest Service lands. Multiple challenges associated with these processes have been a source of frustration for the agency. One of these challenges involves administrative appeals through which public entities can challenge a Forest Service decision following a NEPA process. These appeals instigate an internal review process and can result in an affirmation of the Forest Service decision, a reversal of that decision, or additional work that re-initiates all or part of the NEPA process. We examine the best predictors of appeals and their outcomes on a representative sample of 489 Forest Service NEPA processes that were decided between 2007 and 2009. While certain factors associated with pre-existing social contexts (such as a history of controversy) or pre-determined elements of a proposed action (such as the extraction of forest products) predispose certain processes to a higher risk of appeals, other practices and process-related strategies within the control of the agency also appear to bear meaningful influence on the occurrence of appeals and their outcomes. Appeals and their outcomes were most strongly related to programmatic, structural (turnover of personnel in particular), and relationship risks (both internal and external) within the processes, suggesting the need for greater focus within the agency on cultivating positive internal and external relationships to manage the risk of appeals. -- Highlights: ? We examined appeals and their outcomes on 489 U.S. Forest Service NEPA processes. ? Project type, context, team turnover, and personal relationships predicted appeals. ? External relationship management and staff turnover best predicted appeal outcomes. ? Positive internal and external relationships appear to reduce appeal risks.

  9. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    emissions from accidental forest fires, and forest damageof non-forest and pasture maintenance fires), and 3) high-of fires and biomass removal through combustion than forest

  10. Relationships between forest management policies and outdoor recreation opportunities supplied on private forest lands in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prestridge, Kenneth Wayne

    1968-01-01

    by 26 to a 1962 total of 318. In addition, the number of companies planning additional parks in the future declined from 60 to 7&9. Basically, the trend from 1960 to 1962 was a decrease in the number of comps!. es providing public recreation facilities... of the initial sample, only a two by two table could be utilized. This n cessitated restricting ownership size to only two categori. es--large and smail. Due to this restriction the small ownerships were designated as those between 5, 000 acres and 49, 999...

  11. Forest Roads June 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    or encroach on streamside management zones (SMZs). Best Management Practices (BMP) compliance checks and streamside management zones will also be covered. This course is designed for foresters, timber buyers with numerous classroom and field exercises designed to improve the skills used in timber ac- cess road planning

  12. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    , and recreation. Some disturbances can be functions of both nat- ural and human conditions (e.g., forest fire ignition and spread) (Figure 2). Virginia H. Dale (e-mail: vhd@ornl.gov) is a senior scientist and Paul J. Hanson is a research scientist...

  13. Silviculture and Forest Nutrition Forestry is a vital part of the economy in Florida and the Southern United States. Recent estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and changing land-use patterns have reduced timberlands in this region by about 2.5 million acres since interception, carbon allocation) and ecosystem processes (soil nutrient supply, nutrient cycling, uptake Cooperative, the Cooperative Research in Forest Fertilization (CRIFF) program and the Partnership

  14. Mapping forests with Lidar provides flexible, accurate data with many uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi; Tommaso, Stefania Di

    2015-01-01

    to develop inputs for forest fire behavior modeling, and tovegetation inputs for forest fire behavior modeling canopy (across public forests. Forest fire behavior models need a

  15. Can extractive reserves save the rain forest: A ecological and socioeconomic comparison of non-timber forest product extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and West Kalimantan, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salafsky, N.; Dugelby, B.L.; Terborgh, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    Extractive reserves in tropical rain forests, in which only non-timber products are harvested, have been heralded by some conservationists as a means of maintaining biodiversity while providing income for local people. The study of extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, leads to a more tempered conclusion, for while the Peten program was quite successful, the Kalimantan program was not. The study finds the success of an extractive reserve to be contingent on: (1) ecological conditions, and (2) socioeconomic and political factors. Although the study focuses on market-oriented extractive reserves, many of the issues discussed apply as well to other land uses such as the collection of non-timber forest products for household consumption or small-scale timber extraction.

  16. The Effect of War and Its Aftermath on Land Use and Land Cover in Jinotega, Nicaragua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeledon, Esther Beatriz

    2010-01-01

    Lughod, D. 2000. Failed Buyout: Land Rights for the ContraLughod, D. 2000. Failed Buyout: Land Rights for the Contra

  17. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  18. Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services May 6, 2014 COMPANY NAME DATE CONTACT PERSON MAILING ADDRESS PHONE / CELL # 1 Bedrock Engineering 5/6/14 David O. Hartley PO Box 25783 Fresno, CA 93729 559 North Star Engineering Group, Inc. 5/6/14 John Mensonides 620 12th St. Modesto, CA 95354 209-524-3525 4

  19. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, Bruce A.

    fever, malaria, medea, merea, mosquitoes, pink bollworms, population replacement, population sup such as malaria and dengue fever. Advances in insect transgenesis are mak- ing it increasingly feasible Bugs 2:5, 1-6; September/October 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience COMMENTARY COMMENTARY Key words: dengue

  20. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasalde Dominicc, Jose A. - Department of Biology, Universidad de Puerto Rico

    -12; July/August 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience ReseARCh pApeR ReseARCh pApeR Introduction- and open-channel states can be explained by the structural effects caused by the presence of a bending scanning mutagenesis identifies a bending point on the lipid-exposed M3 transmembrane domain of the Torpedo

  1. Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary & Secondary Forest Products Industry Center #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 2 Abitibi Paper Co. Camp 40 Thunder Bay, Ontario #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 3 Accidents in Forest Products Industry Accident Statistics Primary industry

  2. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-181. 2002. 863 British Columbia's Dangerous Tree Guy7 Abstract New dangerous tree assessment guidelines have recently been developed by the Wildlife snag was replaced with "dangerous tree." According to section 26.1 of these regulations, a dangerous

  3. ADAPTATION OF FORESTS AND PEOPLETO CLIMATE CHANGE 3 Future Environmental Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plattner, Gian-Kasper

    ,stable,growth,and fast growth) of climate change scenarios commonly used to quantitatively assess climate change impacts of these benefits are easily offset as climate warms and the adaptive capacity of currently water limited ecosystems,forests currently house the largest fraction of biodiversity; unmitigated climate change threatens

  4. Chaotic Dynamics of Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-25

    In the thermodynamic limit, a probabilistic cellular automaton can be approximated by a deterministic nonlinear map. Here we construct such a map for the forest fire problem. The construction is based on the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, performed on a square lattice of million cells. The results of the calculation are analyzed by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm (HKA). The only parameter of the map describes the probability that a tree appears at an empty cell during one time step. The obtained map seems to be non-differentiable at the percolation threshold. The Lyapunov exponent for the map is positive. Also, we found the cycle of length three by means of the method of symbolic dynamics. The results are illustrated by the experimental data on the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000. Although these data are fortunately far from thermodynamic limit, their qualitative character is reproduced for smaller lattices.

  5. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From...

  6. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Topic Landing Pages | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Landing Pages Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Topic Landing Pages From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the topic landing pages by...

  7. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19at 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,n.25. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION form a nondiscretionary

  8. Land-ocean contrasts under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Observations and climate models show a pronounced land-ocean contrast in the responses of surface temperature and the hydrological cycle to global warming: Land temperatures increase more than ocean temperatures, low-level ...

  9. Addressing land-based discrimination in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , feudalism was based on ownership of land, the dominant mode of production. Political power was dominated by absolute kings and feudal overlords. Wealth and position in society was derived from the land ownership

  10. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK 20142015 WELCOME Welcome to the Graduate Program in Land and Atmospheric Science at the University of Minnesota. It is a sciencebased interdisciplinary program focused on the fundamentals of Earth system processes related

  11. Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest. Final in north central BC. Using ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS), buffers 25m deep were created

  12. INTERNATIONAL REGIONAL SCIENCE REVIEW (Vol. 25, No. 2, 2002)Walker et al. / LAND USE IN FOREST FRONTIERS LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    for inputs (including labor), outputs, and capital. The risk model is specified and estimated, using survey institutional environment of tropical frontiers. In particular, it poses a risk minimization model

  13. Presented by LandScan Population Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10 Kosovo Refugee Crisis 1998 May 25 of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10 What is LandScan? Population distribution model, database, and tool people are located #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Bhaduri_LandScan_SC10

  14. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  15. Bioenergy and the importance of land use policy in a carbon-constrained world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2010-06-01

    Policies aimed at limiting anthropogenic climate change would result in significant transformations of the energy and land-use systems. However, increasing the demand for bioenergy could have a tremendous impact on land use, and can result in land clearing and deforestation. Wise et al. (2009a,b) analyzed an idealized policy to limit the indirect land use change emissions from bioenergy. The policy, while effective, would be difficult, if not impossible, to implement in the real world. In this paper, we consider several different land use policies that deviate from this first-best, using the Joint Global Change Research Institute’s Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Specifically, these new frameworks are (1) a policy that focuses on just the above-ground or vegetative terrestrial carbon rather than the total carbon, (2) policies that focus exclusively on incentivizing and protecting forestland, and (3) policies that apply an economic penalty on the use of biomass as a proxy to limit indirect land use change emissions. For each policy, we examine its impact on land use, land-use change emissions, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, agricultural supply, and food prices.

  16. Using the National Environmental Policy Act to facilitate the transfer of federal lands for economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ladino, A.G.

    1997-06-01

    In order to evaluate the transfer of certain Federal lands at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the US Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the proposed action had the potential to result in environmental impacts and required the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The specific proposed action evaluated by DOE with support from LANL was the transfer of approximately 28 contiguous acres of underutilized Federal land to the County. This tract was locally referred to as the DP Road tract. Although the land was underutilized, it functioned as part of a larger buffer area between potentially hazardous operations at LANL and the general public. The tract was covered with scrub vegetation. There were no government buildings located on the site. The tract of land had two Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) located within the tract boundary as well as a buried but active liquid radioactive waste pipeline that crossed the site. The tract of land was adjacent to several other DOE SWMUs as well as a public road. In addition, there were ownership issues pertaining to the transfer of the land to persons and agencies other than the County. This particular tract of land was being considered for transfer to the County at the same time DOE and LANL began evaluating another large Federal land tract for lease to the County to be developed as a private research park.

  17. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  18. Consistency of wind erosion assessments across land use and land cover types: A critical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, J; Okin, GS; Tatarko, J; Webb, NP; Herrick, JE

    2014-01-01

    of the SWEEP model during high wind on the Columbia Plateau.J.D. , 1998a. A single event wind erosion model. Trans. ASAEZobeck, T.M. , 1998. Revised Wind Erosion Equation (RWEQ).

  19. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECIES COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL TRAWL LANDINGS IN NEW ENGLAND, 1957 Marine Biological Laboratory;#12;ABSTRACT This report presents data on the species composition of the industrial trawl fish catch landed OF TABLES Page Table 1. 1957 landings and number of trips of industrial trawl fish vessels at Pt. Judith

  20. Land Information Systems in Developing Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Land Information Systems in Developing Countries: Bibliography Compiled by: Harlan Onsrud Jeff Acknowledgments Articles on land information systems and cadastral systems in developing countries are spread SES 88-10917. #12;1 References Abdul, Majid Bin Mohamed (1984). Proposed Land Information System

  1. FIT-FOR-PURPOSE LAND ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIT-FOR-PURPOSE LAND ADMINISTRATION AND THE POST-2015 DEVELOPMENT AGENDA ANNUAL WORLD BANK the coalescence the yardstick 3 #12;Methodology fit-for-purpose land administration urban and rural; it will influence land administration design 2. Fit-for-purpose is happening; but, needs purpose, stages, and future

  2. Restoring cottonwood & willow riparian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    for the lower San Joaquin Basin In California's Central Valley, widespread flow regulation and land development. In the lower San Joaquin Basin, alteration of natural flow regimes for flood control, irrigation in degraded river reaches has become an increasingly frequent restoration activity in the lower San Joaquin

  3. Monitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    such as land use data, spatial texture, and digital elevation models (DEMs) to obtain greater classificationMonitoring urban land cover change: An expert system approach to land cover classification with Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data to derive a land cover classification for the semiarid Phoenix

  4. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  5. Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect on forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ecosystem's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy, sustain life10/13/2010 1 Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect

  6. Terms of Reference AFF Forest certification experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the review develop training modules on forest certification (One expert, for all regions and also, identify opportunities and challenges, analyse institutional and technical training needs and based

  7. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  8. Clearing Debris from Land (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.

    2007-10-08

    cu?l es la madera que puede salvarse. Podr?a necesitar contar con equipo espe- cializado para despejar eficientemente ?reas de gran extensi?n. Remoci?n de escombros Puede optar entre diferentes m?todos para la remoci?n de escombros de ?rboles: Buld...?zer ? Cont?ctese con un horticultor o especialista forestal de Extensi?n para inspeccionar los ?rboles da?ados y determinar si pueden sal- varse. ? Retire ?rboles valiosos antes de remover los escombros. ? De ser posible, ate un rastrillo en el frente de una...

  9. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees Local economy Less people visiting = less spending Forest Fires Ski Resort Concerns Forest Fires of a forest fire. Vail Eagle County Vail $500,000 for thinning -2008 Helicopter to remove beetle infected

  10. Physiological responses of a black spruce forest to weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    a black spruce forest to weather Michael L. Goulden, • Bruceresponses of the forest to weather. The annual rates ofgross forest CO 2 exchange to weather is required before the

  11. Forest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    forests tend to yield more water. Further reading: Bales RC,et al. 2011. Forests and Water in the Sierra Nevada: SierraForest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra

  12. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T.analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects ofnet effect of a boreal forest fire on climate, on the basis

  13. Bureau of Land Management’s Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    T G Power LLC Hot Sulphur Springs Transmission Line, 120 kV Electric Power Line, Northern Independence Valley, Elko County, Nevada

  14. Assessing the health risk of solar development on contaminated lands |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and Biofuels BiomassAssembly of aCloudArgonne

  15. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessmentsLand | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to:NumberOfNonCorporateOrganizations

  16. Resource Assessment and Land Use Change | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7,Breakout Sessions Notes and Reports |ResolvingResource

  17. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation,SummariesAshmanla

  18. USDA - NRCS Land Evaluation and Site Assessment: Guidebook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP)BioGen LLC JumpForestryForm NRCS-CPA-106

  19. Land capability classification of minesoils in East Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Amy Kristen

    2002-01-01

    for the post-mine land. A land capability classification specific to minesoils will facilitate the design of appropriate land uses or alternative uses for reclaimed mine areas based on observed limitations. The proposed system is similar to the Land...

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;2013 CIVL498 C Ian Eddy LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF THE FOREST SCIENCE CENTER This study used Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to assess the environmental performance of the University

  1. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andsurface energy exchange in the Amazonian terra firme forestvapour, energy, and CO 2 exchange. The rates of whole-forest

  2. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  3. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community...

  4. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  5. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  6. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  7. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  8. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource...

  9. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  10. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  11. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  12. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, David Bryan

    2012-08-02

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  13. Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbu, Lungten

    2002-01-01

    in 1953 sums up in support of forest grazing by stating that "grazing on the commercial timberland offers few complications as long as grazing is managed so that forage is not damaged. If forage is not damaged, there will be no damage to timber... and Development in the Philippines”, Proceedings of a workshop "on Integration of Ruminants into Plantation Systems in Southeast Asia " at Lake Toba, North Sumatra, Indonesia ACIAR proceedings No 64, Editors-B.F. Mullen and H.M. Shelton 5. Chamling, K...

  14. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynam- ics of a central Amazonian rain forest.

  15. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  16. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  17. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  18. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community Tyrrell Sustaining Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community viability and sustainable forestry #12;Issue SummaryPage 3 | Contents Contents

  19. New England Forests: The Path to Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    on forests for the quality and abundance of our region's outstanding drinking water. Forests cool and clean could be more certain that our wood is harvested sustainably and is not contributing to environmental fossil fuels extracted from deep within the earth at great cost to our environment and the climate

  20. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paper products. The Texas forest sector also produces many value-added forest products such as millwork, wood kitchen cabinets, prefabricated wood buildings, wood furniture, and various paper products in terms of total industry output, value-added, employment, and labor income. Total industry output

  1. Riparian Forest Grows Trees fall in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Forest Grows Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave the littoral zone "Life" Cycle of Coarse Woody Habitat #12;Riparian Forest Grows What factors drive the species composition and stand factors drive the species composition and stand structure? Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave

  2. Changing Pattern of Forest Consumption: A Case Study from An Eastern Hill Village in Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pokharel, Binod

    2003-01-01

    , HMGIN 1982 : 63). It is considered a very important contribution of forestry to hill farming in the use of plant bio-mass when mixed with animal excreta yields organic compost m'anure which forms the principal source of soil nutrients for hilly... an important role m sustamlng. the productivity of the land by using the organic manure of anllnal Binod Pokhorell Chonging Pal/ern ofFores/... 43 dung supported with bedding materials from the forest which provides grass, trees and fodder for animals (ADBIN...

  3. Influence of Ancient Settlement in the Contemporary Maya Forest: Investigating Land Use at El Pilar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Anabel; Larios, Rudy; Normark, Johan; Morales, Paulino; Ramos, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    Total Str. 53/22 Masons Laborers Lime Cement Total Str.19 Masons Laborers Lime Cement Total Faisan/Gumbo Masons Laborers Lime Cement Total Str. EP3 Masons

  4. An application of ratio and regression estimation to a forest land ownership project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minaldi, David Lynn

    1967-01-01

    equation (55) is written as 4 2 k(yk- yk) 2 k='1 s Ng- 1 (73) The variance of a ratio, valid in large samples, is given by the well-known formula, ? 2 Var( ? ) =(I- ? )? u n U v N ? 2 V 2 2 a a u+ v 2 Cov (u, v) ? 2 ? 2 U V U V (74... at the first stage are certain characteristics such as y, , x . , and b, , where y, and x (I) ' (i) (~) denote the y and x means respectively for a group of size n/k, and b, (1) . th is the least squares estimator of the regression for the i group. The . th...

  5. An eddy covariance mesonet to measure the effect of forest age on land-atmosphere exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    that supported the solar panels (10 Sie- mens SR100 100-Wa scaf- folding tower and solar panels. The 2003 site wasfewer batteries and the solar panels were mounted close to

  6. Evaluation of erosion and cover re-establishment following site preparation on east Texas forest lands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Timothy Allen

    1979-01-01

    Bogx'aphic ax'Bas (as opposed to 88mpling in oQly one Brea) so th8t coQtx'ol plots sere located as Qeax' 'to the treated study sites as possible. CRAPTER IV PROCEDURES The two objectives of this study were: (1) to describe the re- establishment of soil...

  7. Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectric JumpAtlas for SolarInvestors

  8. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto Electric Coop,Erosion Flume Jump to: navigation,New

  9. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz - InteractiveDepartment ofandCommerce

  10. FAOFAO''s Support tos Support to National Forest Monitoring and AssessmentNational Forest Monitoring and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mSubplots Towards starting point of the plot Rectangular subplot (RSP) Circular subplot (CSP and CSP3 125m Plot 250m 20 m Plot starting point RSP2 and CSP2 RSP1 and CSP1 Plot end point #12;FAOFAO

  11. Technology Assessment TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Technology Assessment 10/14/2004 1 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT STRATEGIC PLAN MISSION STATEMENT Support the Mission of Texas Tech University and the TTU Information Technology Division by providing timely and relevant information and assistance in current and emerging technologies and their practical applications

  12. Explicitly Accounting for Protected Lands within the GCAM 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2012-05-01

    The Global Change Assessment Model Version 3.0 defines three different levels of “Protected Lands” within the agricultural and landuse component. These three different scenarios effectively cordon off 3.5% (5.0 million km2) of the Earth’s terrestrial lands in the de minimus Protected Land Scenario, 5.0% (7.20 million km2) in the Core Protected Land Scenario, and 8.2% (11.8 million km2) in the Expanded Protected Land Scenario. None of these scenarios represents the “right” level of Protected Lands for the planet today or tomorrow. Rather, the goal is to create a range of scenarios that can be used in modeling human responses to climate change and the impact those would have on managed and unmanaged terrestrial lands. These scenarios harness the wealth of information in the United Nations Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre’s World Database on Protected Areas and its categories of explicit degrees of protection.

  13. A multilevel analysis of effects of land use policy on land-cover change and local land use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    2014 Available online Keywords: Desertification Household Multi-scale drivers Multilevel statistical (Reynolds et al., 2007). Land degradation, which is often referred to as desertification in drylands (Dregne

  14. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

  15. Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks MOHAMED HEFEEDA Simon Fraser University, Canada Forest fires cost millions of dollars in damages and claim many human lives for early detection of forest fires. We first present the key aspects in modeling forest fires. We do

  16. Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors by New Forests Asset Management Pty Limited ("New Forests"). The material in this report is from sources believed by New Forests to be reliable, but the information is not warranted and may contain errors

  17. Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23November 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23­November 12, 2014 Forests, Foraging and Fires Catherine, Shannon Durbin is fascinated by the conflict between the role of fire in maintaining healthy forests beauty of forest fires." In the installation Thank You, Fog, Spencer Finch presents 60 photographs made

  18. LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start Title: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan: Date_of_Release: File Type: MS Word Local Name: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan Category: Overview: 004s001 Revision: a Doc_info_end #12;LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 4 TO SECURE THE LBTO ENCLOSURE

  19. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  20. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  1. Educational Needs of Southern Forest Landowners October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use tax rolls to develop forest landowner databases. Once developed, newsletters, pamphlets, brochures

  2. Bestelmeyer, BT, GS Okin, MC Duniway, SR Archer, NF Sayre, JC Williamson, JE Herrick. 2014. Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    . Desertification, land use and the transformation of global drylands. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment : In Press Desertification is an escalating concern in global drylands, yet assessments to guide are involved. In order to provide greater clarity, we propose that assessments of desertification and land

  3. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    processes (exchanges of water and energy) and biogeochemicalsimulation of the water and energy balance (Pitman, 2003).models. Exchange of water and energy between land sur- face

  4. DEPARTMENT OF LAND RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    of invasive plant species, soil nutrient management, bioremediation, land reclamation ecology of natural systems, chemical fate and transport, water quality, crop

  5. Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing in the Western United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  6. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  7. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  8. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  9. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  10. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Small and Medium Sized Primary Forest Products Processors Author: Smith, Robert L.; Cesa , Edward T

  11. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-american-wood-fuel-european-power/Energy & Sustainability a seafaring protest during a forest industry conference. Participants at this week's Mid-Atlantic Forest

  12. The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one). Many forests, however, have been degraded over the past century by misguided fire management, as well fire regimes in some forest types (Covington and Moore 1994; Schoennagel et al. 2004). Key structural

  13. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  14. How emissions, climate, and land use change will impact mid-century air quality over the United States: a focus on effects at national parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val Martin, M.

    We use a global coupled chemistry–climate–land model (CESM) to assess the integrated effect of climate, emissions and land use changes on annual surface O[subscript 3] and PM[subscript 2.5] in the United States with a focus ...

  15. Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan danielle.donovan@spatial.maine.edu May 2002 1. Abstract The evolution of land tenure in Guatemala is a mix of the native Mayan implementation stage, when the CIA began "Operation Success". The operation sent mercenaries into Guatemala

  16. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  17. The Fundamental Challenge in Measuring Sprawl: Which Land Should Be Considered?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    development using the National Land Cover Data Base and decennial census data to assess the extent of sprawl "extended urban areas," based on housing density and commuting patterns, and argue that they represent in the extended urban areas of Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Los Angeles, and Washington. Our sensitivity analyses

  18. The Impact of Observed Vegetation Changes on LandAtmosphere Feedbacks During Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Laboratory of Land Surface Process and Climate Change in Cold and Arid Regions, Cold and Arid Regions conditions of the advanced research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model to assess the influence show that modeled air temperature was improved when MODIS data were incorporated, while precipitation

  19. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forestinput from fine roots in a deciduous forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forestinput from fine roots in a deciduous forest · We assessed the effect of elevated [CO2] Contact: Richard J. Norby Research We assessed the effect of elevated [CO2] on production and mortality of short-lived fine

  20. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalwhereas latent energy fluxes in spruce forests, with theirenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:

  1. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    stand age on the bo- real forest energy balance, Agr. Forestenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:diox- ide and energy fluxes, Agr. Forest Meteorol. , 96,

  2. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    EFFECTS ON SURFACE ENERGY EXCHANGE forest: Evidence from1998), Energy balance storage terms in a mixed forest,and energy exchanges of a boreal black spruce forest, J.

  3. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  4. TS 10 Developing Land Administration Systems Paul van der Molen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TS 10 ­ Developing Land Administration Systems Paul van der Molen TS10.5 Some Microeconomic Aspects Microeconomic Aspects of Land Ownership Paul VAN DER MOLEN, The Netherlands Key words: land administration, microeconomics, institutions, property rights, transaction costs, land markets SUMMARY Land administration ('the

  5. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  6. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Integrated Market-Based Value-Added Forest Sector Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder analysis Sustainability Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder

  7. Working Paper #7 Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    -rich communities. Further, secondary forest products wages often exceed average wages of other jobs in rural areas companies (12). In addition, export oriented timber related #12;3 companies may offer rural communities

  8. Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre (Including the Advanced Wood Processing;Building Emergency Response Plan 17/05/2013 Page 1 Table of Contents Emergency Telephone Numbers ......................................................................................................................... 5 Life Safety Systems and Building Features

  9. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  10. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  11. Land Use Planning (3cr.) Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    , as well as the use of geographic information systems. The environmental approach to land use planning, ENV 2011. Students should also have taken ENV 2010, Geographic Information Systems, or alternatively information system · The ability to do a land suitability analysis Class expectations: This class is designed

  12. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality Branch Environmental Protection Dept. BC Environment Victoria, B.C. and Fraser Pollution Abatement Office ..................................................... WATER QUALITY OF UNDISTURBED AREAS ....................... LAND USE EFFECTS ON WATER QUALITY

  13. Oak Ridge reservation land-use plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibb, W. R.; Hardin, T. H.; Hawkins, C. C.; Johnson, W. A.; Peitzsch, F. C.; Scott, T. H.; Theisen, M. R.; Tuck, S. C.

    1980-03-01

    This study establishes a basis for long-range land-use planning to accommodate both present and projected DOE program requirements in Oak Ridge. In addition to technological requirements, this land-use plan incorporates in-depth ecological concepts that recognize multiple uses of land as a viable option. Neither environmental research nor technological operations need to be mutually exclusive in all instances. Unique biological areas, as well as rare and endangered species, need to be protected, and human and environmental health and safety must be maintained. The plan is based on the concept that the primary use of DOE land resources must be to implement the overall DOE mission in Oak Ridge. This document, along with the base map and overlay maps, provides a reasonably detailed description of the DOE Oak Ridge land resources and of the current and potential uses of the land. A description of the land characteristics, including geomorphology, agricultural productivity and soils, water courses, vegetation, and terrestrial and aquatic animal habitats, is presented to serve as a resource document. Essentially all DOE land in the Oak Ridge area is being fully used for ongoing DOE programs or has been set aside as protected areas.

  14. Universal scaling of forest fire propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Porterie; Pierre, Clerc Jean; Nouredine, Zekri; Zekri, Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we use a variant of the Watts-Strogatz small-world model to predict wildfire behavior near the critical propagation/nonpropagation threshold. We find that forest fire patterns are fractal and that critical exponents are universal, which suggests that the propagation/nonpropagation transition is a second-order transition. Universality tells us that the characteristic critical behaviour of propagation in real (amorphous) forest landscapes can be extracted from the simplest network model.

  15. 251USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Athree-stageapproachwasappliedtoassessthequalityofforestsinsouthwesternPoland,whichareheavily

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    classification of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite images. Digital classification of Landsat TM images can, and digital classification of satellite images -- to assess the extent of air pollution to Polish forests of aerial photographs and ground-truth information sup- ported the main stage of the work: digital

  16. An Evaluation of the Perceived Effectiveness of the Municipal Forester Institute on its Participants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie Rena'

    2011-02-22

    of these budgetary issues, it is crucial to focus attention on assessment and evaluation of the educational programs it funds (United States Forest Service, n.d.). One example of an urban forestry training program with a detailed effectiveness evaluation... to the urban forestry profession. For example, there is a vast amount of literature on the importance of evaluation of training programs (Braun, 1979; Diem, 2002; Dixon, 1990; Fitzpatrick, 2004; Mann and Robertson, 1996; Tuckman, 1979), yet it is difficult...

  17. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  18. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR LAND SUBSIDENCE IN SHALLOW GROUNDWATER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2010-01-01

    and R. L. Klausing, 1969, Land subsidence due to groundwater7612-10874 Fig. S. Land subsidence at Pixley, California:Symposium on Land Subsidence, Anaheim, CA, December 10-

  19. Bureau of Land Management - Land Use Planning Handbook | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformationAssessment

  20. CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Endangered Species. For further information please contact: R. Juge Gregg, Washington, DC, rjgregg for ecosystem services provided by forests such as watershed protection, biodiversity and carbon storage. Forest NGOs and investment institutions. For further information, please contact: Kerstin Canby, kcanby

  1. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  2. Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

  3. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  4. Forest sector: A world bank policy paper. Sector forestal: Documento de politica del banco mundial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Forests are the most extensive terrestrial ecosystem, and nearly 500 million people depend on forests for their livelihood. Since the World Bank issued its forestry sector policy paper in 1978, there has been growing concern about the accelerated rate of destruction of the remaining primary forests in various parts of the world. The policy paper identifies two key challenges: to slow the alarmingly rapid rates of deforestation, especially (although not exclusively) in the tropical moist forests, and to ensure adequate planting of new trees to meet the rapidly growing demand for fuelwood in developing countries. The Bank intends to move vigorously to promote the conservation of natural forests and the sustainable development of managed forestry resources.

  5. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  6. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holden, Sandra R; Treseder, Kathleen K

    2013-01-01

    bon emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.in forests. For example, forest fires burn an aver- age of ?type included: burn, forest fire, prescribed fire,

  7. EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to...

  8. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic Preservation Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Historic...

  9. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of...

  10. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission...

  11. Clean Cities: Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land of Sky Clean Vehicles Coalition (Western North Carolina) The Land of Sky Clean Vehicles coalition (Western North Carolina) works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community...

  12. Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land economy. This may also require that existing agricultural producers need to travel farther

  13. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An...

  14. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land...

  15. The Public Lands Commission of 1879 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odom, Danna Evelyn

    1971-01-01

    primary sources for a study of' the Public Lands Commission of i879 are the 2 1 ' rl ~Rt (46 Cong. , 2 . , Ron Rxee tt Document 06), and Thomas Donaldson's The Public Domain. Important background material for the formation of the commission... is provided. by A Letter from the ~Actin Presi- 6* t 8 th Nt' 1~Ad. f S ' ~7?'tt' sess. , House Miscellaneous Document 5), and by the ~Re ort on the Lands of the Arid ~Re ion of the United. States with a Kore Detailecl Account of the Lands of Utah, by John...

  16. Prepared by: Ryan Nadel In August this year, the International Union of Forest Research Organisations (IUFRO) hosted its 23rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for people; Climate change and forestry; Bio-Energy; Forest Biodiversity Conservation; Forests and water

  17. Making land fly : the institutionalization of China's land quota markets and its implications for urbanization, property rights, and intergovernmental politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation investigates China's land quota markets, a recent land policy innovation that virtually transfers urbanization permission from the countryside to cities. To circumvent national government's quota restrictions ...

  18. Path Planning Algorithm for Extinguishing Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, M P Sivaram

    2012-01-01

    One of the major impacts of climatic changes is due to destroying of forest. Destroying of forest takes place in many ways but the majority of the forest is destroyed due to wild forest fires. In this paper we have presented a path planning algorithm for extinguishing fires which uses Wireless Sensor and Actor Networks (WSANs) for detecting fires. Since most of the works on forest fires are based on Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and a collection of work has been done on coverage, message transmission, deployment of nodes, battery power depletion of sensor nodes in WSNs we focused our work in path planning approach of the Actor to move to the target area where the fire has occurred and extinguish it. An incremental approach is presented in order to determine the successive moves of the Actor to extinguish fire in an environment with and without obstacles. This is done by comparing the moves determined with target location readings obtained using sensors until the Actor reaches the target area to extinguish f...

  19. Land system architecture: Using land systems to adapt and mitigate global environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, B.L.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Verbug, Peter H.; Murray, Alan T.

    2013-04-01

    Land systems (mosaics of land use and cover) are human environment systems, the changes in which drive and respond to local to global environmental changes, climate to macro-economy (Foley et al., 2005). Changes in land systems have been the principal proximate cause in the loss of habitats and biota globally, long contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gases, and hypothesized to have triggered climate changes in the early Holocene (Ruddiman, 2003). Land use, foremost agriculture, is the largest source of biologically active nitrogen to the atmosphere, critical to sources and sinks of carbon, and a major component in the hydrologic cycle (e.g., Bouwman et al., 2011). Changes in land systems also affect regional climate (Feddema et al., 2005; Pielke, 2005), ecosystem functions, and the array of ecosystem services they provide. Land systems, therefore, are a central feature of how humankind manages its relationship with nature-intended or not, or whether this relationship proceeds sustainably or not.

  20. Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbauer, S. F.

    2004-01-16

    The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

  1. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout sessions focused on tribal water programs.

  2. 2015 Tribal Lands and Environment Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) are hosting the annual Tribal Lands and Environment Forum. The four-day forum will feature special trainings, field trips, and breakout...

  3. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  4. Modeling Land Biogeochemistry Term Spring 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    :30 pm or by appointment Course Description Dynamic land models are widely used as part of Earth system models and serve to represent exchange of energy (heat radiation momentum), water, carbon, and nutrients

  5. Northeast Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . To learn more about the C-CAP data products used in this report and to access the data sets, please visit% of the total land area. The region has significant coastal-dependent industries, including tourism

  6. Biomass Energy and Competition for Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

  7. LITHUANIAN FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE Studies on forestry, technology and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................20 3.3. Calculation of forest fuel cost production in Rokiskis forest enterprise Final report Financed by Swedish Energy Agency Girionys ­ 2002 http..................................................................................................22 3.5. Cost effecting factors

  8. Global forest governance --Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global forest governance -- Bringing forestry science (back) in Stefan Werland Technical, global environmental problems are complex issues. Political decision makers increasingly depend will draw upon an alternative, broader conception of `global forest governance'. After pointing out

  9. FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    FOREST MONITORING AT THE MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK. of the Interior, University of Vermont, National Park Service, Rubenstein School of Environment Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller and Natural Resources National Historical Park #12;Forest Monitoring at the Marsh

  10. Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Soil Disturbance from an Integrated Mechanical Forest Fuel Reduction Operation in Southwest Oregon1 literature has quantified harvesting system effectiveness or soil disturbance concerns from such operations. This paper reports results of soil disturbance generated from an integrated forest harvesting

  11. Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials and The Forest Products Industry: University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension with support from: Sustainable Forestry Initiative N............................................................................................................................2 Road Access

  12. One-dimensional general forest fire processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bressaud, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional generalized forest fire process: at each site of $\\zz$, seeds and matches fall according some i.i.d. stationary renewal processes. When a seed falls on an empty site, a tree grows immediately. When a match falls on an occupied site, a fire starts and destroys immediately the corresponding connected component of occupied sites. Under some quite reasonable assumptions on the renewal processes, we show that when matches become less and less frequent, the process converges, with a correct normalization, to a limit forest fire model. According to the nature of the renewal processes governing seeds, there are four possible limit forest fire models. The four limit processes can be perfectly simulated. This study generalizes consequently a previous result of the authors where seeds and matches were assumed to fall according to Poisson processes.

  13. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    a Agricultural and urban habitats DOR—Deciduous orchard EOR—orchard IGR—Irrigated grain crops IRF—Irrigated row and field crops IRH—Irrigated hayfield PAS—Pasture RIC—Rice URB—Urban

  14. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    three bioethanol feedstocks at different production levelsbioethanol feedstocks—corn grain, corn grain and stover, and sugar beets—at various production

  15. Forest Stewardship Council FSC, A.C. All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % in the UK have started to shift to eco-friendly options such as FSC. Source: Publishers World #12;Forest

  16. INTRODUCTION: The success of a forest residual based biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    to hydro power, but not at the expense of hydro power." These findings demonstrate that while family forest

  17. Japanese Large Corporations' Use of Forest Certification in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,107 (April 2011), PEFC: 205 (June 2011), SGEC: 409 (June 2011) As a major importer of forest products, Japan

  18. JAPAN GOING TOWARD FOREST CERTIFICATION September 24, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )........................................................... 4 PEFC (Pan-European Forest Certification Certificates (3 companies, 15th Sep. 2004) ................................... 8 PEFC COC Certificates (2

  19. Forest Certification Programs in North and South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and principles Tree Farm / SFI - PEFC mutual recognition FSC small forests program All U.S. systems revised

  20. Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.