Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or...

2

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974 - Utilization of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info Start Date 2011 State Pennsylvania Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act prescribes the procedure utilization of land or conveyance of rights for exploration or extraction of gas, oil or coal bed methane in

3

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on National Forest System Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on National Forest System Lands USDA Forest Service National Renewable Energy Laboratory CD-Lite Version: Download CD-Lite ZIP File with no GIS Data (46 MB) Download CD ZIP File (146 MB) NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not

4

Pennsylvania Farmland and Forest Land Assessment Act of 1974...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Land or Conveyance of Rights for Exploration or Extraction of Gas, Oil or Coal Bed Methane This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

5

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on National Forest System Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report and CD for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS), evaluates the potential for renewable energy resource development on National Forest System (NFS) lands. USFS can use the report findings to consider potential for development of solar and wind energy resources on NFS lands, in land management decisions. The Geographical Information System (GIS) based analysis resulted in the following findings: (1) Ninety-nine National Forest Units have high potential for power production from one or more of these solar and wind energy sources; and (2) Twenty National Forest Units in nine states have high potential for power production from two or more of these solar and wind energy sources.

Not Available

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

California's forest resources. Preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Assessment was prepared in response to the California Forest Resources Assessment and Policy Act of 1977 (FRAPA). This Act was passed to improve the information base upon which State resource administrators formulate forest policy. The Act provides for this report and a full assessment by 1987 and at five year intervals thereafter. Information is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction to the forest resources assessment program; the forest area: a general description; classifications of the forest lands; the watersheds; forest lands and the air resource; fish and wildlife resources; the forested rangelands; the wilderness; forest lands as a recreation resource; the timber resource; wood energy; forest lands and the mineral, fossil fuels, and geothermal energy resources; mathematically modeling California's forest lands; vegetation mapping using remote sensing technology; important forest resources legislation; and, State and cooperative State/Federal forestry programs. Twelve indexes, a bibliography, and glossary are included. (JGB)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Forest Resource Assessment Global Forest Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Forest Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/ Global Forest Resource Assessment Screenshot References: Global Forest Research Assessment[1] Overview "FAO, in cooperation with its member countries, has monitored the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. These global assessments provide valuable information to policy-makers in countries, to international negotiations, arrangements and organizations related to forests and to the general public. The Global Forest Resources Assessment

8

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1999 State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the

9

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

10

Assessment of a multi-objective decision support system generated land use plan on forest fodder dependency in a Himalayan watershed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the impact of integrated watershed land use plans generated through multi-objective optimization techniques in a Central Himalayan watershed on forest fodder dependency for meeting fodder requirements of livestock in the watershed. ... Keywords: Forest fodder dependency, Himalayas, Integrated watershed development, Multi-objective decision support system

A. Raizada; Pradeep Dogra; B. L. Dhyani

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Evolution trends of land use/land cover in a mediterranean forest landscape in Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the evolution trends of landscape, in particular those linked to urban/rural relations, is crucial for a sustainable landscape planning. The main goal of this paper is to interpret the forest landscape dynamics occurred over the period ... Keywords: Calabria (Italy), GIS, Mediterranean forest landscape, aerial photographs, land use/land cover (LULC) changes, transition matrices

Salvatore Di Fazio; Giuseppe Modica; Paolo Zoccali

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning  

SciTech Connect

Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

14

Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Jump to: navigation, search Name Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Agency/Company /Organization World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, United Nations Environment Programme, International Council for Science, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land, Climate Focus Area Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics GHG inventory Resource Type Software/modeling tools Website http://www.fao.org/gtos/gofc-g References Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD)[1] Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) Screenshot "Global Observation of Forest and Land Cover Dynamics (GOFC-GOLD) is a

15

Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate and slow-growing forests generally have prevented wood production from becoming a major state such as climate change, renewable energy, intense recreational use, billion dollar fire suppression costs and Implementation of Forest Management in Colorado #12;Acknowledgements The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS

16

Marginal Lands: Concept, Assessment and Management  

SciTech Connect

Marginal lands have received wide attention for their potential to improve food security and support bioenergy production. However, environmental, ecosystem service, and sustainability concerns have been widely raised over the use of marginal land. Knowledge of the extent, location, and quality of marginal lands as well as their assessment and management are limited and diverse. This paper provides a review of the historical development of marginal concept, its application and assessment. Limitations and priority research needs of marginal land assessment and management were discussed.

Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Assessment Toolkit Land Use Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

18

Carbon Supply From Changes in Management of Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products 2006; published 11 May 2006. [1] Spatially-distributed forest biomass components are essential to understand carbon cycle and the impact of biomass burning emissions on air quality. We estimated the density

Kuligowski, Bob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

Standiford, Richard B.

22

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change Light Duty Vehicles/Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to farmgate or forest roadside (not transportation or conversion) 路 Exogenous targets for biofuel production emissions related to biofuels 颅 Emissions can be reduced by including a broad set of incentives targeting 路 Resource assessment and indirect land use change 2 #12;Increasing Feedstock Production for Biofuels

23

APPENDIX C Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Protect Forests From Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on insect and disease activity in the state. Because the current aerial survey is conducted by different1 APPENDIX C 颅 Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Gaps Protect Forests From Harm o. Need updated LANDFIRE data on the current condition of Colorado's lodgepole pine forests. Need a fuel

24

Integrated assessment and the relation between land-use change and climate change  

SciTech Connect

Integrated assessment is an approach that is useful in evaluating the consequences of global climate change. Understanding the consequences requires knowledge of the relationship between land-use change and climate change. Methodologies for assessing the contribution of land-use change to atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are considered with reference to a particular case study area: south and southeast Asia. The use of models to evaluate the consequences of climate change on forests must also consider an assessment approach. Each of these points is discussed in the following four sections.

Dale, V.H.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Spatial decision support system for land assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: GIS, agriculture planning, artificial intelligence, decision support system, expert system, geoinformatics, geoinformation system, land evaluation, land use planning

Cl醬dio Chauke Nehme; Margareth Sim鮡s

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests  

SciTech Connect

Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Fox, J. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States); Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M. [Chiang Mai Univ. (Thailand)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assess technical and economic potential for land-use initiatives...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

28

Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessing impacts of climate change on forests: The state of biological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

Dale, V.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rauscher, H.M. [Forest Service, Grand Rapids, MI (United States). North Central Forest Experiment Station

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. 路 Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber 路 Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories 路 Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

31

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

32

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

Jonathan Aggett

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

EIS-0442: Forest Service Reauthorization of Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands in Colorado, Utah and Nebraska for Routine Maintenance Practices including Changes in Vegetation Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Draft Environmental Impact Statement: Comment Period Ends 10/12/13This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE抯 Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western抯 proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

34

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Name Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Countries Agency/Company /Organization National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment Resource Type Dataset, Maps, Publications Website http://www.biofuels.apec.org/p Country Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Chinese Taipei, Thailand, United States, Vietnam Australia and New Zealand, South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South America, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, , South-Eastern Asia, Northern America, South-Eastern Asia

35

Issues in using landscape indicators to assess land changes  

SciTech Connect

Landscape indicators, when combined with information about environmental conditions (such as habitat potential, biodiversity, carbon and nutrient cycling, and erosion) and socioeconomic forces, can provide insights about changing ecosystem services. They also provide information about opportunities for improving natural resources management. Landscape indicators rely on data regarding land cover, land management and land functionality. Challenges in using landscape indicators to assess change and effects include (1) measures of land management and attributes that are reliable, robust and consistent for all areas on the Earth do not exist, and thus land cover is more frequently utilized; (2) multiple types of land cover and management are often found within a single landscape and are constantly changing, which complicates measurement and interpretation; and (3) while causal analysis is essential for understanding and interpreting changes in indicator values, the interactions among multiple causes and effects over time make accurate attribution among many drivers of change particularly difficult. Because of the complexity, sheer number of variables, and limitations of empirical data on land changes, models are often used to illustrate and estimate values for landscape indicators, and those models have several problems. Recommendations to improve our ability to assess the effects of changes in land management include refinement of questions to be more consistent with available information and the development of data sets based on systematic measurement over time of spatially explicit land qualities such as carbon and nutrient stocks, water and soil quality, net primary productivity, habitat and biodiversity. Well-defined and consistent land-classification systems that are capable of tracking changes in these and other qualities that matter to society need to be developed and deployed. Because landscapes are so dynamic, it is crucial to develop ways for the scientific community to work together to collect data and develop tools that will enable better analysis of causes and effects and to develop robust management recommendations that will increases land s capacity to meet societal needs in a changing world.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An Assessment of Land Availability and Price in the Coterminous United States for Conversion to Algal Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Realistic economic assessment of land-intensive alternative energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, and biofuels) requires information on land availability and price. Accordingly, we created a comprehensive, national-scale model of these parameters for the United States. For algae-based biofuel, a minimum of 1.04E+05 km2 of land is needed to meet the 2022 EISA target of 2.1E+10 gallons year-1. We locate and quantify land types best converted. A data-driven model calculates the incentive to sell and a fair compensation value (real estate and lost future income). 1.02E+6 km2 of low slope, non-protected land is relatively available including croplands, pasture/ grazing, and forests. Within this total there is 2.64E+5 km2 of shrub and barren land available. The Federal government has 7.68E+4 km2 available for lease. Targeting unproductive lands minimizes land costs and impacts to existing industries. However, shrub and barren lands are limited by resources (water) and logistics, so land conversion requires careful consideration.

Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Toward A National Early Warning System for Forest Disturbances Using Remotely Sensed Land Surface Phenology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are using a statistical clustering method for delineating homogeneous ecoregions as a basis for identifying disturbances in forests through time over large areas, up to national and global extents. Such changes can be shown relative to past conditions, or can be predicted relative to present conditions, as with forecasts of future climatic change. This quantitative ecoregion approach can be used to predict destinations for populations whose local environments are forecast to become unsuitable and are forced to migrate as their habitat shifts, and is also useful for predicting the susceptibility of new locations to invasive species like Sudden Oak Death. EFETAC and our sister western center WWETAC, along with our NASA and ORNL collaborators, are designing a new national-scale early warning system for forest threats, called FIRST. Envisioned as a change-detection system, FIRST will identify all land surface cover changes at the MODIS observational scale, and then try to discriminate normal, expected seasonal changes from locations having unusual activity that may represent potential forest threats. As a start, we have developed new national data sets every 16 days from 2002 through 2008, based on land surface phenology, or timing of leaf-out in the spring and brown-down in the fall. Changes in such phenological maps will be shown to contain important information about vegetation health status across the United States. The standard deviation of the duration of fall can be mapped, showing places where length of fall is relatively constant or is variable in length from year to year.

HargroveJr., William Walter [USDA Forest Service; Spruce, Joe [NASA Stennis Space Center; Gasser, Gerry [NASA Stennis Space Center; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Sustainable Land-use Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

39

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report represents an initial activity of the Bureau of Land Managements (BLM) proposed National Energy Policy Implementation Plan: identify and evaluate renewable energy resources on federal lands and any limitations on accessing them. Ultimately, BLM will prioritize land-use planning activities to increase industrys development of renewable energy resources. These resources include solar, biomass, geothermal, water, and wind energy. To accomplish this, BLM and the Department of Energys National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) established a partnership to conduct an assessment of renewable energy resources on BLM lands in the western United States. The objective of this collaboration was to identify BLM planning units in the western states with the highest potential for private-sector development of renewable resources. The assessment resulted in the following findings: (1) 63 BLM planning units in nine western states have high potential for one or more renewable energy technologies; and (2) 20 BLM planning units in seven western states have high potential for power production from three or more renewable energy sources. This assessment report provides BLM with information needed to prioritize land-use planning activities on the basis of potential for the development of energy from renewable resources.

Not Available

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

Dr. James A. Burger

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Baseline soil carbon was determined for each of the eighty-one plots. Fertility analysis of soil samples was completed and these data were used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions and the pre-designated plots were fertilized. We also evaluated economic-based policy instruments that are designed to mitigate the reforestation burden borne by the owner of reclaimed mined land. Results suggest that although profitability of reforestation of these previously reclaimed mine lands may be achievable on better sites under lower interest rates, substantial payments would be required to reach ''profitability'' under many conditions.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

43

Environmental assessment of spatial plan policies through land use scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a method based on scenario analysis to compare the environmental effects of different spatial plan policies in a range of possible futures. The study aimed at contributing to overcome two limitations encountered in Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) for spatial planning: poor exploration of how the future might unfold, and poor consideration of alternative plan policies. Scenarios were developed through what-if functions and spatial modeling in a Geographical Information System (GIS), and consisted in maps that represent future land uses under different assumptions on key driving forces. The use of land use scenarios provided a representation of how the different policies will look like on the ground. This allowed gaining a better understanding of the policies' implications on the environment, which could be measured through a set of indicators. The research undertook a case-study approach by developing and assessing land use scenarios for the future growth of Caia, a strategically-located and fast-developing town in rural Mozambique. The effects of alternative spatial plan policies were assessed against a set of environmental performance indicators, including deforestation, loss of agricultural land, encroachment of flood-prone areas and wetlands and access to water sources. In this way, critical environmental effects related to the implementation of each policy were identified and discussed, suggesting possible strategies to address them. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method contributes to two critical issues in SEA: exploration of the future and consideration of alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Future scenarios are used to test the environmental performance of different spatial plan policies in uncertainty conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatially-explicit land use scenarios provide a representation of how different policies will look like on the ground.

Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: davide.geneletti@ing.unitn.it

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE抯 Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western抯 proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

45

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Research priorities in land use and land-cover change for the Earth system and integrated assessment modelling  

SciTech Connect

This special issue has highlighted recent and innovative methods and results that integrate observations and AQ3 modelling analyses of regional to global aspect of biophysical and biogeochemical interactions of land-cover change with the climate system. Both the Earth System and the Integrated Assessment modeling communities recognize the importance of an accurate representation of land use and land-cover change to understand and quantify the interactions and feedbacks with the climate and socio-economic systems, respectively. To date, cooperation between these communities has been limited. Based on common interests, this work discusses research priorities in representing land use and land-cover change for improved collaboration across modelling, observing and measurement communities. Major research topics in land use and land-cover change are those that help us better understand (1) the interaction of land use and land cover with the climate system (e.g. carbon cycle feedbacks), (2) the provision of goods and ecosystem services by terrestrial (natural and anthropogenic) land-cover types (e.g. food production), (3) land use and management decisions and (4) opportunities and limitations for managing climate change (for both mitigation and adaptation strategies).

Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Pongratz, Julia; Rose, Steven K.; Betts, Richard; Herold, Martin; Feddema, Johannes J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Development Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/forestmonitoringforactionfor Cost: Free Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Screenshot References: FORMA[1] "Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) uses freely available satellite data to generate rapidly updated online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by paying to keep forests intact."

49

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

GRR/Section 13-NV-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NV-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-NV-a - Land Use...

51

GRR/Section 13-MT-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MT-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-MT-a - Land Use...

52

GRR/Section 13-ID-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ID-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-ID-a - Land Use...

53

GRR/Section 13-OR-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-OR-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-OR-a - Land Use...

54

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas General Land Office Regulations & Policies Open Beaches Act Dune Protection Act Beach Dune Rules Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-TX-a - State Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative The Texas General Land Office (GLO) is in charge of making sure construction on the Texas coast that affects the beach and dunes is

55

Survey of Lava Tubes in the Former Puna Forest Reserve and on Adjacent State of Hawaii Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated after members of the Puna community brought to the attention of the Historic Preservation Office that major lava tube systems extended from the Pahoa area into at least portions of the former Puna Forest Reserve. They were concerned that planned geothermal exploration and development could damage these lava tubes which they said contained extensive evidence of past Hawaiian use including fortifications, shrines, platforms and burials. Geothermal development is currently being planned by Campbell Estate and True Geothermal Energy Company in the southern portion of the former Reserve which has been designated by the State of Hawaii as one of the three Geothermal Sub-Zones in Puna. To demonstrate these claims, two staff members of the Historic Sites Section were shown examples in a lava tube makai of the Campbell Estate boundary. After reviewing the archaeological and historical reports commissioned for geothermal exploration, it was agreed that if these lava tubes did extend inland and continued to contain archaeological sites or burials then the potential of significant sub-surface sites had not been adequately addressed in the Historic Sites Section review process. Most reports acknowledged the possibility of lava tubes in the area and that they could contain burials, but no tube systems were ever identified or explored during any of the field surveys. These surveys primarily assessed the presence or absence of cultural properties that occur on the surface or as deposits within the soil layer. With the assistance of the Division of Water Resource Management (DWRM), the Historic Sites Section agreed to conduct this survey because those community members who came forward requested that this information be handled by a neutral party. They asked that documentation occur in such a manner that it could be kept as confidential as possible while still providing enough information to protect any sites from damage. The survey had three major aims. The first was to establish whether or not the lava tubes continued into the land now held by Campbell Estate or the Geothermal Sub-Zone. The second was to assess the extent to which any lava tube systems found contained archaeological remains or burials and, if so, to evaluate their general significance. The third was to define, if possible, any patterns in the distribution of the lava tube systems or the archaeological remains within them. Such patterns can allow general predictions to be made about which areas are most likely to have similar tube systems with significant archaeological sites. This is of particular importance in this region where large portions of the former Forest Reserve and the Geothermal Sub-Zone have not been inspected, and conducting extensive surveys is extremely difficult because of dense vegetation, hazardous conditions and poor ground visibility. One of the authors (Stone) has a background in Hawaiian lava tube biology, so we were able to include a preliminary survey of the invertebrate fauna found in these underground ecosystems.

McEldowney, H.; Stone, F.D.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Assessing Forested Riparian Buffer Ecological Integrity Using Lidar Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Forested riparian buffers (FRB) provide numerous critical ecosystem services. However, the linear and often narrow spatial configuration of FRBs makes it difficult to identify broadscale (more)

Wasser, Leah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

GRR/Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Land Use Assessment Process - Land Use Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13 - Land Use Assessment Process 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13 - LandUseAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Preexisting land uses at and surrounding the site are critical considerations in the early planning stages of the project. Federal and state law may prohibit interference with certain preexisting uses. For instance, developers should consider impact on farmland, livestock, nearby

58

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment GRR/Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-CA-a - Coastal Land Use Assessment 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies California Coastal Commission California State Lands Commission Regulations & Policies California Coastal Act California PRC 搂 6826 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 13-CA-a Coastal Land Use Assessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under the California Coastal Act, projects in California Coastal Zones may

59

FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.  

SciTech Connect

This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

Brent Sohngen

2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimating Aboveground Tree Biomass on Forest Land in the Pacific Northwest: A Comparison of Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiple use management of the Nation抯 forest resources for sustained yields of wood, water, forage, wildlife, and recreation. Through forestry research, cooperation with the States and private forest owners, and management of the National Forests and National Grasslands, it strives梐s directed by Congress梩o provide increasingly greater service to a growing Nation. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, and where applicable, sex, marital status, familial status, parental status, religion, sexual orientation, genetic information, political beliefs, reprisal, or because all or part of an individual抯 income is derived from any public assistance program. (Not all prohibited bases apply to all programs.) Persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact USDA抯 TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TDD). To file a complaint of discrimination, write

United States; Forest Service; Xiaoping Zhou; Miles A. Hemstrom; The Forest; Service U. S; Department Agriculture

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessing land conservation strategies : the case of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

South Florida's Everglades is home to 67 threatened and endangered species. By 2100 it is estimated that sea level rise will inundate over 20% of existing conservation lands. Species will be dislocated and migrate to new ...

Lassiter, Allison (Allison Blythe)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The CCSM4 Land Simulation, 18502005: Assessment of Surface Climate and New Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews developments for the Community Land Model, version 4 (CLM4), examines the land surface climate simulation of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) compared to CCSM3, and assesses new earth system features of CLM4 ...

David M. Lawrence; Keith W. Oleson; Mark G. Flanner; Christopher G. Fletcher; Peter J. Lawrence; Samuel Levis; Sean C. Swenson; Gordon B. Bonan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessment of structural attributes of even-aged Eucalyptus grandis forest plantations using small-footprint discrete return lidar data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Assessment of forest structural attributes has major implications in the management of forestry by providing information of ecological and economic importance. The traditional methods of (more)

Tesfamichael, Solomon G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

GRR/Section 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRRSection 13-AK-a - Land Use Assessment < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 13-AK-a -...

68

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evenness . Geographic information systems (GIS) .GIS-based inventory modeling . Habitats . Hemeroby . Land0199-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystems Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this quarter we worked on methodologies for analyzing carbon in mine soils. A unique property of mine soils is the presence of coal and carboniferous rock particles that are present in mine soils in various sizes, quantities, and qualities. There is no existing method in the literature that may be of use for quantitative estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in mine soils that can successfully differentiate between pedogenic and geogenic carbon forms. In this report we present a detailed description of a 16-step method for measuring SOC in mine soils designed for and tested on a total of 30 different mine soil mixtures representing a wide spectrum of mine soils in the hard-rock region of the Appalachian coalfield. The proposed method is a combination of chemical procedure for carbonates removal, a thermal procedure for pedogenic C removal, and elemental C analysis procedure at 900 C. Our methodology provides a means to correct for the carbon loss from the more volatile constituents of coal fragments in the mine soil samples and another correction factor for the protected organic matter that can also remain unoxidized following thermal pretreatment. The correction factors for coal and soil material-specific SOM were based on carbon content loss from coal and SOM determined by a parallel thermal oxidation analysis of pure ground coal fragments retrieved from the same mined site as the soil samples and of coal-free soil rock fragments of sandstone and siltstone origin.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

71

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report we present data that show the spatial distribution of carbon in mine soils. Soil carbon data from deep soil pits from grassland minelands located in Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia were analyzed to determine the vertical distribution and variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) down to a 2-m depth. Regression analyses were used to describe and model the distribution by soil depth of C(wt%), BD{sub fines}(g cm{sup -3}), and fines (vol%) in mine soils. The volume of excavated mine soil samples was transformed in terms of costs of digging and sampling, including sample collection and preparation, and C(wt%) analysis, in order to determine the maximum cost-effective depth (MCD) for carbon inventorying on the mined sites analyzed. Based on the horizontal variation of SOC(g m{sup -2}), we determined the sampling intensity required to achieve a desired accuracy of the amount of sequestered SOC(g m{sup -2}) at certain probability levels. The MCD and sampling intensity measurements were used to determine the minimum detectable difference (MDD) of SOC(g m{sup -2}) between two consecutive carbon inventories. We also proposed a method to determine the minimum number of years before a future C inventory event is carried out so that the measured SOC(g m{sup -2}) differences were greater than MDD. We used geostatistical analyses procedures to determine spatial dependence predictability of surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) data on the minelands analyzed. Kriging techniques were used to create surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) maps for the sites in Ohio and West Virginia. The average C sequestration rate in the surface soil layer for the Ohio (age 9) sites was estimated at 124 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, and it was estimated at 107 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} for the West Virginia sites (age 4). Because of the young age of the Virginia sites, 0.2 and 1 year old, we came to a decision that C sequestration rates would be inappropriate at this stage of their development, as these soils are expected to change with time.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004 The ORNL DAAC announces the release of 12 map data products -- land cover, forested area, forest carbon content, and...

74

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Assess institutional frameworks for LEDS for land-use sector Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

75

Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before...

76

Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus...

77

Final Report, Wind Power Resource Assessment on the Warm Springs Reservation Tribal Lands, Report No. DOE/GO/12103  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report concludes a five-year assessment of wind energy potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon lands.

Jim Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates; HDR Engineering; Dr. Stel Walker, Oregon State University

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

78

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Resource assessment Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/sites/profor.info/files/Benefit_Sharing_WEB.pdf Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Screenshot References: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing[1] "This study uses an evidence-based approach to provide insights into developing and maintaining collaborative arrangements in the forest sector. It aims to inform discussions and approaches to forest partnership and

79

Governance of Forests Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests Initiative Forests Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Governance of Forests Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Resources Institute Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.wri.org/project/gov Country Brazil, Indonesia UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References WRI-Forests [1] Overview "The Governance of Forests Initiative (GFI) is a collaboration between WRI, the Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia (IMAZON), and the Instituto Centro de Vida (ICV) to develop a framework of indicators for assessing and improving governance in the forest sector, as an essential precursor to debating whether and how to unleash market forces to

80

Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Using biodiversity methods to assess the impacts of oil and gas development in tropical rain forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil and gas development in tropical rain forests has attracted international attention because of the potentially adverse effects on the forest ecosystems. Biodiversity is a topic of particular concern, but is difficult to assess for small areas of disturbance. In July 1992 we used light traps to compare insect diversity at canopy and ground level as a means of detecting the impacts of an exploratory well site and related facilities within mature Amazonian rain forest in the Oriente Province of Ecuador. Replicate samples were collected at the well site, in a nearby area of agricultural development, and in a reference site within mature forest. Species richness was determined, and diversity indices were calculated for each set of samples. Results indicated that changes in diversity could be detected in the canopy and at ground level at the well site, but that the reduction in diversity was small. Biological diversity was substantially reduced in the area of agricultural development. Limitations and possible applications of this approach are discussed.

Reagan, D.P.; Silva del Poso, X. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)]|[Sociedad Entomologica Ecuatoriana, Quito (Ecuador)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effects of Land-Use Policy, Forest Fragmentation, and Residential Parcel Size on Land-Cover and Carbon Storage in Southeastern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The overarching goal of this dissertation is to improve our understanding of the coupled natural-human land-use system in Southeastern Michigan. To accomplish this task Chapter (more)

Robinson, Derek Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Integrating the principles of strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The lack of early integration with the planning and decision-making process has been a major problem in environmental assessment. Traditional project-based environmental impact assessment has inadequate incentives and capacities to incorporate critical environmental impacts at a broader temporal or spatial scale. While many applications have been geared towards implementing project-level environmental assessments, comparatively little research has been done to determine how to incorporate strategically critical environmental impacts into local planning. Although the principles of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) are not yet required in local planning in the United States, these principles create a theoretical framework for local environmental assessment. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of local plans to integrate and implement the key SEA principles. This study focuses on increasing the understanding of how and where to integrate environmental impacts into the local planning and decision-making process by converting the principles of SEA into specific planning tools, policies, and implementation strategies. This study develops a protocol with 112 indicators to measure the strengths and weaknesses of integrating strategic environmental assessment into local comprehensive land use plans. A random sample of 40 California local comprehensive land use plans and associated planning processes is evaluated based on this plan quality evaluation protocol. Statistical analysis and multiple regression models identify the factors affecting the quality of plans with respect to their ability to assess environmental impacts. The results identify the relative strengths and weaknesses of the ability of local jurisdictions to integrate the SEA principles. The results show that many strategically important environmental issues and tools are rarely adopted by current local plans. The regression analysis results further identify the effects of planning capacity, environmental assessment capacity, public participation and contextual variables on environmental assessment plan quality. The findings extend established planning theory and practice by incorporating strategic environmental considerations into the existing framework of what constitutes a high quality local land use comprehensive plan and suggest ways to improve plan quality.

Tang, Zhenghong

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy Development on DOE Legacy Management Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Legacy Management Legacy Management DOE/GO-102008-2435 February 2008 Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy Development on DOE Legacy Management Lands Puerto Rico Alaska Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy Development on DOE Legacy Management Lands Authors: Doug Dahle, Dennis Elliott, Donna Heimiller, Mark Mehos, Robi Robichaud, Marc Schwartz, Byron Stafford, and Andy Walker Published by National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by the Midwest Research Institute * Battelle DOE/GO-102008-2435 February 2008 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

86

Assessing understorey structural characteristics in eucalypt forests: an investigation of LiDAR techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of airborne LiDAR technology to quantify forest structure within eucalypt forests has been evaluated with a focus on the understorey stratum. To achieve (more)

Goodwin, Nicholas R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Modeling Water and Heat Balance of the Boreal Landscape桟omparison of Forest and Arable Land in Scandinavia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water and heat balances of an arable field and a forest in the boreal zone in Scandinavia were explored using 3 yr of observations and simulations with two different soil杤egetation朼tmosphere transfer (SVAT) models over a 30-yr period. ...

David Gustafsson; Elisabet Lewan; Per-Erik Jansson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 2: Impact assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiversity impacts . Bioethanol . Evenness . Geographicto produce a liter of bioethanol depends on where thethen assessed for three bioethanol feedstocks at different

Geyer, Roland; Lindner, Jan P.; Stoms, David M.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Assessment of Tropical Forest Degradation with Canopy Fractional Cover from Landsat ETM+ and IKONOS Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical forests are being subjected to a wide array of disturbances in addition to outright deforestation. Selective logging is one of the most common disturbances ongoing in the Amazon, which results in significant changes in forest structure ...

Cuizhen Wang; Jiaguo Qi; Mark Cochrane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

NPP Boreal Forest: J鋎ra錽, Sweden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low water storage capacity. Land use history in the region includes forest grazing, burning for crops and grazing, charcoal burning, tar-burning, logging and felling for paper...

93

A GIS decision support system for regional forest management to assess biomass availability for renewable energy production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, the use of a mix of renewable and traditional energy sources is deemed to help in solving increasing energy demands and environmental issues, thus making it particularly important to assess the availability of renewable energy sources. In ... Keywords: Bioenergy, Decision support system, Environmental sustainability, Forest residues, GIS, Harvesting techniques modelling, Renewable energy

Pietro Zambelli; Chiara Lora; Raffaele Spinelli; Clara Tattoni; Alfonso Vitti; Paolo Zatelli; Marco Ciolli

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Extraction of non-forest trees for biomass assessment based on airborne and terrestrial LiDAR data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of the federal funded project 'LiDAR based biomass assessment' is the nationwide investigation of the biomass potential coming from wood cuttings of non-forest trees. In this context, first and last pulse airborne laserscanning (F+L) data ... Keywords: LiDAR, correlation, point cloud, segmentation, three-dimensional, vegetation

Matthias Rentsch; Alfons Krismann; Peter Krzystek

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Withdrawal of Public Lands Within and Surrounding the Calliente Rail Corrider, Nevada  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QA: N/A QA: N/A Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED WITHDRAWAL OF PUBLIC LANDS WITHIN AND SURROUNDING THE CALIENTE RAIL CORRIDOR, NEVADA DOE/EA 1545 December 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Las Vegas, Nevada U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Ely, Nevada INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK December 2005 i COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Title: Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Proposed Withdrawal of Public Lands Within and Surrounding the Caliente Rail Corridor, Nevada (DOE/EA 1545) For further information contact:

97

Preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS) and alternative electric energy technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary comparative assessment of land use for the satellite power system (SPS), other solar technologies, and alternative electric energy technologies has been conducted. The alternative technologies are coal-gasification/combined-cycle, coal fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), light water reactor (LWR), liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), terrestrial photovoltaics (TPV), solar thermal electric (STE), and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Fusion was not included in this preliminary work but will be a part of the final evaluation based on available research, to identify a suitable assessment methodology, and to identify data deficiencies. The major issues of a land use assessment are the quantity, purpose, duration, location, and costs of the required land use. The phased methodology described treats the first four issues, but not the costs. Several past efforts at comparative or single-technology assessment are reviewed briefly. The current state of knowledge about land use is described for each technology. Conclusions are drawn regarding deficiencies in the data on comparative land use and needs for further research. (WHK)

Newsom, D.E.; Wolsko, T.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies, August 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL/TP-6A2-46209 NREL/TP-6A2-46209 Posted with permission. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies Energy Working Group August 2009 This report was prepared for the APEC Energy Working Group under EWG 11/2008A by: Anelia Milbrandt National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Golden, Colorado, USA Web site: www.nrel.gov Dr. Ralph P. Overend NREL Research Fellow (Retired) Ottawa, Ontario, Canada APEC#209-RE-01.4 Acknowledgments The authors would like to acknowledge and thank the project overseer, Mr. Jeffrey Skeer (Department of Energy, USA and chair of the APEC Biofuels Task Force), for his support, review, and guidance throughout this project. We also thank Mr. Mark Stumborg from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada for his review and recommendations.

99

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program抯 land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 20012006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

Schlosser, C. Adam

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

scenarios were developed with GIS modeling. Current land use0170-9 LAND USE IN LCA Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversityGeographic information systems (GIS) are adept at modeling

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

103

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

104

Assessment of the Regional Climate Model Version 3 over the Maritime Continent Using Different Cumulus Parameterization and Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an assessment of the Regional Climate Model, version 3 (RegCM3), coupled to two land surface schemes: the Biosphere朅tmosphere Transfer System, version 1e (BATS1e), and the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS). The model抯 ...

Rebecca L. Gianotti; Dongfeng Zhang; Elfatih A. B. Eltahir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Portal Forest Carbon Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forest Carbon Portal Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United States Agency for International Development, United Kingdom Department for International Development, Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com/ Forest Carbon Portal Screenshot References: FCP[1] "Ecosystem Marketplace's Forest Carbon Portal is a clearinghouse of information, feature stories, event listings, project details, 'how-to' guides, news, and market analysis on forest-based carbon sequestration projects. Deforestation and land-use change are responsible for 17% of the

106

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC (2007) California biofuel goals and production potential.Many LCA studies of biofuel production and use have appearedand downstream of biofuel crop production that have land use

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Automatic environmental quality assessment for mixed-land zones using lidar and intelligent techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Human impact on the natural environment is an evident global fact. Natural, industrial and touristic areas coexist in a more than delicate balance. In Andalusia, in the south of Spain, the Regional Ministry for the Environment is responsible for the ... Keywords: Classification, Decision trees, Intelligent techniques, LULC, Land cover, Land uses, Lidar

Jorge Garcia-Gutierrez; Luis Gon鏰lves-Seco; Jose C. Riquelme-Santos

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Industry, Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/i1580e/i1580e00.pdf Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse Gas Screenshot References: Forestry Industry Impacts[1] "This book examines the influence of the forest products (roundwood, processed wood products and pulp and paper) value chain on atmospheric greenhouse gases. Forests managed for natural conservation, for protection

109

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of high杝patial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Land use and geospatial aspects in life cycle assessment of renewable energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Renewable energy systems such as wind, solar and biomass are significantly more land intensive than traditional fossil fuels. Moreover, their environmental implications are highly geographically heterogeneous. Consequently, they present a significant ...

T. P. Seager; S. A. Miller; J. Kohn

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessing the Performance of the Ensemble Kalman Filter for Land Surface Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ensemble Kalman filter provides an easy-to-use, flexible, and efficient option for data assimilation problems. One of its attractive features in land surface applications is its ability to provide distributional information about variables, ...

Yuhua Zhou; Dennis McLaughlin; Dara Entekhabi

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Factorial Assessment of the Sensitivity of the BATS Land-Surface Parameterization Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land-surface schemes developed for incorporation into global climate models include parameterizations that are not yet fully validated and depend upon the specification of a large (2050) number of ecological and soil parameters, the values of ...

A. Henderson-Sellers

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Use of NDVI and Land Surface Temperature for Drought Assessment: Merits and Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large number of water- and climate-related applications, such as drought monitoring, are based on spaceborne-derived relationships between land surface temperature (LST) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The majority of ...

Arnon Karnieli; Nurit Agam; Rachel T. Pinker; Martha Anderson; Marc L. Imhoff; Garik G. Gutman; Natalya Panov; Alexander Goldberg

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Assessment of Roughness Length Schemes Implemented within the Noah Land Surface Model for High Altitude Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current land surface models still have difficulties with producing reliable surface heat fluxes and skin temperature (Tsfc) estimates for high altitude regions, which may be addressed via adequate parameterization of the roughness lengths for ...

Donghai Zheng; Rogier Van Der Velde; Zhongbo Su; Martijn J. Booij; Arjen Y. Hoekstra

115

Performance Assessment of New Land Surface and Planetary Boundary Layer Physics in the WRF-ARW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pleim朮iu land surface model, Pleim surface layer scheme, and Asymmetric Convective Model (version 2) are now options in version 3.0 of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) Advanced Research WRF (ARW) core. These physics ...

Robert C. Gilliam; Jonathan E. Pleim

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Observations and assessment of forest carbon recovery following disturbance in North America  

SciTech Connect

Disturbance processes of various types substantially modify ecosystem carbon dynamics both temporally and spatially. The recovery of forests from disturbance typically results in carbon sequestration, but the point at which ecosystems move from being net sources to sinks of carbon is quite variable depending on a number of factors. Here we review some of the essential measurements needed to track the dynamics of carbon associated with forest disturbance, the longer-term recovery of carbon pools following disturbance, and consider the measurements used to document recovery, as well as how they vary with the type of disturbance. First we provide a brief overview of the relevance of disturbance to carbon dynamics. Specifically, we address 3 topics: (1) the different measurements needed to characterize recovery from different types of disturbance (e.g. fire, insects, harvest); (2) the essential measurements required to quantify the dynamics of carbon components associated with forest recovery; (3) the utility of multiple types of observations (lines of evidence) in documenting recovery from disturbance. Related to these topics we then explore a series of specific types of disturbance (fire, insects, harvest), and the relative importance of various factors (and associated measurements) that influence carbon pools and fluxes in different systems (boreal and temperate). These topics and associated research questions are focused on North America, but aspects are undoubtedly relevant to other forested ecosystems.

Goetz, Scott J.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Law, Beverly E.; Hicke, J.; Huang, C.; Houghton, R. A.; McNulty, Steve; O'Halloran, Tom; Harmon, Mark; Meddens, Arjan; Pfeifer, Eric; Mildrexler, David; Kasischke, Eric

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Simple, Minimal Parameter Model for Predicting the Influence of Changing Land Cover on the Land朅tmosphere System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of changing land cover on the soil杤egetation朼tmosphere system are numerous. With the fraction of land used for farming and grazing expected to increase, extensive alterations to land cover such as replacing forests with cropland will ...

Justin E. Bagley; Ankur R. Desai; Paul C. West; Jonathan A. Foley

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Forest Preserve District  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve District Forest Preserve District Nature Bulletin No. 109 March 29, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT Forest Preserve Districts, in Illinois, are separate municipal bodies governed by a Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners consisting of the elected county commissioners, as in Cook County, or by a committee of the county board of supervisors, as in 7 other counties. The legislative act which provided for such a district, if authorized by referendum vote of the people, became a law on July 1, 1914. Under that act, the commissioners are empowered to levy taxes, issue bonds, and to acquire lands containing forests "for the purpose of protecting and preserving the flora, fauna and scenic beauties.... and to restore, restock, protect and preserve the natural forests and said lands with their flora and fauna, as nearly as may be in their natural state and condition for the purpose of the education, pleasure and recreation of the public". A limit of 35,000 acres was set; later increased to 39,000.

119

NASA Land Validation Campaign Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products > Validation NASA Land Validation Campaign Data Land Validation Campaigns The goal of the EOS Validation Program is the comprehensive assessment of all EOS science data...

120

Creation of the WATCH Forcing Data and Its Use to Assess Global and Regional Reference Crop Evaporation over Land during the Twentieth Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Water and Global Change (WATCH) project evaluation of the terrestrial water cycle involves using land surface models and general hydrological models to assess hydrologically important variables including evaporation, soil moisture, and runoff. ...

G. P. Weedon; S. Gomes; P. Viterbo; W. J. Shuttleworth; E. Blyth; H. 謘terle; J. C. Adam; N. Bellouin; O. Boucher; M. Best

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. The Tribe's Comprehensive Strategic Plan seeks to diversify the Tribal Economy through the creation of alternative energy businesses, such as wind, solar and bio-mass facilities while protecting the waters of Lake Superior, tribal inland lakes and streams. In addition, the Community desired to utilize clean/green energy resources to promote the self-sufficiency of the Tribal Nation. The objective of the study is to preserve our environment and maintain our cultural goals of using the resources of the land wisely. To reduce our consumption of fossil fuels, mercury and carbon dioxide emissions, which harm our water and land; we have decided to evaluate the opportunities of utilizing wind power. Preliminary projections show that we may eliminate pollution from our land in a cost effective manner. This study will evaluate wind capacity and our current energy consumption while projecting the feasibility of converting to wind power for operations at our major facilities. This project will study the feasibility of wind power at two locations for the purpose of reducing the Tribe's reliance upon fossil fuels and creating business opportunities, jobs and revenue for the community.

Nominelli, Gregg R.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

123

Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56 56 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation Oak Ridge, Tennessee February 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations i ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ac acres ALARA as low as reasonably achievable AMSA American Metropolitan Sewer Association CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CSF cancer slope factor DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA environmental assessment EFPC East Fork Poplar Creek EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPS Effluent Polishing System (West End Treatment Facility) FONSI Finding of No Significant Impact g gram ha hectares HEAST Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables HI hazard index HQ hazard quotient IDP Industrial Discharge Permit IRIS Integrated Risk Information System kg kilogram

124

Poverty and Forests Linkages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty and Forests Linkages Poverty and Forests Linkages Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Poverty and Forests Linkages Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/Documents/pdf/livelihoods/PovertyForestsLinkage Country: India, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Guinea, Laos, Tanzania Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa Coordinates: 28.86掳, 81.56掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.86,"lon":81.56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

125

Micro-level land use impacts of bioconversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy crisis has prompted research and development of renewable energy sources, among which are the bioconversion technologies. Crops, crop residues, manure and other organic wastes are potential sources of liquid, solid and gaseous fuels. These feedstocks originate on the farm or in the forest and therefore are land intensive. Implementation of the bioconversion technologies will involve actions which will impact existing land use patterns. Because of differences in crop type, yield per acre, existing land use conditions and agricultural practices, an aggregated national approach to the assessment of land use is not sufficient. If energy policy regarding bioconversion is to be successful, then it must be sensitive to micro-level information. This paper demonstrates the land use assessment work at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in support of the Department of Energy's Technical Assessment of Solar Energy Program, (TASE). Local Biomass potential, existing and use and potential land use impacts from bio-energy implementation for three of the fifteen counties selected for the TASE study will be presented. The methodology creased for the evaluation is useful in determining the biomass potential for any community or county, and in identifying regional differences inherent in the trade-offs between existing land use and energy production.

Parsons, V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Capturing the implications of land use change in Brazil through environmental assessment: Time for a strategic approach?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brazil is experiencing a surge in planting of sugar cane crops driven by internal markets and external policy drivers for biofuels. The current expectation is for the expansion of these crops to continue. This creates concern over the extent to which the full implications of large scale land use change are currently being considered by decision-makers. Using the State of Sao Paulo as a case study (as it accounts for the majority of sugar cane grown in Brazil), a comparison was made of the impacts identified in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) and Preliminary Environmental Reports (PERs), which have to be submitted for approval of most new sugar cane activities, with significant impacts known to be associated with sugar cane activities derived from literature review. The results from a review of 32 EISs and PERs (30% of the population) indicated that whilst some impacts were well covered by the sample (water and soil pollution, and air emissions) energy balance and Green House Gas emissions and food security had very limited consideration, and water resources, residues, labour conditions and social responsibility were only partially covered. Environmental Impact Assessment is constrained by its environmental advocacy role and its application to the project level only. This study highlights its limitations in the context of assessment of land use change which demands more strategic consideration.

Gallardo, Amarilis Lucia Casteli Figueiredo, E-mail: amacafi@ipt.b [Institute for Technological Research, Center of Environmental and Energetic Technologies, Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo - SP, CEP 05508-901 (Brazil); Bond, Alan, E-mail: alan.bond@uea.ac.u [InteREAM (Interdisciplinary Research in Environmental Assessment and Management), School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 361GTR-NRS-P-105 STRATEGIES FOR ASSESSING INTER-AND INTRA-SPECIFIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATEGIES FOR ASSESSING INTER- AND INTRA-SPECIFIC VARIATION IN TREE BIOMASS IN THE INTERIOR WEST David L. Regional forest inventory and forecasting applications are therefore increasingly focused on tree biomass, including biomass in traditionally non-merchantable components. Yet accurate biomass equations

128

Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strategic assessment of bioenergy development in the west:modeled the variation in bioenergy crop yields. Yield dataof biobased polymers and bioenergy: an analysis and system

Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

130

Appendix B Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Sources and Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/comap. #12;9 Core Data Layers In order to answer key questions for the assessment such as "Where does

131

Prepared as part of a Joint Venture Agreement with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is widespread recognition of the potential role forests can play in contributing to Green House Gas (GHG) reductions through carbon sequestration. Non-industrial private forests (NIPF) comprise a significant portion of forests in the U.S. (approximately 40%). Thus, it is crucial to assess the role that NIPF landowners can play in broader carbon sequestration efforts. Management actions that could increase carbon sequestration on NIPF lands include afforestation of agricultural land, longer rotations, intensive management, changing stocking density, or choosing alternative tree species. Because the resulting carbon sequestration benefits are to a large extent external to individual landowners, incentives such as carbon sequestration subsidies and carbon release taxes, carbon rental fees, or cost-sharing agreements, may be necessary to induce them to adopt these management options. A key question is how effective these different policies can be in eliciting the desired management choices by NIPF owners. In this report we assess the current state of knowledge about carbon sequestration in forests, including afforestation of agricultural land, sequestration in existing forests, and sequestration in NIPFs. We review the broader literature on the response of NIPF owners to incentives intended to promote specific forest management activities and to conserve habitat for endangered species,

Christian Langpap; Taeyoung Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

133

Sublimation of Snow from Coniferous Forests in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved representations of snow interception by coniferous forest canopies and sublimation of intercepted snow are implemented in a land surface model. Driven with meteorological observations from forested sites in Canada, the United States, and ...

Richard Essery; John Pomeroy; Jason Parviainen; Pascal Storck

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Land Turtles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turtles Turtles Nature Bulletin No. 157 May 29, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LAND TURTLES Turtles are four-legged reptiles that originated before the dinosaurs appeared, some 175 million years ago. The distinguishing feature of the turtle is its shell, varying in shape and markings with the different species: an arched upper shell grown fast to the backbone, and a flat lower shell grown fast to the breastbone, the two connected on either side by a bony bridge. In some species, like the box turtles, the lower shell is hinged, enabling the animal to completely conceal its head, tail and limbs by closing the two shells together. Most turtles live in water all or part of the time, but all of them lay their eggs on land, and neither the nest nor the young is attended by the parents. Each species has its own method of nest construction, using the hind legs to dig a hole in the ground, but the eggs are covered and left to be hatched by the heat of the sun. The eggs are relished by many animals such as skunks and squirrels; the young, before their armor hardens, are devoured by birds, mammals, fishes and other turtles.

135

Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Vietnam in Vietnam Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam Agency/Company /Organization Regional Community Forestry Training Center for Asia and the Pacific Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://recoftc.org/site/filead Country Vietnam UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam[1] Forest Tenure Reform in Vietnam Screenshot Summary "This report presents a synthesis of findings from the two surveys undertaken in Dak Lak (by Dak Lak Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD)) and Hoa Binh by VFU (See Annex A. for a list of members in the two research teams). It was prepared by Nguyen Quang Tan, Nguyen Ba

136

Tropical Africa: Mean Biomass of Closed Forests By Country  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forests By Country image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

137

Tropical Africa: Mean Biomass of Open Forests By Country  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forests By Country image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

138

2. Annual Quantities of Land Clearing Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Land Clearing Debris:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land clearing debris is defined as growing stock and other timber sources cut or otherwise destroyed in the process of converting forest land to non-forest uses. 1 Growing stock that is removed in silvicultural operations such as pre-commercial thinning is also included in this definition. Land clearing debris is typically in the form of tree tops and branches, trees cut or knocked down and left on site, and stumps. In non-forested areas, such as grasslands and desert, land clearing debris may include soil, rocks, and shrubs, although fuel is primarily derived from previously forested areas.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

I think that I shall never see {hor_ellipsis} a lovely forestry policy: Land use programs for conservation of forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forestry programs are frequently invoked as having potential for mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. Most studies have attempted to quantify the potential impact of forest programs on carbon uptake and the potential costs of such programs. In this paper, we will attempt instead to focus on the institutional issues of the implementation of forestry programs for carbon sequestration. In particular, we explore the challenges for implementing forest programs that are: of increasing technological complexity; and in settings that depart significantly from the idealized conditions of economic models. We start in Section 1 by examining a suite of instruments that are commonly employed to implement a given policy. Section 2 examines a relatively simple case -- a tree-planting program in the US -- and demonstrates that there are significant difficulties involved in implementing a carbon sequestration program, even in a well-developed market economy. Section 3 focuses on other technologies in the US and why the choice of policy instruments and program design is more difficult than for the simple tree-planting case. Section 4 considers implementation of forestry policies in other countries where the economies may bear less resemblance to the ideal market economy than the US. In those settings, the choice of policy instruments may be very sensitive to non-market considerations that are often missed in conventional policy and cost analysis.

Rayner, S.F.; Richards, K.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Forest Cover Change in the Northeastern U.S.: A Spatial Assessment in the Context of an Environmental Kuznets Curve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the association of forest cover, treated as an environmental good, and income at the county scale in the Northeastern United States was conducted for 2006. Global analysis using a spatial error regression model indicates an environmental ... Keywords: Environmental Kuznets Curve, Forest Cover, Geographically Weighted Regression, Northeastern United States, Spatial Error Regression Model

George C. Bentley, Robert G. Cromley, Dean M. Hanink, C. Patrick Heidkamp

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

DeLucia, Evan H.

143

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 2002-2006 OF THE CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE CURLY TOP VIRUS CONTROL PROGRAM FOR BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT AND DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/EA-# 1363 April, 2002 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. I. INTRODUCTION 9 A. Purpose and Need......................................................... 10 B. Background................................................................... 10-11 II. PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES Alternative 1 - Proposed Action........................................... 12 General Program.................................................... 12-15 Program Specifics.................................................. 15-18 Public Health and Environmental Considerations:

144

CEMENTITIOUS BARRIERS MODELING FOR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS OF SHALLOW LAND BURIAL OF LOW LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE - 9243  

SciTech Connect

The Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) was created to develop predictive capabilities for the aging of cementitious barriers over long timeframes. The CBP is a multi-agency, multi-national consortium working under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM-21) funded Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as the lead laboratory. Members of the CBP are SRNL, Vanderbilt University, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SIMCO Technologies, Inc. (Canada), and the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN). A first step in developing advanced tools is to determine the current state-of-the-art. A review has been undertaken to assess the treatment of cementitious barriers in Performance Assessments (PA). Representatives of US DOE sites which have PAs for their low level waste disposal facilities were contacted. These sites are the Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Nevada Test Site, and Hanford. Several of the more arid sites did not employ cementitious barriers. Of those sites which do employ cementitious barriers, a wide range of treatment of the barriers in a PA was present. Some sites used conservative, simplistic models that even though conservative still showed compliance with disposal limits. Other sites used much more detailed models to demonstrate compliance. These more detailed models tend to be correlation-based rather than mechanistically-based. With the US DOE's Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group (LFRG) moving towards embracing a risk-based, best estimate with an uncertainties type of analysis, the conservative treatment of the cementitious barriers seems to be obviated. The CBP is creating a tool that adheres to the LFRG chairman's paradigm of continuous improvement.

Taylor, G

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

DOE/EA-1329; Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (8/10/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

329 329 Environmental Assessment for the Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico Final Document Date Prepared: August 10, 2000 Prepared by: Department of Energy, Los Alamos Area Office Wildfire Hazard Reduction and Forest Health Improvement Program at LANL Environmental Assessment iii August 10, 2000 Contents ACRONYMS AND TERMS ....................................................................................................................................................... v EXECUTIVE SUMMARY........................................................................................................................................................ vii 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED .......................................................................................................................................................1

146

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the

147

International Forest Policy Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Forest Policy Database International Forest Policy Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Forest Policy Database Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.etfrn.org/etfrn/topics/policy/index.html International Forest Policy Database Screenshot References: GTZ International Forest Policy Database[1] Overview "This topic page is being developed in cooperation with GTZ-IWP, the International Forest Policy project of the German organisation for international cooperation. GTZ-IWP has contributed considerably to the ETFRN NEWS 41/42 on national forest programmes. During this cooperation both GTZ and ETFRN identified a need for a central point of access to information on international forest

148

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Forest inventory: Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit, Craig Mountain, Idaho. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this report is to determine the quantity and quality of existing forest habitat types on the 59,991-acre Peter T. Johnson Wildlife Mitigation Unit (WMU). Products from this effort include a description of the ecological condition, a map of habitat types, and an inventory of forest resources on the WMU lands. The purpose of this and other resource inventories (plant and wildlife) is to assess the current resources condition of the WMU and to provide necessary information to generate a long-term management for this area.

Narolski, Steven W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDRISI Land Change Modeler IDRISI Land Change Modeler Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IDRISI Land Change Modeler Agency/Company /Organization: Clark Labs Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.clarklabs.org/ Cost: Paid IDRISI Land Change Modeler Screenshot References: IDRISI Land Change Modeler[1] Overview "The Land Change Modeler is revolutionary land cover change analysis and prediction software with tools to analyze, measure and project the impacts of such change on habitat and biodiversity." References 鈫 "IDRISI Land Change Modeler" Retrieved from

151

Overview of Forest Observations in the GEOSS Work Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land颅surface climate int. Vegetation characteristics Weather Land颅surface climate int. Vegetation of forest carbon (nationally and globally) 路 Engage user communities and networks not yet involved in GEO-07 Regional Networks for Ecosystems 7. US-06-02 Pilot Communities of Practice New task proposed: Forest Carbon

152

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Land Use Geothermal/Land Use < Geothermal(Redirected from Land Use) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

153

Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Index Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations Foundation Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.forestcarbonindex.org/ Web Application Link: www.forestcarbonindex.org/maps.html Cost: Free References: Forest Carbon Index [1] The Forest Carbon Index (FCI) compiles and displays global data relating to biological, economic, governance, investment, and market readiness conditions for every forest and country in the world, revealing the best places and countries for forest carbon investments. Please use this site to

154

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.pwc.co.uk/pdf/forest_finance_toolkit.pdf Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Screenshot References: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit[1] Overview "This Toolkit has been developed jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is a globally applicable resource designed to help financial institutions support the management of forest resources through sustainable and legal timber production and processing, and markets for carbon and other

155

Final Report and Strategic Plan on the Feasibility Study to Assess Geothermal Potential on Warm Springs Reservation Lands. Report No. DOE/GO/15177  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005 the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Tribal Council authorized an evaluation of the geothermal development potential on the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises obtained a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct a geological assessment and development estimate. Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises utilized a team of expert consultants to conduct the study and develop a strategic plan. The resource assessment work was completed in 2006 by GeothermEx Inc., a consulting company specializing in geothermal resource assessments worldwide. The GeothermEx report indicates there is a 90% probability that a commercial geothermal resource exists on tribal lands in the Mt. Jefferson area. The geothermal resource assessment and other cost, risk and constraints information has been incorporated into the strategic plan.

James Manion, Warm Springs Power & Water Enterprises; David McClain, McClain & Associates

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

156

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PROPOSED WITHDRAWAL OF PUBLIC LANDS WITHIN AND SURROUNDING THE CALIENTE RAIL CORRIDOR, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose for agency action is to preclude surface entry and the location of new mining claims, subject to valid existing rights, within and surrounding the Caliente rail corridor as described in the Yucca Mountain FEIS (DOE 2002). This protective measure is needed to enhance the safe, efficient, and uninterrupted evaluation of land areas for potential rail alignments within the Caliente rail corridor. The evaluation will assist the DOE in determining, through the Rail Alignment environmental impact statement (EIS) process, whether to construct a branch rail line, and to provide support to the BLM in deciding whether or not to reserve a ROW for the rail line under the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA). The BLM participated as a cooperating agency in preparing this EA because it is the responsible land manager and BLM staff could contribute resource specific expertise.

DOE

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Monitoring Selective Logging in Tropical Evergreen Forests Using Landsat: Multitemporal Regional Analyses in Mato Grosso, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging degrades tropical forests. Logging operations vary in timing, location, and intensity. Evidence of this land use is rapidly obscured by forest regeneration and ongoing deforestation. A detailed study of selective logging ...

Eraldo A. T. Matricardi; David L. Skole; Mark A. Cochrane; Jiaguo Qi; Walter Chomentowski

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Meteorological Impacts of Forest Mortality due to Insect Infestation in Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical characteristics of forests and other ecosystems control land朼tmosphere exchanges of water and energy and partly dictate local and regional meteorology. Insect infestation and resulting forest dieback can alter these characteristics and, ...

Christine Wiedinmyer; Michael Barlage; Mukul Tewari; Fei Chen

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Agency/Company /Organization: Center for International Forestry Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Publications Website: www.cifor.cgiar.org/fctoolbox/ Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Screenshot References: CIFOR Toolbox[1] Summary "This Forests and Climate Change Toolbox has been developed to build understanding and technical proficiency on issues of climate change and forests including mitigation, adaptation, carbon accounting and markets, and biofuels." References 鈫 "CIFOR Toolbox" Retrieved from

160

Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

N /A

2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An assessment of the available windy land area and wind energy potential in the contiguous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Estimates of land areas with various levels of wind energy resource and resultant wind energy potential have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some windy lands as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource estimated over the contiguous United States is surprisingly large and has the potential to supply a substantial fraction of the nation's energy needs, even with the use of today's wind turbine technology. Although this study shows that, after exclusions, only about 0.6% of the land area in the contiguous United States is characterized by high wind resource (comparable to that found in windy areas of California where wind energy is being cost-effectively developed), the wind electric potential that could be extracted with today's technology from these areas across the United States is equivalent to about 20% of the current US electric consumption. Future advances in wind turbine technology will further enhance the potential of wind energy. As advances in turbine technology allow areas of moderate wind resource to be developed, more than a tenfold increase in the wind energy potential is possible. These areas, which cover large sections of the Great Plains and are widely distributed throughout many other sections of the country, have the potential of producing more than three times the nation's current electric consumption. 9 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Water Vapor, CO2, and Temperature Profiles in and above a Forest桝ccuracy Assessment of an Unattended Measurement System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility of a global climate change has increased research interest in the least understood parts of the climate system. One of those parts is the boundary between the land surface of the earth and the lowest part of the planetary boundary ...

Meelis M鰈der; Anders Lindroth; Sven Halldin

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Research Article Historical Pesticide Exposure in California Using Pesticide Use Reports and Land-Use Surveys: An Assessment of Misclassification Error and Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used California抯 Pesticide Use Report (PUR) and land-use survey data to conduct a simulation study evaluating the potential consequences of misclassifying residential exposure from proximity to agricultural pesticide application in health effect studies. We developed a geographic model linking the PUR with crop location data from land-use surveys to assess the impact of exposure misclassification from simpler exposure models based solely on PUR or land-use data. We simulated the random selection of population controls recruited into a hypothetical case朿ontrol study within an agricultural region. Using residential parcel data, we derived annual exposure prevalences, sensitivity, and specificity for five pesticides and relied on the PUR plus land-use model as the 揼old standard. Based on these estimates, we calculated the attenuation of prespecified true odds ratios (ORs), assuming nondifferential exposure misclassification. True ORs were severely attenuated a) when residential exposure status was based on a larger geographic area yielding higher sensitivity but low specificity for exposure, in contrast to relying on a smaller area and increasing specificity; b) for less frequently applied pesticides; and c) with increasing mobility of residents among the study population. Considerable effect estimate attenuation also occurred when we used residential distance to crops as a proxy for pesticide exposure. Finally, exposure classifications based on annual instead of seasonal summaries of PUR resulted in highly attenuated ORs, especially during seasons when applications of specific pesticides were unlikely to occur. These results underscore the importance of increasing the spatiotemporal resolution of pesticide exposure models to minimize misclassification.

Rudolph P. Rull; Beate Ritz

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) (Redirected from GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

165

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Website: ies.lbl.gov/taxonomy/term/34 References: GCOMAP Project [1] Logo: Generalized Comprehensive Mitigation Assessment Process (GCOMAP) "The GCOMAP project reported on the global potential for carbon sequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenarios from 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typically seen in global

166

Report to Congress: Corridors and Rights-of-Way on Federal Lands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corridors and Rights-of-Way on Federal Lands Authority to grant, issue, or renew electric transmission ROWs on Federal land is held by the Forest Service (FS) of the U.S....

167

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Assessing the impacts of climate change on natural resource systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is a collection of papers addressing the theme of potential impacts of climatic change. Papers are entitled Integrated Assessments of the Impacts of Climatic Change on Natural Resources: An Introductory Editorial; Framework for Integrated Assessments of Global Warming Impacts; Modeling Land Use and Cover as Part of Global Environmental Change; Assessing Impacts of Climatic Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling; Integrating Climatic Change and Forests: Economic and Ecological Assessments; Environmental Change in Grasslands: Assessment using Models; Assessing the Socio-economic Impacts of Climatic Change on Grazinglands; Modeling the Effects of Climatic Change on Water Resources- A Review; Assessing the Socioeconomic Consequences of Climate Change on Water Resources; and Conclusions, Remaining Issues, and Next Steps.

Frederick, K.D.; Rosenberg, N.J. [eds.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GermanyBlack Forest News Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update,...

170

Mitigation Options in Forestry, Land-Use, Change and Biomass Burning in Africa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and sequester carbon in land use sectors are describe in some detail. The paper highlights those options in the forestry sector, which are more relevant to different parts of Africa. It briefly outlines a bottom-up methodological framework for comprehensively assessing mitigation options in land use sectors. This method emphasizes the application of end-use demand projections to construct a baseline and mitigation scenarios and explicitly addresses the carbon storage potential on land and in wood products, as well as use of wood to substitute for fossil fuels. Cost-effectiveness indicators for ranking mitigation options are proposed, including those, which account for non-carbon monetary benefits such as those derived from forest products, as well as opportunity cost of pursuing specific mitigation option. The paper finally surveys the likely policies, barriers and incentives to implement such mitigation options in African countries .

Makundi, Willy R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Technical Cooperation Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "In Indonesia, the US Forest Service has a new partnership with the Indonesian Ministry of Forests aimed at improving forest governance by strengthening ties between field operations and headquarters in order to manage and conserve forests on a landscape-scale. " References 鈫 "US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation" Retrieved from

172

Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Liberia Western Africa References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "Liberia contains over 40% of the remaining closed canopy rainforest in West Africa, a sizeable carbon sink. The Forest Service works with the Government of Liberia to reorganize its forest service and forestry sector in the post-conflict era. The US Forest Service helped develop a chain of custody system for tracking timber and a financial management

173

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramLandslide Risk Case Studies in Forest Development Planning and Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramThe use of trade, firm, or corporation names in this publication is for the information and convenience of the reader. Such use does not constitute an official endorsement or approval by the Government of British Columbia of any product or service to the exclusion of any others that may also be suitable. This document should be regarded as technical information and not as government policy. National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data Main entry under title. Landslide risk case studies in forest development planning and operations (Land management handbook, ISSN 0229-1622; 56) Includes bibliographical references: p.

Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine; Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Jordan Western Asia References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "In Jordan, the Forest Service provides technical support to Bedouin communities on community grassland rehabilitation projects. The focus is on rehabilitating extremely degraded rangelands-unique because it is designed to work without using fences to exclude grazing animals." References 鈫 "US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation" Retrieved from

175

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Agency/Company /Organization: Colorado State University Partner: United States Agency for International Development, United States Forest Service, United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/ghgtool/index.php Cost: Free Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software Screenshot References: Agriculture and Land Use National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Software[1]

176

Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Forest County Potawatomi Community Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest County Potawatomi Community Project Forest County Potawatomi Community Project Forest County Potawatomi Community Project November 13, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Community, a federally recognized tribe with its reservation in Forest County, Wisconsin, and with trust lands in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, is implementing an integrated renewable energy deployment plan that will provide electricity for the Tribe's government buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $2.6 million in funding for this Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) project. Biogas Generation Facility The Forest County Potawatomi CommRE project will include installation of a biogas generation plant on Tribe-owned land in Milwaukee County. The digesters associated with the biogas cogeneration plant will utilize a

179

EOS Land Validation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation The EOS Land Validation Project Overview EOS Land Validation Logo The objective of the EOS Land Validation Project is to achieve consistency, completeness,...

180

Forests to offset the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the role of trees in the prevention of global warming. If forest plantations are used as carbon sinks, it is estimated that 500 million hectares of intensively managed, rapidly growing plantation forests could sequester all of the 5 billion tons or so of carbon released annually through the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation. Land area requirements would be large enough to dwarf all previous forest plantation efforts. The cost would bean average of $400 per hectare to establish such plantations in the United States.

Sedjo, R.A. (Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program (FIP) Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Brazil, Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Indonesia, Laos, Mexico, Peru South America, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, South America References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7]

182

Geothermal/Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Use < Geothermal Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Land Use Planning General Regulatory Roadmap The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the USDA Forest Service (FS) have prepared a joint Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to analyze and expedite the leasing of BLM-and FS-administered lands with high potential for renewable geothermal resources in 11 Western states and Alaska. Geothermal Land Use Planning is ... Example Land Use Plans References Information for Publication Standards for EA/EIS/Planning Documents IM 2004-110.pdf Fluid Mineral Leasing and Related Planning and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Processes April 11, 2004 and

183

Applying geographic information systems to support strategic environmental assessment: Opportunities and limitations in the context of Irish land-use plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strengthening of spatial database infrastructures, further promoted by the INSPIRE Directive adopted in 2007, has led to an increased use of spatial data in planning and decision-making. Given that land-use plans are intrinsically spatial, such evidence and approaches can significantly benefit plan-making. A spatial framework could especially support the specific Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) aspects of the plan-making process. Spatial tools such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are particularly well-placed to support the environmental integration sought in SEA by providing evidence through the spatial assessment of multiple environmental datasets. Moreover, GIS bring the opportunity to augment conventional assessment techniques (e.g. matrix-based assessments) by acting as visual mediators of spatial knowledge and by providing an effective tool for the spatial and temporal analysis of environmental impacts. This paper presents a GIS-based approach to SEA (GISEA), and analyses the above premise by evaluating the barriers, limitations, opportunities and benefits of its implementation. The GISEA approach has been applied to seven development plans of differing scales in the Republic of Ireland. The results of the case studies revealed that current issues in SEA (e.g. restricted time-frames and institutional arrangements) condition the implementation of a GIS-based approach. Moreover, GIS expertise, data accessibility and quality remain limiting factors to an effective GIS application in SEA. However, the results also confirmed that GIS have the potential to increase the objectivity and accuracy of the assessment, enhance both the understanding of environmental and planning considerations and the delivery of information, and, therefore, help to improve the effectiveness of SEA practice.

Gonzalez, Ainhoa, E-mail: ainhoag@yahoo.co [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Gilmer, Alan, E-mail: alan.gilmer@dit.i [Department of Environment and Planning, Dublin Institute of Technology, Zhivago Building, Bolton Street, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Foley, Ronan, E-mail: ronan.foley@nuim.i [National Centre for Geo-computation, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Sweeney, John, E-mail: john.sweeney@nuim.i [Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Fry, John, E-mail: john.fry@ucd.i [School of Biology and Environmental Science, UCD Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comparison of bucket-wheel spoil and phosphogypsum/clay blend as substrates for Nonriverine Wet Hardwood Forest restoration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Phosphate mining in Beaufort county, NC impacts a rare plant community type, Nonriverine Wet Hardwood Forest (NRWHF). Reclamation of land after mining utilizes three byproducts (more)

Andrews, Ross Lester

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An exploration of perceived benefits of recreation in the Pine Valley District of the Dixie National Forest .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public land agencies are mandated to incorporate Ecosystem Management practices into forest planning and management. The human dimensions of Ecosystem Management, including recreation and amenity (more)

Kaufman, Andrew Jay, 1963-

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Information Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe Information Forests, an approach to classification that generalizes Random Forests by replacing the splitting criterion of non-leaf nodes from a discriminative one -- based on the entropy of the label distribution -- to a generative one -- based on maximizing the information divergence between the class-conditional distributions in the resulting partitions. The basic idea consists of deferring classification until a measure of "classification confidence" is sufficiently high, and instead breaking down the data so as to maximize this measure. In an alternative interpretation, Information Forests attempt to partition the data into subsets that are "as informative as possible" for the purpose of the task, which is to classify the data. Classification confidence, or informative content of the subsets, is quantified by the Information Divergence. Our approach relates to active learning, semi-supervised learning, mixed generative/discriminative learning.

Yi, Zhao; Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The Need for Open Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Need for Open Lands Need for Open Lands Nature Bulletin No. 742 February 8, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour .Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor THE NEED FOR OPEN LANDS There is an old saying: The proof of the pudding is the eating . In other words, if it's good, people enjoy it and beg for more. The proof of the need for open lands -- publicly owned areas for recreational uses and open spaces undisturbed -- is the tremendous and ever-increasing use of those we have. We need more now. Year after year we will need more and more. It is imperative that areas desirable for future use be acquired now or as soon as possible, regardless of cost and even though they may stand idle ' -- vacant and undeveloped -- until more funds become available. Otherwise they may be gone, or the asking price may be a hundred times greater. Open spaces such as farm lands and prairies may have been occupied by residential, commercial or industrial developments. Woodlands may have been cut, stream channels dredged and wetlands drained, destroying all but a memory of their beauty and recreational values. There are compelling reasons for our need of open lands and why we should waste no time in providing more. Those reasons have been confirmed and emphasized by exhaustive studies and statistical analyses nationwide in scope.

188

Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1679e/i1679e00.pdf References: Developing Effective Forest Policy[1] Purpose "The purpose of this guide is to outline the concepts associated with forest policy development and the formulation of a formal forest policy statement, based on country experiences in recent decades. While focusing on the development and formulation of national forest policies, the guide can also be applied at subnational and local levels. Similarly, it can

189

WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.wri.org/working_papers/gfi_tenure_indicators_sep09.pdf Cost: Free WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit Screenshot References: WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit[1] "The Governance of Forests Initiative (GFI) seeks to bring widely accepted principles of good governance to bear on the challenges of sustaining forests in developing countries. GFI is a collaboration of the World Resources Institute, Imazon (Brazil) and the Instituto Centro de Vida (Brazil). This document presents the GFI Toolkit (Version 1) and outlines a process

190

Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Brazil South America References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] USFS engagement in Brazil: - Reducing deforestation through improving sustainable forest management ("...supports local partners in Brazil to teach forest technicians, managers and supervisors how to apply forest management principles and reduced-impact logging methods in the Brazilian Amazon") - Forest Monitoring - Remote Sensing - LiDAR - National Forest

191

Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Russia Eastern Europe References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "Like the US, Russia contains temperate and boreal forests. The forests share similar species, similar forest health problems, and some common threats. Since the mid-nineties, the US Forest Service has worked with Russian partners, including the State Forestry Service of Russia to: 1) promote sustainable forestry practices, 2) address forest health issues and

192

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Northern Hemisphere Biome-and Process-Specific Changes in Forest Area and Gross Merchantable Volume: 1890-1990 (DB1017) data Data DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1017 Contributors A. N. D. Auclair, J. A. Bedford, and C. Revenga Description This database lists annual changes in areal extent (Ha) and gross merchantable wood volume (m3) produced by depletion and accrual processes in boreal and temperate forests in Alaska, Canada, Europe, Former Soviet Union, Non-Soviet temperate Asia, and the contiguous United States for the years 1890 through 1990. Forest depletions (source terms for atmospheric CO2) are identified as forest pests, forest dieback, forest fires, forest harvest, and land-use changes (predominantly the conversion of forest, temperate woodland, and shrubland to cropland). Forest accruals (sink terms

193

Land Use History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the cultural-historical environment of the 88,900-acre (35,560-ha) Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP) over the past four centuries of Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governance. It includes a review and synthesis of available published and unpublished historical, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic literature about the human occupation of the area now contained within the VCNP. Documents include historical maps, texts, letters, diaries, business records, photographs, land and mineral patents, and court testimony. This study presents a cultural-historical framework of VCNP land use that will be useful to land managers and researchers in assessing the historical ecology of the property. It provides VCNP administrators and agents the cultural-historical background needed to develop management plans that acknowledge traditional associations with the Preserve, and offers managers additional background for structuring and acting on consultations with affiliated communities.

United States; Forest Service; Kurt F. Anschuetz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Assessment of microbial processes on radionuclide mobility in shallow land burial. [West Valley, NY; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of microbial metabolism of the organic substituents of low level radioactive wastes on radionuclide mobility in disposal sites, the nature of the microbial transformations involved in this metabolism and the effect of the prevailing environmental parameters on the quantities and types of metabolic intermediates accumulated were examined. Since both aerobic and anaerobic periods can occur during trench ecosystem development, oxidation capacities of the microbial community in the presence and absence of oxygen were analyzed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites were reviewed. Several deficiencies in available data were determined. Further research needs are suggested. This assessment has demonstrated that the biochemical capabilities expressed within the low level radioactive waste disposal site are common to a wide variety of soil bacteria. Hence, assuming trenches would not be placed in sites with such extreme abiotic conditions that all microbial activity is precluded, the microbial populations needed for colonization and decomposition of the organic waste substances are readily provided from the waste itself and from the soil of existing and any proposed disposal sites. Indeed, considering the ubiquity of occurrence of the microorganisms responsible for waste decomposition and the chemical nature of the organic waste material, long-term prevention of biodecomposition is difficult, if not impossible.

Colombo, P.; Tate, R.L. III; Weiss, A.J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road construction and

196

Assessment of the feasibility of recommissioning the French Landing Hydroelectric Facility in Van Buren Township, Michigan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study of the feasibility of recommissioning a small, low-head hydroelectric facility in southeastern Michigan are presented. The study concludes that there are several cost-effective designs for recommissioning the site, based on the use of vertical turbines and the sale of power to nearby industrial markets. In terms of the bulk sale of power to the local electric utility, no cost-effective alternatives were found to exist. A major burden on project cost-effectiveness was found to be the relatively large costs for structural repairs to the dam and powerhouse needed to insure safe operation and on adequate service life. From an engineering standpoint it was found that the items of equipment needed to recommission the site are readily available from both US and foreign manufacturers. A variety of hydraulic turbine designs could be successfully adapted to the existing powerhouse, without extensive new construction. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and revenues. A detailed environmental assessment using an impact matrix methodology concluded that the development of the facility for hydroelectric generation would have important positive environmental consequences related to improved impoundment and flow management techniques as well as enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam. The institutional and regulatory implications of developing the site for hydroelectric generation were found to be significant but manageable.

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil [Amazonas]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Piedade, M. T. F., and W. J. Junk. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and components of productivity for several types of tropical forest were determined for a number of study sites around Manaus, Brazil, from 1963 to the present. The study sites include several (0.2 ha) stands of terra firme (dry land) forest at " 64" to the northeast of Manaus, towards Itacoatiara (approximately 3.0 S 59.7 W, near the " Egler" Reserve), riverine forest in the 10 km x 10 km " Reserve" (2.95 S 59.95 W, 26 km

198

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

199

State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: moderncms.ecosystemmarketplace.com/repository/moderncms_documents/SFCM State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Screenshot References: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009[1] Overview "This report was created to increase transparency and answer fundamental questions about the supply of forestry-based carbon credits, such as transaction volumes, credit prices, hectares influenced and tenure rights. It outlines the aggregate numbers from our survey of 61 project developers1

200

Brazil-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Brazil-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Brazil South America References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management Jump to: navigation, search Logo: UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management Name UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, Global Environment Facility Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Website http://www.un.org.kh/undp/pres Program Start 2011 Country Cambodia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References UNDP Cambodia: Environment and Energy [1] UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management Screenshot "UNDP and Global Environment Facility on Monday launched a new project worth over US$3.8 million to help Cambodia preserve its forests to benefit the rural poor as well as to contribute to reducing emission of green house gases into atmosphere.

202

Mexico-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Mexico-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Mexico Central America References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

203

Indonesia-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Indonesia-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

204

Laos-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Laos-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

205

Ghana-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ghana-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Ghana-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ghana-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Ghana Western Africa References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

206

Burkina Faso-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burkina Faso-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Burkina Faso-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Burkina Faso-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Burkina Faso Western Africa References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

207

Peru-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Peru-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Peru South America References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF), which is one of two funds within the framework of the

208

Hanford Federal Facility state of Washington leased land  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to provide information concerning past solid and hazardous waste management practices for all leased land at the US DOE Hanford Reservation. This report contains sections including land description; land usage; ground water, air and soil monitoring data; and land uses after 1963. Numerous appendices are included which provide documentation of lease agreements and amendments, environmental assessments, and site surveys.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modeling the View Angle Dependence of Gap Fractions in Forest Canopies: Implications for Mapping Fractional Snow Cover Using Optical Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forest canopies influence the proportion of the land surface that is visible from above, or the viewable gap fraction (VGF). The VGF limits the amount of information available in satellite data about the land surface, such as snow cover in ...

Jicheng Liu; Curtis E. Woodcock; Rae A. Melloh; Robert E. Davis; Ceretha McKenzie; Thomas H. Painter

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

EA-1890: Final Environmental Assessment (Adopted) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment (Adopted) Final Environmental Assessment (Adopted) EA-1890: Final Environmental Assessment (Adopted) Hydropower License, Reedsport OPT Wave Park Project-FERC Project No. 12713-002 On February 1, 2010, Reedsport OPT Wave Park, LLC (OPT) filed an application for an original license to construct and operate the Reedsport OPT Wave Park Project (Reedsport Project or project). The 1.5-megawatt (MW) project would include 10 wave energy conversion devices moored in Oregon State territorial waters about 2.5 nautical miles off the coast near Reedsport, in Douglas County, Oregon. The onshore portion of the project, also located in Douglas County, would occupy about 5 acres of federal lands administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (Forest Service). The project would generate an average of about 4,140

211

Colorado Bark Beetle Mitigation Fund Helps Our Future Forests 1.5 Million Acres of Colorado's Forests Affected by Mountain Pine Beetle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

long-term sustainable forest management to reduce the impacts of insect and disease outbreaks started, MPB has killed most of the mature pines and beetle populations have decreased. The Real Costs the cost of managing our forests. The role of CSFS is to treat priority acres on state and private lands

212

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

213

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

214

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+ framework.

215

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector

216

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Station Newport Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center Robi Robichaud, Jason Fields, and Joseph Owen Roberts Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52801 February 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Naval Station Newport

217

Effects of Land Cover Change on the Energy and Water Balance of the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land cover change on the energy and water balance of the Mississippi River basin are analyzed using the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) model. Results of a simulated conversion from complete forest cover to crop cover over a ...

Tracy E. Twine; Christopher J. Kucharik; Jonathan A. Foley

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

REDD+ In Dryland Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dryland Forests Dryland Forests Jump to: navigation, search Name REDD+ In Dryland Forests: Issues and Prospects for Pro-poor REDD in the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Namibia, Zambia, Mozambique UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

219

How Communities Manage Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

How Communities Manage Forests How Communities Manage Forests Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How Communities Manage Forests Agency/Company /Organization: FORZA Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Background analysis Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.rightsandresources.org/documents/files/doc_1687.pdf Country: Bhutan, Bulgaria, Nepal, Kyrgyzstan, United Kingdom, Slovenia, Switzerland, Vietnam UN Region: Central Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

220

Climate and Energy-Water-Land System Interactions Technical Report to the U.S. Department of Energy in Support of the National Climate Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a framework to characterize and understand the important elements of climate and energy-water-land (EWL) system interactions. It identifies many of the important issues, discusses our understanding of those issues, and presents a long-term research program research needs to address the priority scientific challenges and gaps in our understanding. Much of the discussion is organized around two discrete case studies with the broad themes of (1) extreme events and (2) regional intercomparisons. These case studies help demonstrate unique ways in which energy-water-land interactions can occur and be influenced by climate.

Skaggs, Richard; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Frumhoff, Peter; Lowry, Thomas; Middleton, Richard; Pate, Ron; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Arnold, J. G.; Averyt, Kristen; Janetos, Anthony C.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Jennie S.; Rose, Steven K.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentelObserved and simulated land subsidence for extenso meter 1 .and Miller, R. E. 1975. land subsidence due to ground water

Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Numerical Simulation of Land Subsidence in the Los Banos-Kettleman City Area, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

risk assessment of land subsidence in Shanhai. EnvironmentalF. and Riley, F. S. 1984. Land Subsidence in the San Joaquinand Miller, R. E. 1975. Land subsidence due to ground water

Larson, Keith J; Basagaoglu, Hakan; Marino, Miguel A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

An easy-to-use MATLAB program (MamLand) for the assessment of landslide susceptibility using a Mamdani fuzzy algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, landslide susceptibility mapping using a completely expert opinion-based approach was applied for the Sinop (northern Turkey) region and its close vicinity. For this purpose, an easy-to-use program, ''MamLand,'' was developed for the construction ... Keywords: Geographical Information Systems (GIS), Landslide susceptibility, Mamdani fuzzy inference system, Sinop (Turkey)

A. Akgun; E. A. Sezer; H. A. Nefeslioglu; C. Gokceoglu; B. Pradhan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shaaf, and the FLUXNET validation communities to choose sites and to identify the land products needed for validation. We also worked with MODAPS on subsetting the Land...

225

Africa Land Use (1980)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Land Use (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

226

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

227

Impact of post-mining subsidence on nitrogen transformation in southern tropical dry deciduous forest, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our research was to assess the impact of post-mining land subsidence, caused due to underground coal mining operations, on fine root biomass and root tips count; plant available nutrient status, microbial biomass N (MBN) and N-mineralization rates of a Southern tropical dry deciduous forest of Singareni Coalfields of India. The changes were quantified in all the three (rainy, winter and summer) seasons, in slope and depression microsites of the subsided land and an adjacent undamaged forest microsite. Physico-chemical characteristics were found to be altered after subsidence, showing a positive impact of subsidence on soil moisture, bulk density, water holding capacity, organic carbon content, total N and total P. The increase in all the parameters was found in depression microsites, while in slope microsites, the values were lower. Fine root biomass and root tips count increased in the subsided depression microsites, as demonstrated by increases of 62% and 45%, respectively. Soil nitrate-N and phosphate-P concentrations were also found to be higher in depression microsite, showing an increase of 35.68% and 24.74%, respectively. Depression microsite has also shown the higher MBN value with an increase over control. Net nitrification, net N-mineralization and MBN were increased in depression microsite by 29.77%, 25.72% and 34%, respectively. There was a positive relation of microbial N with organic C, fine root biomass and root tips.

Tripathi, N.; Singh, R.S.; Singh, J.S. [Central Institute of Mining & Fuel Research, Dhanbad (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5 or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990抯 and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05 resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Agency/Company /Organization: United States Geological Survey Sector: Land Focus Area: Land Use Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps User Interface: Website Website: landcover.usgs.gov/landcoverdata.php Cost: Free USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI) Screenshot References: USGS-Land Cover Institute (LCI)[1] "Welcome to the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Land Cover Institute (LCI). The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute

230

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Global and Seasonal Assessment of Interactions between Climate and Vegetation Biophysical Processes: A GCM Study with Different Land朧egetation Representations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global and seasonal assessment of regions of the earth with strong climate杤egetation biophysical process (VBP) interactions is provided. The presence of VBP and degree of VBP effects on climate were assessed based on the skill of simulations ...

Yongkang Xue; Fernando De Sales; Ratko Vasic; C. Roberto Mechoso; Akio Arakawa; Stephen Prince

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Mexico Central America References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "For more than ten years, the US Forest Service has collaborated with the Government of Mexico to provide forest management training and has fostered many opportunities to share the Mexican case study with international groups. The result has often been to inspire innovative incentives that serve multiple purposes: halting deforestation, improving both watershed

233

Stream Discharge in Tropical Headwater Catchments as a Result of Forest Clearing and Soil Degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tropical Africa is affected by intense land-use change, particularly forest conversion to agricultural land. In this study, the stream discharge of four small headwater catchments located within an area of 6 km2 in western Kenya was examined for 2 ...

John W. Recha; Johannes Lehmann; M. Todd Walter; Alice Pell; Louis Verchot; Mark Johnson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of the Effects of Different Land Use and Land Cover Patterns on Mesoscale Meteorological Simulations in the Taiwan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use (LU) data employed in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model classify most LU types in Taiwan as mixtures of irrigated cropland and forest, which is not an accurate representation of current ...

Fang-Yi Cheng; Yu-Ching Hsu; Pay-Liam Lin; Tang-Huang Lin

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management intensity, and boost equilibrium commodity prices. Later a major empirical modeling section uses the U.S. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model with Greenhouse Gases (FASOMGHG) to simulate land use and production responses to various biofuel and climate policy scenarios. Simulations are performed to assess the effects of imposing biofuel mandates in the U.S. consistent with the Renewable Fuels Standard of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2). Simulations are run for several climate mitigation policy scenarios (with varying GHG (CO2) prices and eligibility restrictions for GHG offset activities) with and without conservation land recultivation. Important simulation outputs include time trajectories for land use, GHG emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production shifts that can influence water consumption and nutrient use in regions already plagued by water scarcity and quality concerns. Results suggest that the potential magnitude of climate mitigation on commodity markets and exports is substantially higher than under biofuel expansion in isolation, raising concerns of international leakage and stimulating the 揊ood vs. Carbon debate. Finally, a reduced-form dynamic emissions trading model of the U.S. economy is developed using simulation output from FASOMGHG and the National Energy Modeling System to test the effect of biofuel mandate expansion and domestic offset eligibility restrictions on total economy-wide GHG abatement costs. Findings are that while the RFS2 raises the marginal costs of offsets, full abatement costs depend on a number of policy factors. GHG payment incentives for forest management and non-CO2 agricultural offsets can increase full abatement costs by more than 20%.

Baker, Justin Scott

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

land | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land land Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

238

MODIS Land Product Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > MODIS Land Subsets Validation > MODIS Land Subsets MODIS Land Product Subsets Overview Earth, Western Hemisphere The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products and to characterize field sites. Output files contain pixel values of MODIS land products in text format and in GeoTIFF format. In addition, data visualizations (time series plots and grids showing single composite periods) are available. MODIS Land Product Subsets Resources The following MODIS Land Product Subsets resources are maintained by the ORNL DAAC: MODIS Land Products Offered Background Citation Policy Methods and formats MODIS Sinusoidal Grid - Google Earth KMZ Classroom Exercises

239

Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

Luxmoore, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baldocchi, D.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Why does air passage over forest yield more rain? Examining the coupling between rainfall, pressure and atmospheric moisture content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of forest loss on rainfall remains poorly understood. Addressing this challenge Spracklen et al. recently presented a pan-tropical study of rainfall and land-cover that showed that satellite-derived rainfall measures were positively ...

A. M. Makarieva; V. G. Gorshkov; D. Sheil; A. D. Nobre; P. Bunyard; B.-L. Li

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

Gray, Ian P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Jump to: navigation, search Name India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife Agency/Company /Organization Government of India Sector Land Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.envfor.nic.in/legis Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife[1] Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers Eco-marks Scheme Eco-sensitive Zone Environmental Clearance - General Environmental Labs Environmental Standards Hazardous Substances Management Loss Of Ecology Noise Pollution Ozone Layer Depletion Water Pollution 2-T Oil Public Liability Insurance

243

Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.responsibleasia.org Country Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, Vietnam UN Region Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program[1] "The Responsible Asia Forestry and Trade (RAFT) is a five-year program funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development Regional Development Mission for Asia (USAID RDMA) in Bangkok. RAFT is managed by

244

CIFOR/ICRAF Forests and Climate Training | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CIFOR/ICRAF Forests and Climate Training CIFOR/ICRAF Forests and Climate Training Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CIFOR/ICRAF Forests and Climate Training Agency/Company /Organization: United States Agency for International Development, Center for International Forestry Research Sector: Land Focus Area: - Biofuels, Forestry, Offsets and Certificates Topics: Finance, Implementation, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.cifor.cgiar.org/carbofor/projects/climate/CapacityBuildingWorkPlan CIFOR/ICRAF Forests and Climate Training Screenshot References: Carbofor Training [1] Purpose "To design and facilitate training workshops about how the trends relating to global climate change may affect USAID's ongoing and future

245

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development, Global Environment Facility, United Nations Development Programme Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.forestcarbonportal. Country Cambodia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References REDD Cambodia Case Study[1] Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Screenshot

246

Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Jump to: navigation, search Name Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Agency/Company /Organization Government of Norway, Government of Indonesia Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.norway.or.id/Norway Country Norway, Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia, Northern Europe References Norway-Indonesia REDD+ Partnership - Frequently asked questions[1] Letter of Intent[2] Background Letter of Intent FAQ's [Fact Sheet] Photo World Resources Institute: Susan Minnemeyer References 鈫 "Norway-Indonesia REDD+ Partnership - Frequently asked questions" 鈫 "Letter of Intent" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Norway-Indonesia-Forest_Management_Agreement&oldid=374779"

247

The Role of Disturbance in Dry Tropical Forest Landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disturbance can be defined as 'any relatively discrete event in time that disrupts ecosystem, community, or population structure and changes resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment'. This definition requires that the spatial and temporal scales of the system and disturbance be determined. Disturbances are typically characterized by their size, spatial distribution, frequency or return time, predictability, and magnitude (which includes both intensity and severity). These disturbance attributes set the parameters for the suite of species, both plant and animal, that can persist within a given system. As such, an understanding of seasonally dry tropical forests in Asia requires an understanding of disturbance within the region. However, disturbances are relatively poorly understood in dry tropical forests, partly because of the weak seasonality in temperature and high tree species diversity of these forests relative to most forest systems of the world. There are about 1,048,700 km{sup 2} of dry tropical forests worldwide and that only 3% of this land is in conservation status. In other words, 97% of the world's seasonally dry tropical forest is at risk of human disturbance. About half of this forest occurs in South America, where most of the conservation lands are located. Satellite imagery based on MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data shows that only about 3.8% of the world's dry tropical forests are in Australia and South east Asia. The susceptibility of these forests to human disturbances is of great concern and is largely unstudied. Because natural disturbance regimes shape the ecosystem structure and are in many ways integral to these forest systems, it is critical to know how natural disturbance affects dry forest in order to understand the effects of human activities on these forests. Even basic information about disturbances in dry tropical forests is only recently available. Therefore this chapter brings together much of the available information from dry tropical forest throughout the world with the goal of developing an understanding of the role of disturbance in Asian dry forests. Most ecologists now recognize that disturbances, rather than being catastrophic agents of destruction, are a normal, perhaps even an integral, part of long-term system dynamics. The composition, structure, organization, and development and trophic dynamics of most forest systems are the products of disturbances. As an example, the forest composition for two disturbances in the Anaikatty Hills of Western Ghats were compared, where the low disturbance was from past logging followed by cutting and illicit felling and grazing and the high disturbance was due to human presence, past logging, and fuelwood collection. They found higher species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the low-disturbance forest (98 and 3.9, respectively) compared to the high-disturbance stand (45 and 2.71, respectively) as well as significant differences in mean basal area of trees, density of seedlings, number of species, density and diversity of shrubs, and number of species and diversity of herbs. Some ecological systems contain species that have evolved in response to disturbances. Adaptations typical of dry tropical forest plants are drought tolerance, seed dispersal mechanisms, and the ability to sprout subsequent to disturbance. In contrast, evidence was found that human disturbance in Kakamega Forest of western Kenya has significantly reduced allelic richness and heterozygosity, increased inbreeding, and slightly reduced gene flow in Prunus africana in the past century.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Health of Colorado's Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fort Collins, Colo., and Aerial Survey Coordinator, Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS. Patricia M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Fort Collins, Colo. Brian Howell, Aerial SurveyThe Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current

249

Visual Resource Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement March 2013 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Volume 2: Appendices DOE/EIS-0451 Appendix A Caribou National Forest Revised Forest Plan Amendment This page intentionally left blank. BPA Hooper Springs Transmission Project Draft EIS Appendices March 2013 A-1 Appendix A Caribou Forest Plan Amendment This proposed amendment to the Caribou National Forest (CNF) Revised Forest Plan would establish a new corridor of Management Prescription 8.1-Concentrated Development Area, to authorize transmission line construction, operation, and maintenance on CNF lands within the proposed transmission line right-of-way (ROW). A.1 Reason for Amendment Currently, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is the lead agency preparing a draft

250

Land animal sizes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land animal sizes Name: tamar c Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: Why are today's land mammals so much smaller than prehistoric mammals?...

251

The Common Land Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Common Land Model (CLM) was developed for community use by a grassroots collaboration of scientists who have an interest in making a general land model available for public use and further development. The major model characteristics include ...

Yongjiu Dai; Xubin Zeng; Robert E. Dickinson; Ian Baker; Gordon B. Bonan; Michael G. Bosilovich; A. Scott Denning; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Paul R. Houser; Guoyue Niu; Keith W. Oleson; C. Adam Schlosser; Zong-Liang Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

School Land Board (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

253

3-PG Productivity Modeling of Regenerating Amazon Forests: Climate Sensitivity and Comparison with MODIS-Derived NPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential forest growth predicted by the Physiological Principles in Predicting Growth (3-PG) model was compared for forest and deforested areas in the Legal Amazon to assess potential differing regeneration associated with climate. Historical ...

Joseph D. White; Neal A. Scott; Adam I. Hirsch; Steven W. Running

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of an image data set from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme, a component of the LBA-ECO Large...

255

Estimation of the North朣outh Transect of Eastern China forest biomass using remote sensing and forest inventory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of forest biomass is required for the estimation of carbon sinks and a myriad other ecological and environmental factors. In this article, we combined satellite data Thematic Mapper TM and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer MODIS, ...

Yanhua Gao, Xinxin Liu, Chengcheng Min, Honglin He, Guirui Yu, Min Liu, Xudong Zhu, Qiao Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

EA-1606: Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC September 7, 2011 EA-1606: Draft Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah...

257

Democratic Republic of Congo-Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Democratic Republic of Congo-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Democratic Republic of Congo Middle Africa References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7] Mexico Specific Documents[8] Peru Specific Documents[9] Overview "The Forest Investment Program (FIP) is a targeted program of the Strategic

258

Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Biomass, - Biofuels, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Implementation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Case studies/examples Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Mozambique UN Region Eastern Africa References Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods[1] Mozambique-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Screenshot Background "This report documents how the spread of biofuels is affecting land access for poorer groups in Mozambique, and what actions are being taken,

259

The Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) is internationally recognized as a key NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, evapotranspiration, streamflow, soil moisture, etc.) is being used to improve water resource and Hydro-energy NASA resource for the global assessment of terrestrial water and energy conditions and fluxes results to address multiple national application solutions. Knowledge of terrestrial water, energy

Houser, Paul R.

260

Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether we could get Colorado Springs to take some of it. The Mayor called the head of the electric plant Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Corrie Knapp Prepared for the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute

262

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years with the Forest Survey at the Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, he joined the Aerial Re, and is now a mathe- matical statistician. #12;C lassifying forest stand volumes on single aerial photographs is unique to the na- tionwide Forest Survey 1 -- stratifying volume on photographs is not. In fact, since

Standiford, Richard B.

263

Emerging factors associated with the decline of a gray fox population and multi-scale land cover associations of mesopredators in the Chicago metropolitan area.  

SciTech Connect

Statewide surveys of furbearers in Illinois indicate gray (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and red (Vulpes vulpes) foxes have experienced substantial declines in relative abundance, whereas other species such as raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) have exhibited dramatic increases during the same time period. The cause of the declines of gray and red foxes has not been identified, and the current status of gray foxes remains uncertain. Therefore, I conducted a large-scale predator survey and tracked radiocollared gray foxes from 2004 to 2007 in order to determine the distribution, survival, cause-specific mortality sources and land cover associations of gray foxes in an urbanized region of northeastern Illinois, and examined the relationships between the occurrence of gray fox and the presence other species of mesopredators, specifically coyotes and raccoons. Although generalist mesopredators are common and can reach high densities in many urban areas their urban ecology is poorly understood due to their secretive nature and wariness of humans. Understanding how mesopredators utilize urbanized landscapes can be useful in the management and control of disease outbreaks, mitigation of nuisance wildlife issues, and gaining insight into how mesopredators shape wildlife communities in highly fragmented areas. I examined habitat associations of raccoons, opossums (Didelphis virginiana), domestic cats (Felis catus), coyotes, foxes (gray and red), and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) at multiple spatial scales in an urban environment. Gray fox occurrence was rare and widely dispersed, and survival estimates were similar to other studies. Gray fox occurrence was negatively associated with natural and semi-natural land cover types. Fox home range size increased with increasing urban development suggesting that foxes may be negatively influenced by urbanization. Gray fox occurrence was not associated with coyote or raccoon presence. However, spatial avoidance and mortality due to coyote predation was documented and disease was a major mortality source for foxes. The declining relative abundance of gray fox in Illinois is likely a result of a combination of factors. Assessment of habitat associations indicated that urban mesopredators, particularly coyotes and foxes, perceived the landscape as relatively homogeneous and that urban mesopredators interacted with the environment at scales larger than that accommodated by remnant habitat patches. Coyote and fox presence was found to be associated with a high degree of urban development at large and intermediate spatial scales. However, at a small spatial scale fox presence was associated with high density urban land cover whereas coyote presence was associated with urban development with increased forest cover. Urban habitats can offer a diversity of prey items and anthropogenic resources and natural land cover could offer coyotes daytime resting opportunities in urban areas where they may not be as tolerated as smaller foxes. Raccoons and opossums were found to utilize moderately developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers at a large spatial scale, which may facilitate dispersal movements. At intermediate and small spatial scales, both species were found to utilize areas that were moderately developed and included forested land cover. These results indicated that raccoons and opossums used natural areas in proximity to anthropogenic resources. At a large spatial scale, skunk presence was associated with highly developed landscapes with interspersed natural and semi-natural land covers. This may indicate that skunks perceived the urban matrix as more homogeneous than raccoons or opossums. At an intermediate spatial scale skunks were associated with moderate levels of development and increased forest cover, which indicated that they might utilize natural land cover in proximity to human-dominated land cover. At the smallest spatial scale skunk presence was associated with forested land cover surrounded by a suburban matrix. Compared to raccoon

Willingham, Alison N.; /Ohio State U.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

EOS Land Validation Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOS Land Validation Presentations EOS Land Validation Presentations Meeting: Land Cover Validation Workshop Date: February 2, 2004 Place: Boston, MA Title: Validation Data Support Activities at the ORNL DAAC (Power Point) Presenter: Bob Cook Meeting: Fall 2003 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting Date: December 9, 2003 Place: San Francisco, CA Title: Ground-Based Data Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: Supporting the Validation of MODIS Land Products (Power Point) Presenter: Larry Voorhees Meeting: Terra and Aqua Products Review Date: March 2003 Place: NASA HQ Title: MODIS Land Summary (Power Point) Presenter: Chris Justice, University of Maryland Meeting: Spring 2002 American Geophysical Union (AGU) Meeting

265

LAND AND WATER USE CHARACTERISTICS AND HUMAN HEALTH INPUT PARAMETERS FOR USE IN ENVIRONMENTAL DOSIMETRY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in releases of small amounts of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. For regulatory compliance purposes, potential offsite radiological doses are estimated annually using computer models that follow U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guides. Within the regulatory guides, default values are provided for many of the dose model parameters but the use of site-specific values by the applicant is encouraged. A detailed survey of land and water use parameters was conducted in 1991 and is being updated here. These parameters include local characteristics of meat, milk and vegetable production; river recreational activities; and meat, milk and vegetable consumption rates as well as other human usage parameters required in the SRS dosimetry models. In addition, the preferred elemental bioaccumulation factors and transfer factors to be used in human health exposure calculations at SRS are documented. Based on comparisons to the 2009 SRS environmental compliance doses, the following effects are expected in future SRS compliance dose calculations: (1) Aquatic all-pathway maximally exposed individual doses may go up about 10 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors; (2) Aquatic all-pathway collective doses may go up about 5 percent due to changes in the aquatic bioaccumulation factors that offset the reduction in average individual water consumption rates; (3) Irrigation pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go up about 40 percent due to increases in the element-specific transfer factors; (4) Irrigation pathway collective doses may go down about 50 percent due to changes in food productivity and production within the 50-mile radius of SRS; (5) Air pathway doses to the maximally exposed individual may go down about 10 percent due to the changes in food productivity in the SRS area and to the changes in element-specific transfer factors; and (6) Air pathway collective doses may go down about 30 percent mainly due to the decrease in the inhalation rate assumed for the average individual.

Jannik, T.; Karapatakis, D.; Lee, P.; Farfan, E.

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL DAAC MODIS Land Product Subsets MODIS Collection 5 Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Create subset for user selected site, area, product, and time period. Data for...

267

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citation When using subsets of MODIS Land Products from the ORNL DAAC, please use the citation: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC). 2011....

268

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the Environmental Monitoring and...

269

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petroleum Engineering Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that...

270

Papua New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Papua New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Papua New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Papau New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Papua New Guinea Melanesia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+

271

Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Biomass, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Resource Type Training materials Website http://www.snvworld.org/en/sec Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References LEAF[1] "Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF), supported by USAID/RDMA, aims to strengthen the capacity of target countries to achieve meaningful and sustained reductions in GHG emissions from the forestry-land use sector while assisting them in benefitting from the emerging international REDD+ framework. LEAF employs a regional approach to promote best practices, build technical

272

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

273

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

274

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

275

Nicholas DeForest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nicholas DeForest Grid Integration Group Microgrids Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R1121 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-1139 (510) 486-6188...

276

Idaho Panhandle National Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Forests. The RNA features vegetation on dry cliffs that are embedded in mid-elevation moist western hemlock/western redcedar/grand fir forests. Immediately below the cliffs is riparian habitat that supports many wetland species, including a disjunct west coast moss, Ulota megalospora, whose first known occurrence in Idaho is in this RNA. This establishment report documents the boundaries of the RNA, the objectives for the RNA, its features, description of

United States; Forest Service; Priest River; Experimental Forest; Dennis E. Ferguson; Arthur C. Zack Ferguson; Dennis E. Zack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Simulation of Water and Energy Fluxes in an Old-Growth Seasonal Temperate Rain Forest Using the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Pacific Northwest (PNW), concern about the impacts of climate and land cover change on water resources and flood-generating processes emphasizes the need for a mechanistic understanding of the interactions between forest canopies and ...

Timothy E. Link; Gerald N. Flerchinger; Mike Unsworth; Danny Marks

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

csp land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

csp land use Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land...

279

how much land | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

280

land requirements | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2005 Math-Science-Technology Institute Oak Ridge, Tennessee Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area ARC Participants Darin Baugess Ben Mordan Debi Owens Yvonne Shafer Mentors Larry Pounds Harry Quarles Final Presentations Pollard Auditorium July 22, 2005 Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area Introduction: The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 33,000 to 36,000 acres. This large forested area of land contains numerous unique habitats and communities that are disappearing from other areas in Tennessee and the Southeast US. In 2004 John Devereux Joslin, Jr. investigated one community in the north end of the Oak Ridge Reservation called the East

282

Measuring and Monitoring Plans for Baseline Development and Estimation of Carbon Benefits for Change in Forest Management in Two Reg ions: Changing from Clearcut to Group Selection Harvests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In Search of the Rain Forest By Candace Slater (Candace Slater (Ed. ). In Search of the Rain Forest. Durham:

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary of Remote Sensing Technical Capability, 2009-2015 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary of Remote Sensing Technical Capability, 2009-2015 Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: www.rff.org/RFF/Documents/RFF-Rpt-Measurement%20and%20Monitoring_Final Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary of Remote Sensing Technical Capability, 2009-2015 Screenshot References: Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests[1] Summary "This report is part of a series of studies carried out under an initiative

285

Cameroon-Forest Sector Development in a Difficult Political Economy | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cameroon-Forest Sector Development in a Difficult Political Economy Cameroon-Forest Sector Development in a Difficult Political Economy Jump to: navigation, search Name Cameroon-Forest Sector Development in a Difficult Political Economy Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://lnweb90.worldbank.org/o Country Cameroon UN Region Middle Africa References Cameroon-Forest Sector Development in a Difficult Political Economy[1] Forward Click here to view study "This case study is one of six evaluations of the implementation of the World Bank's 1991 Forest Strategy. This and the other cases (Brazil, China, Costa Rica, India, and Indonesia) complement a review of the entire set of lending and nonlending activities of the World Bank Group (IBRD,

286

Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Agency/Company /Organization Regional Community Forestry Training Center for Asia and the Pacific Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Background analysis Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://recoftc.org/site/filead Country Philippines, Nepal UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development[1] Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Screenshot

287

Land-Use and Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Land-Use and Ecosystems Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses National Land Cover Data 1992 (2005), and 2001 (2008) Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere from Land-Use...

288

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

289

land.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT SALE OF LAND AT OAK RIDGE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES May 2001 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, DC 20585 May 7, 2001 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Sale of Land at Oak Ridge" BACKGROUND Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the U.S. Department of Energy (Department) may sell land in the performance of identified programmatic functions. The functions specified in the Atomic Energy Act include encouraging scientific and industrial progress, controlling special nuclear

290

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

GRR/Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process -FD-a - Land Use Planning Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-a - Land Use Planning Process 01-FD-a - LandUsePlanning.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Department of Energy Bureau of Indian Affairs United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976(FLPMA) CEQ CRF Regulations 40 C.F.R. 1501.7 Scoping 40 C.F.R. 1502.9 Draft, Final, and Supplemental Statements 40 C.F.R. 1502.14 Alternatives Including the Proposed Action 40 C.F.R. 1503.4 Response to Comments 40 C.F.R. 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During the NEPA Process

292

DOE/EA-1603: Final Environmental Assessment for the Expansion...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KAFB is owned by the USAF, the DOE, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, and the U.S. Forest Service. This EA analyzes the potential impacts of expanding DOE operations at the...

293

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

294

Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

296

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

297

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FC

298

1974 FORESTER the world a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1974 FORESTER #12;#12;2 TREES make the world a better place in which to live! #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS . .... . .... . . . . . .....63 ADVERTISERS . . .. . . . . . .. ....... ....... .. 75 #12;FORESTER'S SALUTE TO DR. ERIC A. BOUROO. The Forester salutes Dean Bourdo for his accomplishments in advancing forestry at Michigan Tech, as a member

299

Special Issue: High Elevation Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources, Colorado State University William Ciesla, Aerial Survey Coordinator, U.S. Forest Service (retired material for homes. They also capture, purify, and release water for our use. Recent aerial surveys confirmSpecial Issue: High Elevation Forests 2008 The Health of Colorado's Forests Report #12;David A

300

Sugar Land, TX -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alumnus Recognized by Secretary of Energy for Work at National Lab Sugar Land, TX - The National Energy Technology Laboratory is proud to announce that U.S. Air Force Academy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Meter) MCD12Q1 LC MODISTerra+Aqua Lan Cover ( LC ) Type Yearly L3 Global 500m SIN Grid annual 500 MCD12Q2 LCD MODISTerra+Aqua Land Cover Dynamics ( LCD ) Yearly L3 Global...

302

OpenEI - land  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4150 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

303

National Land Cover Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Land Cover Data National Land Cover Data Metadata also available as Metadata: q Identification_Information q Data_Quality_Information q Spatial_Data_Organization_Information q Spatial_Reference_Information q Entity_and_Attribute_Information q Distribution_Information q Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: United States Geological Survey Publication_Date: Unpublished Material Title: National Land Cover Data Edition: 01 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: raster digital data Other_Citation_Details: Classification and processing of the orginal remote sensing products was done by the Multi-Resolution Land Characterization Consortium and EROS Data Center (U.S. Geological Survey). The Consortium includes the

304

NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Hall, F. G. 1997. NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a boreal forest was determined at 31 spruce and 30 aspen forest stands in the Superior National Forest (SNF) near Ely, Minnesota, U.S.A., in 1983 and 1984 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the ability of remote sensing to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass and net primary productivity (NPP). These ground-based estimates of above-ground biomass

305

Population and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing the forest for the trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB, Kremer A: Forest tree genomics: Growing resources andPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeingPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing

Eckert, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Influences of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages on the land surface fluxes and radiative temperature  

SciTech Connect

We conducted observations and modeling at a forest site to assess importance of biomass heat and biochemical energy storages for land-atmosphere interactions. We used the terrestrial ecosystem Fluxes And Pools Integrated Simulator (FAPIS). We first examined FAPIS performance by testing its predictions with and without biomass energy storages against measurements of surface energy and CO2 fluxes. We then evaluated the magnitudes and temporal patterns of the calculated biomass energy storages. Effects of energy storages on flux exchanges and variations of radiative temperature were investigated by contrasting FAPIS simulations with and without the storages. We found that with the storages, FAPIS predictions agreed with measurements well; without them, FAPIS performance deteriorated for all surface energy fluxes. The biomass heat storage and biochemical energy storage had clear diurnal patterns with typical ranges from -50 to 50 and -3 to 20 Wm-2, respectively; these typical ranges were exceeded substantially when there were sudden changes in atmospheric conditions. Without-storage simulations produced larger sensible and latent heat fluxes during the day but smaller fluxes (more negative values) at night as compared with with-storage simulations. Similarly, without-storage simulations had higher surface radiative temperature during the day but lower radiative temperature at night, indicating that the biomass energy storages act to dampen diurnal temperature range. Therefore, biomass heat and biochemical energy storages are an integral and substantial part of the surface energy budget and play a role in modulating land surface temperatures and must be considered in studies of land - atmosphere interactions and climate modeling.

Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Heuer, Mark [ATDD, NOAA; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri; Liu, Qing [ORNL; Riggs, Jeffery S [ORNL; Sluss, Daniel Wayne [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

308

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office This page intentionally left blank. DOE/EA-1779 Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Date Issued-June 2011 Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC and CDM Federal Services Inc. contributed to the preparation of this document and may not be considered for review of the document U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS FIGURES......................................................................................................................................................

309

Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Land Management Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052-EA DOE/EA-1960 June 28, 2013 Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line PREPARING OFFICE U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Southern Nevada District Office Las Vegas Field Office 4701 N. Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 702-515-5000 Office 702-515-5010 Fax Environmental Assessment for the Townsite Solar Project DOE/EA-1960 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2013-0052 EA N-91290 Prepared For U.S. Department of the Interior

310

Resource Assessment and Land Use Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

via pipeline compressed in CA 68.0 0 68.0 Liquefied natural gas Overseas sourced LNG delivered to Baja, regasified and reliquefied at 80% efficiency 93.37 0 93.37...

311

Preliminary Assessment SHALLOW LAND DISPOSAL AREA, PARKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mine haulage-ways. Room and pillar construction allows approximately one-third of the coal to remain be forecasted (ARCO, 1995). Trench 10, in the lower trench area, is excavated into coal mine spoils, where the Upper Freeport Coal seam was once strip-mined. The base of trench 10 rests on a clay and shale layer

US Army Corps of Engineers

312

Exploring the Impact of Land Cover and Topography on Rainfall Maxima in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative contribution of topography and land use on precipitation is analyzed in this paper for a forested area in the Netherlands. This area has an average yearly precipitation sum that can be 75100 mm higher than the rest of the country. To ...

H. W. ter Maat; E. J. Moors; R. W. A. Hutjes; A. A. M. Holtslag; A. J. Dolman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & R茅al Michaud & Marie-Pier Dub茅 # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

314

6 USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-42CD. 2006. History of the Partnership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide) the expertise needed to handle the design, training, data management, analysis, and information Partnership Designed to Provide Both Short-term and Long-term Feedback for Land Managers R. Hutto, Professor-oriented perspective from the University and a management-needs perspective from the National Forests within

Montana, University of

315

Restoring forest landscapes for biodiversity conservation and rural livelihoods: A spatial optimisation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conserving nature in the presence of humans is especially challenging in areas where livelihoods are largely based on locally available natural resources. The restoration of forests in such contexts calls for the identification of sites and actions that ... Keywords: Ecosystem services, Integer-linear programming (ILP), Land use allocation, Poverty, Reforestation priorities, Spatial optimisation, Timber harvest

Francesco Orsi; Richard L. Church; Davide Geneletti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Future land use plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) changing mission, coupled with the need to apply appropriate cleanup standards for current and future environmental restoration, prompted the need for a process to determine preferred Future Land Uses for DOE-owned sites. DOE began the ``Future Land Use`` initiative in 1994 to ensure that its cleanup efforts reflect the surrounding communities` interests in future land use. This plan presents the results of a study of stakeholder-preferred future land uses for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), located in central Long Island, New York. The plan gives the Laboratory`s view of its future development over the next 20 years, as well as land uses preferred by the community were BNL ever to cease operations as a national laboratory (the post-BNL scenario). The plan provides an overview of the physical features of the site including its history, topography, geology/hydrogeology, biological inventory, floodplains, wetlands, climate, and atmosphere. Utility systems and current environmental operations are described including waste management, waste water treatment, hazardous waste management, refuse disposal and ground water management. To complement the physical descriptions of the site, demographics are discussed, including overviews of the surrounding areas, laboratory population, and economic and non-economic impacts.

NONE

1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy and land use  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Urban Forest Assessment --Roanoke, Virginia 2 Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from US EPA's Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID). Forecasted marginal carbon

Virginia Tech

319

Land use and energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the amount of land required by past and future energy development in the United States and examines major federal legislation that regulates the impact of energy facilities on land use. An example of one land use issue associated with energy development - the potential conflict between surface mining and agriculture - is illustrated by describing the actual and projected changes in land use caused by coal mining in western Indiana. Energy activities addressed in the report include extraction of coal, oil, natural gas, uranium, oil shale, and geothermal steam; uranium processing; preparation of synfuels from coal; oil refineries; fossil-fuel, nuclear, and hydro-electric power plants; biomass energy farms; and disposal of solid wastes generated during combustion of fossil fuels. Approximately 1.1 to 3.3 x 10/sup 6/ acres were devoted to these activities in the United States in 1975. As much as 1.8 to 2.0 x 10/sup 6/ additional acres could be required by 1990 for new, nonbiomass energy development. The production of grain for fuel ethanol could require an additional 16.9 to 55.7 x 10/sup 6/ acres by 1990. Federal laws that directly or indirectly regulate the land-use impacts of energy facilities include the National Environmental Protection Act, Clean Air Act, Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and Coastal Zone Management Act. The major provisions of these acts, other relevant federal regulations, and similar state and local regulatons are described in this report. Federal legislation relating to air quality, water quality, and the management of public lands has the greatest potential to influence the location and timing of future energy development in the United States.

Robeck, K.E.; Ballou, S.W.; South, D.W.; Davis, M.J.; Chiu, S.Y.; Baker, J.E.; Dauzvardis, P.A.; Garvey, D.B.; Torpy, M.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

GRR/Section 3 - Land Access Process Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3 - Land Access Process Overview GRR/Section 3 - Land Access Process Overview < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3 - Land Access Process Overview 03LandAccessOverview (4).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Bureau of Indian Affairs Fish and Wildlife Service Bureau of Reclamation United States Department of Energy United States Department of Defense Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) Energy Policy Act, Section 1835 - Split Estate Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 Federal Geothermal Leasing - 2007 Rules (43 CFR Part 3200) 43 C.F.R. 3203 Competitive Leasing 43 C.F.R. 3104 Performance Bond

322

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Web and Web Services based tool that provides Subsets and Visualization of MODIS land products to facilitate land validation and field site characterization. S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook; B. E. Wilson. AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 14-18 2009 MODIS Land Product Subsets,S.K. Santhana Vannan; R. B. Cook. November, 2009 MODIS Web Service, S.K. Santhana Vannan. ORNL DAAC UWG Meeting, May 2009 Subsetting Tools for MODIS Land Products: Time-series data for field sites, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Santhana Vannan, S. K. Holladay, and T. W. Beaty. Global Vegetation Workshop, Missoula MT, August 8-10, 2006 MODIS ASCII Subsets, R. B. Cook. May 2006 Subsets of Remote Sensing Products for AmeriFlux Sites: MODIS ASCII Subsets, AmeriFlux Annual Meeting, R. B. Cook, S. M. Margle, S. K. Holladay, F. A. Heinsch, and C. B. Schaaf. October 5-7, 2004, Boulder, Colorado

323

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction The goal of the MODIS Land Product Subsets project is to provide summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote-sensing products, and to characterize field sites. The MODIS Land Product Subsets are derived from MODIS products that were generated with Collection 4 or later algorithms. Please be advised that these products are subject to continual review and revision. The MODIS land product subsets are provided in ASCII and GeoTIFF format. The subsets are stored as individual text(ASCII) files, each file represents one field site and one MODIS product.The ASCII data covers 7x7 km of the field site. These ASCII files contain comma-delimited rows of parameter values (image bands) for each pixel in the selected area. Each row in the file will contain data from one 8-day, 16-day, or annual period (depending on the temporal frequency of the data product represented).

324

Comparison of the Land-Surface Interaction in the ECMWF Reanalysis Model with the 1987 FIFE Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment for the summer season of 1987 are used to assess the land-surface interaction of the ECMWF reanalysis. In comparison with an earlier study, ...

Alan K. Betts; Pedro Viterbo; Anton C. M. Beljaars

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Principal Components of Multi-Frequency Microwave Land Surface Emissivities. Part 1: Estimation Under Clear and Precipitating Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission will provide considerably more over-land observations over complex terrain, high elevation river basins and cold surfaces, necessitating an improved assessment of the microwave land ...

F. Joseph Turk; Ziad S. Haddad; Yalei You

326

Understanding and Mapping Land-Use and Land-Cover Change along Bolivia's Corredor Bioceancio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Corredor Bioceanico is a major transportation project connecting the agricultural heartlands of South America to the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. The final link is in southeastern Bolivia - an underdeveloped area that is home to two indigenous groups and globally-significant woodlands and wetlands. Infrastructure developments - comprising a major highway upgrade, revitalized railway services and increased flows along gas pipelines to Brazil - pose major threats to livelihoods and the region's ecological integrity. There are two broad objectives: (i) to map and quantify the spatial patterns of land change using a time-series of coarse and medium resolution satellite imagery; and (ii) to understand the socio-economic and political drivers of change by linking household surveys and interviews with farmers; environmental, climatic, and political data; and classified satellite imagery. Overall, large-scale deforestation has occurred along the Corredor Bioceanico for mechanized commercial production of oil-seed crops such as soybeans and sunflower. The significance of these findings is that agriculture-driven deforestation is pushing into sensitive areas threatening world-renowned ecosystems such as the Chaco, Chiquitano and Pantanal as well as noteworthy national parks. Though quantity remains relatively small compared to other parts of South America, rates of forest loss match or exceed those of more publicized regions such as Rondonia or Mato Grosso, Brazil. Moreover, rates of forest loss are accelerating linearly with time due to policies implemented by incumbent president Evo Morales. Results also show that in the first years of cultivation, pasture is the dominant land-use, but it quickly gives way to intensively cropped farmland. The main findings in terms of percentage area cleared according to forest type is that farmers appear to be favoring transitional forest types on deep and poorly drained soils of alluvial plains. Semi-structured interviews with farmers and representatives of key institutions illustrate that price determined by the global market is not proportionally the most dominant motive driving LULCC in the lowlands of Santa Cruz, Bolivia - an area seen as a quintessential neoliberal frontier.

Redo, Daniel J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

DOE/EA-1677: Final Environmental Assessment for Addressing the Conveyance and Transfer of the Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, Section 13005 (May 2010)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N N a a t t i i o o n n a a l l N N u u c c l l e e a a r r S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y A A d d m m i i n n i i s s t t r r a a t t i i o o n n S S e e r r v v i i c c e e C C e e n n t t e e r r DOE/EA-1677 F F i i n n a a l l E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t A A d d d d r r e e s s s s i i n n g g t t h h e e C C o o n n v v e e y y a a n n c c e e a a n n d d T T r r a a n n s s f f e e r r o o f f t t h h e e T T w w o o L L a a n n d d T T r r a a c c t t s s P P u u r r s s u u a a n n t t t t o o P P u u b b l l i i c c L L a a w w 1 1 1 1 1 1 - - 1 1 1 1 , , S S e e c c t t i i o o n n 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 5 5 May 2010 COVER SHEET FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ADDRESSING THE CONVEYANCE AND TRANSFER OF TWO LAND TRACTS PURSUANT TO PUBLIC LAW 111-11, SECTION 13005 RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Cooperating Federal Agencies: U.S. Air Force (USAF), Kirtland Air Force Base; U.S. Department

328

County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

329

Scientific analysis is essential to assess biofuel policy effects: in response to the paper by Kim and Dale on "Indirect land use change for biofuels: Testing predictions and improving analytical methodologies"  

SciTech Connect

Vigorous debate on the effects of biofuels derives largely from the changes in land use estimated using economic models designed mainly for the analysis of agricultural trade and markets. The models referenced for land-use change (LUC) analysis in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Final Rule on the Renewable Fuel Standard include GTAP, FAPRI-CARD, and FASOM. To address bioenergy impacts, these models were expanded and modified to facilitate simulations of hypothesized LUC. However, even when models use similar basic assumptions and data, the range of LUC results can vary by ten-fold or more. While the market dynamics simulated in these models include processes that are important in estimating effects of biofuel policies, the models have not been validated for estimating land-use changes and employ crucial assumptions and simplifications that contradict empirical evidence.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; McBride, Allen [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Mosquito Control in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 454-A April 22, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of...

331

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool The Global Subsetting and Visualization Tool provides customized subsets of MODIS Land products in ASCII format on demand for any location on Earth. Users select a site (either from a picklist or by entering the site's geographic coordinates) and the area surrounding that site, from one pixel up to 201 x 201 km. The tool is expected to take up to 60 minutes to complete the processing, and the tool will send you an email message containing the URL where you can access the output. The tool provides time series plots of the measurement, an ASCII file of the pixel values for the selected product along with quality information, average and standard deviations for the area selected, and a file that can be imported directly into GIS software. In addition we provide a land cover grid (IGBP classification) of the area, along with an estimate of heterogeneity (Shannon richness and evenness).

332

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods methods This section describes methods used to generate MODIS Land Subsets for Collection 4 and Collection 5 data products. Methods for Selected Sites (Collections 4 and 5) Methods for North America Tool (Collection 4) Methods for the Global Tool (Collection 5) Methods for Selected Sites (Collection 4 and 5) Source for Selected Site Data: Full MODIS scenes (1200-km x 1200-km) are initially subset to 11-km x 31-km (Collection 4) or 25-km x 25-km (Collection 5) by the MODAPS; these initial subsets contain the field site or flux tower. Reformatting and additional subsetting to 7-km x 7-km containing the field site or flux tower are done by the ORNL DAAC. Tools Used: The ORNL DAAC uses the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) to reformat the MODIS data from HDF-EOS to binary format. A tool developed at ORNL is then used to convert the binary format to ASCII. The MRT is available from the Land Processes DAAC. Whereas the MRT can also be used to reproject data from its native projection to other projections, ORNL chose to forgo the resampling associated with reprojection to minimize data manipulation and distortion. The MOD12Q1 Land Cover Collection 3 data are in I-Sin projection, and the Collection 4 and Collection 5 data are in Sinusoidal projection.

333

Estimating The Effect of Biofuel on Land Cover Change Using Multi-Year Modis Land Cover Data  

SciTech Connect

There has been a growing debate on the effects of the increase in demands of biofuels on land use land cover (LULC) change with apprehension in some quarters that the growing demand for bioenergy as a clean fuel will result in widespread direct and indirect LULC change. However estimating both direct and indirect LULC change is challenging and will require development of accurate high frequency, high resolution (temporal and spatial) land use land cover data as well as new LULC models which can be used to locate, quantify and predict these changes. To assess whether the demand for biofuel has caused significant LULC we used MODIS land cover data (MCD12Q1) from 2001 to 2008 along with cropland data layer (CDL) to estimate cropland and grassland changes in United States for the years 2002-2008 as well as its correlation with biofuel growth.

Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48掳 32' 24.18" N, 08掳 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

335

NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Profile of the Pasoh Forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Kira, T., N. Manokaran, and S. Appanah. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and productivity of a lowland tropical forest in the Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia, were determined from 1971 to 1973, under the auspices of the International Biological Programme. From 1970 to 1978, intensive research on lowland rain forest ecology and dynamics took place under a joint research project between the University of Malaya (UM) and the

336

Land Stewardship | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Land Stewardship Mission The team advocates improved ecosystem health on LM properties in accordance with DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management; federal regulations, such as the Endangered Species Act, the Noxious Weed Act, and the Wetlands and Floodplains Act; and in consideration of LM agreements with regulatory agencies and tribes. The team advocates identifying and proposing land management improvements on LM sites that are beneficial to ecosystems and improve remedy sustainability. Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team identifies and evaluates proposals to enhance ecosystem health at

337

land use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

use use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

338

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

339

Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Chapter 37 Land Disposal Restrictions (Kentucky) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor...

340

Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation and Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Forest Conservation and Restoration as a Response to Climate change National Energy Technology Laboratory May 14, 2001 Today's presentation * Nature Conservancy background * Land Use and Climate Change * Project Experience * Key Issues and Research Needs The mission of The Nature Conservancy is to preserve plants, animals and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and waters they need to survive. Conservancy Background * Largest private conservation organization * Founded in 1951 * Conserved more than 12 million acres in U.S., and millions more in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia/Pacific * 1.2 million members

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released LBA Land Use and Land Cover Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two image data sets from the Land Use and Land Cover science theme (LC-15 team), a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-15 SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model Data, Amazon Basin: 2000 . Data set prepared by S. Saatchi. This data set provides a subset of the SRTM30 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) elevation and standard deviation data (STD of the data points used in the averaging) for the Amazon Basin. SRTM30 is a near-global digital elevation model (DEM) comprising a combination of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February, 2000, and the earlier U.S. Geological Survey's GTOPO30 data set.

342

Modeling urban growth and land use/land cover change in the Houston Metropolitan Area from 2002 - 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Area (Houston CMSA) has experienced rapid population growth during the past decades and is the only major US metropolitan area with no zoning regulations. We use SLEUTH, a spatially explicit cellular automata model, to simulate future (2002-2030) urban growth in the Houston metropolitan area, one of the fastest growing metropolises in the United States during the past decades. The model is calibrated with historical data for the period 1974-2002 that are extracted from a time series of satellite images. The dataset consists of four historical urban extents (1974, 1984, 1992, 2002), two land use layers (1992, 2002), five transportation layers (1974, 1984, 1990, 2002, 2025), slope layer, hillshade layer, and excluded layer. Future growth patterns are predicted based on growth coefficients derived during the calibration phase. After calibrating the model successfully, the spatial pattern of urban growth of the Houston CMSA for the period from 2002 to 2030 is predicted. Within SLEUTH, growth in the Houston CMSA is predominately "organic" with most growth occurring along the urban/rural fringe. Projected increases in urban area from 2002 to 2030 parallel projected increases in population growth within the Houston CMSA. We design three specific scenarios to simulate the spatial consequences of urban growth under different environmental conditions. The first scenario is to simulate the unmanaged growth with no restrictions. The second scenario is to project the moderate growth trend by taking into consideration environmental protection, specifically for agricultural areas, forests and wetlands. The last scenario is to simulate the managed growth with maximum environmental protection. Adjusting the level of protection for different land cover types was found to markedly affect the land use changes in the Houston CMSA. Without any protection on resource lands, Houston CMSA is estimated to lose 2,000 km2 of forest land by 2030, about 600 km2 of agricultural land, and approximately 400 km2 of wetland. Approximately half of all resource land could be saved by the third scenario, managed growth with maximum protection.

Oguz, Hakan

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Products Laboratory Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place Madison, WI Website http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/ References USDA Forest Products Laboratory [1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! USDA Forest Products Laboratory is a company located in Madison, WI. References 鈫 "USDA Forest Products Laboratory" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USDA_Forest_Products_Laboratory&oldid=381741" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

344

GRR/Section 3-FD-a - Federal Land Leasing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-FD-a - Federal Land Leasing GRR/Section 3-FD-a - Federal Land Leasing < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-FD-a - Federal Land Leasing 03FDAFederalLandLeasing.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act Energy Policy Act of 2005 Geothermal Steam Act of 1970 Federal Power Act Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act 40 CFR 1506.1 43 CFR 1610.5-3 43 CFR 1610.5-5 43 CFR 3000.12 43 CFR 3200 43 CFR 3201.10 43 CFR 3201.11 43 CFR 3202.10 43 CFR 3203 43 CFR 3203.12 43 CFR 3206.12 10 U.S.C. 2917 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03FDAFederalLandLeasing.pdf 03FDAFederalLandLeasing.pdf

345

Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

1CHILE'S FRONTIER FORESTS: CONSERVING A GLOBAL TREASURE FRONTIER FORESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Claes Hall Aracruz Celulose Sweden Sharon Haines International Paper United States Matti Karjula Stora; The World Bank, World Wildlife Fund; The Nature Conservancy; Aracruz Celulose; Forest and Paper Association

347

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Forest Products Industry of the Future  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc (LATA) conducted an evaluation of the potential impact and value of a portion of the current portfolio of r&d projects supported by the Office of Industrial Technology and the Forest Products Industry of the Future. The mission of the evaluation was to (a) assess the potential impact of the projects to meet the critical goals of the industry as identified in the vision and roadmapping documents. (b) Evaluate the relationship between the current portfolio of projects and the Agenda 202 Implementation Plan. In addition, evaluate the relationship between the portfolio and the newly revised draft technology strategy being created by the industry. (c) Identify areas where current efforts are making significant progress towards meeting industry goals and identify areas where additional work my be required to meet these goals. (d) Make recommendations to the DOE and the Forest Products Industry on possible improvements in the portfolio and in the current methodology that DOE uses to assess potential impacts on its R&D activities.

Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites Geography of the MODIS Land Subsets for selected Field Sites The 7- x 7-km grid containing the field or tower site is provided to enable comparison of pixel values of MODIS products with field data collected at a site. The values are intended to be examined over time either as a collection of individual values or combined (e.g., the average and range) within a 3- x 3-km grid or a 5- x 5-km grid around the site. Examples of analyses using the ASCII subset data can be found in presentations. If users would like to examine the MODIS data spatially in a map, we suggest that they obtain the GeoTIFF subsets or MODIS products from the LP DAAC. Please note that the grid and pixel sizes are not exact multiples of 1 km, but are only approximations. For instance, the grid and pixel size for the 1 km Sinusoidal grid is approximately 926 m. For additional information, please view the MODIS Web site.

350

EA-1960: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment EA-1960: Draft Environmental Assessment Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area...

351

EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area...

352

EA-1606: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment Proposed Use of Savannah River Site Lands for Military Training, SC DOE prepared an environmental assessment to analyze the potential environmental impacts...

353

Assess and improve the national greenhouse gas inventory and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

354

Assess business as usual (BAU) scenarios | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for sector technologies Renewable Energy Technical Potential Toolkit Building Energy Assessment Toolkit Power System Screening and Design Toolkit Land Use Assessment...

355

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

SciTech Connect

Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

IA-SDSS: A GIS-based land use decision support system with consideration of carbon sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) can play a positive role in mitigating global warming by sequestering carbon from the atmosphere into vegetation and soils. Local entities (e.g. local government, community, stockholders) have been making ... Keywords: Carbon models, Carbon sequestration, GIS, Integrated assessment, Land-use planning, RS, SDSS

Jun Wang; Jingming Chen; Weimin Ju; Manchun Li

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plantation, forest-to-acacia plantation, forest-to-rubber plantation, and forest-to-oil palm plantation. We determined annual equivalent values for each option, and the...

358

Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

359

Towards sustainable management of Louisiana抯 coastal wetland forests: problems, constraints, and a new beginning  

SciTech Connect

Over 345,000 ha of forested swamps occur throughout the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain. Natural and anthropogenic changes in hydrology and geomorphology at local and landscape levels have reduced the productivity in many of these coastal wetland forests areas and have caused the complete loss of forest cover in some places. A summary and interpretation of the available science, suggestions for policy change, and a multidisciplinary (multi-responsibility) approach were needed to address these issues [in the context of private land]. In response, the Louisiana Governor's office formed a Coastal Wetland Forest Conservation and Use Science Working Group (SWG) and an associated Advisory Panel to provide the Governor with information and suggestions of strategies for environmental and economic utilization, conservation, and protection of Louisiana's coastal wetland forest ecosystem in the long-term. The process of engaging scientists, resource managers, and other stakeholders in this effort is described, and the recommendations of the SWG are presented relative to forestry practices and the potential for sustainable management of coastal wetland forests.

Chambers, J. L.; Keim, R. F.; Faulkner, S. P.; Day Jr., J. W.; Gardiner, E. S.; Hughes, M. S.; King, S. L.; McLeod, K. W.; Miller, C. A.; Nyman, J. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Dispersion Parameters over Forested Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique set of micrometeorological data was obtained during a 196770 multidisciplinary environmental field program in a tropical forest environment. The program was under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) and was ...

R. T. Pinker; J. Z. Holland

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Case studies of geothermal leasing and development on federal lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to a widely expressed need to examine the impact of the federal regulatory system on the rate of geothermal power development, the Department of Energy-Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) has established a Streamlining Task Force in cooperation with appropriate federal agencies. The intent is to find a way of speeding development by modification of existing laws or regulations or by better understanding and mechanization of the existing ones. The initial focus was on the leasing and development of federal lands. How do the existing processes work? Would changes produce positive results in a variety of cases? These are questions which must be considered in a national streamlining process. This report presents case studies of federal leasing actions on seven diverse locations in the western region. Characteristics of existing high geothermal potential areas are quite diverse; geography, environment, industry interest and the attitudes and activities of the responsible federal land management agencies and the interested public vary widely. Included are descriptions of post and current activities in leasing exploration and development and discussions of the probable future direction of activities based on current plans. Implications of these plans are presented. The case studies were based on field interviews with the appropriate State and District BLM officer and with the regional forester's office and the particular forest office. Documentation was utilized to the extent possible and has been included in whole or in part in appendices as appropriate.

Trummel, Marc

1978-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

363

Article Uncertainty of Forest Biomass Estimates in North Temperate Forests Due to Allometry: Implications for Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Estimates of above ground biomass density in forests are crucial for refining global climate models and understanding climate change. Although data from field studies can be aggregated to estimate carbon stocks on global scales, the sparsity of such field data, temporal heterogeneity and methodological variations introduce large errors. Remote sensing measurements from spaceborne sensors are a realistic alternative for global carbon accounting; however, the uncertainty of such measurements is not well known and remains an active area of research. This article describes an effort to collect field data at the Harvard and Howland Forest sites, set in the temperate forests of the Northeastern United States in an attempt to establish ground truth forest biomass for calibration of remote sensing measurements. We present an assessment of the quality of ground truth biomass estimates derived from three different sets of diameter-based allometric equations over the Harvard and Howland Forests to establish the contribution of errors in ground truth data to the error in biomass estimates from remote sensing measurements.

Razi Ahmed; Paul Siqueira; Scott Hensley; Kathleen Bergen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access MODIS ASCII Subset Products - FTP Access All of the MODIS ASCII Subsets are available from the ORNL DAAC's ftp site. The directory structure of the ftp site is based on the abbreviated names for the MODIS Products. Terra MODIS products are abbreviated "MOD", Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MYD" and combined Terra and Aqua MODIS products are abbreviated "MCD". The abbreviated names also include the version number (also known as collection). For specific products, please refer to the following table: Product Acronym Spatial Resolution Temporal Frequency Terra V005 SIN Aqua V005 SIN Terra/Aqua Combined V005 SIN Surface Reflectance SREF 500 m 8 day composites MOD09A1 MYD09A1 ---------- Land Surface Temperature and Emissivity TEMP 1 km 8 day composites MOD11A2 MYD11A2 ----------

365

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Collection 5 The MODIS data from the Terra and Aqua satellites are being reprocessed using revised algorithms beginning in September 2006. This new set of MODIS Products is called Collection 5. To view the product changes that took place in going from Collection 4 to Collection 5, please visit the following Web site: http://landweb.nascom.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/QA_WWW/newPage.cgi?fileName=MODLAND_C005_changes The ORNL DAAC provides subsets of the Collection 5 MODIS Land Products. Investigators from around the world have shown a great deal of interest in this activity, asking that over 1000 field and flux tower sites be included in Collection 5 subsetting (up from 280 sites for Collection 4 MODIS subsetting). Availability of the Collection 5 Data Products

366

MODIS Land Products Subsets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Data for Selected Field Sites (n=1147) Obtain MODIS data for areas centered on selected field sites or flux towers from around the world. The goal of the MODIS Subsets for Selected Field Sites is to prepare summaries of selected MODIS Land Products for the community to use for validation of models and remote sensing products and to characterize field sites. Search for data: By Site from a Map Server from Google Earth (Install Google Earth) From FTP site (ASCII) Methods Data products were first subsetted from one or more 1200x1200-km MODIS tiles to 25 x 25-km arrays by the MODIS Science Data Support Team (MODAPS). These products were further subsetted (7x7) and reformatted from their native HDF-EOS to ASCII using version 2.2 of the MODIS Reprojection Tool (MRT) in combination with code developed at the ORNL DAAC.

367

Effect of anthropogenic land-use and land cover changes on climate and land carbon storage in CMIP5 projections for the 21st century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the RCP2.6 and 8.5 scenarios performed for the fifth coupled model intercomparison project (CMIP5). This analysis focuses on ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudr; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

368

Effect of Anthropogenic Land-Use and Land-Cover Changes on Climate and Land Carbon Storage in CMIP5 Projections for the Twenty-First Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land-use changes on climate are assessed using specified-concentration simulations complementary to the representative concentration pathway 2.6 (RCP2.6) and RCP8.5 scenarios performed for phase 5 of the Coupled Model ...

V. Brovkin; L. Boysen; V. K. Arora; J. P. Boisier; P. Cadule; L. Chini; M. Claussen; P. Friedlingstein; V. Gayler; B. J. J. M. van den Hurk; G. C. Hurtt; C. D. Jones; E. Kato; N. de Noblet-Ducoudr; F. Pacifico; J. Pongratz; M. Weiss

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Land reclamation beautifies coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article explains how the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiments station, MAFES, has helped prepare land exploited by strip mining at North American Coal Corporation's Red Hills Mine. The 5,800 acre lignite mine is over 200 ft deep and uncovers six layers of coal. About 100 acres of land a year is mined and reclaimed, mostly as pine plantations. 5 photos.

Coblentz, B. [MSU Ag Communications (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

On environmental lifecycle assessment for policy selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rst and second generation biofuel targets. Energy Policy,Land clearing and the biofuel carbon debt. Science, 319(Life cycle assessment of biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon 禄 A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: pdf.wri.org/working_papers/getting_ready_2010-07-13.pdf A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Screenshot References: A Review of R-PP[1] This working paper is part of a series of regular updates reviewing the Readiness Preparation Proposals (R-PPs) submitted by REDD+ Country

372

Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Jump to: navigation, search Name Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Agency/Company /Organization European Union Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://eur-lex.europa.eu/smart Country Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Ireland, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Hungary, Malta, Netherlands, Austria, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Finland, Sweden, United Kingdom Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Southern Europe, Western Asia, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe, Northern Europe

373

Biofuel Policies and Indirect Land Use Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Union sees the expansion of biomass production for bioenergy as one of the components of its strategy to replace fossil energy sources by non-fossil renewable sources. However, the target of 10 % renewables in the transport sector by 2020 set in the Directive 2009/28/EC on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (EU-RED) has been widely criticised. Due to an increase in biomass demand for feedstocks for biofuel production and a continuously high demand of the food and feed sector, the demand for land to be used for both food and production and bioenergy is expected to increase globally (see e.g. Hertl et al. 2008, Haberl et al. 2011). Considering that already today deforestation for agricultural expansion and for conversion into pasture, but also forest degradation, infrastructure development, destructive logging and fires cause nearly 20 % of global GHG emissions (UN-REDD 2009), the contribution of biofuels to climate mitigation is at least questionable. To ensure that biofuels contribute to GHG emission savings and that their overall sustainability is maintained, the EU-RED has put forward a sustainability regulation in

Ruth Delzeit; Mareike Lange

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Data Sets Released from Two LBA Land Use-Land Change Teams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Two land Use-Land Change Teams The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of two data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, a component of the LBA-ECO Large Scale...

375

Forest Service Special Use Authorization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Service Special Use Authorization Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Forest Service Special Use Authorization Details...

376

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Mineral resource potential and geology of the Challis National Forest, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

This book presents an assessment of the mineral potential of the Challis National Forest based on geological, geochemical, and geophysical data compiled at a 1:250,000 scale and on published information on mineral deposits and occurrences. More than half of the forest has a high to moderate resource potential for one or more of the following commodities: Ag, Au, Ba, Bi, Cu, Mo, Nb, Pb, REE, Ta, Th, Sb, Sn, U, V, W, Zn, fluorspar, geothermal energy, and common variety minerals.

Worl, R.G.; Wilson, A.B.; Smith, C.L.; Kleinkopf, M.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record System PIA, Bonneville Power Administration Land Record...

379

EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Centre Land Trading Limited EA-365 Centre Land Trading Limited Order Authorizing Centre Land Trading Limited to export electric energy to Canada EA-365 Centre Land Trading...

380

PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) PIA - Land Record System (SWPA) More Documents & Publications Thursday, February 14, 2008...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Tanzania-Biofuels, Land Access and Rural Livelihoods Agency/Company /Organization International Institute for Environment and Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Implementation, Resource assessment, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Tanzania UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

382

Montana State Land Board | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Board Jump to: navigation, search Name Montana State Land Board Place Helena, Montana Website http:dnrc.mt.govLandBoardS References Webpage1 This article is a stub. You...

383

POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with land and labor inputs and pollution emissions as a by-isolating the role of land use in pollution control we: i)land and the composite good, and disutility from the pollution

Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Analytical Land朅tmosphere Radiometer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of radiometric land surface temperature (?r) to an equivalent isothermal (aerodynamic) surface temperature (?i) is important in balancing the land surface energy budget with satellite-based ?r measurements. An analytical land...

Ayman Suleiman; Richard Crago

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Comparing simulations of three conceptually different forest models with National Forest Inventory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although they were originally introduced for different purposes, forest models are often used today for scenario development, which includes forest production as one aspect of forest development. However, studies using an independent data set to compare ... Keywords: Climate change, Ecosystem model, Forest growth, Increment, Sensitivity, Simulator

Markus O. Huber; Chris S. Eastaugh; Thomas Gschwantner; Hubert Hasenauer; Georg Kindermann; Thomas Ledermann; Manfred J. Lexer; Werner Rammer; Stefan Sch鯮ghuber; Hubert Sterba

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands GRR/Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative This flowchart illustrates the process of leasing Land Trade Lands in Texas. The Texas General Land Office (GLO) administers leases on Land Trade Lands through Title 31 of the Texas Administrative Code Section 155.42.

387

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Biofuels, causes of land-use change, and the role of fire in greenhouse gas emissions  

SciTech Connect

IN THEIR REPORTS IN THE 29 FEBRUARY ISSUE ('LAND CLEARING AND THE BIOFUEL CARBON debt,' J. Fargione et al., p. 1235, and 'Use of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gases through emissions from land-use change,' T. Searchinger et al., p. 1238), the authors do not provide adequate support for their claim that biofuels cause high emissions due to land-use change. The conclusions of both papers depend on the misleading premise that biofuel production causes forests and grasslands to be converted to agriculture. However, field research, including a meta-analysis of 152 case studies, consistently finds that land-use change and associated carbon emissions are driven by interactions among cultural, technological, biophysical, political, economic, and demographic forces within a spatial and temporal context rather than by a single crop market. Searchinger et al. assert that soybean prices accelerate clearing of rainforest based on a single citation for a study not designed to identify the causal factors of land clearing. The study analyzed satellite imagery from a single state in Brazil over a 4-year period and focused on land classification after deforestation. Satellite imagery can measure what changed but does little to tell us why. Similarly, Fargione et al. do not rely on primary empirical studies of causes of land-use change. Furthermore, neither fire nor soil carbon sequestration was properly considered in the Reports. Fire's escalating contribution to global climate change is largely a result of burning in tropical savannas and forests. Searchinger et al. postulate that 10.8 million hectares could be needed for future biofuel, a fraction of the 250 to 400 million hectares burned each year between 2000 and 2005. By offering enhanced employment and incomes, biofuels can help establish economic stability and thus reduce the recurring use of fire on previously cleared land as well as pressures to clear more land. Neither Searchinger et al. nor Fargione et al. consider fire as an ongoing land-management tool. In addition, deep-rooted perennial biofuel feedstocks in the tropics could enhance soil carbon storage by 0.5 to 1 metric ton per hectare per year. An improved understanding of the forces behind land-use change leads to more favorable conclusions regarding the potential for biofuels to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Joint Environmental Assessment of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Tope Virus Control Program for the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy, Finding of No Significant Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Curly Top Virus Control Program in California Curly Top Virus Control Program in California AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY The DOE, Naval Petroleum Reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a 5-year period from 2002 through 2006. It is expected that approximately 2,000 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year.

390

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

391

NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Tropical moist forest near Darien (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Golley, F. B. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama, 1967-1968. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a transitional moist/dry tropical forest were determined in 1967-68 at Darien Province, Panama. NPP was not estimated. Situated about 160 km ESE of Panama City, close to the town of Santa Fe, the Darien study site consisted of two plots, about 8 km apart, one of

392

NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Litter trap and throughfall collector in the Chamela forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Maass, M., and A. Martinez-Yrizar. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Net primary productivity (NPP) of a tropical dry deciduous forest was estimated, based on the integration of ecosystem data obtained in various years between 1982 and 1995, at the Chamela Biological Station of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The Biosphere Reserve Chamela-Cuixmala, Jalisco, is situated near the

393

NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: View across the forest canopy near Atherton (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Stocker, G. C. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Litterfall was determined over 3-4 years (1974/5-1978) for two tropical rainforest sites and for 5 years (1980-1985) for a third study site near Atherton, Queensland, in northeast Australia. Although net primary production (NPP) was not determined, the extensive site description data and the rarity of measurements on tropical forests south of the Equator

394

NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Forest after clearing of secondary growth at the Kade site (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Nye, P. H., and D. J. Greenland. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a secondary tropical forest were determined in the late 1950s at the Kade Agricultural Research Station of the former University College, Ghana. Net primary production (NPP) was estimated on the basis of standing biomass accumulation and litter fall. Later studies on litter and wood fall and

395

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil extraction in Ecuador, the appropriation and industrialization of herbal medicine in the forests of Belize, a critical history

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Land-use Scenario Analysis Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other economic and resource data as needed for LEDS development

397

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING TECHNIQUES FOR LAND USE CLASSIFICATION OF RIO JAUCA WATERSHED USING IKONOS IMAGES-Mayag眉ez E-mail: edwinmm80@yahoo.com Key words: GIS, remote sensing, land use, supervised classification resource and supplies water to the metropolitan area. Remote sensing techniques can be used to assess

Gilbes, Fernando

398

Evaluating the JULES Land Surface Model Energy Fluxes Using FLUXNET Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy flux measurements from a sample of 10 flux network (FLUXNET) sites selected to represent a range of climate conditions and biome types were used to assess the performance of the Hadley Centre land surface model (Joint U.K. Land ...

Eleanor Blyth; John Gash; Amanda Lloyd; Matthew Pryor; Graham P. Weedon; Jim Shuttleworth

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July 颅 September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

Richner, Heinz

400

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April 颅 June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April 颅 June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

Richner, Heinz

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Uni Land | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Land Jump to: navigation, search Name Uni Land Place Bologna, Italy Zip 40063 Sector Solar Product Italian property company, which buys land without permits and develops it for residential and commerical use before selling it on. The firm is involved with solar project development. Coordinates 44.50483掳, 11.345169掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.50483,"lon":11.345169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

403

The Great DOE Land Rush?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area manager. co, 1800 ha-about 15% of the lab's land- (NERP), at the Savannah River site in South But some DOE officials argue that could be transferred as early as 2001 to the...

404

OpenEI - land requirements  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4180 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

405

OpenEI - land use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4160 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

406

solar land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

solar land use solar land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

407

pv land use | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pv land use pv land use Home Rosborne318's picture Submitted by Rosborne318(5) Member 2 December, 2013 - 11:06 Request for Information Renewable Energy Generation/Production Shreveport Airport Authority - Response Deadline 2 January 2014 pv land use Solar solar land use Solar Power The Shreveport Airport Authority intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) at some future time for renewable energy generation opportunities on Shreveport Airport property. Files: application/pdf icon solar_rfi_complete.pdf Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 25 June, 2013 - 12:10 Solar Land Use Data on OpenEI acres csp land use how much land land requirements pv land use solar land use square miles I'm happy to announce that a new report on Solar+Land+Use was just released by the National+Renewable+Energy+Laboratory. You can find a brief summary

408

First National Climate Assessment: Production Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

forest ecosystems. He was a covening lead author on the 1990 and 1995 IPCC assessments of climate change. He has served as a vice-chair of the International Geosphere-Biosphere...

409

Wisconsin抯 Forest Products Industry Business Climate Status Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsin抯 Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) is a non-profit, non-stock corporation with a mission of accelerating investments in energy efficient, environmentally friendly technologies into Wisconsin industry clusters. CTT was awarded its mission in February of 2002 by the Focus on Energy program, which identified the energy intensive, economically important industry clusters whose needs for advanced technology transfer could be served by the CTT. These clusters are Forest Products, Metal Casting, Food Processing, Printing, Glass, Biobased Products & Energy, Water & Wastewater, and Utilities. Technology roadmaps had been developed for each industry cluster through U.S. Department of Energy grants and by Focus on Energy. However, a more in-depth understanding of critical issues facing industry clusters was still needed. CTT, in a joint effort with the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory (FPL) in Madison, initiated issue scoping sessions for the Forest Products cluster. One-on-one meetings with senior executives of Wisconsin forest products companies were conducted to assess the current state and future potentials of the industry group. The findings of these sessions document a litany of challenges facing the industry and are summarized at the end of this report. Many of these challenges and the potential for investments in new technologies were

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effects of land markets and land management on ecosystem function: A framework for modelling exurban land-change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the conceptual design and application of a new land-change modelling framework that represents geographical, sociological, economic, and ecological aspects of a land system. The framework provides an overarching design that can be ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling, Carbon storage and flux, Exurban development, Land-use and land-cover change, Policy

Derek T. Robinson, Shipeng Sun, Meghan Hutchins, Rick L. Riolo, Daniel G. Brown, Dawn C. Parker, Tatiana Filatova, William S. Currie, Sarah Kiger

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

difficult to get with conventional ground survey methods. Our first thought was to use aerial photography ................................................................................................................ 2 Obtaining Aerial Photography. As a tool in solving land management problems, aerial photography has been accepted for many years. Many

Standiford, Richard B.

412

South Fork Snake River/Palisades Wildlife Mitigation Project: Environmental assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund the implementation of the South Fork Snake River Programmatic Management Plan to compensate for losses of wildlife and wildlife habitat due to hydroelectric development at Palisades Dam. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game drafted the plan, which was completed in May 1993. This plan recommends land and conservation easement acquisition and wildlife habitat enhancement measures. These measures would be implemented on selected lands along the South Fork of the Snake River between Palisades Dam and the confluence with the Henry`s Fork, and on portions of the Henry`s Fork located in Bonneville, Madison, and Jefferson Counties, Idaho. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment evaluating the proposed project. The EA also incorporates by reference the analyses in the South Fork Snake River Activity/Operations Plan and EA prepared jointly in 1991 by the Bureau of Land Management and the Forest Service. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

GRR/Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process -FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 1-FD-b - Land Use Plan Amendment Process 01-FD-b - LandUsePlanAmendmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management United States Forest Service Regulations & Policies National Environmental Policy Act 40 CFR 1506.1 Limitations on Actions During NEPA Process 40 CFR 1501.4(e)(2) "No Significant Impact" 40 CFR 1501.7 Scoping 43 CFR 1610.3-1(d) Developing Guidance to Field Manager 43 CFR 1610.3-2(e) To the Governor 43 CFR 1610.7-2(b) Public Notice Triggers None specified A Plan amendment is a modification of one or more parts (e.g., decisions about geothermal leasing) of an existing Land Use Plan (LUP). A LUP can be

414

Assimilation of Satellite-Observed Snow Albedo in a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied ...

M. Jahanzeb Malik; Rogier van der Velde; Zoltan Vekerdy; Zhongbo Su

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Modeling the Impact of Land Surface Degradation on the Climate of Tropical North Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradation of the land surface has been suggested as a cause of persistent drought in tropical north Africa. A general circulation model is used to assess the impact of degradation of five regions within tropical north Africa. Idealized ...

Douglas B. Clark; Yongkang Xue; Richard J. Harding; Paul J. Valdes

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Local and Regional Economic Benefits from Forest Products Production Activities at the Savannah River Site: 1955-Present  

SciTech Connect

SRS was established in 1951 as a nuclear materials production facility; however, decline in the defense mission budget at SRS has created a major economic impact on the community in the Central Savannah River Area. SRS has been offsetting these effects by producing revenue (80 million dollars to date) from the sale of forest products since 1955 primarily trees, but also pine straw. Revenue has been re-invested into the infrastructure development, restoration and management of natural resources. Total asset value of the forest-land has increased from 21 million to over 500 million dollars in the same period.

Teeter, L.; Blake, J.I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Enhanced Raw Materials Forest Products Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sterility in Forest Trees................................................................................................... 2

Hq Program Managers

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

LBA Land Use and Land Cover Change Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four data sets from the Carbon four data sets from the Carbon Dynamics and Nutrient Dynamics science themes, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO CD-36 South American Land Data Assimilation System Atmospheric Forcing Data . Data set prepared by L.G.G. de Goncalves, W.J. Shuttleworth, D. Vila, E. Larroza, M.J. Bottino, D.L. Herdies, J.A. Aravequia, J.G. de Mattos, D.L. Toll, M. Rodell and P. Houser. This data set provides South American Land Data Assimilation System (SALDAS) atmospheric forcing data necessary for land surface modeling for South America. The data were derived by combining modeled and observation based sources.The forcing data cover the entire continent of South America at 0.125 degree resolution and are built around the model-calculated values of

420

Environmental Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASSESSMENT (EA) ASSESSMENT (EA) FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF THE SOUTH ACCESS ROAD (CR 802) IN SUPPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT (WIPP) IN EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO NEPA #: DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA PREPARED IN COOPERATION WITH: DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE P. O. BOX 2078 CARLSBAD, NM 88221-2078 PREPARED BY: OWEN W. LOFTON SUPERVISORY MULTI RESOURCES SPECIALIST BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT CARLSBAD FIELD OFFICE 620 EAST GREENE CARLSBAD, NM 88220 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT BLM Office: Carlsbad Field Office DOI-BLM-NM-P020-2010-0011-EA Serial #: NM-123703 Department of Energy (DOE), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) South Access Road (SAR) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action 1.1 The DOE CBFO, is requesting a right-of-way (ROW) that consists of re-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions, has resulted in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Choice:Forest or Fuel? The demand for biofuels, driven by the desire to reduce fossil fuel, combined with the expanded demand for biofuels, will result in higher food prices, since less land by using biofuels (vegetable oils). But the use of biofuels may not reduce CO2 emissions, even when

422

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands Boyan Kovacic boyan.kovacic@ee.doe.gov 5/2/12 2 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov * BLM RE Drivers * BLM RE Programs * BLM Permitting and Revenues * Case Studies * Withdrawn Military Land Outline 3 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov BLM: Bureau of Land Management BO: Biological Opinion CSP: Concentrating Solar Power DOE: Department of Energy DOI: Department of Interior EA: Environmental Assessment EIS: Environmental Impact Statement FONSI: Finding of No Significant Impact FS: U.S. Forrest Service IM: Instruction Memorandum MPDS: Maximum Potential Development Scenario NEPA: National Environmental Policy Act NOI: Notice of Intent NOP: Notice to Proceed

423

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Large-Scale Renewable Energy Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development on Public Lands Boyan Kovacic boyan.kovacic@ee.doe.gov 5/2/12 2 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov * BLM RE Drivers * BLM RE Programs * BLM Permitting and Revenues * Case Studies * Withdrawn Military Land Outline 3 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov BLM: Bureau of Land Management BO: Biological Opinion CSP: Concentrating Solar Power DOE: Department of Energy DOI: Department of Interior EA: Environmental Assessment EIS: Environmental Impact Statement FONSI: Finding of No Significant Impact FS: U.S. Forrest Service IM: Instruction Memorandum MPDS: Maximum Potential Development Scenario NEPA: National Environmental Policy Act NOI: Notice of Intent NOP: Notice to Proceed

424

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Power on Public Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Wind Power on Public Lands Through its programs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and partners, Wind Powering America is assisting with the evaluation of wind energy development on public lands. The cover of the publication. Federal Wind Energy Assistance through NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory assists with wind resource assessment and development activities initiated by federal agencies to facilitate distributed renewable energy projects at federal agency sites. This brief outlines the process for requesting National Renewable Energy Laboratory assistance with federal wind energy projects. Army National Guard NREL provided the Army National Guard at Fort Carson, Colorado, with a 50-m

425

Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Agency/Company /Organization Hiroshima University Focus Area Transportation Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.j Program Start 2010 Country Bangladesh UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. References 鈫 "Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies"

426

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products: Resources and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Resources & Links Resources & Links Software Tools Forest Products Industry of the Future Tools & Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the forest products industry. DOE BestPractices Software Tools DOE BestPractices offers a range of software tools and databases that help manufacturers assess their plant's steam, compressed air, motor, and process heating systems. DOE Plant Energy Profiler Industry experience has shown that many plant utility personnel do not have an adequate understanding of their energy cost structure and where the major focus should be for any energy savings program. This tool will address this need and enable an engineer assigned to a plant utility to

427

Evironmental protection in Malaysia with sustainable forest management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malaysia has achieved a very significant development socio-economically since independent in 1957. Large tracts of forest have been converted to give way to settlements and agricultural and industrial areas. Logging is still being carried out annually. ... Keywords: environmental protection, forest certification, forest harvesting, sustainable forest management, tropical forest resources

Dato'Hj Dahlan Hj. Taha; Hj. Kamaruzaman Jusoff

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

GRR/Section 3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-CA-a - State Land Leasing Process and Land Access (ROWs) < GRR Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGRRSection3-CA-a-StateLand...

429

Comparison of Water-Related Land Cover Types in Six 1-km Global Land Cover Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land cover classification is a fundamental and vital activity that is helpful for understanding natural dynamics and the human impacts of land surface processes. Available multiple 1-km global land cover datasets have been compared to identify ...

Tosiyuki Nakaegawa

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DOE/EA-1677: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Final Environmental Assessment Addressing the Conveyance and Transfer of the Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, Section 13005 (05/06/10)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N N a a t t i i o o n n a a l l N N u u c c l l e e a a r r S S e e c c u u r r i i t t y y A A d d m m i i n n i i s s t t r r a a t t i i o o n n S S e e r r v v i i c c e e C C e e n n t t e e r r DOE/EA-1677FONSI F F i i n n d d i i n n g g o o f f N N o o S S i i g g n n i i f f i i c c a a n n t t I I m m p p a a c c t t f f o o r r t t h h e e F F i i n n a a l l E E n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t a a l l A A s s s s e e s s s s m m e e n n t t A A d d d d r r e e s s s s i i n n g g t t h h e e C C o o n n v v e e y y a a n n c c e e a a n n d d T T r r a a n n s s f f e e r r o o f f t t h h e e T T w w o o L L a a n n d d T T r r a a c c t t s s P P u u r r s s u u a a n n t t t t o o P P u u b b l l i i c c L L a a w w 1 1 1 1 1 1 - - 1 1 1 1 , , S S e e c c t t i i o o n n 1 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 5 5 May 2010 Finding of No Significant Impact for Proposed Conveyance and Transfer of Two Land Tracts Pursuant to Public Law 111-11, section 13005, Albuquerque, New Mexico (DOE/EA-1677) U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration

431

US Fish and Wildlife Service lands biomonitoring operations manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of an operations manual designed to facilitate the development of biomonitoring strategies for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands. It is one component of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands Biomonitoring Operations Manual. The Volume contains the Introduction to the Manual, background information on monitoring, and procedures for developing a biomonitoring strategy for Service lands. The purpose of the Biomonitoring Operations Manual is to provide an approach to develop and implement biomonitoring activities to assess the status and trends of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service trust resources. It also provides field sampline methods and documentation protocols for contaminant monitoring activities. The strategy described in the Manual has been designed as a stand alone process to characterize the presence of contaminants on lands managed by the Service. This process can be sued to develop a monitoring program for any tract of real estate with potential threats from on- or off-site contaminants. Because the process was designed to address concerns for Service lands that span the United States from Alaska to the Tropical Islands, it has a generic format that can be used in al types of ecosystems, however, significant site specific informtion is required to complete the Workbook and make the process work successfully.

Rope, R.C.; Breckenridge, R.P.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Morrison, I. K., and N. W. Foster. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil were determined for a 30-year old pine forest in northern Ontario, Canada, and a detailed nutrient budget published. The 30-year old stand was compared with nearby 20-year old and 65-year old stands, all of which were growing on a glaciofluvial flat. Net primary productivity (NPP) was not directly estimated, but data exist on above-ground tree growth and litterfall.

433

NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Rencz, A. N., and A. N. D. Auclair. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada, 1974. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of a boreal ecosystem (subarctic lichen woodland) was determined at Schefferville, Canada, during the 1974 growing season. The main objective was to describe a "typical" lichen woodland, a vegetation type found in the transitional zone between boreal forest and tundra on well-drained, nutrient-poor podzolic soils. Such areas are occupied sparsely by black spruce trees (Picea mariana) with low growth

434

land-use | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

land-use land-use Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

435

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

436

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Summary: This project was an intensive remote sensing and field study of the boreal forest in the Superior National Forest (SNF). The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the ability of remote-sensing data to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and net primary productivity (NPP). The SNF is mostly covered by boreal forest. Boreal forests were chosen for this project because of their relative taxonomic simplicity, their great extent, and their potential sensitivity to climatic change. Information on the SNF project is available by accessing the SNF pages maintained by the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.govSNF/summary.html. Table of Contents:

437

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

53 Wood products originating from forests outside the United States are not included in the U.S. greenhouse gas inventory. 54 Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

438

Land use and land cover, 1978 Hot Springs, South Dakota, Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Land use and land cover of the area surrounding Hot Springs, South Dakota in 1978 is presented in map form. (ACR)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50皷70癈 range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80癈. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The IAGL Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model that computes the fluxes of energy and momentum between the land surface and the atmosphere is presented. It is designed to serve as a lower boundary in a mesoscale atmospheric model and is intended to be used to study the influence of ...

Koen De Ridder; Guy Schayes

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest land assessment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ORNL/TM-1999/216 Characterizing Land Cover, LAI,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-18 5. Study Site and Measurement Plan for Harvard Forest (HARV), Petersham, Massachusetts forest site is located at the Harvard Forest, near Petersham, Massachusetts, and 1-5 #12;1-6 is also part

442

Historic land use and carbon estimates for South and Southeast Asia: 1880--1980  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital data base containing estimates of land use change and the carbon content of vegetation for South and Southeast Asia for the years 1880, 1920, 1950, 1970, and 1980. These data were originally collected for climate modelers, so they could reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of historical land use change and of carbon release. For this data base, South and Southeast Asia is defined as the countries of India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Kampuchea (Cambodia), Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines. The most important change in land use over the 100 year period was the conversion of 107 {times} 10{sup 6} ha of forest/woodland to categories with lower biomass. Land thus transformed accounted for 13.5% of the total area of the study region. The estimated total carbon content of live vegetation in South and Southeast Asia has dropped progressively, from 59 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1880 to 27 {times} 10{sup 9} Mg in 1980. Throughout the study period the carbon stock in forests was greater than the carbon content in all other categories combined, although its share of the total declined progressively from 81% in 1880 to 73% in 1980. The data base itself was developed in Lotus 1-2-3{trademark} using a sequential bookkeeping model. The source data were obtained at the local and regional level for each country from official agricultural and economic statistics from historical geographic and demographic texts, reports, and articles; and from any other available source. Because of boundary changes through time and disparities between the validity, availability, and scale of the data for each country, the data were aggregated into 94 ecological zones. The resulting data base contains land use and carbon information for 94 ecological zones and national totals for 13 countries.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Richards, J.F.; Flint, E.P. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of History

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

444

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regressionerror on a suite of benchmark datasets. As the basethe Machine Learning Benchmark Problems package; see http://

Segal, Mark R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Discriminant Random Forest (DRF) Classification Methodology  

Jupiter Laser Facility. ... State-of-the-art methodologies that perform this type of classification include Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, and Random Forest.

446

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate Change Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate...

447

Christian veneer dryer: Forest products fact sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new closed rotary drum dryer for the forest products industry.

NREL

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Forest Partners Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Product San Francisco-based project developer focused on building...

449

Denitrification rates in a wastewater-irrigated forest soil in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect

Denitrification is considered to be an important N removal process in land-based wastewater treatment systems, although in situ denitrification rates have rarely been reported. The authors investigated the contribution of denitrification to N removal in a land treatment system by measuring in situ denitrification rates for 12 mo in a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) forest irrigated with tertiary-treated wastewater. The variability of denitrification rates was investigated using a nested field design that divided the land treatment system into four spatial components (irrigation block, topographic position, field site, and sample plot) and two temporal components (sample period, sample day). Denitrification was measured using undisturbed soil cores collected daily, for six consecutive days on 21 occasions throughout the year. Soil moisture content, NO{sub 3} concentration, available C, denitrifying enzyme activity, and temperature also were measured. The annual denitrification rate in the irrigated soil was 2.4 kg N ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1}, and only slightly higher than the unirrigated soil. Temporal effects contributed more than spatial effects to the overall variation in denitrification rates. Multiple regression analysis showed that soil factors could only explain 29% of the variation in denitrification rates. Soil water-filled porosity was low in the land treatment system, and less than the critical threshold value determined in a laboratory study. The authors concluded that denitrification in this land treatment system studied was limited by excessive aeration in the free-draining soils.

Barton, L.; McLay, C.D.A.; Schipper, L.A.; Smith, C.T.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A land-use systems approach to represent land-use dynamics at continental and global scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the current global land cover datasets and global scale land-use models use a classification of land cover based on the dominant land cover type within a distinct region or pixel. Such a classification disregards the diversity and intensity of ... Keywords: Global, IMAGE, Land-use change, Land-use intensification, Land-use systems

Aur閘ien Letourneau; Peter H. Verburg; Elke Stehfest

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EA-1696: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

associated distribution infrastructure on Pantex Federal property or leased land using federal funding. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Pantex Renewable Energy...

452

EA-1915: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Potential Floodplain and Wetland Involvement Proposed Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA DOE is announcing its intent to prepare an EA to assess the...

453

EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment Townsite Solar Project Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada The Bureau of Land Management, with Western Area Power Administration...

454

Oregon Department of State Lands | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon Department of State Lands Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon Department of State Lands Name Oregon Department of State Lands Address 775 Summer Street, Suite 100 Place...

455

Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

456

Solar Land Use | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Land Use Land Use Jump to: navigation, search (The following text is derived from a National Renewable Energy Laboratory report on solar land use in the United States.)[1] One concern regarding large-scale deployment of solar energy is its potentially significant land use. This article summarizes data and analysis of the land use associated with U.S. utility-scale ground-mounted photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. This article presents total and direct land-use results