National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for forest carbon inventory

  1. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  2. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  3. Forest Inventory and Harvest Unit Layout By Grant Becker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    is accounted for. This step sets up the entire harvest, from boundary placement and property marking to water depending on the severity of slope, landscape, water bodies, and more. These factors can bring a harvestForest Inventory and Harvest Unit Layout By Grant Becker Introduction Forest inventory is of most

  4. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  5. Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 – 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US Forest Service - Annonymous,

    2012-02-01

    A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

  6. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating Energy, Products, and Land's Note M.T. Goergen Jr. SAF TASK FORCE REPORT Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating EnergyThis Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows Climate­Forest Interactions Biomass Use and Feedstock

  7. This publication provides an overview of forest resources in Vermont based on inventories conducted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This publication provides an overview of forest resources in Vermont based on inventories conducted RESOURCEUPDATE FS-30 Forests of Vermont, 2013 Forest Service | December 2014 1 Currently, Vermont is home to over.6 97,826 12.9 -25.3 Table 1.--Vermont forest statistics, 2013 and 2007. Volumes are for trees 5-inch

  8. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    to fossil fuel Regenerated forest energy used in the LoggingManaging forests because carbon matters: Integrating energy,Energy from post-consumer residues relevant private forest

  9. Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect on forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ecosystem's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy, sustain life10/13/2010 1 Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect

  10. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  11. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    forests provide more carbon sequestration benefits than let-the relative carbon sequestration benefits of let-growlife cycle carbon sequestration benefits, averaged over 120,

  12. An evaluation of alternate remote sensing products for forest inventory, monitoring, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    and related attributes at a regional scale. Several sensors were evaluated, including (i) single date Landsat), a lidar sensor that di- rectly measures the height and canopy structure of forest vegetation. To evaluateAn evaluation of alternate remote sensing products for forest inventory, monitoring, and mapping

  13. The Multi-source National Forest Inventory of Finland methods and results 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomppo, Erkki

    The Multi-source National Forest Inventory of Finland ­ methods and results 2009 Erkki Tomppo://www.metla.fi/julkaisut/workingpapers/ ISSN 1795-150X Office Post Box 18 FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland tel. +358 29532 2111 e-mail julkaisutoimitus@metla.fi Publisher Finnish Forest Research Institute Post Box 18 FI-01301 Vantaa, Finland tel. +358 29532 2111 e

  14. Biomass Chronosequences of United States Forests: Implications for Carbon Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichstein, Jeremy W.

    Management and Carbon Sequestration Forests account for a large fraction of the carbon stored in global soils for forest management aimed at carbon sequestration is controversial. On the one hand, logging diminishes of succession (Peet 1981, 1992; Shugart 1984). In the context of forest management aimed at carbon sequestration

  15. This publication provides an overview of forest resources in New Hampshire based on inventories conducted by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This publication provides an overview of forest resources in New Hampshire based on inventories of Agriculture RESOURCEUPDATE FS-29 Forests of New Hampshire, 2013 Forest Service | December 2014 1 Overview Currently, New Hampshire is home to nearly 4.8 million acres of forest land (Table 1). Since the 1997

  16. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This chapter provides an assessment of the net carbon dioxide (CO2) flux caused by (1) changes in forest carbon in the form of forest and soil surveys. Carbon dioxide fluxes from forest carbon stocks and from nonInventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990 1998 April 15, 2000 U.S. Environmental

  17. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

  18. Increasing carbon nanotube forest density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Alexander P

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding mechanical, electrical, thermal, and morphological properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) open up exciting potential applications in a wide range of fields. One such application is replacing the ...

  19. DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    1 DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Professor in Sustainable Resource Sciences, UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences PARTICIPANTS Tom Gower ­ Professor, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI Rick

  20. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges Reid Miner, Vice President, NCASI

  1. Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelc, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

  2. Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

    2009-03-31

    In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

  3. Superhydrophobic Carbon Nanotube Forests Kenneth K. S. Lau*1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PTFE) coating on the surface of the nanotubes. Superhydrophobicity is achieved down to the microscopic functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with a non-wetting polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, our PTFE-coated carbon nanotube forests aim to mimic nature's design. By growing a forest of nanotube

  4. Increasing carbon storage in intact African tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide1,2 . The role of tropical forests is critical dioxide concentrations, may be the cause of the increase in carbon stocks13 , as some theory14 and models2 with estimates of fossil fuel emissions, ocean carbon fluxes and carbon released from land-use change, indicate

  5. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    seasons lead to less carbon sequestration by a subalpineboreal forests to global carbon sequestration (Kurz et al. ,off- set point when carbon sequestration equals carbon loss

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Changes in carbon density for three old-growth forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    a living laboratory for studying forest carbon sequestration under natural environmental conditions that forest landscapes on Changbai Mountain are indeed carbon sinks. Keywords Carbon sequestration . China provide baselines that reveal the potential for continued carbon sequestration in many places where

  7. Sesso Temtica: Uso de satlites, modelos de ecossistemas e inventrios florestais para apoio s polticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    políticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory, France) Challenges related to estimating forest biomass and quantifying its uncertainty for informing. Presentations will cover (i) REDD+ project design, (ii) satellite remote sensing, (iii) ecosystem modeling

  8. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: U.S. emissions inventories Narasimhan K. Larkin a: Fire emissions Emissions inventories Greenhouse gases a b s t r a c t Emissions from wildland fire fire emissions change considerably due to fluctuations from year to year with overall fire season

  9. Carbon fluxes and storage in forests and landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    , as they store 45 % of the terrestrial carbon and account for ~50 % of soil calbon sequestration (Bonan 2008Chapter 6 Carbon fluxes and storage in forests and landscapes Jiquan Chen, Ranjeet John, Ge Sun this chapter with a discussion of the major carbon fluxes (e.g., gross primary ploductlon, ecosystem

  10. Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

  11. Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2009-06-29

    The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the lab’s total carbon footprint.

  12. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  13. Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201EnergyInformation Tools for

  14. Isotopic composition of carbon dioxide from a boreal forest fire: Inferring carbon loss from measurements and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Edward A. G; Trumbore, Susan E; Mack, Michelle C; Harden, Jennifer W

    2003-01-01

    emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959 – 1999, Can. J.and O. N. Krankina, Forest fires in Russia: Carbon dioxideDIOXIDE FROM A BOREAL FOREST FIRE Park, R. , and S. Epstein,

  15. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dail, David Bryan

    2012-08-02

    This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

  16. Remote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbulsky, Martín

    Remote estimation of carbon dioxide uptake by a Mediterranean forest M A R T I´ N F. G A R B U L Science and Environment, University of Tuscia, 01100 Viterbo, Italy Abstract The estimation of the carbon of the ecology of global change. Current remote sensing methodologies for estimating gross primary productivity

  17. A pre-publication version of Carbon Trends in U.S. forestlands: a context for the role of soils in forest carbon sequestration. The Potential of U.S. Forest Soils to Sequester Carbon. Chapter 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in forest carbon sequestration. The Potential of U.S. Forest Soils to Sequester Carbon. Chapter 3 in: Kimble-45. Carbon Trends in U.S. Forestlands: A Context for the Role of Soils in Forest Carbon Sequestration Linda SA pre-publication version of Carbon Trends in U.S. forestlands: a context for the role of soils

  18. Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

    2012-12-17

    During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

  19. MINIMUM COST STRATEGIES FOR SEQUESTERING CARBON IN FORESTS Darius M. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    MINIMUM COST STRATEGIES FOR SEQUESTERING CARBON IN FORESTS Darius M. Adams Ralph J. Alig Bruce A the costs of meeting explicit targets for increments of carbon sequestered in forests when both forest management decisions and the area of forests can be varied. Costs are estimated as welfare losses in markets

  20. Pursuing Carbon and ForestPursuing Carbon and Forest SustainabilitySustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biomass Energy ProductionIn Forest Biomass Energy Production University of WashingtonCommissioner of Public Lands PeterPeter GoldmarkGoldmark''ss Forest Biomass Energy Initiative Pilot Projects 2009Pilot BioaviationBioaviation Fuel 2011Fuel 2011 #12;3 Forest Biomass Energy InitiativeForest Biomass Energy

  1. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing 13 Forest Inventory and Empirical Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16

  2. FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN XUHUI LEE and XINZHANG HU-air exchange of carbon, water, and energy was conducted at a mid-latitude, mixed forest on non-flat terrain to address this question, we conducted a field experiment on energy and carbon exchanges in a mixed forest

  3. Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

  4. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  5. R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R E V I E W Effects of biological invasions on forest carbon sequestration D . A . P E LT Z E R on the effects of some of the major drivers of global change on carbon (C) sequestration, particularly carbon that drive C sequestration. Keywords: biological invasion, carbon sequestration, community structure, forest

  6. Spatial and temporal patterns of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatial and temporal patterns of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000 hydrocarbons) from forest fires in China for the time period from 1950 to 2000 by using a combination of remote of carbon emissions from forest fires in China from 1950 to 2000, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05313, doi:10

  7. North America's forests are thought to be a significant sink for atmospheric carbon.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    reflects the frequency of disturbance. In fact, one explanation for the forest sink in the eastern United carbon flux reflect a lack of detailed knowledge about the effects of forest disturbance and recovery highlighted forest disturbance as a critical factor constraining carbon dynamics [Wofsy and Harris, 2002

  8. Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

  9. Estimation of biomass and carbon stocks: the case of the Atlantic Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    S.E. 2008. Estimation of biomass and carbon stocks: the casein Amazonian forest biomass. Global Change Biol. 10:545-562R. 2004b. Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots.

  10. Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

  11. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    (World Energy Council, Nature 390, p. 215) and increasing at a rate of about 0·1 Gt year­1 primary productivity. The carbon balance of forests is determined by a number of component processes in the carbon balance of each biome are also reviewed, and the evidence for a carbon sink in each forest biome

  12. Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    ARTICLE Rehabilitation forestry and carbon market access on high-graded northern hardwood forests for rehabilitation and increased carbon stores, yet few studies have examined the feasibility of using carbon markets to restore high-graded forests. We evaluated the effectiveness of rehabilitation on 391 ha of high

  13. R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessments and mitigate climate change. Large amounts of carbon (C) are stored in deep mineral forest soils, but are often not considered in accounting for global C fluxes because mineral soil C is commonly thought to be relatively

  14. Carbon Dioxide Exchange Between an Old-growth Forest and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Carbon Dioxide Exchange Between an Old-growth Forest and the Atmosphere Kyaw Tha Paw U,1 * Matthias ABSTRACT Eddy-covariance and biometeorological methods show significant net annual carbon uptake in an old that old-growth forest eco- systems are in carbon equilibrium. The basis for differences between

  15. The legacy of harvest and fire on ecosystem carbon storage in a north temperate forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Peter S.

    to store carbon (C) due to variation in disturbance frequency and intensity, successional status, soil: Disturbance effects on forest carbon storage Final Submission to Global Change Biology 1 #12;Summary1 2 3 4 5 this legacy of disturbance constrains forest carbon (C) storage rates by quantifying C pools and fluxes after

  16. Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Impacts of Management on Carbon Sequestration and Trace Gas Emissions in Forested Wetland-DNDC, was modified to enhance its capacity to predict the impacts of management practices on carbon sequestration nonnegligible roles in mitigation in comparison with carbon sequestration. Forests are recognized for having

  17. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI Pallardy, Stephen G 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

  18. Forest dynamics at regional scales: predictive models constrained with inventory data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lines, Emily

    2012-06-12

    by scaling from key tree-level processes, but models typically have no climate dependency. In this thesis I demonstrate how large-scale national inventories combined with improvements in computational methods mean that models that incorporate the climate...

  19. Seasonal patterns of forest canopy and their relevance for the global carbon cycle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizunuma, Toshie

    2015-06-30

    In the terrestrial biosphere forests have a significant role as a carbon sink. Under recent climate change, it is increasingly important to detect seasonal change or ‘phenology’ that can influence the global carbon cycle. ...

  20. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  1. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  2. Post-Soviet farmland abandonment, forest recovery, and carbon sequestration in western Ukraine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    Post-Soviet farmland abandonment, forest recovery, and carbon sequestration in western Ukraine T O of Forest Management, Ukrainian National Forestry University, vul. Gen. Chuprynky, 103, 79031 Lviv, Ukraine fluxes in western Ukraine (57 000 km2 ) and to assess the region's future carbon sequestration potential

  3. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  4. Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  5. O P I N I O N Biogenic vs. geologic carbon emissions and forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    O P I N I O N Biogenic vs. geologic carbon emissions and forest biomass energy production J O H N- versities articulated a concern over equating biogenic carbon (C) emissions with fossil fuel emissions the amount of carbon in circulation. In contrast, carbon dioxide released from fossil fuels increases

  6. Do Forests Have a Say in Global Carbon Markets for Climate Stabilization Policy ? Massimo Tavoni1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., and Dev. Economics, Ohio State University While carbon sequestration was included in the Kyoto Protocol. Notwithstanding the widespread research suggesting that biological sequestration of carbon can play an important reason for the setbacks to forest sequestration regarded whether carbon sequestration would reduce carbon

  7. Interaction of ice storms and management practices on current carbon sequestration in forests with potential mitigation under future CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    Interaction of ice storms and management practices on current carbon sequestration in forests with potential impacts on carbon sequestration. Common forest management practices, such as fertilization on current carbon sequestration in forests with potential mitigation under future CO2 atmosphere, J. Geophys

  8. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  9. Effects of afforestation and forest management on soil carbon dynamics and trace gas emissions in a Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong) Carr.) forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerva, Argyro

    The establishment and intensive management of forests for the production of timber can have significant effects on the soil carbon dynamics. The establishment of forest on organic soils under grasslands may lead to ...

  10. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing Geospatial Resolution of Inventory-Based Carbon Accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Baskaran, Latha Malar [ORNL; Hellwinckel, Chad M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Nelson, Richard G [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary productivity were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (~1km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous US and compared with higher resolution (30m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil-fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for US croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C yr-1 for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate to high resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics.

  11. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests' carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980's in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country's total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  12. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 4: Mexico: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests` carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980`s in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country`s total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  13. Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Recovery of Soil Carbon Stocks on Disturbed Coastal Plain Soils Through Secondary Forest SuccessionPlain Soils Through Secondary Forest Succession Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically Contact and Environmental Research 50 µm Recovery of soil carbon stocks in historically degraded soils provides a means

  14. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  15. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Carbon Dioxide Evolution from the Floor of Three Minnesota Forests Author(s): W. A. Reiners and extend access to Ecology. http://www.jstor.org #12;Late Spring 1968 CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION RATES 471. Germination behavior of some halc- phytes. Bull. Res. Council Israel (D) 6: 187-188. CARBON DIOXIDE EVOLUTION

  17. Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

  18. Using stable isotopes to investigate interactions between the forest carbon and nitrogen cycles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Richard Kiran Francis

    2015-06-30

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization due to atmospheric deposition (NDEP ) may explain some of the net carbon (C) sink (0.6-0.7 Pg y-1) in temperate forests, but estimates of the additional C uptake due to atmospheric N additions ...

  19. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    energy and water ?uxes at mature and disturbed forest sites,and energy ?uxes from a boreal mixedwood forest ecosystem inforests and the atmosphere (Baldocchi, 2008) because they provide near- continuous half-hourly time series of carbon, water, and energy

  20. Forest Sensitivity to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and its Relevance to Carbon Management Richard J. Norby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the airborne fraction of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion, and, therefore, the rate of increase of CO2Forest Sensitivity to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and its Relevance to Carbon Management Richard J the responses of forest trees to rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 has for the past two decades been

  1. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States David J forestry Tree cover Forest inventory a b s t r a c t Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole

  2. 255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Vitality inventories of Scots pine stands, the most common species in Poland, have been done since 1991 by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    255USDA Forest Service Gen.Tech.Rep. PSW-GTR-166. 1998. Abstract Vitality inventories of Scots pine as the primary indicator of stand vitality. During 1991 to 1995, SO2 and NOx were measured at 1,417 forest, decreasing concentrations of SO2 and NOx were observed during the past 5 years. Changes of vitality in Scots

  3. Mineralization of ancient carbon in the subsurface of riparian forests Noel P. Gurwick,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gold, Art

    Mineralization of ancient carbon in the subsurface of riparian forests Noel P. Gurwick,1,2 Daniel M C mineralization rates can support ecosystem-relevant rates of denitrification. Buried horizons and 14 C dating of dissolved inorganic carbon revealed that ancient SOC mineralization was common

  4. Warming accelerates decomposition of decades-old carbon in forest soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (received for review January 10, 2012) Global climate carbon-cycle models predict acceleration of soilWarming accelerates decomposition of decades-old carbon in forest soils Francesca M. Hopkinsa,b,1, CA 94720; and d Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited

  5. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    First Update to the Climate Change Scoping Plan: Building onManaging forests for climate change mitigation. Science 320:IPCC] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 2006. IPCC

  6. Regional scale cropland carbon budgets: evaluating a geospatial agricultural modeling system using inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Sahajpal, Ritvik; West, Tristram O.; Thomson, Allison M.; Xu, Min; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate quantification and clear understanding of regional scale cropland carbon (C) cycling is critical for designing effective policies and management practices that can contribute toward stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, extrapolating site-scale observations to regional scales represents a major challenge confronting the agricultural modeling community. This study introduces a novel geospatial agricultural modeling system (GAMS) exploring the integration of the mechanistic Environmental Policy Integrated Climate model, spatially-resolved data, surveyed management data, and supercomputing functions for cropland C budgets estimates. This modeling system creates spatially-explicit modeling units at a spatial resolution consistent with remotely-sensed crop identification and assigns cropping systems to each of them by geo-referencing surveyed crop management information at the county or state level. A parallel computing algorithm was also developed to facilitate the computationally intensive model runs and output post-processing and visualization. We evaluated GAMS against National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) reported crop yields and inventory estimated county-scale cropland C budgets averaged over 2000–2008. We observed good overall agreement, with spatial correlation of 0.89, 0.90, 0.41, and 0.87, for crop yields, Net Primary Production (NPP), Soil Organic C (SOC) change, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), respectively. However, we also detected notable differences in the magnitude of NPP and NEE, as well as in the spatial pattern of SOC change. By performing crop-specific annual comparisons, we discuss possible explanations for the discrepancies between GAMS and the inventory method, such as data requirements, representation of agroecosystem processes, completeness and accuracy of crop management data, and accuracy of crop area representation. Based on these analyses, we further discuss strategies to improve GAMS by updating input data and by designing more efficient parallel computing capability to quantitatively assess errors associated with the simulation of C budget components. The modularized design of the GAMS makes it flexible to be updated and adapted for different agricultural models so long as they require similar input data, and to be linked with socio-economic models to understand the effectiveness and implications of diverse C management practices and policies.

  7. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  8. Subalpine Forest Carbon Cycling Short- and Long-Term Influence ofClimate and Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kueppers, L.; Harte, J.

    2005-08-23

    Ecosystem carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change comprise one of the largest remaining sources of uncertainty in global model predictions of future climate. Both direct climate effects on carbon cycling and indirect effects via climate-induced shifts in species composition may alter ecosystem carbon balance over the long term. In the short term, climate effects on carbon cycling may be mediated by ecosystem species composition. We used an elevational climate and tree species composition gradient in Rocky Mountain subalpine forest to quantify the sensitivity of all major ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes to these factors. The climate sensitivities of carbon fluxes were species-specific in the cases of relative above ground productivity and litter decomposition, whereas the climate sensitivity of dead wood decay did not differ between species, and total annual soil CO2 flux showed no strong climate trend. Lodge pole pine relative productivity increased with warmer temperatures and earlier snowmelt, while Engelmann spruce relative productivity was insensitive to climate variables. Engelmann spruce needle decomposition decreased linearly with increasing temperature(decreasing litter moisture), while lodgepole pine and subalpine fir needle decay showed a hump-shaped temperature response. We also found that total ecosystem carbon declined by 50 percent with a 2.88C increase in mean annual temperature and a concurrent 63 percent decrease ingrowing season soil moisture, primarily due to large declines in mineral soil and dead wood carbon. We detected no independent effect of species composition on ecosystem C stocks. Overall, our carbon flux results suggest that, in the short term, any change in subalpine forest net carbon balance will depend on the specific climate scenario and spatial distribution of tree species. Over the long term, our carbon stock results suggest that with regional warming and drying, Rocky Mountain subalpine forest will be a net source of carbon to the atmosphere.

  9. R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Stefan

    R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests Geertje for carbon storage and sequestration. Lianas reduce tree growth, survival, and leaf productivity; however liana carbon stocks are unlikely to compensate for liana-induced losses in net carbon sequestration

  10. ESTIMATION OF FOREST CARBON VOLUME AND VALUE IN TENNESSEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    simulation methods ¨Assess alternative management scenarios Photo Citation ¨ http://www.icis.com/energy to Sequester Carbon and Mitigate The Greenhouse Effect, eds. pp. 34­45, New York: CRC Press. ¨ Hoover, C. M., S the Economic Potential of Forestry for Carbon Sequestration under Alternative Carbon Price Paths." Journal

  11. Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbauer, S. F.

    2004-01-16

    The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

  12. Carbon flows and economic evaluation of mitigation options in Tanzani's forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.R.; Okinting'Ati, Aku

    1995-02-02

    This paper presents estimates of the rate of forest use, deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the corresponding carbon flows, in the Tanzanian forest sector. It is estimated that the country lost 525,000 ha of forests in 1990, with associated committed emissions of 31.5 Mt. Carbon (MtC), and 7.05 MtC of committed carbon sequestration. The paper then describes the possible response options in the forest sector to mitigate GHG emissions, and evaluates the most stable subset of these-i.e. forest conservation, woodfuel plantations and agroforestry. The conservation options were found to cost an average of U.S. $1.27 per tonne of carbon (tC) conserved. Five options for fuelwood plantations and agroforestry, with two different ownership regimes were evaluated. Each one of the options gives a positive net present value at low rates of discount, ranging from U.S. $1.06 to 3.4/1C of avoided emissions at 0 percent discount rate. At 10 percent discount, the eucalyptus and maize option has a highest PNV of U.S. $1.73 tC, and the government plantation gives a negative PNV (loss) of U.S. $0.13 tC sequestered. The options with a private/community type of ownership scheme fared better than government run options. This conclusion also held true when ranking the options by the BRAC indicator, with the government fuelwood plantation ranked the lowest, and the private agroforestry option of eucalyptus and corn performing best. The mitigation options evaluated here show that the forest sector in Tanzania has one of the most cost-effective GHG mitigation opportunities in the world, and they are within the developmental aspirations of the country.

  13. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Forest Products...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Export 31 Combustion Emissions (MMT CO 2 e Million Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Total Emissions Offsite Emissions + Onsite Emissions Energy (TBtu ...

  14. Continuous Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzman de Villoria, Roberto

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes are one of the most promising materials due their numerous applications in flexible electronic devices, biosensors and multifunctional aircraft materials, among others. However, the ...

  15. Carbon balance of coniferous forests growing in contrasting climates: Model-based analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to understand why carbon balance (or net ecosystem production, NEP) differs among forests. Here, we use-site differences in gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE) and NEP. The most important factor physiology on NEP were secondary, but still substantial. The work provides detailed quantitative evidence

  16. Ecosystem Carbon Storage Across the GrasslandForest Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silman, Miles R.

    of the large soil carbon stocks under an afforestation scenario exist. Key words: Peru; Manu National Park, JBF, and PM conceived of or designed this study; AG, MRS, MZ, GCD, WRF, and KCG performed re- search in the newly created carbon markets and funds (Glenday 2006). Similarly, the size and dynamics of the above

  17. Ecosystem Carbon Storage Across the GrasslandForest Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    of the large soil carbon stocks under an afforestation scenario exist. Key words: Peru; Manu National Park 2010 Author Contributions: AG, MRS, YM, JBF, and PM conceived of or designed this study; AG, MRS, MZ in the newly created carbon markets and funds (Glenday 2006). Similarly, the size and dynamics of the above

  18. Research Article Airborne carbon deposition on a remote forested lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    allochthonous carbon sources and food webs (Cole et al., 2006). There are numerous pathways for terrestrial inputs of terrestrial particulate organic carbon (TPOC) were measured during summ- er stratification of TPOC were between 6:1 and 22:1 (molar), much lower than the values for terrestrial leaves which were

  19. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 3 APRIL 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1123 Mangroves among the most carbon-rich forests in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    ­20% of global anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, second only to fossil fuel combustion7,8 . Recent of coastal development, aqua- culture expansion and over-harvesting1­4 . Carbon emissions resulting from and dead wood biomass, soil carbon content, and soil depth in 25 mangrove forests across a broad area

  20. State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage EditStamford,EnergyFarm InsuranceForest

  1. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  2. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2003-12-18

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

  3. Application of Remote Sensing Technology and Ecological Modeling of Forest Carbon Stocks in Mt. Apo Natural Park, Philippines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Ligaya Rubas

    2015-01-23

    This dissertation work explored the application of remote sensing technology for the assessment of forest carbon storage in Mt. Apo Natural Park. Biomass estimation is traditionally conducted using destructive sampling with high levels...

  4. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassar, Ray

    2003-01-01

    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 115 (2003) 91­107 Post-fire carbon dioxide fluxes in the western Canadian boreal forest: evidence from towers, aircraft and remote sensing Brian D. Amiroa,, J. Ian ecosystem exchange by eddy covariance) and remote sens- ing/modeling (net primary productivity

  5. JOURNAL OF NATURAL RESOURCES & LIFE SCIENCES EDUCATION VOLUME 38 2009 87 exceeds the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    , and lifestyle/ social dimensions. For example, is an energy-efficient hybrid car (with regenerative braking the harvesting rate, forest carbon uptake during growth of new trees in the harvested forest or woodlot offsets, Increasing energy costs as well as concerns about climate change associated with fossil fuel use have

  6. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  7. Carbon Stocks and Projections on Public Forestlands in the United States, 19522040

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLES Carbon Stocks and Projections on Public Forestlands in the United States, 1952­2040 JAMES are publicly owned; they represent a substantial area of potential carbon sequestration in US for- ests inventoried than privately owned forests. Thus, less information is avail- able about their role as carbon

  8. How surface fire in Siberian Scots pine forests affects soil organic carbon in the forest floor: Stocks, molecular structure, and conversion to black carbon (charcoal)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czimczik, Claudia I; Preston, Caroline M; Schmidt, Michael W. I; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2003-01-01

    Ecological effects of forest fires, Bot. Rev. , 26, 483 –1 ] In boreal forests, fire is a frequent disturbance andal. , 1999]. Risk of forest fires was high during the entire

  9. The integration of digitized images, databases, and inventory protocol in an inventory updating program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Charles Timothy

    1993-01-01

    with large amounts of land, such as forest products companies or the Nature Conservancy, also use inventories to assess conditions of their holdings. The Soil Conservation Service National Resource Inventory (NRI) involves collecting and interpreting...

  10. Final Technical Report Interannual Variations in the Rate of Carbon Storage by a Mid-Latitude Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wofsy, Steven; Munger, J W

    2012-07-31

    The time series of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon by an entire forest ecosystem on time scales from hourly to decadal was measured by eddy-covariance supplemented with plot-level measurements of biomass and tree demography. The results demonstrate the response of forest carbon fluxes and long-term budgets to climatic factors and to successional change. The data from this project have been extensively used worldwide by the carbon cycle science community in support of model development and validation of remote sensing observations.

  11. OAK FOREST CARBON AND WATER SIMULATIONS: MODEL INTERCOMPARISONS AND EVALUATIONS AGAINST INDEPENDENT DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Paul J; Amthor, Jeffrey S; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wilson, K.; Grant, Robert F.; Hartley, Anne; Hui, D.; HuntJr., E. Raymond; Johnson, Dale W.; Kimball, John S.; King, Anthony Wayne; Luo, Yiqi; McNulty, Steven G.; Sun, G.; Thornton, Peter; Wang, S.; Williams, M.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Cushman, Robert Michael

    2004-01-01

    Models represent our primary method for integration of small-scale, processlevel phenomena into a comprehensive description of forest-stand or ecosystem function. They also represent a key method for testing hypotheses about the response of forest ecosystems to multiple changing environmental conditions. This paper describes the evaluation of 13 stand-level models varying in their spatial, mechanistic, and temporal complexity for their ability to capture intra- and interannual components of the water and carbon cycle for an upland, oak-dominated forest of eastern Tennessee. Comparisons between model simulations and observations were conducted for hourly, daily, and annual time steps. Data for the comparisons were obtained from a wide range of methods including: eddy covariance, sapflow, chamber-based soil respiration, biometric estimates of stand-level net primary production and growth, and soil water content by time or frequency domain reflectometry. Response surfaces of carbon and water flux as a function of environmental drivers, and a variety of goodness-of-fit statistics (bias, absolute bias, and model efficiency) were used to judge model performance. A single model did not consistently perform the best at all time steps or for all variables considered. Intermodel comparisons showed good agreement for water cycle fluxes, but considerable disagreement among models for predicted carbon fluxes. The mean of all model outputs, however, was nearly always the best fit to the observations. Not surprisingly, models missing key forest components or processes, such as roots or modeled soil water content, were unable to provide accurate predictions of ecosystem responses to short-term drought phenomenon. Nevertheless, an inability to correctly capture short-term physiological processes under drought was not necessarily an indicator of poor annual water and carbon budget simulations. This is possible because droughts in the subject ecosystem were of short duration and therefore had a small cumulative impact. Models using hourly time steps and detailed mechanistic processes, and having a realistic spatial representation of the forest ecosystem provided the best predictions of observed data. Predictive ability of all models deteriorated under drought conditions, suggesting that further work is needed to evaluate and improve ecosystem model performance under unusual conditions, such as drought, that are a common focus of environmental change discussions.

  12. I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Forests, Carbon and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    start with an overview of global climate change and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Carbon dioxide (CO2 W A N D R O B E R T M A T T H E W S O F F O R E S T R E S E A R C H FORESTS, CARBON DIOXIDE the concentrations of GHGs in the atmosphere are rising. Carbon dioxide is the most important contributor

  13. Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl at Western Economics Association Meetings, July 5-8, 2001, San Francisco #12;2 Jointly Estimating Carbon Sequestration Supply from Forests and Agriculture Alterations in agricultural and forestry (AF) land use and

  14. Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

    2005-03-18

    Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

  15. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses April 2001, Discussion Paper 01-19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedjo, Roger; Sohngen, Brent; Mendelsohn, Robert

    2001-04-05

    This study develops cumulative carbon ''supply curves'' for global forests utilizing a dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and particular time points within that century, the curves are not traditional Marshallian supply curves or steady-state supply curves. Rather, the focus is on cumulative carbon cost curves (quasi-supply curves) at various points in time over the next 100 years. The research estimates a number of long-term, cumulative, carbon quasi-supply curves under different price scenarios and for different time periods. The curves trace out the relationship between an intertemporal price path for carbon, as given by carbon shadow prices, and the cumulative carbon sequestered from the initiation of the shadow prices, set at 2000, to a selected future year (2010, 2050, 2100). The timber supply model demonstrates that cumulative carbon quasi-supply curves that can be generated through forestry significantly depend on initial carbon prices and expectations regarding the time profile of future carbon prices. Furthermore, long-run quasi-supply curves generated from a constant price will have somewhat different characteristics from quasi-supply curves generated with an expectation of rising carbon prices through time.The ?least-cost? curves vary the time periods under consideration and the time profile of carbon prices. The quasi-supply curves suggest that a policy of gradually increasing carbon prices will generate the least costly supply curves in the shorter periods of a decade or so. Over longer periods of time, however, such as 50 or 100 years, these advantages appear to dissipate.

  16. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2006), The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,J. , et al. (2003), Large forest fires in Canada, 1959–1997,2003; U.S. National Interagency Forest Fire Centre, http://

  17. Has fire suppression increased the amount of carbon stored in western U.S. forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellows, Aaron W.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    precipitation (MAP), forest type, and fire regime. [ 7 ] Thein mid-elevation conifer forests, where fire suppression is20th century fire suppression in western US forests, and a

  18. Exposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    to reduce the rate at which atmospheric CO2 increases, the Kyoto Protocol has transformed CO2 emissions in a future CO2-enriched world is even greater (Houghton, 1997). For example, despite some downExposure to an enriched CO2 atmosphere alters carbon assimilation and allocation in a pine forest

  19. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  20. Forest Inventory & Analysis Forests Resource Status & Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to supporting sustainable, environmentally-based, economic development. TFS Response · In 2001, TFS began a benchmark for measuring sustainability, as well as the success of land management practices. Economic Impact of forestland, all of which provide a myriad of economic, environmental and social benefits. The bulk

  1. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  2. Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest. Final Report and Conference Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conte, Maureen H

    2008-04-10

    Carbon dioxide is the major “greenhouse” gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.

  3. Presentation 2.3: The sustainable forest products industry, carbon and climate change Mikael Hannus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emissions, the forest products industry can - become more energy efficient and increase its share of biomass International Seminar onFAO IEA ICFPA International Seminar on Energy and the Forest Products IndustryEnergy the industry. To assist in the efforts to reduce society's energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the forest

  4. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    time series of carbon, water, and energy exchange at themeasurements of carbon, water and energy exchanges betweenN. , 2006. Carbon, energy and water ?uxes at mature and

  5. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in2007), Comparison of carbon dioxide fluxes over three borealharvest influence carbon dioxide fluxes of black spruce

  6. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  7. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 396GTR-NRS-P-105 FIA'S VOLUME-TO-BIOMASS CONVERSION METHOD (CRM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed from published equations. These 35 equations, which predict aboveground biomass of individual volume estimates to biomass using constant specific gravity values and auxiliary information for branches sector (Heath et al. 2011) of the Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks (EPA 2012). A meta

  8. Session K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-189. 2008. 285 Estimating Forest Fuels in the Southwest Using Forest Inventory Data1 objective of this study was to demonstrate the linkages between forest inventory data and hazardous fuelSession K--Estimating Forest Fuels--Gebert, Schuster, Woudenberg, O'Brien USDA Forest Service Gen

  9. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy flux densities, Bull.et al. (2006), Carbon, energy and water fluxes at mature and

  10. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-02-15

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

  11. Modeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    . Introduction Linkages between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global thermal properties have forcedModeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake the examination of biospheric carbon flows and pools. Variability in carbon storage or the net ecosystem exchange

  12. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory A content inventory and analysis will help...

  13. Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession.ecosystem productivity (NEP), gross ecosystem productivity (Mg C ha ?1 at 80 years. Peak NEP ranged from 0.9 to 2.9 Mg C

  14. Using climate policies and carbon markets to save tropical forests : the case of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpels, Marisa (Marisa Carina)

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s, advocates for forest conservation thought that climate change could provide a lever to motivate developing countries to reduce deforestation. Fifteen years after the first climate change ...

  15. Supporting Online Material for: Carbon in Amazon forests: Unexpected seasonal fluxes and disturbance-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seasonal variations in important climatic variables at this site: solar radiation, net radiation, air; measurements at Km 83 after that date are not included here, since we focus on the dynamics of primary forests

  16. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2005-07-20

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we determined that by grinding the soil samples to a finer particle size of less than 250 ?m (sieve No. 60), the effect of mine soil coal particle size on the extent to which these particles will be oxidized during the thermal treatment of the carbon partitioning procedure will be eliminated, thus making the procedure more accurate and precise. In the second phase of the carbon sequestration project, we focused our attention on determining the sample size required for carbon accounting on grassland mined fields in order to achieve a desired accuracy and precision of the final soil organic carbon (SOC) estimate. A mine land site quality classification scheme was developed and some field-testing of the methods of implementation was completed. The classification model has been validated for softwoods (white pine) on several reclaimed mine sites in the southern Appalachian coal region. The classification model is a viable method for classifying post-SMCRA abandoned mined lands into productivity classes for white pine. A thinning study was established as a random complete block design to evaluate the response to thinning of a 26-year-old white pine stand growing on a reclaimed surface mine in southwest Virginia. Stand parameters were projected to age 30 using a stand table projection. Site index of the stand was found to be 32.3 m at base age 50 years. Thinning rapidly increased the diameter growth of the residual trees to 0.84 cm yr{sup -1} compared to 0.58 cm yr{sup -1} for the unthinned treatment; however, at age 26, there was no difference in volume or value per hectare. At age 30, the unthinned treatment had a volume of 457.1 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} but was only worth $8807 ha{sup -1}, while the thinned treatment was projected to have 465.8 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1}, which was worth $11265 ha{sup -1} due to a larger percentage of the volume being in sawtimber size classes.

  17. Tema: Emissions Inventories Titel: Denmark's National Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tema: Emissions Inventories Titel: Denmark's National Inventory Report - Submitted under the United;Arbejdsrapport fra DMU nr.: 127 Samfund og miljø ­ Emissions Inventories Denmark's National Inventory Report ­ Emissions Inventories. Research Notes from NERI no. 127. Reproduction is permitted, provided the source

  18. Moving from Status to Trends: Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 2012 74GTR-NRS-P-105 USING FIESTA, AN R-BASED TOOL FOR ANALYSTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development Core Team 2011). R is a powerful statistical computing and graphical program language a flexible, cross-platform environment for statistical tool development and application through R package FIESTA, AN R-BASED TOOL FOR ANALYSTS, TO LOOK AT TEMPORAL TRENDS IN FOREST ESTIMATES Tracey S. Frescino

  19. The combined effects of thinning and prescribed fire on carbon and nutrient budgets in a Jeffrey pine forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dale W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Murphy, James D. [University of Nevada, Reno; Walker, Roger F. [University of Nevada, Reno; Miller, Watkins W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Glass, D. W. [University of Nevada, Reno; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

    2008-09-01

    Both burning and harvesting cause carbon and nutrient removals from forest ecosystems, but few studies have addressed the combination of these effects. For a Pinus jeffreyii forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, we posed the question: what are the relative impacts of thinning and subsequent burning on carbon and nutrient removals? The thinning methods included whole-tree thinning (WT, where all aboveground biomass was removed) cut to length (CTL, where branches and foliage were left on site in a slash mat on top of skid trails) and no harvest (CONT). Total C and nutrient exports with thinning and burning were greater in the WT and CTL than in the CONT treatments. Total C and N removals were approximately equal for the WT and CTL treatments, although harvesting dominated exports in the WT treatment and burning dominated exports in the CTL treatment. Total removals of P, K, Ca, Mg and S were greatest in the WT treatments, where harvesting dominated removals. Comparisons of nutrient removals with ecosystem capital and calculations of potential replenishment by atmospheric deposition suggested that N is the nutrient likely to be most depleted by harvesting and burning treatments.

  20. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  1. Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    : carbon isotopes, elevation, Hawai'i, imaging spectroscopy, land-use change, pastures, remote sensing be addressed, future changes in ecosystem dynamics and atmospheric carbon dioxide cannot be easily predictedEffects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry

  2. anagin Forests because Carbon Matters: In grating Energy, Products, and Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    storage and releases, water fluxes from the soil and into the atmosphere, and solar energy copture with traditional forest products, but it may also produce benefits through competition and market efficiency. Short to heart the finding of the Intergovernmental Panel on Oimote OlOnge in its Fourth Assessment Report when

  3. A model analysis of N and P limitation on carbon accumulation in Amazonian secondary forest after

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alternate land-use abandonment DARRELL A. HERBERT*, MATHEW WILLIAMS and EDWARD B. RASTETTER Marine in residual fuel and belowground necromass relative to soil organic matter (SOM) N:P produced a simul- taneous- nificantly. Associated with the practice of forest conversion to alternate land-use is an export of C

  4. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to characterize vertically-aligned carbon nanotube forest porosimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yuan, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated much research interest and potential applications due to their unique properties such as their high tensile strength, high thermal conductivity, and unique semiconductor properties. ...

  5. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    emissions from boreal forest fires, J. Geophys. Res. , 109,Skinner, W. R. : Large forest fires in Canada, 1959–1997, J.S. : The Impact of Bo- real Forest Fire on Climate Warming,

  6. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    development of Boreal forests and fire regimes on the Kenaiemissions from boreal forest fires, J. Geophys. Res. , 109,Skinner, W. R. : Large forest fires in Canada, 1959–1997, J.

  7. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forestinput from fine roots in a deciduous forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forestinput from fine roots in a deciduous forest · We assessed the effect of elevated [CO2] Contact: Richard J. Norby Research We assessed the effect of elevated [CO2] on production and mortality of short-lived fine

  8. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 27012711 Carbon structure and enzyme activities in alpine and forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    2007-01-01

    : Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; Py-GC/MS; Enzymes; Microbe; Carbon; Chemistry; Soil organicSoil Biology & Biochemistry 39 (2007) 2701­2711 Carbon structure and enzyme activities in alpine of soil organic matter fractions and its relationship to biological processes remains uncertain. We used

  9. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com The carbon balance of tropical forest regions, 19902005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    the biosphere to the atmosphere, through the combustion and decomposition of vegetation biomass. The exact of knowledge of the carbon balance of the tropical bio- sphere, looking at both CO2 emissions from land use, principally because they contain the more substantial biomass carbon stocks, but also because so few data

  10. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Morton, DC

    2015-01-01

    19), 7888–7892. CHEN ET AL. HURRICANES AND AMAZON FIRES AREand G. C. Hurtt (2007), Hurricane Katrina’s carbon footprintThe 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season: Blip or ?ip? ,

  11. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration and harvesting, and the physical properties of stands, trees and timber. Scope of our work Our research focuses expertise in forecasting forest growth is now applied to carbon assessment and management. We also work

  12. Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 -Tropical forests in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil plantations could be more profitable left standing threat of being converted to oil palm plantations. "They are not meant to be clearing forest for palm oil development. It's pretty clear that forests are being felled for oil palm," said Venter, a conservation

  13. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    the Australian National Green- house Gas Inventory (DCCEE,fuel emissions Carbon and green house gas (GHG) accounts are

  14. Carbon stocks in coffee agroforests and mixed dry tropical forests in the western highlands of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    of Guatemala Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh · Tom P. Evans · Edwin Castellanos · J. C. Randolph Received: 4 January 2012- ducted in 2007 and 2010 in the Lake Atitla´n region of Guatemala, this research examines the carbon pools Estudios Ambientales y de Biodiversidad, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, 18 Avenida 11-95 Zona 15

  15. Comparison of coniferous forest carbon stocks between old-growth and young second-growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanborn, Paul

    stocks by 54%­41%. Résumé : Les stocks de carbone (C) ont été évalués pour les forêts de montagne-Britannique, au Canada. Des parcelles-échantillons ont été éta- blies dans quatre vieilles forêts (141­250 ans) et quatre jeunes forêts de seconde venue (ans) sur les deux types dominants de texture du sol, grossière

  16. Warming acceleratesQ:1 decomposition; 2 of decades-old carbon in forest soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , CA 94720; and d Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 AUTHOR to distinguish the contribution of decades-old carbon to CO2 fluxes in a labo- ratory incubation study. The first- sphere, which has declined since the early 1960s when large-scale atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons

  17. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andon tropical forest carbon, water, and energy exchange. Twothe role of forest in the water and energy cycles and

  18. AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANUAL FOR AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES IN SWEDEN NILS YEAR for aerial photo interpretation 1 www-nils.slu.se SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics. 901 83 Umeå, Sweden #12;NILS ­ manual for aerial photo interpretation 2 Table of contents 1 About NILS

  19. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Product, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, James A

    2006-09-30

    Concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the Earth’s atmosphere have increased dramatically in the past 100 years due to deforestation, land use change, and fossil fuel combustion. These humancaused, higher levels of CO{sub 2} may enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect and may contribute to climate change. Many reclaimed coal-surface mine areas in the eastern U.S. are not in productive use. Reforestation of these lands could provide societal benefits, including sequestration of atmospheric carbon. The goal of this project was to determine the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on the tens of thousands of hectares of mined land and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from large-scale application of forest restoration procedures. We developed a mine soil quality model that can be used to estimate the suitability of selected mined sites for carbon sequestration projects. Across the mine soil quality gradient, we tested survival and growth performance of three species assemblages under three levels of silvicultural. Hardwood species survived well in WV and VA, and survived better than the other species used in OH, while white pine had the poorest survival of all species at all sites. Survival was particularly good for the site-specific hardwoods planted at each site. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Grassland to forest conversion costs may be a major contributor to the lack of reforestation of previously reclaimed mine lands in the Appalachian coal-mining region. Otherwise profitable forestry opportunities may be precluded by these conversion costs, which for many combinations of factors (site class, forest type, timber prices, regeneration intensity, and interest rate) result in negative land expectation values. Improved technology and/or knowledge of reforestation practices in these situations may provide opportunities to reduce the costs of converting many of these sites as research continues into these practices. It also appears that in many cases substantial payments, non-revenue values, or carbon values are required to reach “profitability” under the present circumstances. It is unclear when, or in what form, markets will develop to support any of these add-on values to supplement commercial forestry revenues. However, as these markets do develop, they will only enhance the viability of forestry on reclaimed mined lands, although as we demonstrate in our analysis of carbon payments, the form of the revenue source may itself influence management, potentially mitigating some of the benefits of reforestation. For a representative mined-land resource base, reforestation of mined lands with mixed pine-hardwood species would result in an average estimated C accumulation in forms that can be harvested for use as wood products or are likely to remain in the soil C pool at ~250 Mg C ha{sup -1} over a 60 year period following reforestation. The “additionality” of this potential C sequestration was estimated considering data in scientific literature that defines C accumulation in mined-land grasslands over the long term. Given assumptions detailed in the text, these lands have the potential to sequester ~180 Mg C ha{sup -1}, a total of 53.5 x 10{sup 6} Mg C, over 60 years, an average of ~900,000 Mg C / yr, an amount equivalent to about 0.04% of projected US C emissions at the midpoint of a 60-year period (circa 2040) following assumed reforestation. Although potential sequestration quantities are not great relative to potential national needs should an energy-related C emissions offset requirement be developed at some future date, these lands are available and unused for other economically valued purposes and many possess soil and site properties that are well-suited to reforestation. Should such reforestation occur, it would also produce ancillary benefits by providing env

  20. Modeling the effects of fire severity and climate warming on active layer thickness and soil carbon storage of black spruce forests across the landscape in interior Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genet, Helene [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [Institute of Arctic Biology (IAB), University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Barrett, K. [USGS Alaska Science Center] [USGS Alaska Science Center; Breen, Amy [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Euskirchen, Eugenie S [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Johnstone, J. F. [University of Saskatchewan] [University of Saskatchewan; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park] [University of Maryland, College Park; Melvin, A. M. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Bennett, A. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Mack, M. C. [University of Florida, Gainesville] [University of Florida, Gainesville; Rupp, Scott T. [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF)] [International Arctic Research Center, SNAP, University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF); Schuur, Edward [University of Florida] [University of Florida; Turetsky, M. R. [University of Guelph, Canada] [University of Guelph, Canada; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    There is a substantial amount of carbon stored in the permafrost soils of boreal forest ecosystems, where it is currently protected from decomposition. The surface organic horizons insulate the deeper soil from variations in atmospheric temperature. The removal of these insulating horizons through consumption by fire increases the vulnerability of permafrost to thaw, and the carbon stored in permafrost to decomposition. In this study we ask how warming and fire regime may influence spatial and temporal changes in active layer and carbon dynamics across a boreal forest landscape in interior Alaska. To address this question, we (1) developed and tested a predictive model of the effect of fire severity on soil organic horizons that depends on landscape-level conditions and (2) used this model to evaluate the long-term consequences of warming and changes in fire regime on active layer and soil carbon dynamics of black spruce forests across interior Alaska. The predictive model of fire severity, designed from the analysis of field observations, reproduces the effect of local topography (landform category, the slope angle and aspect and flow accumulation), weather conditions (drought index, soil moisture) and fire characteristics (day of year and size of the fire) on the reduction of the organic layercaused by fire. The integration of the fire severity model into an ecosystem process-based model allowed us to document the relative importance and interactions among local topography, fire regime and climate warming on active layer and soil carbon dynamics. Lowlands were more resistant to severe fires and climate warming, showing smaller increases in active layer thickness and soil carbon loss compared to drier flat uplands and slopes. In simulations that included the effects of both warming and fire at the regional scale, fire was primarily responsible for a reduction in organic layer thickness of 0.06 m on average by 2100 that led to an increase in active layer thickness of 1.1 m on average by 2100. The combination of warming and fire led to a simulated cumulative loss of 9.6 kgC m 2 on average by 2100. Our analysis suggests that ecosystem carbon storage in boreal forests in interior Alaska is particularly vulnerable, primarily due to the combustion of organic layer thickness in fire and the related increase in active layer thickness that exposes previously protected permafrost soil carbon to decomposition.

  1. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    of carbon and energy exchanges Agric. Forest Meteorol. 113Agric. Forest Meteorol. Foken T 2008 The energy balance

  2. Simulating boreal forest carbon dynamics after stand-replacing fire disturbance: insights from a global process-based vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    NPP, GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succes-evaluated comprise GPP, NEP, TER, leaf area index (LAI),net ecosystem production or NEP, total ecosystem respiration

  3. Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

  4. Testing a Mechanistic Model of Forest-Canopy Mass and Energy Exchange Using Eddy Correlation: Carbon Dioxide and Ozone Uptake by a Mixed Oak-Maple Stand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amthor, JS; Goulden, ML; Munger, JW; Wofsy, SC

    1994-01-01

    exchange of mass and energy between a forest canopy and thewater, energy, and momentum exchange between a forest andmeasurements of forest mass and energy exchange are

  5. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andsurface energy exchange in the Amazonian terra firme forestvapour, energy, and CO 2 exchange. The rates of whole-forest

  6. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  7. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynam- ics of a central Amazonian rain forest.

  8. Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

  9. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  10. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  11. Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battipaglia, Giovanna [Second University of Naples; Saurer, Matthias [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Cherubini, Paulo [WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research; Califapietra, Carlo [University of Tuscia; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Cotrufo, M. Francesca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2013-01-01

    Elevated CO2 increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used 13C to assess carbon isotope discrimination ( 13C ci/ca) and changes in WUEi, while direct CO2 effects on stomatal conductance were explored using 18O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO2 increased 13C-derived WUEi on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting WUEi responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modeling elevated CO2 and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

  12. Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

  13. Forest Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature

  14. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, C. A; Trumbore, S. E; Davidson, E. A; Frey, S. D; Savage, K. E; Hopkins, F. M

    2012-01-01

    carbon cycling in a temperate forest: radiocarbon-based es- timates of residence times, sequestration

  15. Occupation, Dispersal, and Economic Impact of Major Invasive Plant Species in Southern U.S. Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsiao-Hsuan

    2011-02-22

    (Ligustrum sinense Lour.), European Privet (Ligustrum vulgare L.), and Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.). Using data from USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and USGS...

  16. SmartTree: Mobile Tree Inventory Device for Rapid Data Collection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Louise

    2011-11-24

    In order to make a tree inventory in forests it is essential to collect field data as quickly, efficiently and in a cost effective manner. Under the UN REDD framework or REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and ...

  17. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

  18. Reduction of forest floor respiration by fertilization on both carbon dioxide-enriched and reference 17-year-old

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    be best applied to aggrading forest systems where soil resources have not been fully exploited (Mikan et affect the available C pool and impact microbial activity. When N amendments are added to peat soils, Canada. Amador JA, Jones RD (1993) Nutrient limitations on microbial respiration in peat soils

  19. Forest species classification using Object Oriented Image Analysis – does CIR aerial imagery and Object Oriented Methods offer new possibilities? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christine

    2008-12-06

    National Forest Inventories (NFI) in Britain such as the Forestry Commission’s National Inventory of Woodlands and Trees (NIWT) and the Native Woodland Survey of Scotland (NWSS) provide a synoptic view of the current extent, ...

  20. Age-dependent variation in the biophysical properties of boreal forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    2000) Increased carbon sequestration by a boreal deciduouson the annual carbon sequestration by a boreal aspen forest.1996) Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy

  1. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-04-29

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore »large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (66 ± 2%) was rapid (11 to 26 years; mean and SE: 18 ± 3 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial–millennial turnover was typically much less abundant (34 ± 3%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral-associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were statistically similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–25% of annual litter production. Observed trends in mineral-associated ?14C over time could not be fit using the single-pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and ?14C as compared with a more realistic two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils documented here are supported by findings from paired 14C studies in other types of ecosystems, and suggest that most mineral-associated C cycles relatively rapidly (decadal scales) across ecosystems that span a broad range of state factors.« less

  2. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-01-16

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore »large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (74 ± 4%) was rapid (9 to 29 years, mean and SE 20 ± 2 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial – millennial turnover was much less abundant (26%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–30% of annual litterfall production (estimated by doubling aboveground litterfall). Observed trends in mineral-associated ?14C over time could not be fit using the single pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and ?14C as compared with a more realistic constrained two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils implied by our data suggest that other studies using single-pool ?14C models of mineral-associated C dynamics, unconstrained by multiple time points, may have systematically underestimated C turnover.« less

  3. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01

    control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

  4. Lee, McCarl, and Gillig The Dynamic Competitiveness of U.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    the emissions efficiency of fossil fuel usage, or 3 #12;Lee, McCarl, and Gillig · actions reducing the dependence on fossil fuel sources by switching fuels. The costs of such actions were a prominent argument can play an important role but that the relative importance of strategies depends on carbon price

  5. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement, currently identified as 2030 and 2033, depending on the type of waste. TSPA-LA uses the results of this analysis to decay the inventory to the year of repository closure projected for the year of 2060.

  6. Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Forestry., White, M. and Yamulki, S. (2012). Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests

  7. Age-dependent variation in the biophysical properties of boreal forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    for long term energy flux data sets. Agricultural and ForestBOREAL FOREST atmosphere exchange of both carbon and energy.forests account for a large portion of terrestrial biomass and their rates of mass and energy

  8. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    C. S. : The impact of boreal forest fire on climate warming,W. : Climate change and forest fire poten- tial in Russianflight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon diox-

  9. The effect of post-fire stand age on the boreal forest energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    emissions from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999. Can. J.W.R. , 2002. Large forest fires in Canada, 1959– 1997. J.flight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon dioxide

  10. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    at Fourth Symposium on Forest and Fire Meteorology, Am.flight measurements of forest-fire effects on carbon dioxideNorth American boreal forest, in Fire, Climate Change and

  11. Instructions for use Eurasian J. For. Res. 15-1: 9-17 , 2012 Hokkaido University Forests, EFRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachizawa, Kazuya

    .yamagata-u.ac.jp Forest Fires Effects on Carbon Stocks and Soil Chemistry in Central Yakutia, Eastern Siberia LOPEZ C. M sites. Salt content increased in the active layer following forest fires, but a decade later, the salt: Black carbon, Forest fires, Permafrost, Soil chemistry, Soil organic carbon Introduction Boreal forests

  12. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  13. With Mathematica Gasoline Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Clifford A.

    Preprint 1 With Mathematica and J: Gasoline Inventory Simulation Cliff Reiter Computational for the number of gallons of gasoline sold by a station for a thousand weeks. The pattern involves demands with the delivery and storage of the gasoline and we desire not to run out of gasoline or exceed the station

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and for carbon sequestration (Jandl et al. 2007). Soil acidification and carbon sequestration are influ- encedORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest carbon release under broadleaved forest floors may explain this difference. Spruce forest floor exhibited

  15. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    recreational opportunities and store carbon, all while providing us a valuable renewable resource and important forest products, it also provides an economic motivation for forest landowners to keep their land products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  16. Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andexample, the energy stored in tropical forest biomass variedforest (JRU) and that illustrates the control that available energy

  17. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  18. Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

  19. Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

    2007-01-05

    The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

  20. Forest Mensuration Instructor: Mr. Ken Oser, RF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    covered include: individual and stand level volume estimation, natural resources inventories, sampling of principles of forest mensuration and their applications to estimate forestry resources. Some of the topics) For information on current UF policies for assigning grade points, see https://catalog.ufl.edu/ugrad/current/regulations/info

  1. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux form 25 April 2007; accepted 29 April 2007 Abstract Wood density is an important variable in estimates of forest biomass and greenhouse-gas emissions from land-use change. The mean wood density used in estimates

  2. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  3. Effects of selective logging on tropical forest tree growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J.water content cannot explain the increases in diameter observed before the onset of rains.

  4. Lot sizing with inventory gains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-11-23

    feasible schedule that minimizes the fixed setup costs and per unit production and inventory costs. ...... Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. Wolsey, L.

  5. Aboveground carbon biomass of plantation-grown American chestnut (Castanea dentata) in absence of blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Forested ecosystems may help contribute toward carbon sequestration by capturing and storing atmospheric CO forests for carbon sequestration. Forest Ecology and Management 258 (2009) 288­294 A R T I C L E I N F O Keywords: Afforestation Carbon sequestration Competition Forest restoration Plantation establishment A B

  6. Long-run Implications of a Forest-based Carbon Sequestration Policy on the United States Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monge, Juan

    2012-10-19

    The economic impacts of a government-funded, forest-based sequestration program were analyzed under two different payment schemes. The impacts were obtained by developing a regional, static CGE model built to accommodate a modified IMPLAN SAM for a...

  7. limate change is expected to result in serious ecological, social and economic effects for U.S. forests. Many tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hargrove, William W.

    .geobabble.org/ ~hnw/global/treeranges3/ climate_change/ Species input data: Forest Inventory and Analysis (Figure 1a Assessments of Forest Tree Genetic Degradation Risk from Climate Change (SO-EM-09-01) Spatial Assessments of Forest Tree Genetic Degradation Risk from Climate Change (SO-EM-09-01) Kevin M. Potter1, William W

  8. Transient simulations of Holocene atmospheric carbon dioxide and terrestrial carbon since the Last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    Transient simulations of Holocene atmospheric carbon dioxide and terrestrial carbon since the Last ppm between 8 ka BP and pre-industrial time. The carbon component of the Bern Carbon Cycle Climate. Terrestrial carbon inventory changes related to climate and CO2 forcing, the greening of the Sahara, peat

  9. Carbon Accounting and Economic Model Uncertainty of Emissions from Biofuels-Induced Land Use Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plevin, Richard J; Beckman, Jayson; Golub, Alla A; Witcover, Julie; O'??Hare, Michael

    2015-01-01

    uncertainty of full carbon accounting of forest ecosystemsA. ; Hopson, E. , Proper accounting for time increases crop-use change modeling in GTEM: Accounting for forest sinks.

  10. Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2008-01-01

    potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

  11. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mitigation, discounting, emissions trading, forestry, quality assurance, risk management, sequestration

  12. A long-term record of carbon exchange in a boreal black spruce forest: means, responses to interannual variability, and decadal trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, AL; Barford, CC; Wofsy, SC; Goulden, ML; Daube, BC

    2007-01-01

    the growing season (OGS and EGS, respectively) as the firstthe influence of OGS, EGS, and LGS on the annual carbon

  13. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    K. G. : Direct carbon emissions from Canadian forest fires,O. , and Merlet, P. : Emission of trace gases and aerosolsEstimating direct carbon emissions from Canadian wildland

  14. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud Full report Inventory spreadsheet State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory Release date: July 11, 2013 Next release...

  15. 11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTORT/FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    market signals for forest products, including energy. As stated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate11 March 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTORT it's time to get the policy right on biomass energy carbon accounting The clock is ticking

  16. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  17. Web Content Analysis and Inventories: Template and FY 2014 Inventory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A content inventory and analysis will help identify content that needs to be updated, edited, added, or removed for maintenance. They're also recommended prior to starting a website redesign. This content template and sample inventory were created in Excel. The sample lists URLs, page names, navigation, navigation hierarchy, and section placement for each page on the website. It also includes a notes field, which can be used for a Web content analysis.

  18. Inventory of miscellaneous streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lueck, K.J.

    1995-09-01

    On December 23, 1991, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of the Department of Ecology Consent Order. The Consent Order lists the regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site to comply with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code. The RL provided the US Congress a Plan and Schedule to discontinue disposal of contaminated liquid effluent into the soil column on the Hanford Site. The plan and schedule document contained a strategy for the implementation of alternative treatment and disposal systems. This strategy included prioritizing the streams into two phases. The Phase 1 streams were considered to be higher priority than the Phase 2 streams. The actions recommended for the Phase 1 and 2 streams in the two reports were incorporated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Miscellaneous Streams are those liquid effluents streams identified within the Consent Order that are discharged to the ground but are not categorized as Phase 1 or Phase 2 Streams. This document consists of an inventory of the liquid effluent streams being discharged into the Hanford soil column.

  19. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  20. Risk Aversion in Inventory Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Traditional inventory models focus on risk-neutral decision makers, i.e., characterizing replenishment strategies that maximize expected total profit, or equivalently, minimize expected total cost over a planning horizon. ...

  1. RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission.........................................................................................................................1 Roadmap Organization

  2. An Overview of the Forest Bird Monitoring Program in Ontario, Canada1 Daniel A. Welsh2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Overview of the Forest Bird Monitoring Program in Ontario, Canada1 Daniel A. Welsh2 Abstract: In 1987, the Canadian Wildlife Service (Ontario Region) initiated a program to inventory and monitor developed for Northwestern Ontario. Site Selection and Station Layout Forest stands representative

  3. CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Endangered Species. For further information please contact: R. Juge Gregg, Washington, DC, rjgregg for ecosystem services provided by forests such as watershed protection, biodiversity and carbon storage. Forest NGOs and investment institutions. For further information, please contact: Kerstin Canby, kcanby

  4. Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.E. Law; D. Turner; M. Goeckede

    2010-06-01

    GOAL: To develop and apply an approach to quantify and understand the regional carbon balance of the west coast states for the North American Carbon Program. OBJECTIVE: As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance. APPROACH: In performing the regional analysis, the research plan for the bottom-up approach uses a nested hierarchy of observations that include AmeriFlux data (i.e., net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from eddy covariance and associated biometric data), intermediate intensity inventories from an extended plot array partially developed from the PI's previous research, Forest Service FIA and CVS inventory data, time since disturbance, disturbance type, and cover type from Landsat developed in this study, and productivity estimates from MODIS algorithms. The BIOME-BGC model is used to integrate information from these sources and quantify C balance across the region. The inverse modeling approach assimilates flux data from AmeriFlux sites, high precision CO2 concentration data from AmeriFlux towers and four new calibrated CO2 sites, reanalysis meteorology and various remote sensing products to generate statewide estimates of biosphere carbon exchange from the atmospheric point of view.

  5. Reducing uncertainty in predictions of the response of Amazonian forests to climate change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowland, Lucy Miranda

    2013-07-01

    Amazonia contains the largest expanse of tropical forest in the world and is globally significant as a store of carbon, a regulator of climate and an area of high species diversity. The ability of the Amazonian forests ...

  6. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  7. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

    2012-01-01

    Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

  8. Forests 2012, 3, 370-397; doi:10.3390/f3020370 ISSN 1999-4907

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    for bioenergy without compromising the carbon sink is uncertain. Using past literature and previously validated that could be used for biomass production. Greater carbon storage was estimated to result from partial.mdpi.com/journal/forests Review Harvesting Carbon from Eastern US Forests: Opportunities and Impacts of an Expanding Bioenergy

  9. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  10. Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan The 2013 Excess Uranium Inventory Management Plan describes a framework for the effective...

  11. 4, 99123, 2007 Amazon carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , suggested much larger estimates for tropical forest carbon sequestration in the Ama- zon BasinBGD 4, 99­123, 2007 Amazon carbon balanc J. Lloyd et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences An airborne regional carbon balance

  12. Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization Contact: Gregg Marland, 865 of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted to and removed from the atmosphere are essential for understanding global.S. Department of Energy Greenhouse Gas Inventory Uncertainties Need Characterization Abstract: The assessment

  13. Inventory pre-positioning for humanitarian operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akkihal, Anup Roop

    2006-01-01

    This research examines the impact of inventory pre-positioning on humanitarian operations. The study identifies optimal locations for warehousing non-consumable inventories required for initial deployment of aid. These ...

  14. An Effective Implementation of Operational Inventory Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sellamuthu, Sivakumar

    2010-01-16

    operations related to inventory management projects and during that process adapt and/or extend theoretical inventory models according to real-world business complexity and data integrity problems. A holistic approach to automation was taken to satisfy both...

  15. AGRICULTURAL INVENTORY LOWER FRASER VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory Estimates 8 #12;- ii - LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 Agricultural Waste Management Zones 2 Figure 2 4 Livestock Mass Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 5 Agricultural Land Distribution by Waste Management Zone 10 Figure 6 Livestock Mass to Agricultural Land Ratio by Waste Management Zone 11

  16. RFID Technology for Inventory Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is leveraging the use and application of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to a variety of markets. Tagging and tracking of individual items for inventory control is revealing rich rewards through increased time efficiency and reduced human intervention.

  17. 45USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Management of OaksWithin the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in California. These maps reside as digital information in our Forest and Resource Database and Geographic the CALVEG classification system, and are easily cross-walked to the Wildlife Habitat Relationship (WHR) classification system. The integrated resource vegetation inventories are part of the national program for forest

  18. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    estimates of annual carbon sequestration in a Sitka spruce (carbon cycling in a temperate forest: Radiocarbon-based estimates of residence times, sequestration

  19. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  20. Leaf traits and foliar CO2 exchange in a Peruvian tropical montane cloud forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Weg, Marjan

    2011-06-28

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are one of the most fascinating, but least understood ecosystems in the world, and the interest in the carbon (C) cycle of TMCFs with regard to carbon sequestration and storage ...

  1. Research Summary The EU Emissions Trading System: Opportunities for Forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary The EU Emissions Trading System: Opportunities for Forests? European forestry has sequestration provided by European forests has not been recognised by markets. The EU Emissions Trading System as part of a wider review covering emerging carbon markets. Background The EU Emissions Trading Scheme

  2. Reynolda Campus Wake Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Reynolda Campus Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Office of Research than NIH and NSF, such as the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and State

  3. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  5. FACTS II (Aspen FACE) Facility and Harshaw Forest Experimental Farm Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Project Name: Forest Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-II) The Aspen Free-air CO2 and O3 Enrichment (FACE) Project. Project Number: Site: Harshaw Forest Experimental Farm (HFEF) USDA Forest ServiceUniversity Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposed Dates Beginning Date: May 1998 of Project: Ending Date: October 15

  6. Methods of valuing and pricing inventories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Futch, George Peyton

    1947-01-01

    reflected income, . . . On December 19, 1917 the Treasury Department for the first time authorized the taking of inven? tories at cost or ~cost or market, whichevex is lower'. " Until about thirty years ago the primary, purpose of the annual statements... be included with materials, or both organisations may include it in the inventory, or it may be shown in the deferred charge section of the balance sheet, The trend. is in favor of including supplies inventory in the inventories, Many small retail concerns...

  7. Estimation of tropical forest structural characteristics using large-footprint lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    Estimation of tropical forest structural characteristics using large-footprint lidar Jason B in identifying the amount of carbon in terrestrial vegetation pools and is central to global carbon cycle studies. Although current remote sensing techniques recover such tropical forest structure poorly, new large-footprint

  8. ELSEVIER Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 90 (1998)291-306 AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998-01-01

    Forest-atmosphere carbon dioxide exchange in eastern Siberia D.Y. ~ o l l i n ~ e r ~ . ~ ? ' ,EM at a remote Siberian site during July and August of 1993. Our goal was to measure and partitton total C02; Stornatal control, Carbon balance; Boreal forest *Co~rc\\pondingauthor. Fax: 1 603 868 7604 0168

  9. Critical Materials Institute - course inventory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding in Actinide SandwichCray era Craycourse-inventory en CMI

  10. course inventory | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named| Princeton PlasmaZhihongOn-Sitecourse inventory CMI

  11. The influence of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Hu, J.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-15

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year data set from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle)more »to multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found the following: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70 % to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 90 and 110 %, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10 %), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m?2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m?2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6 % in dry conditions and between 15 and 25 % in partially wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, even though precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced the magnitude of Rnet, LE increased from ≈ 10 to over 20 W m?2 due to increased evaporation. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 2–3 ?mol mol?1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel cycle suggesting that it was due to synoptic weather patterns (different air masses and/or effects of barometric pressure). Finally, the effect of clouds on the timing and magnitude of daytime ecosystem fluxes is described.« less

  12. The effect of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-06-16

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year dataset from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle) tomore »multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70% to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 70–80%, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10%), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m-2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m-2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6% in dry conditions and 20% in wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced Rnet and increased LE. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 2–3 ?mol mol-1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel cycle suggesting that it was due to synoptic weather patterns (different air masses and/or effects of barometric pressure). In the evening hours during wet conditions, weakly stable conditions resulted in smaller vertical ?c differences compared to those in dry conditions. Finally, the effect of clouds on the timing and magnitude of daytime ecosystem fluxes is described.« less

  13. Large Neighborhood Search for LNG Inventory Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-12-15

    We consider an LNG IRP from the perspective of an vertically integrated oil ...... Maritime inventory routing with multiple products: A case study from the cement.

  14. National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: National System Templates: Building Sustainable National Inventory Management Systems AgencyCompany Organization: United...

  15. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  16. Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of human-induced climate change is critically dependent on the carbon (C) sequestration potential carbon cycle, being considered an important and continuing carbon sink. However, the response of carbon sequestration in forests to global climate change remains a major uncertainty, with a particularly poor under

  17. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    John- stone, J. F. : Quantifying fire severity, carbon, andfrom Canadian forest fires, 1959– 1999, Can. J. Forestwildland fires1, Int. J. Wildland Fire, 16, 593–606, doi:

  18. Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA/AVHRR data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    Development and analysis of a 12-year daily 1-km forest fire dataset across North America from NOAA Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, P.O. Box 8089, Missoula, MT 59807, United States g NOAA forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. While forest fires in North America (NA) have

  19. NaturallyProduced CarbonSources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (e.g., methane) to generate electricity, drive a petroleum-powered car, or cut down a forest, CO2 element in our universe. Carbon dioxide, or CO2, is the most abundant car- bon bearing gas, and plays a special role in Earth's carbon cycle. From an atmospheric perspective, sources emit or release carbon

  20. THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 sequestration and between 1 and 49 percent for forest based carbon sequestration. Value adjustments 18 19 20 21 22 BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER Abstract Carbon sequestered via

  1. THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER A. Abstract Carbon sequestration via forests and agricultural soils saturates over time to sequestration because of (1) an ecosystems limited ability to take up carbon which we will call saturation

  2. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure) Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life...

  3. Inventory Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kincaid, Charles T.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Miley, Terri B.; Nelson, Iral C.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Evans, John C.

    2006-06-01

    This document presents the basis for a compilation of inventory for radioactive contaminants of interest by year for all potentially impactive waste sites on the Hanford Site for which inventory data exist in records or could be reasonably estimated. This document also includes discussions of the historical, current, and reasonably foreseeable (1944 to 2070) future radioactive waste and waste sites; the inventories of radionuclides that may have a potential for environmental impacts; a description of the method(s) for estimating inventories where records are inadequate; a description of the screening method(s) used to select those sites and contaminants that might make a substantial contribution to impacts; a listing of the remedial actions and their completion dates for waste sites; and tables showing the best estimate inventories available for Hanford assessments.

  4. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  5. Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law , Christoph K. Thomas

    2011-09-20

    This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

  6. EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EPA-GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools (Redirected from US EPA GHG Inventory Targeted Data Collection Strategies and Software Tools) Jump to:...

  7. Development of Probabilistic Emission Inventories of Benzene, Formaldehyde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    Development of Probabilistic Emission Inventories of Benzene, Formaldehyde And Chromium emission inventories (EI) of benzene, formaldehyde and chromium for the Houston area. This project

  8. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  9. Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Carbon sequestration is an emerging forest management objective within California and around the dynamics of carbon sequestration and to accurately measure carbon storage is essential to insure successful per acre making the argument for use of the species in long-term carbon sequestration projects self

  10. Linkage of MIKE SHE to Wetland-DNDC for carbon budgeting and anaerobic biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction Increasing emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) are believed 2004 Key words: Biogeochemical modeling, Carbon dynamics, Forest wetland, Greenhouse gases emission and forest management practices on GHGs emissions and carbon dynamics to test the capabilities of the models

  11. Global Forests Syllabus -1 GLOBAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , and conservation. Another explores ongoing strategies that seek to sustain forests through markets and other (environmental, socioeconomic and political) under which forest products are harvested and transformed. A variety stakeholders & power Reading comments 18 Changing scenarios Reading comments 20 Costs, benefits

  12. High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    High surface area diamond-like carbon electrodes grown on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes H packed forests of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). The DLC:VACNT composite film and high corrosion resistance [13,14]. Other type of dopants, including nickel and boron, also result

  13. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Coporate Plan 2006­2009 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Corporate Plan 2006­2009 1Corporate Plan 2006­2009 #12;Chief Executive Professor Jim Lynch Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Surrey GU10 4LH Tel: 01420 22255 E-mail: research

  14. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  15. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  16. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  17. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    much more than carbon sequestration does, and often in abiophysics, carbon sequestration, climate change, climatethe accompanying carbon sequestration does—and sometimes in

  18. National Coal Quality Inventory (NACQI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Finkelman

    2005-09-30

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) between 1999 and 2005 to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. Collaboration between the USGS, State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry plus funding support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) permitted collection and submittal of coal samples for analysis. The chemical data (proximate and ultimate analyses; major, minor and trace element concentrations) for 729 samples of raw or prepared coal, coal associated shale, and coal combustion products (fly ash, hopper ash, bottom ash and gypsum) from nine coal producing States are included. In addition, the project identified a new coal reference analytical standard, to be designated CWE-1 (West Elk Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado) that is a high-volatile-B or high-volatile-A bituminous coal with low contents of ash yield and sulfur, and very low, but detectable contents of chlorine, mercury and other trace elements.

  19. Inventory of state energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melcher, A.G.; Gist, R.L.; Underwood, R.G.; Weber, J.C.

    1980-03-31

    These models address a variety of purposes, such as supply or demand of energy or of certain types of energy, emergency management of energy, conservation in end uses of energy, and economic factors. Fifty-one models are briefly described as to: purpose; energy system; applications;status; validation; outputs by sector, energy type, economic and physical units, geographic area, and time frame; structure and modeling techniques; submodels; working assumptions; inputs; data sources; related models; costs; references; and contacts. Discussions in the report include: project purposes and methods of research, state energy modeling in general, model types and terminology, and Federal legislation to which state modeling is relevant. Also, a state-by-state listing of modeling efforts is provided and other model inventories are identified. The report includes a brief encylopedia of terms used in energy models. It is assumed that many readers of the report will not be experienced in the technical aspects of modeling. The project was accomplished by telephone conversations and document review by a team from the Colorado School of Mines Research Institute and the faculty of the Colorado School of Mines. A Technical Committee (listed in the report) provided advice during the course of the project.

  20. Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents 4.1 Existing Legal Protections Protections Level Name Clean Water Act Endangered Species Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act National Environmental State Instream Water Rights ­ Oregon Water Resources Department Morrow County Zoning Ordinance ­ Morrow

  1. Annual Transuranic Waste Inventory Report - 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Page 4 of 382 Table of Figures Figure 1-1. U.S. Department of Energy TRU Waste Generator Sites ... 17 Figure 2-1. TRU Waste Inventory Process Flowchart...

  2. Stochastic ship fleet routing with inventory limits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a stochastic ship routing problem with inventory management. The problem involves finding a set of least costs routes for a fleet of ships transporting a single commodity when the demand for ...

  3. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  4. Lacunarity as a texture measure for a tropical forest landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of tropical forest cover alters terrestrial plant and animal population dynamics, reduces biodiversity and carbon storage capacity, and, as a global phenomenon could affect regional and global climate patterns. Lacunarity as a texture measure can offer a simple solution to characterize the texture of tropical forest landscape and determine spatial patterns associated with ecological processes. Lacunarity quantifies the deviation from translational invariance by describing the distribution of gaps within a binary image at multiple scales. As lacunarity increases, the spatial arrangement of tropical forest gaps will also increase. In this study, we used the Spatial Modeler in Imagine as a graphic programming tool to calculate lacunarity indices for a tropical forest landscape in Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala. Lacunarity indices were derived from classified Landsat MSS images acquired in 1974 and 1984. Random-generated binary images were also used to derive lacunarity indices and compared with the lacunarity of forest patterns derived from the classified MSS images. Tropical forest area declined about 17%, with most of the forest areas converted into pasture/grassland for grazing. During this period, lacunarity increased about 25%. Results of this study suggest that tropical forest fragmentation could be quantified with lacunarity measures. The study also demonstrated that the Spatial Modeler can be useful as a programming tool to quantify spatial patterns of tropical forest landscape by using remotely sensed data.

  5. PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    for the energy suppliers in pulse-power applications such as solid-state sensors. Supercapacitors have simple

  6. Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,Pevafersa JV Jump to:BioFordFords,

  7. Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlex Fuels Energy JumpVyncke Jump

  8. Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures Jump to: navigation,Portal Jump to:

  9. Age of riverine carbon suggests rapid export of terrestrial primary production in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J.rains. The lack of variability in ? 14 C VP values between the rising water

  10. Street Tree Inventory Report and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . * Favor trees other than crapemyrtle in street tree planting projects. * Develop a systematic program for tree maintenance and planting. * Continue to hold an annual Arbor Day celebration and involve local: Report prepared by: Texas Forest Service Urban Forestry Coordinator Texas Forest Service 301 Tarrow Drive

  11. forestry.gov.uk/carboncode The Woodland Carbon Code is an initiative led by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carbon from these projects brings many benefits in addition to carbon sequestration. is effectivelyforestry.gov.uk/carboncode ® The Woodland Carbon Code is an initiative led by the Forestry Commission and supported by a Carbon Advisory Group of UK forest industry and carbon market experts. A buyers

  12. Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014 Forest Products Trade between China. Whiletheglobaleconomicdownturnaffectedconsumptioninmanycountries,China'stradewithAfricaremained mostly unaffected. In particular, commodities, such as oil and gas

  13. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appeals Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses...

  14. Estimating the above-ground biomass of mangrove forests in Kenya 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Rachel

    2014-11-27

    Robust estimates of forest above-ground biomass (AGB) are needed in order to constrain the uncertainty in regional and global carbon budgets, predictions of global climate change and remote sensing efforts to monitor ...

  15. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16 Forest in Rural Studies 17 International

  16. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence of recovery on further...

  17. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  18. CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry sectors with PEFC C-o-C certification June 2003 Construction 1% Pulp & paper 4% Wood manufacturing% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers 5% Other primary forest industries 6% Sawmilling 39% Timber trade 43% #12;Forest industry sectors

  19. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  20. Predictive analytics for inventory in a sporting goods organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolbert, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Inventory management for retail companies has become increasingly more important in recent years as competition grows and new supply chain models are implemented. Inventory levels have implications on not only the financial ...

  1. Managing On-air Ad Inventory in Broadcast Television

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bollapragada, Srinivas; Mallik, Suman

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the experiences of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC), we present an analytical model for managing on-air ad inventory in broadcast television. The ad inventory in this industry is priced based on rating ...

  2. Dartmouth College Library Committee Inventory Page 1 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Library Committee Inventory Page 1 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE LIBRARY COMMITTEE INVENTORY June 2012 Library Administrative Group (LAG) Library Management Group (LMG) Committees & Working Groups Collections Action Student Advisors on Libraries and Computing Digital Projects and Infrastructure Group Diversity Committee

  3. Comprehensive carbon footprint analysis of the value chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. CO2 and CH4) · Results are reported as carbon dioxide equivalents · Can be calculated for products or companies #12;SHOK Summit 20.4.2010 Carbon footprint of wood supply 1.EmissionsComprehensive carbon footprint analysis of the value chains of forest industry SHOK Summit 20

  4. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  5. Fungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Monitoring Yellowstone's Bumble Bees · Microbial Diversity in Non-sulfur and Iron Geothermal Steam VentsFungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone Restoration of Native Vegetation in Gardiner Basin v o l u m e 2 0 · i s s u e 1 · 2 0 1 2 Yellowstone Vegetation #12;F or two decades, Yellowstone

  6. UCHC POLICY FOR MAINTAINING A CHEMICAL INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    delivered to 400 Farmington Avenue. #12;Certain research areas will have high hazard storage rooms of this policy is to create and maintain an ongoing inventory of hazardous materials present on the UCHC campus Farmington Avenue, Technology Incubation Program (TIP) labs, Hospital clinics that may receive hazardous

  7. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this inventory, some of which has been placed into a searchable spreadsheet, is to support the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and to research cost information in state-mandated energy efficiency program evaluations – e.g., for use in updating analytic and modeling assumptions used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

  8. GHG Inventory Update Summary December 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    : Emissions from all on-campus fuel combustion (co-gen facility, heating oil, propane) Direct Transportation inventories. The first several charts illustrate campus consumption of electricity, gas/diesel, propane, and the Flathead Lake biological station, use propane for the heating of their buildings. This is a possible reason

  9. Sensor Data Aggregation for Resource Inventory Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Polly

    aggregation. We focus on optimizing the energy efficiency for the resource inventory problems. By resource security to consumer electronics in the future. Sharing the vision and emphasizing the energy efficiency on limited battery power. That makes energy efficiency a major design challenge for sensor networks. From

  10. Forest Estate Modelling (Part 2) Forest Research Institute, Rotorua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    adequate models of growth and yield, and data on costs and prices, it is not too difficult to find "optiForest Estate Modelling (Part 2) O. Garcia Forest Research Institute, Rotorua The Problem Given after centuries of continued forest management, exist in Europe. Some countries still base their forest

  11. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  12. FOREST CERTIFICATION:FOREST CERTIFICATION: BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS ORBIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stewardship Council (FSC) ­ 257 million acres Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC

  13. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  14. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    ;Definitions of Key Terms: (1) "Carbon dioxide" (CO2) means the chemical compound containing one atom of carbon" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative to an equivalent unit of carbon dioxide over a given period of time. For instance, methane (CH4) has a GWP of 23

  15. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  16. The Health of Colorado's Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current and Future Forest Resources #12;Acknowledgements William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International), is the primary author of the 2009 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests. Thanks to the following Colorado

  17. Mesquite Urban Forest Ecosystem Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................ 10 IV. Carbon Storage and Sequestration

  18. Challenges in elevated CO2 experiments on forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Ram

    of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA 4 Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde, Denmark 5 University concentrations in future experiments to better predict the effects of climate change? Plantations and natural. Forest ecosystems under climate change Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most important greenhouse gas emitted

  19. Thinking about efficiency of resource use in forests Dan Binkleya,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binkley, Dan

    the production of woody biomass as the same function, minus allocation to other tissues and respiration. Several of forests can be described as a function of the supply of resources, the proportion of resources captured by trees, and the efficiency with which trees use resources to fix carbon dioxide. This function can

  20. Solar energy at Forest Research Solar Power at Alice Holt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - crystalline solar photovoltaic panels (175 watt panels with a total peak DC rating of 32.375 kilowatts). SolarSolar energy at Forest Research Solar Power at Alice Holt research station provides a renewable per annum. As part of a programme to improve energy efficiency and meet government targets on carbon

  1. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  2. 15 September 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include the following: · using solid wood products avoids carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from substitute needs to be built to reduce annual CO2 emissions by 14 to 31% and fossil fuel consumption by 12 to 19 is used to displace fossil fuels as energy source. · that young forest stands sequester energy more

  3. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  4. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    : First Author: Yu-Chuan Chen First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Yu-Chuan Chen Hyejung;Computational Statistics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Canonical Forest Yu-Chuan Chen

  5. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Landowners often need professional help after a weather-related disaster has damaged timber stands. A consulting forester can help a landowner develop management strategies that fit the landowner's objectives. This publication includes a checklist...

  6. Sequential test procedures for inventory differences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, A.S.; Kern, E.A.; Emeigh, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    By means of a simulation study, we investigated the appropriateness of Page's and power-one sequential tests on sequences of inventory differences obtained from an example materials control unit, a sub-area of a hypothetical UF/sub 6/-to-U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ conversion process. The study examined detection probability and run length curves obtained from different loss scenarios. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests? No. Some forests need burning on the forest floor 2. What are the types of forest fires? Broadly there are two types: low

  8. Street Tree Inventory Report and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to train and shape young trees. * Favor trees other than live oak in street tree planting projects. * Develop an annual work plan for tree maintenance and planting. * Continue to hold an annual Arbor Day with community staff or volunteers. Questions or comments should be directed to: Report prepared by: Texas Forest

  9. Street Tree Inventory Report and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . * Favor shade trees other than live oak in street tree planting projects. * Locate and remove and planting. * Conduct an annual Arbor Day celebration and involve local groups. Credits The Texas Sample with community staff or volunteers. Questions or comments should be directed to: Report prepared by: Texas Forest

  10. nature geoscience | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2009 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 737 CO2 emissions from forest loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    emissions from forest loss G. R. van der Werf,D. C. Morton, R. S. DeFries, J. G. J. Olivier, P. S as a notable carbon dioxide source. P rogrammes that aim to reduce the emissions from deforestation and forest degradation are being considered as a cost-effective way to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions1

  11. A supply chain carbon footprint analysis of the University of California, Berkeley Christopher M. Jones and Daniel M. Kammen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    A supply chain carbon footprint analysis of the University of California, Berkeley Christopher M.S. university to calculate its supply chain carbon footprint. The genesis of this project was an understanding conducted a carbon footprint analysis that combined information from the reported emissions inventory

  12. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade: Scenarios and challenges:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European Conference ­ 4 ­ 5 May 2010 ­Phnom Penh 2 Long Ratanakoma (Cambodia) - Climate change, forest conversion

  13. Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School 

  14. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  15. Thicket manipulation and static inventory control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Marvin Rex

    1974-01-01

    is termed a closed trail if it has the same first and last points [12 ], that is, if pO -- p A spanning walk of a graph G is a walk which con- tains all of the edges of G. If this spanning walk is also a closed trail, it is termed an eulerian trail... little time or programming effort to unpack and display. In addition, each record in the main inventory files includes the supervisors full last name and the former and present location names, as well as their codes. Though retrieval is accomplished...

  16. IPCC Inventory Guidelines LULUCF | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro Industries LtdInventory

  17. LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION LOW-HIGH VALUES FOR PETROLEUM AVERAGE INVENTORY RANGES (MILLION BARRELS) FILE UPDATED April 2004 Line Month Low High Number Product Name Geography...

  18. Optimization Online - Bound Improvement for LNG Inventory Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb 14, 2014 ... Bound Improvement for LNG Inventory Routing. Yufen Shao (yufen.shao ***at*** exxonmobil.com) Kevin Furman (kevin.c.furman ***at*** ...

  19. Parallel Large-Neighborhood Search Techniques for LNG Inventory ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apr 17, 2014 ... Parallel Large-Neighborhood Search Techniques for LNG Inventory Routing. Badrinarayanan Velamur Asokan(badri.velamur.asokan ***at*** ...

  20. Algorithm for Lot Sizing with Inventory Bounds and Fixed Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alper Atamturk

    2007-06-26

    Jun 26, 2007 ... An O(n^2) Algorithm for Lot Sizing with Inventory Bounds and Fixed Costs. Alper Atamturk (atamturk ***at*** berkeley.edu) Simge Kucukyavuz ...

  1. Categorization of Used Nuclear Fuel Inventory in Support of a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuel assembly and cladding materials, initial enrichment, discharge burnup, and irradiation exposure conditions) in the current UNF inventory, and the character of future UNF...

  2. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  3. Carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon sequestration is the process of capture and long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2).[1] Carbon sequestration describes long-term storage of carbon dioxide or other forms of carbon to either mitigate or defer global warming and avoid ...

  4. Forest Research Wildfires in Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 recorded grassfires and nearly 550 forest fires in South Wales; this equates to eight times more per unit

  5. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  6. Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

  7. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  8. 2006 Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Forest Inventory and Analysis Symposium 83 Research Applications of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , scientists and managers can benefit because they gain information about the geographic patterns in ecosystems Applications of Ecosystem Patterns Robert G. Bailey1 Abstract.--This article discusses the origins of natural ecosystem patterns from global to local scales. It describes how understanding these patterns can help

  9. CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luyssaert, S. [University of Antwerp; Inglima, I. [Second University of Naples; Jung, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; Piao, S. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Wingate, L. [University of Edinburgh; Matteucci, G. [CNR-ISAFOM; Aubinet, M. [Faculte Universitaire des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux; Beer, C. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Bernhofer, C. [Technische Universitat Dresden; Black, K. G. [University College, Dublin; Bonal, D. [INRA Kourou - UMR EcoFog; Chambers, J. [Tulane University; Ciais, P. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Delucia, Evan H. [University of Illinois; Dolman, A. J. [Universitate Amsterdam; Don, A. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Gielen, B. [University of Antwerp; Grace, John [University of Edinburgh; Granier, A. [INRA EEF; Grelle, A. [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Griffis, T. [University of Minnesota; Grunwald, T. [Technische Universitat Dresden; Guidolotti, G. [University of Tuscia; Hanson, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Harding, R. [Center of Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Kolari, P. [University of Helsinki; Kruijt, B. [Alterra; Kutsch, W. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Lagergren, F. [Lund University, Sweden; Laurila, T. [Finnish Meteorological institute; Law, B. [Oregon State University; Le Maire, G. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Lindroth, A. [Lund University, Sweden; Magnani, F. [Universita di Bologna; Marek, M. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic; Mateus, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Portugal; Migliavacca, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Mission, L. [University of California, Berkeley; Montagnani, L. [Bolzano, Agency for the Environment; Moncrief, J. [University of Edinburgh; Moors, E. [Alterra; Munger, J. W. [University of Oxford; Nikinmaa, E. [University of Helsinki; Loustau, D. [INRA EPHYSE; Pita, G. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Portugal; Rebmann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Richardson, A. D. [University of New Hampshire; Roupsard, O. [CIRAD; Saigusa, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Sanz, M. J. [CEAM, Valencia, Spain; Seufert, G. [Joint Research Centre, Italy; Sorensen, L. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Tang, J. [University of Minnesota; Valentini, R. [University of Tuscia; Vesala, T. [University of Helsinki; Janssens, I. A. [University of Antwerp

    2007-01-01

    Forests sequester large amounts of atmospheric carbon. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties have been and are being collected at many sites around the world, but synthesis of these data is still sparse. To facilitate synthesis activities, we have assembled a comprehensive global database for forest ecosystems, which includes carbon budget variables (fluxes and stocks), ecosystem traits (e.g. leaf area index, age) as well as ancillary site information such as management regime, climate and soil characteristics. This can be used to: quantify global, regional to biome-specific carbon-budgets, to re-examine established relationships, test emerging hypotheses about ecosystem functioning (e.g. a constant NEP to GPP), and provide benchmarks for model evaluations. Our synthesis highlighted that globally, gross primary production of forests benefited from higher temperatures and precipitation whereas net primary production saturated beyond a threshold of 1500 mm precipitation or a mean annual temperature of 10 C. The global pattern in NEP was found insensitive to climate and appears to be mainly determined by non-climatic conditions such as successional stage, management, site history and site disturbance. At the biome level, only the carbon fluxes in temperate humid evergreen and temperate humid deciduous forests were sufficiently robust. All other biomes still need further study to reduce uncertainties in their carbon balance. Carbon budgets of boreal semi-arid and tropical semi-arid forests would benefit most from additional data inputs. Closing the CO2-balances of specific biomes required the introduction of closure terms. These closure terms were substantial for all biomes and suggested that to better close carbon balances, more data are needed especially on respiratory processes, advection and on non-CO2 carbon fluxes.

  10. developing and forests: finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ncreif.org/indices/timberland.phtml. T he chief attribute of the forestry asset class is its superior historical risk- return pro le producing growing sites and lower establishment and labour costs than the temperate forests of mature products make Africa an attractive forestry option. Typical emerging market risks as well as environmental

  11. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the unintended consequence of government regulation in the global marketplace has been to shift the supply agendas of industrial associations, environmental organizations, government agencies, and forest landowner, certification has become a focal point for the wide range of social, cultural, environmental and economic

  12. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management problems, such as Planning-Programing-Budgeting, will require automated procedures to col- lect in terms of products and services and alter- native methods of producing them . The out- puts from PPBS- semble forest data up to an economic limit of about 50,000 lines of map data at an average cost of 0

  13. International Assistance for Low-Emission Development Planning: Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) Inventory of Activities and Tools--Preliminary Trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, S.; Benioff, R.

    2011-05-01

    The Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN) is a voluntary network of international practitioners supporting low-emission planning in developing countries. The network seeks to improve quality of support through sharing project information, tools, best practices and lessons, and by fostering harmonized assistance. CLEAN has developed an inventory to track and analyze international technical support and tools for low-carbon planning activities in developing countries. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the inventory to help identify trends in assistance activities and tools available to support developing countries with low-emission planning.

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  15. Clean Lead Facility Inventory System user`s manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, J.F.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this user`s manual is to provide instruction and guidance needed to enter and maintain inventory information for the Clean Lead Facility (CLF), PER-612. Individuals responsible for maintaining and using the system should study and understand the information provided. The user`s manual describes how to properly use and maintain the CLF Inventory System. Annual, quarterly, monthly, and current inventory reports may be printed from the Inventory System for reporting purposes. Profile reports of each shipment of lead may also be printed for verification and documentation of lead transactions. The CLF Inventory System was designed on Microsoft Access version 2.0. Similar inventory systems are in use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to facilitate site-wide compilations of mixed waste data. The CLF Inventory System was designed for inventorying the clean or non-radioactive contaminated lead stored at the CLF. This data, along with the mixed waste data, will be compiled into the Idaho Mixed Waste Information (IMWI) system for reporting to the Department of Energy Idaho Office, Department of Energy Headquarters, and/or the State of Idaho.

  16. Do Concept Inventories Actually Measure Anything? Colin S. Wallace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Do Concept Inventories Actually Measure Anything? Colin S. Wallace University of Colorado Society. All rights reserved. Abstract Although concept inventories are among the most frequently used tools in the physics and astronomy education communities, they are rarely evaluated using item response

  17. BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS Carmen M. Benkovitz Atmospheric inventories additional parnmeters (such as sulfur content of fuels). To compile regional and global by national experts or directly estimate emissions based on activity rates from reports compiled by multi

  18. Market Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    in intraday trading and price formation.2 This paper examines the relationship between closing market makerMarket Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott U.C. Berkeley Mark S. Seasholes U prices follow naturally from inventory models. Liquidity suppliers and market markers profit from

  19. Dynamic Stochastic Inventory Management with Reference Price Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xin

    Dynamic Stochastic Inventory Management with Reference Price Effects Xin Chen Department in which demand depends on not only the current selling price but also a memory-based reference price. Pricing and inventory decisions are made simultane- ously at the beginning of each period. Assuming all

  20. Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory City College of New York (CCNY)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory Program City College of New York (CCNY) New York, New York September 2008 #12;13749/42550 Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory Program Prepared for: City College of New York Township Line Road 2 Valley Square, Suite 120 Blue Bell, Pennsylvania 19422 #12;City College of New York

  1. Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S -legally correct but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department -quite precise Inventory -uncertainty can be estimated Travel Based Model Fuel

  2. Smoothing method aids gas-inventory variance trending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1992-03-23

    This paper reports on a method for determining gas-storage inventory and variance in a natural-gas storage field which uses the equations developed to determine gas-in-place in a production field. The calculations use acquired data for shut-in pressures, reservoir pore volume, and storage gas properties. These calculations are then graphed and trends are developed. Evaluating trends in inventory variance can be enhanced by use of a technique, described here, that smooths the peaks and valleys of an inventory-variance curve. Calculations using the acquired data determine inventory for a storage field whose drive mechanism is gas expansion (that is, volumetric). When used for a dry gas, condensate, or gas-condensate reservoir, the formulas require no further modification. Inventory in depleted oil fields can be determined in this same manner, as well. Some additional calculations, however, must be made to assess the influence of oil production on the gas-storage process.

  3. Analysis of inventory difference using fuzzy controllers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zardecki, A.

    1994-08-01

    The principal objectives of an accounting system for safeguarding nuclear materials are as follows: (a) to provide assurance that all material quantities are present in the correct amount; (b) to provide timely detection of material loss; and (c) to estimate the amount of any loss and its location. In fuzzy control, expert knowledge is encoded in the form of fuzzy rules, which describe recommended actions for different classes of situations represented by fuzzy sets. The concept of a fuzzy controller is applied to the forecasting problem in a time series, specifically, to forecasting and detecting anomalies in inventory differences. This paper reviews the basic notion underlying the fuzzy control systems and provides examples of application. The well-known material-unaccounted-for diffusion plant data of Jaech are analyzed using both feedforward neural networks and fuzzy controllers. By forming a deference between the forecasted and observed signals, an efficient method to detect small signals in background noise is implemented.

  4. An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    An inventory of invasive alien species in China 1 An inventory of invasive alien species in China of invasive alien species in China. NeoBiota 15: 1­26. doi: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 Abstract Invasive alien: 10.3897/neobiota.15.3575 www.pensoft.net/journals/neobiota review ArtiCle Advancing research on alien

  5. Carbon Smackdown: Cookstoves for the developing world

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch

    2010-09-01

    In this June 30, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, learn how efficient cookstoves for the developing world ? from Darfur to Ethiopia and beyond ? are reducing carbon dioxide emissions, saving forests, and improving health. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch discuss why they got started in this great challenge and what's next.

  6. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  7. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

    2012-01-01

    editor. Inventory of U.S. greenhouse gas emission and sinks:Ishida. 2008. An integrated greenhouse gas assessment of anguidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories. Volume

  8. Canopy Carbon Gain and Water Use: Analysis of Old-growth Conifers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structure, species composition, and climate. Key words: biogenic carbon emissions; canopy processes; forest;to the global challenge of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). One approach for predictingCanopy Carbon Gain and Water Use: Analysis of Old-growth Conifers in the Pacific Northwest William

  9. Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bert, Didier

    Carbon concentration variations in the roots, stem and crown of mature Pinus pinaster (Ait.) Didier. Evaluations of carbon fixation and storage in this forest are facilitated by its general homogeneity for expansion factors and carbon concentration in the biomass, and more accurate results could be obtained

  10. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  11. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  12. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  13. By Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -intensity lightning fires kept tree density down and the forests were very well adapted to fire because of the healthyBy Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist, Nebraska Forest Service Thinning is an excellent management tool for forest landowners to use to improve forest health and productivity

  14. Are Forest Fires Predictable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-23

    Dynamic mean field theory is applied to the problem of forest fires. The starting point is the Monte Carlo simulation in a lattice of million cells. The statistics of the clusters is obtained by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm. We get the map $p_n\\to p_{n+1}$, where $p_n$ is the probability of finding a tree in a cell, and $n$ is the discrete time. We demonstrate that the time evolution of $p$ is chaotic. The arguments are provided by the calculation of the bifurcation diagram and the Lyapunov exponent. The bifurcation diagram reveals several windows of stability, including periodic orbits of length three, five and seven. For smaller lattices, the results of the iteration are in qualitative agreement with the statistics of the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000.

  15. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  16. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  17. Prescribed burning and mechanical thinning effects on belowground conditions and soil respiration in a mixed-conifer forest, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Prescribed burning and mechanical thinning effects on belowground conditions and soil respiration. Introduction Carbon storage in belowground biomass is twice that of atmospheric carbon (C), and soil; Raich and Potter, 1995; Janssens et al., 2001; Lal, 2008). More specifically, forest soils contain about

  18. Assessing the extent of agriculture/pasture and secondary succession forest in the Brazilian Legal Amazon using SPOT VEGETATION data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    influence on the observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and consequent climatic Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal. c Remote Sensing Department, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Av. dos vegetation cover in the past, acting as a source of carbon. On the contrary, the secondary succession forest

  19. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  20. Radiative forcing of natural forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalcar- bon and energy cycling in the boreal forests, includingand Forest Meteorology, Liu HP, Randerson JT (2008) Interannual variability of surface energy

  1. Health Consequences of Forest Fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; McKee, Douglas; Thomas, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    to Lung Health of Haze From Forest Fires: The SingaporeJim, C.Y. 1999. “The Forest Fires in Indonesia 1997-1998:A Study of the 1997 Forest Fires in South East Asia Using

  2. Using neutrons to fight forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, Hal; Walker, Ronald; Flocchini, R.

    2006-01-01

    USING NEUTRONS TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES Hal Egbert, Ronaldretardant to the scene of forest fires. One system that goesretardant to the scene of forest fires. MAFFS is the acronym

  3. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  4. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Future Forests Program Plan 2013 ­ 2016 (November 2012) #12;2 Summary Mission and vision The mission of Future Forests is to provide management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision

  5. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  6. Multi-temporal Terrestrial Lidar for Estimating Individual Tree Dimensions and Biomass Change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Shruthi

    2013-10-30

    Accurate measures of forest structural parameters are essential to forest inventory and growth models, managing wildfires, and modeling of carbon cycle. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides accurate understory information rapidly through non...

  7. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification (PEFC), the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative

  8. Natural migration rates of trees: Global terrestrial carbon cycle implications. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.M.

    1996-06-01

    The paper discusses the forest-ecological processes which constrain the rate of response by forests to rapid future environmental change. It establishes a minimum response time by natural tree populations which invade alien landscapes and reach the status of a mature, closed canopy forest when maximum carbon storage is realized. It considers rare long-distance and frequent short-distance seed transport, seedling and tree establishment, sequential tree and stand maturation, and spread between newly established colonies.

  9. November2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade #12;#12;Timber Trade Flows and Actors in MyanmarNovember2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance Timber Trade Flows and Actors The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade Kevin Woods November 2013 #12;Acknowledgments The author, Kevin

  10. Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V.; Martins, A.; Pesur, A.; Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H.

    1996-07-01

    It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

  11. Tellus (2007), 59A, 519528 C 2007 The Authors Journal compilation C 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uriarte, Maria

    2007-01-01

    on the structure, dynamics and carbon sequestration potential of Southern New England forests. Baseline estimates of carbon sequestration in aboveground biomass from our simulations are in line with forest inventory data in severe storms is likely to enhance carbon sequestration potential in forests in this region by generating

  12. Psychometric properties of the revised marital satisfaction inventory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aikman, Grace Glass

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Revised marital Satisfaction Inventory (MSI-R) using archival data from previous validation studies of the original instrument. Normalized T-scores were identified for each of the 11 revised...

  13. Strategic inventory management in an aerospace supply chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauro, Joseph (Joseph Peter)

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces multiple methods to set and optimize inventory levels. These methods are then classified based on the complexity involved to implement them. As an organization develops a deeper understanding of ...

  14. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    ..................................... 30 Appendix E: Canadian Default Factors for Calculating CO2 Emissions from Combustion of Natural Gas GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) INVENTORY REPORT 20102011 Dalhousie Office of Sustainability ......................................................... 34 Appendix K: Fleet Vehicles on Campus .............

  15. Optimizing inventory levels using financial, lifecycle and forecast variance data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Irene S

    2007-01-01

    Significant inventory write-offs have recently plagued ATI Technologies, a world leader in graphics and media processors. ATI's product-centric culture has long deterred attention from supply chain efficiency. Given that ...

  16. Time-to-Produce, Inventory, and Asset Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhanhui

    2012-10-19

    In a production-based general equilibrium model, I study the impact of time-to-build and time-to-produce technology constraints and inventory on asset prices and macroeconomic quantity dynamics. A time-to-build constraint ...

  17. Optimization for recipe-based, diet-planning inventory management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Sheng

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents a new modeling framework and research methodology for the study of recipe-based, diet-planning inventory management. The thesis begins with an exploration on the classic optimization problem - the diet ...

  18. US Releases Updated Plutonium Inventory Report | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    details the current plutonium inventory of the U.S. Titled The United States Plutonium Balance, 1944-2009, the document serves as an update to Plutonium: the First 50 Years, which...

  19. 2015 Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activity (IGCA) Inventory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) has not received the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB) 2015 inventory guidance yet, but anticipates that an OMB alert, which is largely a reminder...

  20. Development of the School Motivation and Learning Strategies Inventory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud, Kathryn Chatham

    2006-08-16

    The goal of this project was to develop a self-report inventory designed to assess constructs associated with academic motivation and various learning strategies including study strategies, time management, organizational ...

  1. Inventory management in a pharmaceutical company : minimizing discard practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaojun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    Pharmaceutical company SPM has over 400 cases of inventory discards over the past five years which constitute a significant operating cost. Due to the complexity and randomness of each case, the root causes that result in ...

  2. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  3. U.S. Life Cycle Inventory Database Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle inventory data are the primary inputs for conducting life cycle assessment studies. Studies based on high-quality data that are consistent, accurate, and relevant allow for robust, defensible, and meaningful results.

  4. Inventory planning for low demand items in online retailing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhaochhria, Pallav

    2007-01-01

    A large online retailer strategically stocks inventory for SKUs with low demand. The motivations are to provide a wide range of selections and faster customer fulfillment service. We assume the online retailer has the ...

  5. Strategic inventory management of externally sourced medical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillstrom, Nichole L. (Nichole Leigh)

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine inventory strategies for externally sourced medical devices. In the medical device industry, the desire for high levels of customer service often results in less than optimal ...

  6. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ... Bronze Age...

  7. Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xuening

    2013-01-01

    Los Angeles Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests Aof the Thesis Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests bydata emerges, data mining is finally in the spotlight. This

  8. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    role of forest in the water and energy cycles and sustainingforest carbon, water, and energy exchange. Two sites in theeffects on the water and energy ?uxes by the entire

  9. Model comparisons for estimating carbon emissions from North American wildland fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    from Canadian forest fires, 1959–1999, Can. J. For. Res. ,soils, Int. J. Wildland Fire, in press. Boby, L. A. , E. A.F. Johnstone (2010), Quantifying fire severity, carbon, and

  10. DOSE ASSESSMENT OF THE FINAL INVENTORIES IN CENTER SLIT TRENCHES ONE THROUGH FIVE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L.; Hamm, L.; Smith, F.

    2011-05-02

    In response to a request from Solid Waste Management (SWM), this study evaluates the performance of waste disposed in Slit Trenches 1-5 by calculating exposure doses and concentrations. As of 8/19/2010, Slit Trenches 1-5 have been filled and are closed to future waste disposal in support of an ARRA-funded interim operational cover project. Slit Trenches 6 and 7 are currently in operation and are not addressed within this analysis. Their current inventory limits are based on the 2008 SA and are not being impacted by this study. This analysis considers the location and the timing of waste disposal in Slit Trenches 1-5 throughout their operational life. In addition, the following improvements to the modeling approach have been incorporated into this analysis: (1) Final waste inventories from WITS are used for the base case analysis where variance in the reported final disposal inventories is addressed through a sensitivity analysis; (2) Updated K{sub d} values are used; (3) Area percentages of non-crushable containers are used in the analysis to determine expected infiltration flows for cases that consider collapse of these containers; (4) An updated representation of ETF carbon column vessels disposed in SLIT3-Unit F is used. Preliminary analyses indicated a problem meeting the groundwater beta-gamma dose limit because of high H-3 and I-129 release from the ETF vessels. The updated model uses results from a recent structural analysis of the ETF vessels indicating that water does not penetrate the vessels for about 130 years and that the vessels remain structurally intact throughout the 1130-year period of assessment; and (5) Operational covers are included with revised installation dates and sets of Slit Trenches that have a common cover. With the exception of the modeling enhancements noted above, the analysis follows the same methodology used in the 2008 PA (WSRC, 2008) and the 2008 SA (Collard and Hamm, 2008). Infiltration flows through the vadose zone are identical to the flows used in the 2008 PA, except for flows during the operational cover time period. The physical (i.e., non-geochemical) models of the vadose zone and aquifer are identical in most cases to the models used in the 2008 PA. However, the 2008 PA assumed a uniform distribution of waste within each Slit Trench (WITS Location) and assumed that the entire inventory of each trench was disposed of at the time the first Slit Trench was opened. The current analysis considers individual trench excavations (i.e., segments) and groups of segments (i.e., Inventory Groups also known as WITS Units) within Slit Trenches. Waste disposal is assumed to be spatially uniform in each Inventory Group and is distributed in time increments of six months or less between the time the Inventory Group was opened and closed.

  11. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

  12. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  13. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  14. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  15. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  16. Emissions inventory report summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for calendar year 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory’s potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2008. LANL’s 2008 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  17. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environmental Stewardship Group

    2010-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department/Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This permit was modified and reissued on July 16, 2007. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100M2) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semiannual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semiannual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2009. LANL's 2009 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  18. Outgassing History and Escape of the Martian Atmosphere and Water Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lammer, H; Karatekin, Ö; Morschhauser, A; Niles, P B; Mousis, O; Odert, P; Möstl, U V; Breuer, D; Dehant, V; Grott, M; Gröller, H; Hauber, E; Pham, L B S

    2015-01-01

    The evolution and escape of the martian atmosphere and the planet's water inventory can be separated into an early and late evolutionary epoch. The first epoch started from the planet's origin and lasted $\\sim$500 Myr. Because of the high EUV flux of the young Sun and Mars' low gravity it was accompanied by hydrodynamic blow-off of hydrogen and strong thermal escape rates of dragged heavier species such as O and C atoms. After the main part of the protoatmosphere was lost, impact-related volatiles and mantle outgassing may have resulted in accumulation of a secondary CO$_2$ atmosphere of a few tens to a few hundred mbar around $\\sim$4--4.3 Gyr ago. The evolution of the atmospheric surface pressure and water inventory of such a secondary atmosphere during the second epoch which lasted from the end of the Noachian until today was most likely determined by a complex interplay of various nonthermal atmospheric escape processes, impacts, carbonate precipitation, and serpentinization during the Hesperian and Amazon...

  19. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Stockton

    2005-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), ''Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements''. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. This Title V Operating Permit (Permit No. P-100) includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2004. LANL's 2004 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  20. Emissions Inventory Report Summary for Los Alamos National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2007-09-28

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is subject to annual emissions reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. Additionally, on April 30, 2004, LANL was issued a Title V Operating Permit from the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau, under 20.2.70 NMAC. Modification Number 1 to this Title V Operating Permit was issued on June 15, 2006 (Permit No P-100M1) and includes emission limits and operating limits for all regulated sources of air pollution at LANL. The Title V Operating Permit also requires semi-annual emissions reporting for all sources included in the permit. This report summarizes both the annual emissions inventory reporting and the semi-annual emissions reporting for LANL for calendar year 2006. LANL's 2006 emissions are well below the emission limits in the Title V Operating Permit.

  1. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  2. Validation of the TIARA code to tritium inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billone, M.C.

    1994-03-01

    The TIARA code has been developed to predict tritium inventory in Li{sub 2}O breeder ceramic and to predict purge exit flow rate and composition. Inventory predictions are based on models for bulk diffusion, surface desorption, solubility and precipitation. Parameters for these models are determined from the results of laboratory annealing studies on unirradiated and irradiated Li{sub 2}O. Inventory data from in-reactor purge flow tests are used for model improvement, fine-tuning of model parameters and validation. In this current work, the inventory measurement near the purge inlet from the BEATRIX-II thin-ring sample is used to fine tune the surface desorption model parameters for T > 470{degrees}C, and the inventory measurement near the midplane from VOM-15H is used to fine tune the moisture solubility model parameters. predictions are then validated to the remaining inventory data from EXOTIC-2 (1 point), SIBELIUS (3 axial points), VOM-15H (2 axial points), CRITIC-1 (4 axial points), BEATRIX-II thin ring (3 axial points) and BEATRIX-II thick pellet (5 radial points). Thus. of the 20 data points, two we re used for fine tuning model parameters and 18 were used for validation. The inventory data span the range of 0.05--1.44 wppm with an average of 0.48 wppm. The data pertain to samples whose end-of-life temperatures were in the range of 490--1000{degrees}C. On the average, the TIARA predictions agree quite well with the data (< 0.02 wppm difference). However, the root-mean-square deviation is 0.44 wppm, mostly due to over-predictions for the SIBELIUS samples and the higher-temperature radial samples from the BEATRIX-11 thick-pellet.

  3. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  4. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  5. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication Volume 6 2003 Number 3 Issue Summary Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the rural community perspective of managing the forest Land, Chadwick D. Oliver Series Editor Mary L. Tyrrell Rural Communities and Forests A summary

  6. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  7. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  8. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  9. Forest soil characteristics under varing tree species in East Texas: implications for sustained productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, David Andrew

    1998-01-01

    for the pine plots and 0. 40 for the oak plots, indicating a 4-yr turnover rate for the pine forest floor and a 2. 5-yr turnover rate for the oak plots. These values are similar to those reported elsewhere. Rochow (1975) found a K value of 0. 57 for oak.... The oak plots were never thinned from the original 3. 7 x 3. 7 m planting spacing. The pine plots appeared to have been mechanically (row) thinned from the onginal 2. 4 X 2. 4 m spacing, but the exact history is unknown. A complete inventory was made...

  10. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  11. Patterns and mechanisms of soil acidification in the conversion of grasslands to forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Patterns and mechanisms of soil acidification in the conversion of grasslands to forests ESTEBAN G) evaluate the mechanisms of soil acidification. We characterized soil changes with afforestation using ten acids or enhanced carbonic acid production in the soil, is the dominant mechanism of acidification

  12. Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes A M A N D metabolism, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide as a by-product. Little is known of how autotrophic respiration components vary across environmental gradients, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Here, we

  13. MICROBIAL RESPIRATION RESPONSE TO C, N, AND P AVAILABILITY IN LOBLOLLY PINE FOREST SOILS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whisenant, Justin

    2011-05-05

    and combined effects of nitrogen and phosphorous additions on soil carbon cycling. We performed laboratory incubations on soil samples from two loblolly pine forests in Florida and measured the CO2 respired by soil microbes using an infrared gas analyzer. Our...

  14. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003200498 Recent advances in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the interactions between the forestry land use component and the terrestrial water, carbon and nitrogen cycles environmental, ecological and land-use change. Therefore considerable understanding of the biological, biophysical and physical processes influencing the life cycle of trees and the forest ecosystem is required

  15. CO2 enhancement of forest productivity constrained by limited nitrogen availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enhancement of forest productivity constrained by limited nitrogen availability Richard J for review May 9, 2010) Stimulation of terrestrial plant production by rising CO2 concentra- tion is projected to reduce the airborne fraction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Coupled climate­carbon cycle

  16. November 2008 Carbon Sequestration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    November 2008 Carbon Sequestration in British Columbia's Forests and Management Options T. Andrew of British Columbia through the BC Ministry of the Environment. #12;3Forestry ExECutIvE SuMMary OF FuturE rESEarCh BlAckaNd rAchhpAl S. JASSAlFaculty oF laNd aNd Food SyStemS, uNiverSity oF britiSh columbia ArThur l

  17. 95A.E. Hartemink and K. McSweeney (eds.), Soil Carbon. Progress in Soil Science, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-04084-4_10, Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    and the uncertainty around these stocks is necessary for national C inventories (IPCC 2007), inputs to earth system models (Todd-Brown et al. 2013), and to determine soil organic carbon (SOC) temporal changes (Kravchenko

  18. A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1 Richard P. Vlosky2 Louisiana Forest Products reviews the history of forest certification, development of different certification schemes

  19. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  20. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  1. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  2. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Polar Till Define-i Our Seasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sun-Eanh Energy Relations Earth-Sun Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Sun Affects Our Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Local Energy Relations

  3. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  4. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  5. The effects of harvesting intensity on soil CO2 efflux and carbon content in an east Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londo, Andrew James

    1995-01-01

    land. I examined the effects of harvest intensity on in situ and mineral soil respiration, along with total soil and soluble organic carbon, were examined in a bottomland hardwood forest. Treatments included a clearcut, a partial cut, and a non...

  6. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  7. A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service, 271 Mast Road, Durham, NH 03824 USA.25 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 Forest Service, 271 Mast Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA.11 3 LI-COR Biosciences, Inc., 4421 Superior Street

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ORIGINAL PAPER Carbon in heartwood, sapwood and bark along the stem profile in three Mediterranean to orientate ecosystem management towards potential C sequestration. To achieve this, information is required in forest ecosystems. Keywords Pinus nigra . Pinus pinaster. Pinus sylvestris . Radial and axial . Carbon

  9. Modeling and centralization of strategic inventory for repairable and long lead-time spare parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Tyeliah Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This thesis develops an optimal inventory model for repairable and long leadtime spare parts for an Engine overhaul business. In addition, it presents a business case for centralization of inventory. Pratt & Whitney purchased ...

  10. Coordination of inventory distribution & price markdowns for clearance sales at Zara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdugo, Orietta Parra

    2010-01-01

    There is an essential need in the retail industry, of integrating inventory planning and pricing strategies. In the fast-fashion world of retail, inventory is treated as a perishable item leading to short selling periods. ...

  11. 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial Markets 2014 Review of the Potential Impact of DOE Excess Uranium Inventory On the Commercial...

  12. Applications of stochastic inventory control in market-making and robust supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Miao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation extends the classical inventory control model to address stochastic inventory control problems raised in market-making and robust supply chains. In the financial market, market-makers assume the role of ...

  13. The production planning and inventory management of intermediate products for a pharmaceutical company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kok, Yixiong

    2007-01-01

    TCG is a multinational pharmaceutical company. As part of its drive to stay lean and competitive, TCG hopes to effectively maximize its capital assets by reducing warehouse inventory. This thesis aims to reduce the inventory ...

  14. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    because of its Humans and forest fire credibility on allof the 20th century, natural forest fires out forest fuelsto make Sierra Nevada forests more fire resil- ient is an

  15. Development of the Signals and Systems Concept Inventory (SSCI) Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    31st ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference F2A-2 DEVELOPMENT OF THE SIGNALS AND SYSTEMS CONCEPTDevelopment of the Signals and Systems Concept Inventory (SSCI) Assessment Instrument Kathleen E. Wage and John R. Buck October 2001 Proceedings of the 31st ASEE/IEEE Frontiers in Education Conference

  16. TECHNOLOGY-RELATED FIXED ASSET INVENTORY CONTROL PROCEDURES New Purchases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchens, John

    TECHNOLOGY-RELATED FIXED ASSET INVENTORY CONTROL PROCEDURES New Purchases When a new computer the new equipment shall be submitted to Information Technology Services (ITS) with the ITS Job Request a computer, printer, projector or other technology-related fixed asset to a new University department

  17. 1 | P a g e Home Inventory Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang, Paul

    where we spend the most time is lagging behind in this trend. Our homes are the next facet of our lives home tells you this morning's news and weather, at the same time sending a signal to your car to warm1 | P a g e Home Inventory Project Final Presentation CIS 4398 Projects in Computer Science Thomas

  18. Optimal Manufacturing Flow Controllers: Zero-Inventory Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    Optimal Manufacturing Flow Controllers: Zero-Inventory Policies and Control Switching Sets Michael, (978) 927-2300, FAX (978) 524-3747, veatch@gordonc.edu Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Boston Kimemia and Gershwin [12] proposed a flow control model of a flexible manufacturing system that has been

  19. Waste Inventory for Near Surface Repository (NSR) - 13482

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidotas, Algirdas [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)] [Lithuania Enterprise Company Radioactive Waste Management Agency, Luksio 5, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2013-07-01

    The main characteristics, physical, chemical as well as radiological of the waste intended to be disposed of in the planned NSR are described. This description is mainly based on the waste inventory investigations performed by the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP). The four different waste streams to be disposed of in the NSR are described and investigated. (authors)

  20. Gas-storage calculations yield accurate cavern, inventory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.G. )

    1990-07-02

    This paper discusses how determining gas-storage cavern size and inventory variance is now possible with calculations based on shut-in cavern surveys. The method is the least expensive of three major methods and is quite accurate when recorded over a period of time.

  1. A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This working paper includes new analyses of the six R-PPs recently submitted by Argentina, Costa Rica, Kenya, Nepal, Republic of Congo and Tanzania for formal consideration...

  2. Influence of sky conditions on carbon dioxide uptake by forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dengel, Sigrid

    2009-01-01

    Sky conditions play an important role in the Earth’s climate system, altering the solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface and determining the fraction of incoming direct and diffuse radiation. Sky conditions dictate ...

  3. An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

    2005-10-01

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

  4. UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis 1 University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis 1 University of British Columbia 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Faculty-Specific Preliminary Analysis SEEDS Sustainability Project Sustainability Office, Kelly Coulson Course: CHBE 484 April 15, 2009 #12;UBC 2006 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

  5. Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global inventory of methane clathrate: sensitivity to changes in the deep ocean Bruce Buffett of methane clathrate in marine sediments, and use it to predict the sensitivity of the steady-state methane inventory to changes in the deep ocean. The methane inventory is determined by binning the seafloor area

  6. Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Fuel-Based On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions Inventory for the Denver Metropolitan Area Sajal S of obtaining on-road emissions inventories has been developed. This technique calculates emission factors these factors with fuel use data, available from tax records, yields a fuel based emission inventory. We have

  7. The completeness of taxonomic inventories for describing the global diversity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    The completeness of taxonomic inventories for describing the global diversity and distribution to the completeness of taxonomic inventories can have far-reaching consequences. Here, we used the largest publicly was used to calculate the completeness of the taxonomic inventory at each resolution. In terms

  8. IMPACTS OF ADVANCE DEMAND INFORMATION IN MULTI-CLASS PRODUCTION-INVENTORY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaesmen, Fikri

    1 IMPACTS OF ADVANCE DEMAND INFORMATION IN MULTI-CLASS PRODUCTION-INVENTORY SYSTEMS Seda Tepe information. Most earlier models of production-inventory systems (Buzacott and Shanthikumar, 1994; Karaesmen with safety time in a single-stage capacitated production-inventory system with advance demand information

  9. WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE INVENTORY How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed Since the 1998 improves. At the time of the 1998 Certification Decision, no waste had been emplaced in WIPP, therefore the entire waste inventory was an es- timation of the waste DOE might put in WIPP. The recer- tification

  10. Inventory of U.S. 2012 dioxin emissions to atmosphere Henri Dwyer, Nickolas J. Themelis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory of U.S. 2012 dioxin emissions to atmosphere Henri Dwyer, Nickolas J. Themelis Earth: Total dioxins TEQ dioxins Dioxin sources U.S. inventory Waste-to-energy WTE Emissions Landfill fires a b s t r a c t In 2006, the U.S. EPA published an inventory of dioxin emissions for the U.S. covering

  11. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  12. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1998 Emissions Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. K. Zohner

    1999-10-01

    This report presents the 1998 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradiological emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  13. Air emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: 1994 emissions report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report Presents the 1994 update of the Air Emission inventory for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The INEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of non-radionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEL, and provides non-radionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  14. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-c-102: best-basis inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, S.L.

    1997-08-26

    An effort is underway to provide waste inventory estimates that will serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. As part of this effort, an evaluation of available information for single-shell tank 241-C-102 was performed, and a best-basis inventory was established. This work follows the methodology that was established by the standard inventory task.

  15. Fire dynamics and carbon cycling of miombo woodlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire dynamics and carbon cycling of miombo woodlands Supervised by Mat Williams & Casey Ryan #12 extraction · Fire #12;#12;Research Questions 1. How does fire activity relate to forest biomass? 2. Can fire be linked to tree mortality? 3. Can modelling techniques be used to understand the impact of fire in SE

  16. Patterns of Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    Patterns of Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Dynamics in Decomposing Foliar Litter in Canadian Group 1 Department of Geography and Centre for Climate and Global Change Research, McGill University, Montre´al, Quebec, Canada; 2 Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service, Victoria, British Columbia

  17. CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 enrichment increases carbon and nitrogen input from fine roots in a deciduous forest Colleen2 Ecological Society of America, 2008 #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;+ [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] #12;+ Net primary production + [CO2] + C and N storage in biomass #12;+ Net primary production

  18. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  19. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  20. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry Texas Forest Service College Station, Texas November 2006 #12;Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Texas economy. METHODS This study uses the input-output method to estimate the direct and total economic

  1. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  2. Forest Landowners' Guide to the Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal income tax consid- erations for Forest Land, including capital costs, reforestation tax incentives, timber income and capital gains, government program cost-share payments, tax treatment of other forest

  3. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  4. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  5. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  6. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  7. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-05-06

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  8. Variation in physiological responses of forest trees to disturbance: implications for future forest carbon and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Alexis S.

    2012-05-31

    Rapid environmental change in recent decades has challenged Ecologists to focus on understanding ecosystem response and physiological functioning in the face of increased disturbances. Understanding physiological responses of trees to disturbance...

  9. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The price development of the forest industry's end products, such as paper, has been negative for several

  10. Forests and The Texas Economy. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    , while maintain ing a healthy forest environment, requires the cooperation and understanding of many individuals, groups, and organizations. This document provides a unique statistical base for understanding the current status of forestry in Texas... or wood-based industry is a part of the manufactur ing industry that is a vital component of Texas' diverse econ omy (Figures 5-1 to 5-3). As indicated below, Texas is one of the top producers of forest products in the country: ? Texas is one...

  11. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  12. 4, 27472779, 2004 Boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  13. Forest Research No. 37 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research No. 37 May 2007 Contents m Editorial m Direct sowing ­ useful or useless details Forest Research - © Crown copyright 2007 Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are the epitome. ©AndreaKiewitt EcoThe Biodiversity and Conservation Newsletter of Ecology Division Forest Research type

  14. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  15. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  16. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  17. 7, 49254979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in the European free troposphere A. Petzold et al. Title forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP Experiment in summer 2004 A. Petzold1 , B. Weinzierl1 , H Correspondence to: A. Petzold (andreas.petzold@dlr.de) 4925 #12;ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes

  18. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  19. 6, 32273264, 2006 Forest fire smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3227­3264, 2006 Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Modeling of trace gases from the 1998 North Central Mexico forest fire smoke plume, as measured Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  20. Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest.nfs.unl.edu Dr. Scott Josiah State Forester & Director (402) 472-1467 sjosiah2@unl.edu Don Westover Wildland Fire