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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Index Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations Foundation Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.forestcarbonindex.org/ Web Application Link: www.forestcarbonindex.org/maps.html Cost: Free References: Forest Carbon Index [1] The Forest Carbon Index (FCI) compiles and displays global data relating to biological, economic, governance, investment, and market readiness conditions for every forest and country in the world, revealing the best places and countries for forest carbon investments. Please use this site to

2

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry, baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FC

3

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

4

Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Portal Forest Carbon Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forest Carbon Portal Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, United States Agency for International Development, United Kingdom Department for International Development, Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com/ Forest Carbon Portal Screenshot References: FCP[1] "Ecosystem Marketplace's Forest Carbon Portal is a clearinghouse of information, feature stories, event listings, project details, 'how-to' guides, news, and market analysis on forest-based carbon sequestration projects. Deforestation and land-use change are responsible for 17% of the

5

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Name Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices, Training materials Website http://www.forestcarbonpartner Country Argentina, Bolivia, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of Congo, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Laos, Liberia, Madagascar, Mexico, Moldova, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of the Congo, Suriname, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda, Vanuatu, Vietnam

6

PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANAR MEMS SUPERCAPACITOR USING CARBON NANOTUBE FORESTS Y.Q. Jiang, Q. Zhou, and L. Lin Mechanical ABSTRACT Planar micro supercapacitors utilizing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and very robust cycling stability. As such, we believe these planar MEMS supercapacitors could

Lin, Liwei

7

Carbon Accounting in Forest Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Carbon Pools: Above ground biomass Belowground BiomassBelowground Biomass Soil Organic Carbon Dead: · Aboveground biomassAboveground biomass · Belowground biomass · Soil Organic Carbon · Litter · Dead Wood· Dead Wood · (Wood Products) T?V S?D Industrie Service GmbH #12;Principles · Biomass is usually measured

Pettenella, Davide

8

Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: PricewaterhouseCoopers Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications Website: www.pwc.co.uk/ Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 Screenshot References: Low Carbon Economy Index 2010[1] "PwC re-examines the progress of the G20 economies against the Low Carbon Achievement and Low Carbon Challenge Index. This post- Copenhagen report provides an update on the progress over 2009." Low Carbon Economy Index 2010 References ↑ "Low Carbon Economy Index 2010" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Low_Carbon_Economy_Index_2010&oldid=3841

9

Extracting forest canopy structure from spatial information of high resolution optical imagery: tree crown size versus leaf area index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaves are the primary interface where energy, water and carbon exchanges occur between the forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of the amount of leaf area in a stand, and the tree crown size characterizes how leaves ...

C. Song; M. B. Dickinson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

11

State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: moderncms.ecosystemmarketplace.com/repository/moderncms_documents/SFCM State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Screenshot References: State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009[1] Overview "This report was created to increase transparency and answer fundamental questions about the supply of forestry-based carbon credits, such as transaction volumes, credit prices, hectares influenced and tenure rights. It outlines the aggregate numbers from our survey of 61 project developers1

12

Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing! This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken.

Luxmoore, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baldocchi, D.D. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Forest Carbon Seminars SUTROFOR 2010-2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); · Forest Management (FM); · Fossil fuel substitution (Bioenergy / biofuels); · Reducing Emissions from / biofuels) · Increasing CO2 stock in off-site wood products (CHWP); · Reducing Emissions from Deforestation;Retailers/wholesalers/broker/aggregators (1/2) http://www.carbonneutral.com/ Retailers/wholesalers

Pettenella, Davide

15

Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

18

1 A SUMMARY OF THE GREENHOUSE GAS IMPLICATIONS OF FOREST CARBON STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the development of material-specific estimates of changes in forest carbon storage in EPAs Waste Reduction Model (WARM). It summarizes the approach used to estimate changes in forest carbon storage in managed forests resulting from source reduction and recycling of wood and paper products.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Harnessing Farms and Forests in the Low-Carbon Economy: How to Create, Measure, and Verify Greenhouse Gas Offsets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forests in the Low-Carbon Economy: How to Create, Measure,Forests in the Low-Carbon Economy: How to Create, Measure,go for a low carbon economy, and who the main participants

Mohanty, Tanaya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 -Tropical forests in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 - Tropical forests if carbon credits were priced between $10 and $33 per tonne, a study has found. Forests soak up vast amounts of planet-warming carbon dioxide each year and are crucial in the fight to curb climate change. Many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carbon Sequestration and Its Impacts on Forest Management in the Northeast Developed for the North East State Foresters Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer: This is not a position paper. It is intended to provide a factual basis for interested people in the NEFA region to discuss the carbon sequestration issue. Issues Discussions about forests and their relevance to the carbon sequestration issue are in their infancy. Definitions are varied, standards are not yet set, science is incomplete, and much deliberation ensues about fundamental components of the issue. As a result, the current debates are highly politicized and it is not even clear forum issues are to be worked on. Some debates are happening at the state legislative level, others within the Congress, while others still occur in international settings. Until some of the fundamental definitions and standards are set, there will be substantial politics associated with this issue. This paper attempts to separate current conjecture with fact, thereby allowing the reader to understand how best to begin discussions on the subject. NEFAs Interest in Carbon Sequestration NEFA is most interested in encouraging better stewardship of the forests of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York. In that regard, the interest in carbon sequestration is focused on the role forests might play in the sequestering of carbon through forest management activities. Providing information to landowners and policy makers about which forest management activities sequester the most carbon is an important service to the landowners and society. NEFA will continue to keep current on the rapidly evolving carbon sequestration field in order to play this important role.

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The effectiveness of forest carbon sequestration strategies with system-wide adjustments, Resources for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the effectiveness of tree planting and forest conservation strategies to increase the sink of carbon in global forests. Because forests are expected to sequester additional carbon without explicit human intervention, a baseline case is presented. The baseline predicts that forests will sequester an additional 17.9 Pg (10 15 grams) of carbon over the next 150 years, with nearly 95 % of this accruing to storage in marketed forest products. The paper then compares strategies which assume markets adjust to changes in future timber supply to an optimistic regional planner case in which no market adjustment occurs. The resulting predictions show that system wide market interactions may lead to substantial leakage of carbon from the forest system.

Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn; Roger Sedjo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Carbon Supply From Changes in Management of Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

Brown, S.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

Brown, S

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database  

SciTech Connect

A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

Brown, S

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database  

SciTech Connect

A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

Brown, S.

2002-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Sensitivity of Boreal Forest Carbon Balance to Soil Thaw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 km of Thompson, Manitoba, that ranged in age since theblack spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada. The site lost 0.3 ?black spruce forest in Manitoba, Canada, from 1994 to 1997 (

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Luquillo mountains, Puerto Rico: I. Long-term versus short-Forest, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. US Department ofLuquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. U.S.D.A. Forest Service

Dubinsky, E.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Forests, Carbon and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Forests, Carbon and Climate Change: the UK Contribution 231 W A N D R O B E R T M A T T H E W S O F F O R E S T R E S E A R C H FORESTS, CARBON DIOXIDE AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE The global carbon cycle A discussion of UK forests and carbon-related issues must

31

Measuring Logging Impacts on Forest Carbon Stocks Using Ground and Aerial-based Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research conducted under this project contributes to EPRI member efforts to identify science-based, cost-effective methods to measure and monitor forest management carbon offsets. Specifically, this project tested the use of aerial photography to monitor forest carbon stock changes that result from logging in Ohio and Bolivia. This report covers all phases of the work under this contract and compares methods used in Ohio and Bolivia. It discusses the applicability of methods to the monitoring of dual...

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

BIOMETRIC AND MICROMETEOROLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS OF TROPICAL FOREST CARBON BALANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide fluxes from a very tall tower in a northern forest:67 m tall, 46 cm triangular cross section tower (model 55G;

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Observations and assessment of forest carbon recovery following disturbance in North America  

SciTech Connect

Disturbance processes of various types substantially modify ecosystem carbon dynamics both temporally and spatially. The recovery of forests from disturbance typically results in carbon sequestration, but the point at which ecosystems move from being net sources to sinks of carbon is quite variable depending on a number of factors. Here we review some of the essential measurements needed to track the dynamics of carbon associated with forest disturbance, the longer-term recovery of carbon pools following disturbance, and consider the measurements used to document recovery, as well as how they vary with the type of disturbance. First we provide a brief overview of the relevance of disturbance to carbon dynamics. Specifically, we address 3 topics: (1) the different measurements needed to characterize recovery from different types of disturbance (e.g. fire, insects, harvest); (2) the essential measurements required to quantify the dynamics of carbon components associated with forest recovery; (3) the utility of multiple types of observations (lines of evidence) in documenting recovery from disturbance. Related to these topics we then explore a series of specific types of disturbance (fire, insects, harvest), and the relative importance of various factors (and associated measurements) that influence carbon pools and fluxes in different systems (boreal and temperate). These topics and associated research questions are focused on North America, but aspects are undoubtedly relevant to other forested ecosystems.

Goetz, Scott J.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Law, Beverly E.; Hicke, J.; Huang, C.; Houghton, R. A.; McNulty, Steve; O'Halloran, Tom; Harmon, Mark; Meddens, Arjan; Pfeifer, Eric; Mildrexler, David; Kasischke, Eric

2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monterey Bay Area: Ano Nuevo Long-stemmed and Rossi Square- stemmed Terry Jones and Mark Hylkema INDEX Formation

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Global carbon impacts of using forest harvest residues for district heating in Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forests in Vermont are selectively logged periodically to generate wood products and useful energy. Carbon remains stored in the wood products during their lifetime and in fossil fuel displaced by using these products in place of energy-intensive products. Additional carbon is sequestered by new forest growth, and the forest inventory is sustained using this procedure. A significant portion of the harvest residue can be used as biofuel in central plants to generate electricity and thermal energy, which also displaces the use of fossil fuels. The impact of this action on the global carbon balance was analyzed using a model derived from the Graz/Oak Ridge Carbon Accounting Model (GORCAM). The analysis showed that when forests are harvested only to manufacture wood products, more than 100 years are required to match the sequestered carbon present if the forest is left undisturbed. If part of the harvest residue is collected and used as biofuel in place of oil or natural gas, it is possible to reduce this time to about 90 years, but it is usually longer. Given that harvesting the forest for products will continue, carbon emission benefits relative to this practice can start within 10 to 70 years if part of the harvest residue is used as biofuel. This time is usually higher for electric generation plants, but it can be reduced substantially by converting to cogeneration operation. Cogeneration makes possible a ratio of carbon emission reduction for district heating to carbon emission increase for electricity generation in the range of 3 to 5. Additional sequestering benefits can be realized by using discarded wood products as biofuels.

McLain, H.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Paper-mediated controlled densification and low temperature transfer of carbon nanotube forests for electronic interconnect application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication and characterization of densified and transferred carbon nanotube forests for electronic interconnect application. A simple, low cost and quality method is developed for densifying vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNTs) ... Keywords: Carbon nanotube, Carbon nanotube resistance, Carbon nanotube transfer, Densification, Post-growth processing, Young's modulus

Di Jiang; Teng Wang; Si Chen; Lilei Ye; Johan Liu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils | U.S. DOE Office of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » February 2013 Elevated Nitrogen Slows Carbon Decay in Forest Soils New clues emerge about microbial decomposition mechanisms. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

39

A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: pdf.wri.org/working_papers/getting_ready_2010-07-13.pdf A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Screenshot References: A Review of R-PP[1] This working paper is part of a series of regular updates reviewing the Readiness Preparation Proposals (R-PPs) submitted by REDD+ Country

40

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Carbon Storage and Species Richness in Three South Carolina Coastal Plain Riparian Forests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Micro-topographic variations in carbon storage and their spatial distribution with respect to vegetation were studied in the Pen Branch system as well as intermediate and late successional forests. Overall measurements of above-ground biomass, soil carbon, and stand structure indicate rapid convergence with the patterns in late successional forests. Micro-site differences were small.

Giese, L.A.; Aust, W.M.; Trettin, C.C.; Kolka, R.K.

1999-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

Oberbauer, S. F.

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Comparison of Forest Soil Carbon Dynamics at Five Sites Along a Latitudinal Gradient  

SciTech Connect

Carbon stocks, and C:N ratios, were measured in the forest floor, mineral soil, and two mineral soil fractions (particulate and mineral-associated organic matter, POM and MOM, respectively) at five forest sites, ranging from 60 to 100 years old, along a latitudinal gradient in the eastern United States. Sampling at four sites was replicated over two consecutive years. For many measurements (like forest floor carbon stocks, cumulative soil organic carbon stocks to 20 cm, and the fraction of whole soil carbon in POM), there was no significant difference between years at each site despite the use of somewhat different sampling methods. With one exception, forest floor and mineral soil carbon stocks increased from warm, southern, sites (with fine-textured soils) to northern, cool, sites (with more coarse-textured soils). The exception was a northern site, with less than 10% silt-clay content, that had a soil organic carbon stock similar to those measured at southern sites. Soil carbon at each site was partitioned into two pools (labile and stable) on the basis of carbon measured in the forest floor and POM and MOM fractions from the mineral soil. A two-compartment steady-state model, with randomly varying parameter values, was used in probabilistic calculations to estimate the turnover time of labile soil organic carbon (MRTU) and the annual transfer of labile carbon to stable carbon (k2) at each site in two different years. Based on empirical data, the turnover time of stable soil carbon (MRTS) was determined by mean annual temperature and increased from 30 to 100 years from south to north. Moving from south to north, MRTU increased from approximately 5 to 14 years. Consistent with prior studies, 13C enrichment factors ( ) from the Rayleigh equation, that describe the rate of change in 13C through the soil profile, were an indicator of soil carbon turnover times along the latitudinal gradient. Consistent with its role in stabilization of soil organic carbon, silt-clay content along the gradient was positively correlated (r = 0.91; P 0.001) with parameter k2. Mean annual temperature was indicated as the environmental factor most strongly associated with south to north differences in the storage and turnover of labile soil carbon. However, soil texture appeared to override the influence of temperature when there was too little silt-clay content to stabilize labile soil carbon and thereby protect it from decomposition. Irrespective of latitudinal differences in measured soil carbon stocks, each study site had a relatively high proportion of labile soil carbon (approximately 50% of whole soil carbon to a depth of 20 cm). Depending on unknown temperature sensitivities, large labile pools of forest soil carbon are potentially at risk of depletion by decomposition in a warming climate, and losses could be disproportionately higher from coarse textured forest soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Climate Change and Forest Sinks: Factors Affecting the Costs of Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion. They have not undergone formal peer review or the editorial treatment accorded RFF books and other publications. CLIMATE CHANGE AND FOREST SINKS: FACTORS AFFECTING THE COSTS OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION

Richard G. Newell; Richard G. Newell; Robert N. Stavins; Robert N. Stavins

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Indonesia Forest Fires Exacerbate Carbon Monoxide Pollution over Peninsular Malaysia during July to September 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind carried the smoke further afield from forest fires in Sumatra caused worse air pollution in Malaysia reached extremely hazardous levels and forced schools and an airport to close. There were 3,258 'hot spots' recorded by NOAA satellites in the province ... Keywords: AIRS, Carbon monoxide, Peninsular

Jasim M. Rajab; M. Z. MatJafri; H. S. Lim; K. Abdullah

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of nitrogen additions on above- and belowground carbon dynamics in two tropical forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition is increasing rapidly in tropical regions, adding N to ecosystems that often have high background N availability. Tropical forests play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle, yet the effects of N deposition on C cycling in these ecosystems are poorly understood. We used a field N-fertilization experiment in lower and upper elevation tropical rain forests in Puerto Rico to explore the responses of above- and belowground C pools to N addition. As expected, tree stem growth and litterfall productivity did not respond to N fertilization in either of these Nrich forests, indicating a lack of N limitation to net primary productivity (NPP). In contrast, soil C concentrations increased significantly with N fertilization in both forests, leading to larger C stocks in fertilized plots. However, different soil C pools responded to N fertilization differently. Labile (low density) soil C fractions and live fine roots declined with fertilization, while mineral-associated soil C increased in both forests. Decreased soil CO2 fluxes in fertilized plots were correlated with smaller labile soil C pools in the lower elevation forest (R2 = 0.65, p\\0.05), and with lower live fine root biomass in the upper elevation forest (R2 = 0.90, p\\0.05). Our results indicate that soil C storage is sensitive to N deposition in tropical forests, even where plant productivity is not N-limited. The mineral-associated soil C pool has the potential to respond relatively quickly to N additions, and can drive increases in bulk soil C stocks in tropical forests.

Cusack, D.; Silver, W.L.; Torn, M.S.; McDowell, W.H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 1, Summary: Draft  

SciTech Connect

Forests are a major source of carbon dioxide emissions in developing countries, in most cases far exceeding the emissions from the energy sector. To date, however, efforts at quantifying forestry emissions have produced a wide range of results. In order to assist policymakers in developing measures to reduce emissions` levels and to increase carbon sequestration, the Tropical Forest Research Network (F-7) has undertaken this effort to improve the precision of emissions estimates and to identify possible response options in the forestry sector. This paper summarizes the results of one component of this work. The Tropical Forest Research Network (F-7) was established in 1990 as part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change`s (IPCC) activities in examining growing emissions of greenhouse gases and their potential impact on the global climate. Unlike past methods, this study relied on a network of participants from developing countries to prepare estimates of carbon emissions. The participating countries -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico and Thailand -- currently represent an estimated two-thirds of the annual deforestation of closed moist forests. This study gives an estimate of 837 million tonnes of carbon emissions from deforestation and logging in the F-7 countries in 1990. A proportional projection of these estimates to the tropical biome shows that the total carbon emissions are between 1.1 and 1.7 billion tonnes of carbon, with a working average of 1.4 billion tonnes per year. This work also provides estimates of emissions and uptake from China, which past studies rarely have included. This summary will be followed by individual reports by each of the participating countries, which will include detailed evaluations of possible response options. Estimates for Nigeria are also under preparation.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.; Cerutti, O.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Forests are a major source of carbon dioxide emissions in developing countries, in most cases far exceeding the emissions from the energy sector. To date, however, efforts at quantifying forestry emissions have produced a wide range of results. In order to assist policymakers in developing measures to reduce emissions' levels and to increase carbon sequestration, the Tropical Forest Research Network (F-7) has undertaken this effort to improve the precision of emissions estimates and to identify possible response options in the forestry sector. This paper summarizes the results of one component of this work. The Tropical Forest Research Network (F-7) was established in 1990 as part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) activities in examining growing emissions of greenhouse gases and their potential impact on the global climate. Unlike past methods, this study relied on a network of participants from developing countries to prepare estimates of carbon emissions. The participating countries -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico and Thailand -- currently represent an estimated two-thirds of the annual deforestation of closed moist forests. This study gives an estimate of 837 million tonnes of carbon emissions from deforestation and logging in the F-7 countries in 1990. A proportional projection of these estimates to the tropical biome shows that the total carbon emissions are between 1.1 and 1.7 billion tonnes of carbon, with a working average of 1.4 billion tonnes per year. This work also provides estimates of emissions and uptake from China, which past studies rarely have included. This summary will be followed by individual reports by each of the participating countries, which will include detailed evaluations of possible response options. Estimates for Nigeria are also under preparation.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.); Cerutti, O.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

49

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Influence of leaf area index prescriptions on simulations of heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Leaf-area index (LAI), the total one-sided surface area of leaf per ground surface area, is a key component of land surface models. We investigate the influence of differing, plausible LAI prescriptions on heat, moisture, and carbon fluxes ...

Jatin Kala; Mark Decker; Jean-Franois Exbrayat; Andy J. Pitman; Claire Carouge; Jason P. Evans; Gab Abramowitz; David Mocko

51

Forest soil carbon inventories and dynamics along an elevation gradient in the southern Appalachian Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil organic carbon (SOC) was partitioned between unprotected and protected pools in six forests along an elevation gradient in the southern Appalachian Mountains using two physical methods: flotation in aqueous CaCl{sub 2} (1.4 g/mL) and wet sieving through a 0.053 mm sieve. Both methods produced results that were qualitatively and quantitatively similar. Along the elevation gradient, 28 to 53% of the SOC was associated with an unprotected pool that included forest floor O-layers and other labile soil organic matter (SOM) in various stages of decomposition. Most (71 to 83%) of the C in the mineral soil at the six forest sites was identified as protected because of its association with a heavy soil fraction (> 1.4 g/mL) or a silt-clay soil fraction. Total inventories of SOC in the forests (to a depth of 30 cm) ranged from 384 to 1244 mg C/cm{sup 2}. The turnover time of the unprotected SOC was negatively correlated (r = -0.95, p < 0.05) with mean annual air temperature (MAT) across the elevation gradient. Measured SOC inventories, annual C returns to the forest floor, and estimates of C turnover associated with the protected soil pool were used to parameterize a simple model of SOC dynamics. Steady-state predictions with the model indicated that, with no change in C inputs, the low- (235-335 m), mid- (940-1000 m), and high- (1650-1670 m) elevation forests under study might surrender {approx} 40 to 45% of their current SOC inventory following a 4 C increase in MAT. Substantial losses of unprotected SOM as a result of a warmer climate could have long-term impacts on hydrology, soil quality, and plant nutrition in forest ecosystems throughout the southern Appalachian Mountains.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically viable Forest Harvesting Practices that Increase Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report covers a 3-year cooperative agreement between the University of Maine and the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station that focused on the characterization of forest stands and the assessment of forest carbon storage (see attached for detailed description of the project). The goal of this work was to compare estimates of forest C storage made via remeasurement of FIA-type plots with eddy flux measurements. In addition to relating whole ecosystem estimates of carbon storage to changes in aboveground biomass, we explored methodologies by partitioning growth estimates from periodic inventory measurements into annual estimates. In the final year, we remeasured plots that were subject to a shelterwood harvest over the winter of 2001-02 to assess the production of coarse woody debris by this harvest, to remeasure trees in a long-term stand first established by NASA, to carry out other field activities at Howland, and, to assess the importance of downed and decaying wood as well as standing dead trees to the C inputs to harvested and non harvested plots.

Dail, David Bryan [University of Maine

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration benefits for two forest types used to convert abandoned grasslands for carbon sequestration. Annual mixed hardwood benefits, based on total stand carbon volume present at the end of a given year, range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $5.26/ton of carbon (low prices). White pine benefits based on carbon volume range from a minimum of $0/ton of carbon to a maximum of $18.61/ton of carbon (high prices). The higher maximum white pine carbon payment can primarily be attributed to the fact that the shorter rotation means that payments for white pine carbon are being made on far less cumulative carbon tonnage than for that of the long-rotation hardwoods. Therefore, the payment per ton of white pine carbon needs to be higher than that of the hardwoods in order to render the conversion to white pine profitable by the end of a rotation. These carbon payments may seem appealingly low to the incentive provider. However, payments (not discounted) made over a full rotation may add up to approximately $17,493/ha for white pine (30-year rotation), and $18,820/ha for mixed hardwoods (60-year rotation). The literature suggests a range of carbon sequestration costs, from $0/ton of carbon to $120/ton of carbon, although the majority of studies suggest a cost below $50/ ton of carbon, with van Kooten et al. (2000) suggesting a cutoff cost of $20/ton of carbon sequestered. Thus, the ranges of carbon payments estimated for this study fall well within the ranges of carbon sequestration costs estimated in previous studies.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Application of Low-Cost Digital Elevation Models to Detect Change in Forest Carbon Sequestration Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This two-year study evaluated advanced multispectral digital imagery applications for assessment of forest carbon stock change. A series of bench and field studies in North Carolina and Ohio tested aerial assessments of forest change between two time periods using two software packages (ERDAS and TERREST) for Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation, automated classification software (eCognition) for canopy segmentation and a multiple ranging laser designed to improve quality of elevation data. Results of the DEM software comparison showed that while TERREST has the potential to produce much higher resolution DEM than ERDAS, it is unable to resolve crucial canopy features adequately. Lab tests demonstrated that additional laser data improves image registration and Z-axis DEM quality. Data collected in the field revealed difficult challenges in correctly modeling the location of laser strike and subsequently determining elevations in both software packages. Automated software segmentation of tree canopies provided stem diameter and biomass carbon estimates that were within 3% of comparable ground based estimates in the Ohio site and produced similar biomass estimates for a limited number of plots in the Duke forest. Tree height change between time periods and canopy segmentation from multispectral imagery allowed calculation of forest carbon stock change at costs that are comparable to those for ground-based methods. This work demonstrates the potential of lower cost imagery systems enhanced with laser data to collect high quality imagery and paired laser data for forestry and environmental applications. Additional research on automated canopy segmentation and multi-temporal image registration is needed to refine these methods for commercial use.

Kenneth Glenn MacDicken

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A long-term experiment to measure carbon and water fluxes was initiated in 2004 as part of the Ameriflux network in a second-growth oak-hickory forest in central Missouri. Ecosystem-scale (~ 1 km2) canopy gas exchange (measured by eddy-covariance methods), vertical CO2 profile sampling and soil respiration along with meteorological parameters were monitored continuously. Early results from this forest located on the western margin of the Eastern Deciduous Forest indicated high peak rates of canopy CO2 uptake (35-40 ?mol m-2 s-1) during the growing season. Canopy CO2 profile measurements indicated substantial accumulation of CO2 (~500 ppm) near the surface in still air at night, venting of this buildup in the morning hours under radiation-induced turbulent air flow, and small vertical gradients of CO2 during most of the subsequent light period with minimum CO2 concentrations in the canopy. Flux of CO2 from the soil ranged from 2 to 8 ?mol m-2 s-1 and increased with temperature. Data from this site and others in the network will also allow characterization of regional spatial variation in carbon fluxes as well as inter-annual differences attributable to climatic events such as droughts.

Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Final Technical Report Interannual Variations in the Rate of Carbon Storage by a Mid-Latitude Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time series of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of carbon by an entire forest ecosystem on time scales from hourly to decadal was measured by eddy-covariance supplemented with plot-level measurements of biomass and tree demography. The results demonstrate the response of forest carbon fluxes and long-term budgets to climatic factors and to successional change. The data from this project have been extensively used worldwide by the carbon cycle science community in support of model development and validation of remote sensing observations.

Wofsy, Steven; Munger, J W

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ecosystem-Atmosphere Exchange of Carbon, Water and Energy over a Mixed Deciduous Forest in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the project period we continued to conduct long-term (multi-year) measurements, analysis, and modeling of energy and mass exchange in and over a deciduous forest in the Midwestern United States, to enhance the understanding of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange of carbon. At the time when this report was prepared, results from nine years of measurements (1998 - 2006) of above canopy CO2 and energy fluxes at the AmeriFlux site in the Morgan-Monroe State Forest, Indiana, USA (see Table 1), were available on the Fluxnet database, and the hourly CO2 fluxes for 2007 are presented here (see Figure 1). The annual sequestration of atmospheric carbon by the forest is determined to be between 240 and 420 g C m-2 a-1 for the first ten years. These estimates are based on eddy covariance measurements above the forest, with a gap-filling scheme based on soil temperature and photosynthetically active radiation. Data gaps result from missing data or measurements that were rejected in qua)lity control (e.g., during calm nights). Complementary measurements of ecological variables (i.e. inventory method), provided an alternative method to quantify net carbon uptake by the forest, partition carbon allocation in each ecosystem components, and reduce uncertainty on annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP). Biometric datasets are available on the Fluxnext database since 1998 (with the exclusion of 2006). Analysis for year 2007 is under completion.

Danilo Dragoni; Hans Peter Schmid; C.S.B. Grimmond; J.C. Randolph; J.R. White

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M. (Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore, (India). Center for Ecological Sciences and ASTRA); Deying, Xu (Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, (China). Research Inst. of Forestry)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measuring and Monitoring Plans for Baseline Development and Estimation of Carbon Benefits for Change in Forest Management in Two Reg ions: Changing from Clearcut to Group Selection Harvests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Soil carbon sequestration and changes in fungal and bacterial biomass following incorporation of forest residues.  

SciTech Connect

Sequestering carbon (C) in forest soils can benefit site fertility and help offset greenhouse gas emissions. However, identifying soil conditions and forest management practices which best promote C accumulation remains a challenging task. We tested whether soil incorporation of masticated woody residues alters short-term C storage at forested sites in western and southeastern USA. Our hypothesis was that woody residues would preferentially stimulate soil fungal biomass, resulting in improved C use efficiency and greater soil C storage. Harvest slash at loblolly pine sites in South Carolina was masticated (chipped) and either (1) retained on the soil surface, (2) tilled to a soil depth of 40 cm, or (3) tilled using at least twice the mass of organics. At comparative sites in California, live woody fuels in ponderosa pine stands were (1) masticated and surface applied, (2) masticated and tilled, or (3) left untreated. Sites with clayey and sandy soils were compared in each region, with residue additions ranging from 20 to 207 Mg ha_1. Total and active fungal biomass were not strongly affected by residue incorporation despite the high input of organics. Limited response was also found for total and active bacterial biomass. As a consequence, fungal:bacterial (F:B) biomass ratios were similar among treatments at each site. Total soil C was elevated at one California site following residue incorporation, yet was significantly lower compared to surface-applied residues at both loblolly pine sites, presumably due to the oxidative effects of tilling on soil organic matter. The findings demonstrated an inconsequential effect of residue incorporation on fungal and bacterial biomass and suggest a limited potential of such practices to enhance long-term soil C storage in these forests.

Busse, Matt, D.; Sanchez, Felipe G.; Ratcliff, Alice W.; Butnor, John R.; Carter, Emily A.; Powers, Robert F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Brookhaven National Laboratory free-air carbon dioxide enrichment forest prototype -- Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of approaches have been used in fumigation experiments to quantify the effects of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO{sub 2}]{sub atm}) on plants. Mot of these approaches, reviewed elsewhere (Allen 1992), entail some type of enclosure or chamber. Chambers provide containment of the CO{sub 2}-enriched air and in this way reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} required for the experiment. At the same time, chambers alter microclimate conditions in a variety of ways so that there is a significant chamber effect on the plants within. Free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) is an alternative experimental strategy in which CO{sub 2}-enriched air is released into the ambient environment in such a way as to provide effective experimental control over [CO{sub 2}]{sub atm} without causing any change in other environmental variables. Early types of free-air exposure systems were built in the Netherlands and England for exposing vegetation to elevated concentrations of atmospheric trace gases. The FACE Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered these original ideas in designing the BNL FACE systems. The purpose of the current BNL project in the Duke Forest is to develop a FACE system that can provide adequate control over [CO{sub 2}]{sub atm} in a tall forest setting. This report is a preliminary overview of the data and much remains to be done in the analysis.

Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Nagy, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Relative Content of Black Carbon in Submicron Aerosol as a Sign of the Effect of Forest Fire Smokes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass burning occurs often in regions containing vast forest tracts and peat-bogs. These processes are accompanied by the emission of a large amount of aerosol particles and crystal carbon (black carbon [BC], soot). BC is the predominant source of solar absorption in atmospheric aerosol, which impacts climate. (Jacobson 2001; Rozenberg 1982). In this paper, we analyze the results of laboratory and field investigations that focused on the relative content of BC in aerosol particles. Main attention is given to the study of possibility using this parameter as an informative sign for estimating the effect of remote forest fire smokes on the near-ground aerosol composition.

Kozlov, V.S.; Panchenko, M.V.; Yauscheva, E.P.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forest in northern Wisconsin, USA, Agric. For. Meteorol. ,managed forests in northern Wisconsin, USA, Ecosystems, 10,Oceanic Sciences, University of Wisconsin?Madison, Madison,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly Technical Report for the period October-December, 2003. A kick-off meeting was held with NETL administrators and scientists at Morgantown, WV, on December 2, 2002. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this first quarterly reporting period, five Graduate Research Assistants were recruited, an MOA was drafted between Virginia Tech and three industry cooperators, preliminary field locations for controlled studies were located, and a preliminary analysis of a carbon inventory of forest sites on mined land was made.

Dr. James A. Burger

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spruce forest, near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. The samplingsite near Thompson, Manitoba, showed increased contribution

Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We used 10 Hz eddy flux signals and 0.2 Hz incident radiation (global shortwave and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover percentage and corresponding PAR fluctuations and its diffuse fraction. In future work such a cloud characterization will be related to water and light use efficiency estimates for each of these ecosystems. We developed empirical relationships to link sky cover type and fraction (measured with the ceilometer) to incident direct and diffuse PAR. We developed a methodology for constructing synthetic incident solar radiation time series based on operational reports of sky cover and cloud type from National Weather Service METAR reports. The aim of this work is to document the temporal and spectral properties radiation incident on the canopy, as a first step toward developing a sky-type parameterization for the net carbon uptake models.

Fitzjarrald, David Roy [Atmos Sciences Res Ctr] Atmos Sciences Res Ctr

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

69

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

Jonathan Aggett

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

71

Forest carbon market already shows cracks Reuters, 4 June 2009 -It could save the rainforests of Borneo, slow climate change and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest carbon market already shows cracks Reuters, 4 June 2009 - It could save the rainforests carbon market is emerging in anticipation of a global, U.N. climate deal in December in Copenhagen uncovered evidence of a multi-million-dollar offer of assistance from carbon brokers to a government agency

72

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Baseline soil carbon was determined for each of the eighty-one plots. Fertility analysis of soil samples was completed and these data were used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions and the pre-designated plots were fertilized. We also evaluated economic-based policy instruments that are designed to mitigate the reforestation burden borne by the owner of reclaimed mined land. Results suggest that although profitability of reforestation of these previously reclaimed mine lands may be achievable on better sites under lower interest rates, substantial payments would be required to reach ''profitability'' under many conditions.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Carbon dioxide emission index as a mean for assessing fuel quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission index, defined as the amount of CO{sub 2} released per unit of energy value, was used to rate gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The direct utilization of natural gas is the most efficient option. The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas for production of liquid fuels represents a significant decrease in fuel value of the former. The fuel value of liquids, such as gasoline, diesel oil, etc. is lower than that of natural gas. Blending gasoline with ethanol obtained either from bio-mass or via synthesis may decrease fuel value of the blend when CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the production of ethanol are included in total emissions. The introduction of liquid fuels produced by pyrolysis and liquefaction of biomass would result in the increase in the CO{sub 2} emissions. The CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of coal and petroleum coke are much higher than those from gaseous and liquid fuels. However, for petroleum coke, this is offset by the high value gaseous and liquid fuels that are simultaneously produced during coking. Conversion of low value fuels such as coal and petroleum coke to a high value chemicals via synthesis gas should be assessed as means for replacing natural gas and making it available for fuel applications.

Furimsky, E. [IMAF Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating annual carbon dioxide eddy ?uxes using open-pathJ. , 2010. Ecosystem carbon dioxide ?uxes after disturbanceEnvironmental controls over carbon dioxide and water vapor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The effects of forest fuel reduction on fire severity and long-term carbon storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two forest management objectives being debated in the context of federally managed landscapes in the US Pacific Northwest involve a perceived trade-off between fire restoration (more)

[No author

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystems Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During this quarter we worked on methodologies for analyzing carbon in mine soils. A unique property of mine soils is the presence of coal and carboniferous rock particles that are present in mine soils in various sizes, quantities, and qualities. There is no existing method in the literature that may be of use for quantitative estimation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in mine soils that can successfully differentiate between pedogenic and geogenic carbon forms. In this report we present a detailed description of a 16-step method for measuring SOC in mine soils designed for and tested on a total of 30 different mine soil mixtures representing a wide spectrum of mine soils in the hard-rock region of the Appalachian coalfield. The proposed method is a combination of chemical procedure for carbonates removal, a thermal procedure for pedogenic C removal, and elemental C analysis procedure at 900 C. Our methodology provides a means to correct for the carbon loss from the more volatile constituents of coal fragments in the mine soil samples and another correction factor for the protected organic matter that can also remain unoxidized following thermal pretreatment. The correction factors for coal and soil material-specific SOM were based on carbon content loss from coal and SOM determined by a parallel thermal oxidation analysis of pure ground coal fragments retrieved from the same mined site as the soil samples and of coal-free soil rock fragments of sandstone and siltstone origin.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon Carbon-14 with Mass Loss for an Oak Forest  

SciTech Connect

First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies (~35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the 14C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the 14C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures reflect C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily replicate results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent 14C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

QUANTIFYING FOREST ABOVEGROUND CARBON POOLS AND FLUXES USING MULTI-TEMPORAL LIDAR A report on field monitoring, remote sensing MMV, GIS integration, and modeling results for forestry field validation test to quantify aboveground tree biomass and carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sound policy recommendations relating to the role of forest management in mitigating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) depend upon establishing accurate methodologies for quantifying forest carbon pools for large tracts of land that can be dynamically updated over time. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing is a promising technology for achieving accurate estimates of aboveground biomass and thereby carbon pools; however, not much is known about the accuracy of estimating biomass change and carbon flux from repeat LiDAR acquisitions containing different data sampling characteristics. In this study, discrete return airborne LiDAR data was collected in 2003 and 2009 across {approx}20,000 hectares (ha) of an actively managed, mixed conifer forest landscape in northern Idaho, USA. Forest inventory plots, established via a random stratified sampling design, were established and sampled in 2003 and 2009. The Random Forest machine learning algorithm was used to establish statistical relationships between inventory data and forest structural metrics derived from the LiDAR acquisitions. Aboveground biomass maps were created for the study area based on statistical relationships developed at the plot level. Over this 6-year period, we found that the mean increase in biomass due to forest growth across the non-harvested portions of the study area was 4.8 metric ton/hectare (Mg/ha). In these non-harvested areas, we found a significant difference in biomass increase among forest successional stages, with a higher biomass increase in mature and old forest compared to stand initiation and young forest. Approximately 20% of the landscape had been disturbed by harvest activities during the six-year time period, representing a biomass loss of >70 Mg/ha in these areas. During the study period, these harvest activities outweighed growth at the landscape scale, resulting in an overall loss in aboveground carbon at this site. The 30-fold increase in sampling density between the 2003 and 2009 did not affect the biomass estimates. Overall, LiDAR data coupled with field reference data offer a powerful method for calculating pools and changes in aboveground carbon in forested systems. The results of our study suggest that multitemporal LiDAR-based approaches are likely to be useful for high quality estimates of aboveground carbon change in conifer forest systems.

Lee Spangler; Lee A. Vierling; Eva K. Stand; Andrew T. Hudak; Jan U.H. Eitel; Sebastian Martinuzzi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Tree survival, height and diameter were measured after the first growing season. There were significant treatment and treatment x site interactions. A STELLA{reg_sign}-based model helped us develop insight as to whether it is possible to differentiate the permanent SOC from the C contained in the labile forms of SOM. The model can be used for predicting the amount of C sequestered on mine lands, and the amount of C that is expected to reside in the mine soil for more than 1,000 years. Based on our work, it appears that substantial carbon payments to landowners would be required to reach ''profitability'' under present circumstances. However, even though the payments that we examine could generate non-negative LEVs, there is no guarantee that the payments will actually cause landowners to reforest in practice. It is landowner utility associated with forestland profitability that will be the determining factor in actual conversion--utility that likely would include cash flow timing, amenities, and even the credit position of the landowner.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. During the reporting period (October-December 2004) we completed the validation of a forest productivity classification model for mined land. A coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) of 0.68 confirms the model's ability to predict SI based on a selection of mine soil properties. To determine carbon sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio (Figure 1), West Virginia (Figure 2), and Virginia (Figure 3). The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). For hybrid poplar, total plant biomass differences increased significantly with the intensity of silvicultural input. Root, stem, and foliage biomass also increased with the level of silvicultural intensity. Financial feasibility analyses of reforestation on mined lands previously reclaimed to grassland have been completed for conversion to white pine and mixed hardwood species. Examination of potential policy instruments for promoting financial feasibility also have been completed, including lump sum payments at time of conversion, annual payments through the life of the stand, and payments based on carbon sequestration that provide both minimal profitability and fully offset initial reforestation outlays. We have compiled a database containing mine permit information obtained from permitting agencies in Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Kentucky. Due to differences and irregularities in permitting procedures between states, we found it necessary to utilize an alternative method to determine mined land acreages in the Appalachian region. We have initiated a proof of concept study, focused in the State of Ohio, to determine the feasibility of using images from the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and/or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) to accurately identify mined lands.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Integration of remote sensing and ecosystem modelling techniques to estimate forest net carbon uptake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of forest gross primary production (GPP) can be obtained using a parametric model (C-Fix) that combines ground and remotely sensed data. A methodology is presented to convert these GPP estimates into values of net ecosystem exchange (NEE). ...

F. Maselli; M. Chiesi; L. Fibbi; M. Moriondo

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 3, India and China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore, (India). Center for Ecological Sciences and ASTRA; Deying, Xu [Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, (China). Research Inst. of Forestry

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

Fox, J.F. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report we present data that show the spatial distribution of carbon in mine soils. Soil carbon data from deep soil pits from grassland minelands located in Ohio, Virginia, and West Virginia were analyzed to determine the vertical distribution and variability of soil organic carbon (SOC) down to a 2-m depth. Regression analyses were used to describe and model the distribution by soil depth of C(wt%), BD{sub fines}(g cm{sup -3}), and fines (vol%) in mine soils. The volume of excavated mine soil samples was transformed in terms of costs of digging and sampling, including sample collection and preparation, and C(wt%) analysis, in order to determine the maximum cost-effective depth (MCD) for carbon inventorying on the mined sites analyzed. Based on the horizontal variation of SOC(g m{sup -2}), we determined the sampling intensity required to achieve a desired accuracy of the amount of sequestered SOC(g m{sup -2}) at certain probability levels. The MCD and sampling intensity measurements were used to determine the minimum detectable difference (MDD) of SOC(g m{sup -2}) between two consecutive carbon inventories. We also proposed a method to determine the minimum number of years before a future C inventory event is carried out so that the measured SOC(g m{sup -2}) differences were greater than MDD. We used geostatistical analyses procedures to determine spatial dependence predictability of surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) data on the minelands analyzed. Kriging techniques were used to create surface SOC(g m{sup -2}) maps for the sites in Ohio and West Virginia. The average C sequestration rate in the surface soil layer for the Ohio (age 9) sites was estimated at 124 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, and it was estimated at 107 g C m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} for the West Virginia sites (age 4). Because of the young age of the Virginia sites, 0.2 and 1 year old, we came to a decision that C sequestration rates would be inappropriate at this stage of their development, as these soils are expected to change with time.

James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

86

Effects of soil structure destruction on methane production and carbon partitioning between methanogenic pathways in tropical rain forest soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weathered soils of Puerto Rico: 1. Morphology, formation andForest, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Interim Publica- tion),in subtropical forests in Puerto Rico, Biotropica, 27, 138

Teh, Y A; Silver, W L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Presentation 2.3: The sustainable forest products industry, carbon and climate change Mikael Hannus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumption within the industry. · To assist in the efforts to reduce society's energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, the forest products industry can - become more energy efficient and increase its share of biomass in energy production; - help supply society with increasing amounts of wood and fibre for use as a raw

88

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

89

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Forest Understory Fire in the Brazilian Amazon in ENSO and Non-ENSO Years: Area Burned and Committed Carbon Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understory fires, which burn the floor of standing forests, are one of the most important types of forest impoverishment in the Amazon, especially during the severe droughts of El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) episodes. However, the authors ...

Ane Alencar; Daniel Nepstad; Mariadel Carmen Vera Diaz

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Flux of carbon from 14C-enriched leaf litter throughout a forest soil mesocosm  

SciTech Connect

The role of DOC for the build-up of soil organic carbon pools is still not well known, but it is thought to play a role in the transport of carbon to a greater depth where it becomes more stable. The aim of this study was to elucidate within-year dynamics of carbon transport from litter to the O (Oe and Oa) and A horizons. Mesocosms with constructed soil profiles were used to study dynamics of C transport from 14C-enriched (about 1000 ) leaf litter to the Oe/Oa and A horizons as well as the mineralization of leaf litter. The mesocosms were placed in the field for 17 months during which time fluxes and 14C content of DOC and CO2 were measured. Changes in 14C in leaf litter and bulk soil C pools were also recorded. Significant simultaneous release and immobilization of DOC occurring in both the O and A horizons was hypothesized. Contrary to our hypothesis, DOC released from the labeled Oi horizon was not retained within the Oe/Oa layer. DOC originating in the unlabeled Oe/Oa layer was also released for transport. Extensive retention of DOC occurred in the A horizon. DOC leaching from A horizon consisted of a mix of DOC from different sources, with a main fraction originating in the A horizon and a smaller fraction leached from the overlaying horizons. The C and 14C budget for the litter layer also indicated a surprisingly large amount of carbon with ambient ?14C-signature to be respired from this layer. Data for this site also suggested significant contributions from throughfall to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport into and respiration from the litter layer. The results from this study showed that DOC retentionwas low in the O horizon and therefore not important for the O horizon carbon budget. In the A horizon DOC retention was extensive, but annual DOC input was small compared to C stocks and therefore not important for changes in soil C on an annual timescale.

Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine; Swanston, Christopher W. [USFS; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Initial characterization of processes of soil carbon stabilization using forest stand-level radiocarbon enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the rates and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization are difficult to observe directly, radiocarbon has proven an effective tracer of soil C dynamics, particularly when coupled with practical fractionation schemes. To explore the rates of C cycling in temperate forest soils, we took advantage of a unique opportunity in the form of an inadvertent stand-level {sup 14}C-labeling originating from a local industrial release. A simple density fractionation scheme separated SOM into inter-aggregate particulate organic matter (free light fraction, free LF), particulate organic matter occluded within aggregates (occluded LF), and organic matter that is complexed with minerals to form a dense fraction (dense fraction, DF). Minimal agitation and density separation was used to isolate the free LF. The remaining dense sediment was subjected to physical disruption and sonication followed by density separation to separate it into occluded LF and DF. The occluded LF had higher C concentrations and C:N ratios than the free LF, and the C concentration in both light fractions was ten times that of the DF. As a result, the light fractions together accounted for less than 4% of the soil by weight, but contained 40% of the soil C in the 0-15 cm soil increment. Likewise, the light fractions were less than 1% weight of the 15-30 cm increment, but contained more than 35% of the soil C. The degree of SOM protection in the fractions, as indicated by {Delta}{sup 14}C, was different. In all cases the free LF had the shortest mean residence times. A significant depth by fraction interaction for {sup 14}C indicates that the relative importance of aggregation versus organo-mineral interactions for overall C stabilization changes with depth. The rapid incorporation of {sup 14}C label into the otherwise depleted DF shows that this organo-mineral fraction comprises highly stable material as well as more recent inputs.

Swanston, C W; Torn, M S; Hanson, P J; Southon, J R; Garten, C T; Hanlon, E M; Ganio, L

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Initial characterization of processes of soil carbon stabilizaton using forest satnd-level radiocarbon enrichment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the rates and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization are difficult to observe directly, radiocarbon has proven an effective tracer of soil C dynamics, particularly when coupled with practical fractionation schemes. To explore the rates of C cycling in temperate forest soils, we took advantage of a unique opportunity in the form of an inadvertent standlevel 14C-labeling originating from a local industrial release. A simple density fractionation scheme separated SOM into interaggregate particulate organic matter (free light fraction, free LF), particulate organic matter occluded within aggregates (occluded LF), and organic matter that is complexed with minerals to form a dense fraction (dense fraction, DF). Minimal agitation and density separation was used to isolate the free LF. The remaining dense sediment was subjected to physical disruption and sonication followed by density separation to separate it into occluded LF and DF. The occluded LF had higher C concentrations and C:N ratios than the free LF, and the C concentration in both light fractions was ten times that of the DF. As a result, the light fractions together accounted for less than 4% of the soil by weight, but contained 40% of the soil C in the 0-15 cm soil increment. Likewise, the light fractions were less than 1% weight of the 15-30 cm increment, but contained more than 35% of the soil C. The degree of SOM protection in the fractions, as indicated by D14C, was different. In all cases the free LF had the shortest mean residence times. A significant depth by fraction interaction for 14C indicates that the relative importance of aggregation versus organo-mineral interactions for overall C stabilization changes with depth. The rapid incorporation of 14C label into the otherwise depleted DF shows that this organo-mineral fraction comprises highly stable material as well as more recent inputs.

Swanston, Christopher W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Southon, John R. [University of California, Irvine; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Hanlon, Erin M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Ganio, L. [University of California, Irvine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Initial characterizaiton of processes of soil carbon stabilization using forest stand-level radiocarbon enrichment  

SciTech Connect

Although the rates and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization are difficult to observe directly, radiocarbon has proven an effective tracer of soil C dynamics, particularly when coupled with practical fractionation schemes. To explore the rates of C cycling in temperate forest soils, we took advantage of a unique opportunity in the form of an inadvertent stand level 14C-labeling originating from a local industrial release. A simple density fractionation scheme separated SOM into interaggregate particulate organic matter (free light fraction, free LF), particulate organic matter occluded within aggregates (occluded LF), and organic matter that is complexed with minerals to form a dense fraction (dense fraction, DF). Minimal agitation and density separation was used to isolate the free LF. The remaining dense sediment was subjected to physical disruption and sonication followed by density separation to separate it into occluded LF and DF. The occluded LF had higher C concentrations and C:N ratios than the free LF, and the C concentration in both light fractions was ten times that of the DF. As a result, the light fractions together accounted for less than 4 percent of the soil by weight, but contained 40 percent of the soil C in the 0 15 cm soil increment. Likewise, the light fractions were less than 1 percent weight of the 15 30 cm increment, but contained more than 35 percent of the soil C. The degree of SOM protection in the fractions, as indicated by D14C, was different. In all cases the free LF had the shortest mean residence times. A significant depth by fraction interaction for 14C indicates that the relative importance of aggregation versus organo-mineral interactions for overall C stabilization changes with depth. The rapid incorporation of 14C label into the otherwise depleted DF shows that this organo-mineral fraction comprises highly stable material as well as more recent inputs.

Swanston, Christopher W.; Torn, Margaret S.; Hanson, Paul J.; Southon, John R.; Garten, Charles T.; Hanlon, Erin M.; Ganio, Lisa

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of highspatial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

Gray, Ian P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

Reilly, John M.

98

Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning into new root biomass.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Evans, R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Products Laboratory Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place Madison, WI Website http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/ References USDA Forest Products Laboratory [1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! USDA Forest Products Laboratory is a company located in Madison, WI. References ↑ "USDA Forest Products Laboratory" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USDA_Forest_Products_Laboratory&oldid=381741" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

100

20/02/20132 `State of The Nations' Forests'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Forest Habitat ·Forest Habitat Condition ·Forest Management ·Forest Use ·Carbon Sequestration ·Timber and increment forecast · Carbon forecast (to be published) · Biomass forecast run (to be published / dead Natural Regeneration NVC & ground, field & shrub layer vegetation General health Dead wood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

SoilAtmosphere Exchange of Nitrous Oxide, Nitric Oxide, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Logged and Undisturbed Forest in the Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging is an extensive land use in the Brazilian Amazon region. The soilatmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are studied on two soil types (clay Oxisol and sandy loam ...

Michael Keller; Ruth Varner; Jadson D. Dias; Hudson Silva; Patrick Crill; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Elevated CO2 increases tree-level intrinsic water use efficiency: insights from carbon and oxygen isotope analyses in tree rings across three forest FACE sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elevated CO2 increases intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi) of forests, but the magnitude of this effect and its interaction with climate is still poorly understood. We combined tree ring analysis with isotope measurements at three Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE, POP-EUROFACE, in Italy; Duke FACE in North Carolina and ORNL in Tennessee, USA) sites, to cover the entire life of the trees. We used 13C to assess carbon isotope discrimination ( 13C ci/ca) and changes in WUEi, while direct CO2 effects on stomatal conductance were explored using 18O as a proxy. Across all the sites, elevated CO2 increased 13C-derived WUEi on average by 73% for Liquidambar styraciflua, 77% for Pinus taeda and 75% for Populus sp., but through different ecophysiological mechanisms. Our findings provide a robust means of predicting WUEi responses from a variety of tree species exposed to variable environmental conditions over time, and species-specific relationships that can help modeling elevated CO2 and climate impacts on forest productivity, carbon and water balances.

Battipaglia, Giovanna [Second University of Naples; Saurer, Matthias [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland; Cherubini, Paulo [WSL Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research; Califapietra, Carlo [University of Tuscia; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Cotrufo, M. Francesca [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Hall, F. G. 1997. NPP Boreal Forest: Superior National Forest, U.S.A., 1983-1984. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a boreal forest was determined at 31 spruce and 30 aspen forest stands in the Superior National Forest (SNF) near Ely, Minnesota, U.S.A., in 1983 and 1984 by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The purpose of the experiment was to investigate the ability of remote sensing to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass and net primary productivity (NPP). These ground-based estimates of above-ground biomass

104

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Long-Term Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from a Very Tall Tower in a Northern Forest: Flux Measurement Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methodology for determining fluxes of CO2 and H2O vapor with the eddy-covariance method using data from instruments on a 447-m tower in the forest of northern Wisconsin is addressed. The primary goal of this study is the validation of the methods ...

Bradford W. Berger; Kenneth J. Davis; Chuixiang Yi; Peter S. Bakwin; Cong Long Zhao

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Tropical Africa: Mean Biomass of Closed Forests By Country  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forests By Country image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

107

Tropical Africa: Mean Biomass of Open Forests By Country  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forests By Country image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNLCDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information...

108

Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

INDEX | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEX INDEX INDEX More Documents & Publications Index2.doc ALPHABETICAL INDEX Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules...

110

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

111

Calcite growth rates as a function of aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio, saturation index and strontium concentration  

SciTech Connect

Using in situ atomic force microscopy, the growth rates of the obtuse and acute step orientations on the calcite surface were measured at two saturation indices as a function of the aqueous calcium-to-carbonate ratio and aqueous strontium concentration. The amount of strontium required to inhibit growth was found to correlate with the aqueous calcium concentration, but did not correlate with carbonate. This suggests that strontium inhibits attachment of calcium ions to the reactive sites on the calcite surface. Strontium/calcium cation exchange selectivity coefficients for those sites, Kex, of 1.09 0.09 and 1.44 0.19 are estimated for the obtuse and acute step orientations, respectively. The implication of this finding is that to avoid poisoning calcite growth, the concentration of calcium should be higher than the quotient of the strontium concentration and Kex, regardless of saturation state. Additionally, analytical models of nucleation and propagation of steps are expanded from previous work to capture growth rates of these steps at multiple saturation indices and the effect of strontium. This work will have broader implications for naturally occurring or engineered calcite growth, such as to sequester subsurface strontium contamination.

Bracco, Jacquelyn N [ORNL; Grantham, Ms. Meg [Georgia Institute of Technology; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Torvanger, A. (Senter for Anvendt Forskning, Oslo (Norway) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

International Forest Policy Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Forest Policy Database International Forest Policy Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Forest Policy Database Agency/Company /Organization: GTZ Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.etfrn.org/etfrn/topics/policy/index.html International Forest Policy Database Screenshot References: GTZ International Forest Policy Database[1] Overview "This topic page is being developed in cooperation with GTZ-IWP, the International Forest Policy project of the German organisation for international cooperation. GTZ-IWP has contributed considerably to the ETFRN NEWS 41/42 on national forest programmes. During this cooperation both GTZ and ETFRN identified a need for a central point of access to information on international forest

114

California's forest resources. Preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Assessment was prepared in response to the California Forest Resources Assessment and Policy Act of 1977 (FRAPA). This Act was passed to improve the information base upon which State resource administrators formulate forest policy. The Act provides for this report and a full assessment by 1987 and at five year intervals thereafter. Information is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction to the forest resources assessment program; the forest area: a general description; classifications of the forest lands; the watersheds; forest lands and the air resource; fish and wildlife resources; the forested rangelands; the wilderness; forest lands as a recreation resource; the timber resource; wood energy; forest lands and the mineral, fossil fuels, and geothermal energy resources; mathematically modeling California's forest lands; vegetation mapping using remote sensing technology; important forest resources legislation; and, State and cooperative State/Federal forestry programs. Twelve indexes, a bibliography, and glossary are included. (JGB)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation Place Des Moines, Iowa Zip 50266 Product Offset aggregators that work with American farmers, ranchers, and private forest owners, providing clients with cash flows produced by the sale of credits. Offsets are sold on the Chicago Climate Exchange References AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation is a company located in Des Moines, Iowa . References ↑ "AgraGate Carbon Credits Corporation" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AgraGate_Carbon_Credits_Corporation&oldid=341882"

116

Long-run Implications of a Forest-based Carbon Sequestration Policy on the United States Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modeling Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The economic impacts of a government-funded, forest-based sequestration program were analyzed under two different payment schemes. The impacts were obtained by developing a regional, static CGE model built to accommodate a modified IMPLAN SAM for a determined region in the United States for 2008. The IMPLAN SAM was modified to accommodate the more conventional factors of production (labor, capital and land) and to account for land heterogeneity using the Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA). The regional aggregation considered included the Southern, Northeastern, Southwestern and Midwestern regions. The two policy scenarios considered consisted of two CO2-offset payment schemes: 1) the government compensates the generation of CO2-offsets only by the land converted to a carbon graveyard and 2) the government additionally compensates the CO2 offsets generated as a by-product by the existing commercial logging activity. By doing an analysis of the model with different budget magnitudes under the two scenarios, two different CO2-offset supply schedules were obtained with their respective CO2-offset price and quantity sets. For a budget allocation of $6.9 billion, approximately 1 billion metric tons of CO2 offsets (15% of U.S. 2008 total GHG emissions) were produced in the first scenario versus 0.8 billion metric tons (11% of U.S. 2008 GHG net emissions) in the second one. Fifty million acres were diverted out of agriculture and commercial forestry land to the carbon graveyard mainly in the Northern, Western and Central Great Plains in the first scenario. Twenty two million acres were diverted out of agricultural land to the carbon graveyard and commercial logging mainly in the Northern and Western Great Plains; and the Eastern and Western boundaries of the Appalachian Mountains in the second scenario. Both scenarios resulted in higher land and agricultural commodity prices, lower consumption of agricultural commodities by households, lower agricultural exports and higher imports. The payment structure of the second scenario benefited the commercial logging industry, increasing its production and exports, and decreasing its imports. The non-agricultural sectors mostly impacted by the two policy scenarios were the manufacturing, construction and government employment sectors.

Monge, Juan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Research Report #12;#12;Research Report Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests in Britain Forestry., White, M. and Yamulki, S. (2012). Understanding the carbon and greenhouse gas balance of forests

118

National Forest Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Management Act of 1976 Forest Management Act of 1976 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name National Forest Management Act of 1976 Year 1976 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Wikipedia[1] USFS Forest Management[2] The National Forest Management Act of 1976 is a federal law that governs the administration of national forests. This act requires the United States Forest Service to use a systematic and interdisciplinary approach to resource management in national forests. The USFS provides a full text of the Act here: Pub. L. 94-588 References ↑ "Wikipedia" ↑ "USFS Forest Management" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Forest_Management_Act_of_1976&oldid=455235" Categories: Federal Environmental Statutes

119

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.pwc.co.uk/pdf/forest_finance_toolkit.pdf Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Screenshot References: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit[1] Overview "This Toolkit has been developed jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is a globally applicable resource designed to help financial institutions support the management of forest resources through sustainable and legal timber production and processing, and markets for carbon and other

120

Globalization 300million ha forest area loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from sustainable managed forests using vegetable inks and water-based varnish. Citation UNEP (2011. Our distribution policy aims to reduce UNEP's carbon footprint. #12;i Keeping Track of Our Changing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ARM - Black Forest News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GermanyBlack Forest News Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update,...

122

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Superior National Forest Project/Campaign Document Summary: This project was an intensive remote sensing and field study of the boreal forest in the Superior National Forest (SNF). The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the ability of remote-sensing data to provide estimates of biophysical properties of ecosystems, such as leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and net primary productivity (NPP). The SNF is mostly covered by boreal forest. Boreal forests were chosen for this project because of their relative taxonomic simplicity, their great extent, and their potential sensitivity to climatic change. Information on the SNF project is available by accessing the SNF pages maintained by the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.govSNF/summary.html. Table of Contents:

123

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Agency/Company /Organization: Center for International Forestry Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Publications Website: www.cifor.cgiar.org/fctoolbox/ Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Screenshot References: CIFOR Toolbox[1] Summary "This Forests and Climate Change Toolbox has been developed to build understanding and technical proficiency on issues of climate change and forests including mitigation, adaptation, carbon accounting and markets, and biofuels." References ↑ "CIFOR Toolbox" Retrieved from

124

Parallel Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parallel Parallel Index and Query for Large Scale Data Analysis Jerry Chou Kesheng Wu Oliver Rübel Mark Howison Ji Qiang Prabhat Brian Austin E. Wes Bethel Rob D. Ryne Arie Shoshani ABSTRACT Modern scientific datasets present numerous data manage- ment and analysis challenges. State-of-the-art index and query technologies are critical for facilitating interactive ex- ploration of large datasets, but numerous challenges remain in terms of designing a system for processing general scien- tific datasets. The system needs to be able to run on dis- tributed multi-core platforms, efficiently utilize underlying I/O infrastructure, and scale to massive datasets. We present FastQuery, a novel software framework that address these challenges. FastQuery utilizes a state-of-the- art index and query technology (FastBit) and is designed to process massive datasets on modern supercomputing

125

Forests to offset the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses the role of trees in the prevention of global warming. If forest plantations are used as carbon sinks, it is estimated that 500 million hectares of intensively managed, rapidly growing plantation forests could sequester all of the 5 billion tons or so of carbon released annually through the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation. Land area requirements would be large enough to dwarf all previous forest plantation efforts. The cost would bean average of $400 per hectare to establish such plantations in the United States.

Sedjo, R.A. (Resources for the Future, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Overview of Forest Observations in the GEOSS Work Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land­surface climate int. Vegetation characteristics Weather Land­surface climate int. Vegetation of forest carbon (nationally and globally) · Engage user communities and networks not yet involved in GEO-07 Regional Networks for Ecosystems 7. US-06-02 Pilot Communities of Practice New task proposed: Forest Carbon

127

INDEXING MECHANISM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an Indexing plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an Index pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an index pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the index pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.

Kock, L.J.

1959-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

128

Information Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe Information Forests, an approach to classification that generalizes Random Forests by replacing the splitting criterion of non-leaf nodes from a discriminative one -- based on the entropy of the label distribution -- to a generative one -- based on maximizing the information divergence between the class-conditional distributions in the resulting partitions. The basic idea consists of deferring classification until a measure of "classification confidence" is sufficiently high, and instead breaking down the data so as to maximize this measure. In an alternative interpretation, Information Forests attempt to partition the data into subsets that are "as informative as possible" for the purpose of the task, which is to classify the data. Classification confidence, or informative content of the subsets, is quantified by the Information Divergence. Our approach relates to active learning, semi-supervised learning, mixed generative/discriminative learning.

Yi, Zhao; Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the effectiveness of climate change mitigation through forest plantations and carbon sequestration with an integrated land-use model

Jelle G Van Minnen; Bart J Strengers; Bas Eickhout; Rob J Swart; Rik Leemans

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic regions as an indicator of forest coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks in the United States

Christopher W Woodall; Greg C Liknes; Christopher W Woodall; Greg C Liknes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of an Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Standard Gas Saving System and Its Application to a Measurement at a Site in the West Siberian Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the atmospheric CO2 concentration from a 90-m tower in Berezorechka, western Siberia, that have taken place since October 2001 were used to characterize CO2 variations over a vast boreal forest area. A new CO2 standard gas saving ...

T. Watai; T. Machida; K. Shimoyama; O. Krasnov; M. Yamamoto; G. Inoue

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geographical DistributionGeographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon inof Biomass Carbon in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geographical DistributionGeographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon inof Biomass Carbon of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database Contributed by Sandra Brown,1 Louis R Geographical Distributions of Carbon in Biomass and Soils of Tropical Asian Forests, by S. Brown, L. R. Iverson

133

nomyecoGREEN y Forests in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% recycled paper, using vegetable -based inks and other eco-friendly practices. Our distribution policy aims to reduce UNEP's carbon footprint. Copyright © United Nations Environment Programme, May 2011 Photo credit. Opportunities and roles for financial institutions in forest carbon markets. United Nations Environment

134

ALPHABETICAL INDEX | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALPHABETICAL INDEX ALPHABETICAL INDEX ALPHABETICAL INDEX More Documents & Publications INDEX Index2.doc State Awards for Energy Emergency Preparation...

135

Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index A (1) City & State Atlas A (2) Astronomy Atlas A (3) U.S. Atlas A (8) Geologic Atlases A (9) Environment / Forest & Desert A (10) Historic Atlases A (11) World Atlases A (12) Canada and Russia A (13) Europe and the Middle East A (1) City & State Atlas 1. A (1) ALASKA

Ward, Karen

136

ALPHABETICAL INDEX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Page of 4 ALPHABETICAL INDEX Key Word Chapter Number 8(a) Direct Awards 12 Advance Understandings 7, 3 Affirmative Action 12 Allocable Costs 7 Allowable Costs 7 Anti Kickback Act 8 Aviation Management 11 Balanced Scorecard 5, 10 Bankruptcy 7 Bonds and Insurance 7, 3 Business Management Oversight Process 5 Buy American Act 8 Changes 8 Claims 8 Collective Bargaining 3 Commercial Bill of Lading 11 Conditional Payment of Fee, Profit Or Incentives 2, 5 Consultants 10 Contract Administration Plan 5 Key Word Chapter Number Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act 3 Contracting Officer Representative 5 Contractor Human Resources 3 Contractor Performance 5 Contractor Purchasing System 10

137

Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Liberia Western Africa References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "Liberia contains over 40% of the remaining closed canopy rainforest in West Africa, a sizeable carbon sink. The Forest Service works with the Government of Liberia to reorganize its forest service and forestry sector in the post-conflict era. The US Forest Service helped develop a chain of custody system for tracking timber and a financial management

138

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

Sathaye, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Intraseasonal Interactions between Temperature and Vegetation over the Boreal Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper uses statistical and analytical techniques to investigate intraseasonal interactions between temperature and vegetation [surrogated by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)] over the boreal forests. Results indicate that ...

Weile Wang; Bruce T. Anderson; Dara Entekhabi; Dong Huang; Yin Su; Robert K. Kaufmann; Ranga B. Myneni

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Carbon Sequestration - A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- -- A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View Jim Reaves Staff Director USDA Forest Service R&D Vegetation Management and Protection Research Forests and carbon management § The USDA Forest Service is a research and resource management agency § Carbon is the foundation of forest productivity and sustainability § Carbon sequestration is an additional outcome of good forest management and utilization Forests and carbon sequestration n Forests and forest products are important CO 2 sinks n Carbon sinks offer a potentially significant low-cost opportunity to address carbon sequestration n Feedstocks for bioenergy production provide both clean energy and fossil fuel offsets Trends in forest and agriculture carbon sequestration -342 -12 -7

142

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. Project Benefits Produce approximately 35,000 kilowatt-hours of clean electricity annually Reduce carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 41 tons per year Preserve and increase local jobs for tribal members and others

143

Empirical Analysis of Tortuosity Index of Polyimide Foam for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To this purpose, we assessed the correlation between such tortuosity index with other structural ... Deploying Carbon Fiber in High Volume Energy Applications.

144

On simplifying allometric analyses of forest biomass Dimitris Zianis*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On simplifying allometric analyses of forest biomass Dimitris Zianis* , Maurizio Mencuccini biomass plays a key role in sustainable management and in estimating forest carbon stocks. The most common mathematical model in biomass studies takes the form of the power function M ¼ aDb where a and b

Mencuccini, Maurizio

145

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.conversion factor of pounds of carbon dioxide emitted perappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.into carbon dioxide emissions, we continue to use a factorappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Estimation of the NorthSouth Transect of Eastern China forest biomass using remote sensing and forest inventory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of forest biomass is required for the estimation of carbon sinks and a myriad other ecological and environmental factors. In this article, we combined satellite data Thematic Mapper TM and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer MODIS, ...

Yanhua Gao, Xinxin Liu, Chengcheng Min, Honglin He, Guirui Yu, Min Liu, Xudong Zhu, Qiao Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Jump to: navigation, search Name USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Short Name Humbolt-Toiyabe NF Parent Organization United States Forest Service Address 1200 Franklin Way Place Sparks, NV Zip 89431 Phone number (775) 331-6444 Website http://www.fs.usda.gov/main/ht References Humboldt-Toiyabe NF Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. USFS Toiyabe National Forest is an organization based in Sparks, Nevada, Sparks, Nevada. References ↑ "Humboldt-Toiyabe NF Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USFS_Humboldt-Toiyabe_National_Forest&oldid=640692" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

149

Baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Removals for Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Alice Holt has been intensely studied by scientists since the 1950s. As a result, Forest Research (FR),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

well-organised databases, including: physiographic, soil and vegetation information; stand research includes: · Forest carbon dynamics ­ The combination of conventional tree measurement plots are improving understanding of the carbon balance of forests and helping to predict how carbon exchange

151

DLMF: Index W  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... About the Project. NIST. IndexIndex VIndex Z. Index W. ?A?B?C?D?E?F?G? H?I?J?K?L?M?N?O?P?Q?R?S?T?U?V?W?Z?. Waring's problem: ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests February 2012 #12;This Biomass Supply and Carbon Accounting for Southeastern Forests study was conducted by the Biomass Energy Resource Center Biomass Energy Resource Center Kamalesh Doshi Biomass Energy Resource Center Hillary Emick Biomass Energy

153

Nucleic acid indexing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Guo, Zhen (Bellevue, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nucleic acid indexing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A restriction site indexing method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor indexing sequences complementary to fragment indexing sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial indexing facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.

Guilfoyle, Richard A. (Madison, WI); Guo, Zhen (Bellevue, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance fluxbased and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimates of annual carbon sequestration in a Sitka spruce (carbon cycling in a temperate forest: Radiocarbon-based estimates of residence times, sequestration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Military Communities, Hawaii Military Communities, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii Place Honolulu, HI Website http://www.fcnavyhawaii.com/ References Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii is a company located in Honolulu, HI. References ↑ "Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest City Military Communities in Hawaii" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Forest_City_Military_Communities,_Hawaii&oldid=381670"

157

How indexes have changed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accompanying table compares refinery construction and operating wages monthly for the years 1992 and 1993. The Nelson-Farrar refinery construction cost indexes are inflation indexes, while the operating indexes incorporate a productivity which shows improvement with experience and the increasing size of operations. The refinery construction wage indexes in the table show a steady advance over the 2-year period. Common labor indexes moved up faster than skilled indexes. Refinery operating wages showed a steady increase, while productivities averaged higher near the end of the period. Net results is that labor costs remained steady for the period.

Farrar, G.L.

1994-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

Seasonal Variation in Radiative and Turbulent Exchange at a Deciduous Forest in Central Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperate deciduous forests exhibit dramatic seasonal changes in surface exchange properties following on the seasonal changes in leaf area index. Nearly continuous measurements of turbulent and radiative fluxes above and below the canopy of a ...

Kathleen E. Moore; David R. Fitzjarrald; Ricardo K. Sakai; Michael L. Goulden; J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix B: Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Appendix B: Use of Forest Inventories and Geographic Information Systems To Estimate Biomass Density of Tropical Forests: Application to Tropical Africa S. Brown and G. Gaston U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvalis, OR 97333, USA Abstract One of the most important databases needed for estimating emissions of carbon dioxide resulting from changes in the cover, use, and management of tropical forests is the total quantity of biomass per unit area, referred to as biomass density. Forest inventories have been shown to be valuable sources of data for estimating biomass density, but inventories for the tropics are few in number and their quality is poor. This lack of reliable data has been overcome by use of a promising approach that produces

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Health of Colorado's Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Fort Collins, Colo., and Aerial Survey Coordinator, Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS. Patricia M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Fort Collins, Colo. Brian Howell, Aerial SurveyThe Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current

162

Parameterization of Canopy Structure and Leaf-Level Gas Exchange for an Eastern Amazonian Tropical Rain Forest (Tapajs National Forest, Par, Brazil)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon flux of Amazonian primary forest vegetation has been shown to vary both spatially and temporally. Process-based models are adequate tools to understand the basis of such variation and can also provide projections to future scenarios. The ...

Tomas F. Domingues; Joseph A. Berry; Luiz A. Martinelli; Jean P. H. B. Ometto; James R. Ehleringer

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service Sector: Climate, Land Focus Area: Forestry Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/urban-forests/ctcc/ Cost: Free Language: English References: CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator[1] Overview "The CUFR Tree Carbon Calculator is the only tool approved by the Climate Action Reserve's Urban Forest Project Protocol for quantifying carbon dioxide sequestration from GHG tree planting projects. The CTCC is programmed in an Excel spreadsheet and provides carbon-related information

164

The Forest Preserve District  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve District Forest Preserve District Nature Bulletin No. 109 March 29, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT Forest Preserve Districts, in Illinois, are separate municipal bodies governed by a Board of Forest Preserve Commissioners consisting of the elected county commissioners, as in Cook County, or by a committee of the county board of supervisors, as in 7 other counties. The legislative act which provided for such a district, if authorized by referendum vote of the people, became a law on July 1, 1914. Under that act, the commissioners are empowered to levy taxes, issue bonds, and to acquire lands containing forests "for the purpose of protecting and preserving the flora, fauna and scenic beauties.... and to restore, restock, protect and preserve the natural forests and said lands with their flora and fauna, as nearly as may be in their natural state and condition for the purpose of the education, pleasure and recreation of the public". A limit of 35,000 acres was set; later increased to 39,000.

165

SRD 134 Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. CARBON DIOXIDE. MW [1]. 44.010. NBP [1]. 194.75 K. TP [1]. 216.59 K. CO 2. Pc [1]. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

166

Climate change effects on forests: A critical review  

SciTech Connect

While current projections of future climate change associated with increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases have a high degree of uncertainty, the potential effects of climate change on forests are of increasing concern. A number of studies based on forest simulation models predict substantial temperatures associated with increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. However, the structure of these computer models may cause them to overemphasize the role of climate in controlling tree growth and mortality. We propose that forest simulation models be reformulated with more realistic representations of growth responses to temperature, moisture, mortality, and dispersal. We believe that only when these models more accurately reflect the physiological bases of the responses of tree species to climate variables can they be used to simulate responses of forests to rapid changes in climate. We argue that direct forest responses to climate change projected by such a reformulated model may be less traumatic and more gradual than those projected by current models. However, the indirect effects of climate change on forests, mediated by alterations of disturbance regimes or the actions of pests and pathogens, may accelerate climate-induced change in forests, and they deserve further study and inclusion within forest simulation models.

Loehle, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); LeBlanc, D. [Ball State Univ., Muncie, IN (United States). Dept. of Biology

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

JOM Subject Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2008 ... Polymers is well indexed and each chapter ends with a glossary, summary, exercises, and suggestions for further reading. One feature that...

168

This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAST821/ 853 Joint Oceanography and Marine Biosciences Seminar: Oil in the Environment (Co. Thesis topic: Hydrologic and Geochemical Processes at a Coastal Wetland Mitigation Site. Maria G Water Exchange--Future Research. Department of Geology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 22

169

Extreme Darkness: Carbon Nanotube Forest Covers NIST's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to make precision laser power measurements for advanced technologies such as optical communications, laser-based manufacturing, solar energy ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

Phytomass change in the mountain forests of southern Siberia under climate warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phytomass change in the mountain forests of southern Siberia Phytomass change in the mountain forests of southern Siberia under climate warming Nadja M. Tchebakova (E-mail: ncheby@forest.akadem.ru) V.N. Sukachev Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russia. Robert A. Monserud (E-mail: rmonserud@fs.fed.us; Ph: +1-503-808-2059; Fax: +1-503-808- 2020) Rocky Mountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations, USDA Forest Service, P.O. Box 3890, Portland, OR 97208-3890 USA. Corresponding author. Elena I. Parfenova (E-mail: lyeti@forest.akadem.ru) V.N. Sukachev Institute of Forest, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk, Russia. 28 February 2001 Abstract. Introduction: Mitigation of climate warming is related to carbon sequestration in vegetation

171

Energy Development Index (EDI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Development Index (EDI) Energy Development Index (EDI) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Development Index (EDI) Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency (IEA) Sector: Climate User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.worldenergyoutlook.org/resources/energydevelopment/measuringenergy Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) Healthcare Energy Impact Calculator ... further results An index which is a composite measure of a country's progress in transitioning to modern fuels and modern energy services, as a means to

172

Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Jump to: navigation, search Name Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Agency/Company /Organization Government of Norway, Government of Indonesia Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.norway.or.id/Norway Country Norway, Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia, Northern Europe References Norway-Indonesia REDD+ Partnership - Frequently asked questions[1] Letter of Intent[2] Background Letter of Intent FAQ's [Fact Sheet] Photo World Resources Institute: Susan Minnemeyer References ↑ "Norway-Indonesia REDD+ Partnership - Frequently asked questions" ↑ "Letter of Intent" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Norway-Indonesia-Forest_Management_Agreement&oldid=374779"

173

Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether we could get Colorado Springs to take some of it. The Mayor called the head of the electric plant Healthy Forest Initiative 1 1 Colorado Forest Restoration Institute Collaboration Case Study: Woodland Park Healthy Forest Initiative Corrie Knapp Prepared for the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute

174

PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years with the Forest Survey at the Southeastern Forest Experiment Station, he joined the Aerial Re, and is now a mathe- matical statistician. #12;C lassifying forest stand volumes on single aerial photographs is unique to the na- tionwide Forest Survey 1 -- stratifying volume on photographs is not. In fact, since

Standiford, Richard B.

175

Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating forest biomass in the USA using generalized allometric models and MODIS land products 2006; published 11 May 2006. [1] Spatially-distributed forest biomass components are essential to understand carbon cycle and the impact of biomass burning emissions on air quality. We estimated the density

Kuligowski, Bob

177

Botanischer Garten Index Seminum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Botanischer Garten Index Seminum Samenkatalog 2012 Samenkatalog des Botanischen Gartens und des Parco Botanico del Canton Ticino, Isole di Brissago Universität Zürich Botanischer Garten Gartens und des Parco Botanico del Canton Ticino, Isole di Brissago #12;III INDEX SEMINUM 2012 Bedingungen

Zürich, Universität

178

Gradient index retroreflector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retroreflector is formed of a graded index lens and a reflective coating at one end. The lens has a length of an odd multiple of a quarter period thereof. Hexagonally shaped graded index lenses may be closely packed in an array to form a retroreflecting surface.

Layne, C.B.

1986-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

Life-cycle analysis of forest management for multiple benefits at Independence Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and subsequent erosion ·Promote carbon sequestration ­Generate energy from the woody biomass removed from height (dbh) and tree height. Eight plots were used as inputs to the USDA's Forest Vegetation Simulator

California at Davis, University of

180

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

182

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "There will still be wet winters, but they will more often be followed by warm summers, putting stress on trees and limiting their ability to respond

183

Nicholas DeForest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nicholas DeForest Grid Integration Group Microgrids Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R1121 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-1139 (510) 486-6188...

184

Idaho Panhandle National Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Forests. The RNA features vegetation on dry cliffs that are embedded in mid-elevation moist western hemlock/western redcedar/grand fir forests. Immediately below the cliffs is riparian habitat that supports many wetland species, including a disjunct west coast moss, Ulota megalospora, whose first known occurrence in Idaho is in this RNA. This establishment report documents the boundaries of the RNA, the objectives for the RNA, its features, description of

United States; Forest Service; Priest River; Experimental Forest; Dennis E. Ferguson; Arthur C. Zack Ferguson; Dennis E. Zack

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Role of Disturbance in Dry Tropical Forest Landscapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disturbance can be defined as 'any relatively discrete event in time that disrupts ecosystem, community, or population structure and changes resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment'. This definition requires that the spatial and temporal scales of the system and disturbance be determined. Disturbances are typically characterized by their size, spatial distribution, frequency or return time, predictability, and magnitude (which includes both intensity and severity). These disturbance attributes set the parameters for the suite of species, both plant and animal, that can persist within a given system. As such, an understanding of seasonally dry tropical forests in Asia requires an understanding of disturbance within the region. However, disturbances are relatively poorly understood in dry tropical forests, partly because of the weak seasonality in temperature and high tree species diversity of these forests relative to most forest systems of the world. There are about 1,048,700 km{sup 2} of dry tropical forests worldwide and that only 3% of this land is in conservation status. In other words, 97% of the world's seasonally dry tropical forest is at risk of human disturbance. About half of this forest occurs in South America, where most of the conservation lands are located. Satellite imagery based on MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data shows that only about 3.8% of the world's dry tropical forests are in Australia and South east Asia. The susceptibility of these forests to human disturbances is of great concern and is largely unstudied. Because natural disturbance regimes shape the ecosystem structure and are in many ways integral to these forest systems, it is critical to know how natural disturbance affects dry forest in order to understand the effects of human activities on these forests. Even basic information about disturbances in dry tropical forests is only recently available. Therefore this chapter brings together much of the available information from dry tropical forest throughout the world with the goal of developing an understanding of the role of disturbance in Asian dry forests. Most ecologists now recognize that disturbances, rather than being catastrophic agents of destruction, are a normal, perhaps even an integral, part of long-term system dynamics. The composition, structure, organization, and development and trophic dynamics of most forest systems are the products of disturbances. As an example, the forest composition for two disturbances in the Anaikatty Hills of Western Ghats were compared, where the low disturbance was from past logging followed by cutting and illicit felling and grazing and the high disturbance was due to human presence, past logging, and fuelwood collection. They found higher species richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity index for the low-disturbance forest (98 and 3.9, respectively) compared to the high-disturbance stand (45 and 2.71, respectively) as well as significant differences in mean basal area of trees, density of seedlings, number of species, density and diversity of shrubs, and number of species and diversity of herbs. Some ecological systems contain species that have evolved in response to disturbances. Adaptations typical of dry tropical forest plants are drought tolerance, seed dispersal mechanisms, and the ability to sprout subsequent to disturbance. In contrast, evidence was found that human disturbance in Kakamega Forest of western Kenya has significantly reduced allelic richness and heterozygosity, increased inbreeding, and slightly reduced gene flow in Prunus africana in the past century.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

1. INTRODUCTION Global biomass and soil carbon estimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. INTRODUCTION Global biomass and soil carbon estimate Sahoko Yui and Sonia Yeh Institute peatland carbon data. 2. FOREST BIOMASS CARBON Table 1: Reclassification of Land Cover Types IGBP RFS 2 is to create spatially explicit global database of biomass and soil carbon stock and the emission factors

California at Davis, University of

187

JOM Subject Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 30, 2011 ... Water and glacial acetic acid allow stable plasmas. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methanol, and toluene quench plasmas. Other organic...

188

JOM Subject Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 10, 2010 ... Modeling is well indexed and has a glossary and list of symbols which is needed in such an equation rich book. Modelling treats well the topics...

189

Temperature and Frequency Dependent Conduction Mechanisms Within Bulk Carbon Nanotube Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The resistance of three types of bulk carbon nanotube (CNT) materials (floating catalyst CNT yarn, forest grown CNT yarn, and super acid spun CNT fiber) (more)

Bulmer, John Simmons

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: In Search of the Rain Forest By Candace Slater (Candace Slater (Ed. ). In Search of the Rain Forest. Durham:

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Forest Preserve Wildlife  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest Preserve Wildlife Forest Preserve Wildlife Nature Bulletin No. 437-A December 11, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FOREST PRESERVE WILDLIFE The Forest Preserve District now comprises about 62,512 acres of native landscape, mostly wooded, acquired and held as the statute prescribes: for the purpose of protecting the flora, fauna and scenic beauties in their natural state and condition as nearly as may be. It is a huge wildlife sanctuary wherein no weapon may be carried and no hunting, trapping or molestation of any mammal or bird is permitted. Aside from fish management, the wildlife has been left alone to work out its own systems of checks and balances. There has been no attempt to remove surplus populations; no control of any predator other than wild cats and dogs. None is needed. Dead or hollow trees have been allowed to stand, or lie where they fall, because they furnish homes for many kinds of wildlife and go back into the soil to maintain the health of the woodland. There has been considerable reforestation of open tracts formerly farmed and, in some areas, planting of shrubs and vines which provide food for wildlife.

192

Carbon dioxide and climate: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography with abstracts presents 394 citations retrieved from the Energy Data Base of the Department of Energy Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The citations cover all aspects of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. These include carbon cycling, temperature effects, carbon dioxide control technologies, paleoclimatology, carbon dioxide sources and sinks, mathematical models, energy policies, greenhouse effect, and the role of the oceans and terrestrial forests.

Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Prepared as part of a Joint Venture Agreement with the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is widespread recognition of the potential role forests can play in contributing to Green House Gas (GHG) reductions through carbon sequestration. Non-industrial private forests (NIPF) comprise a significant portion of forests in the U.S. (approximately 40%). Thus, it is crucial to assess the role that NIPF landowners can play in broader carbon sequestration efforts. Management actions that could increase carbon sequestration on NIPF lands include afforestation of agricultural land, longer rotations, intensive management, changing stocking density, or choosing alternative tree species. Because the resulting carbon sequestration benefits are to a large extent external to individual landowners, incentives such as carbon sequestration subsidies and carbon release taxes, carbon rental fees, or cost-sharing agreements, may be necessary to induce them to adopt these management options. A key question is how effective these different policies can be in eliciting the desired management choices by NIPF owners. In this report we assess the current state of knowledge about carbon sequestration in forests, including afforestation of agricultural land, sequestration in existing forests, and sequestration in NIPFs. We review the broader literature on the response of NIPF owners to incentives intended to promote specific forest management activities and to conserve habitat for endangered species,

Christian Langpap; Taeyoung Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

ARM - Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govSite Index govSite Index Expand | Collapse Site Index Videos Image Library About ARM About ARM (home) ARM and the Recovery Act ARM and the Recovery Act (home) ARM Recovery Act Project FAQs Recovery Act Instruments ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) (home) ARM Education and Outreach Efforts Support IPY Research Support for International Polar Year (IPY) ARM Organization ARM Organization (home) Laboratory Partners ARM Safety Policy ARM Science Board ARM Science Board (home) Board Business Become a User Comments and Questions Contacts Contacts (home) ARM Engineering and Operations Contacts Facility Statistics Facility Statistics (home) Historical Field Campaign Statistics

195

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

196

1974 FORESTER the world a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1974 FORESTER #12;#12;2 TREES make the world a better place in which to live! #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS . .... . .... . . . . . .....63 ADVERTISERS . . .. . . . . . .. ....... ....... .. 75 #12;FORESTER'S SALUTE TO DR. ERIC A. BOUROO. The Forester salutes Dean Bourdo for his accomplishments in advancing forestry at Michigan Tech, as a member

197

Special Issue: High Elevation Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resources, Colorado State University William Ciesla, Aerial Survey Coordinator, U.S. Forest Service (retired material for homes. They also capture, purify, and release water for our use. Recent aerial surveys confirmSpecial Issue: High Elevation Forests 2008 The Health of Colorado's Forests Report #12;David A

198

Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate and slow-growing forests generally have prevented wood production from becoming a major state such as climate change, renewable energy, intense recreational use, billion dollar fire suppression costs and Implementation of Forest Management in Colorado #12;Acknowledgements The Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS

199

Program Highlights Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Highlights Index Program Highlights Index Disposal of Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Ecological Risk Assessment of Chemically and Radiologically Contaminated Federal Sites Energy Zone Planning Tool for the Eastern United States Environmental Site Characterization and Remediation at Former Grain Storage Sites Evaluation of Risks of Aquatic Nuisance Species Transfer via the Chicago Area Waterway System Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) Generated by the Petroleum Industry Mobile Climate Observatory for Atmospheric Aerosols in India Mobile Climate Observatory on the Pacific

200

Population and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing the forest for the trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DB, Kremer A: Forest tree genomics: Growing resources andPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeingPopulation and conservation genomics of forest trees: seeing

Eckert, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Article Uncertainty of Forest Biomass Estimates in North Temperate Forests Due to Allometry: Implications for Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Estimates of above ground biomass density in forests are crucial for refining global climate models and understanding climate change. Although data from field studies can be aggregated to estimate carbon stocks on global scales, the sparsity of such field data, temporal heterogeneity and methodological variations introduce large errors. Remote sensing measurements from spaceborne sensors are a realistic alternative for global carbon accounting; however, the uncertainty of such measurements is not well known and remains an active area of research. This article describes an effort to collect field data at the Harvard and Howland Forest sites, set in the temperate forests of the Northeastern United States in an attempt to establish ground truth forest biomass for calibration of remote sensing measurements. We present an assessment of the quality of ground truth biomass estimates derived from three different sets of diameter-based allometric equations over the Harvard and Howland Forests to establish the contribution of errors in ground truth data to the error in biomass estimates from remote sensing measurements.

Razi Ahmed; Paul Siqueira; Scott Hensley; Kathleen Bergen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Fiber optic refractive index monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

Weiss, Jonathan David (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

BNL Website Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Index Site Index A B C D E F G H I J L M N O P Q R S T U V W A About Brookhaven Accelerator-based Science Accelerator Test Facility Addiction Research Adopt-a-Platoon AGS Booster Alternating Gradient Synchrotron Association of Students and Post-docs (ASAP) ATLAS Awards B Badging Office Basic Energy Sciences Directorate Bike/Bicycles Biofuel Research Biosciences Department BRAHMS Brookhaven Advocacy Council Brookhaven Council Brookhaven Employees Recreation Association (BERA) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (environmental cleanup) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (history) Brookhaven Lectures Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Brookhaven Retired Employees' Association (BREA) Brookhaven Science Associates Brookhaven This Week (Weekly News Summary) Brookhaven Women in Science

207

PNNL: Site index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Index Site Index # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z # # 3-D Body Holographic Scanner # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A Alerts - PNNL Staff Information Applied Geology and Geochemistry Applied Process Engineering Laboratory Asymmetric Resilient Cybersecurity (External website) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Division Available Technologies Awards Awards - Science and Engineering External Recognition (SEER) Program # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z B Battelle Corporate Contributions Battelle Memorial Institute Battelle Offices (addresses) Benefits (Insurance Forms, Savings Plan) Bio-Based Product Research at PNNL Biological & Environmental Research-Proteomics

208

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

209

BNL Newsroom | Tags Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tag IndexMedia & Communications Office Tag IndexMedia & Communications Office Newsroom Photos Image Library Historic Images Photo Permissions Videos Fact Sheets Lab History News Categories Contacts Currently Showing News Release Tags Show Tags for News Releases Features Videos What is this? The tag cloud shows the relative proportion of tags assigned to each news release. Click on any tag to see news releases associated with that tag. AAAS (8) accelerators (7) addiction (43) AGS (1) ARRA (12) ATLAS (22) award (100) battelle (8) BERA (1) biochemistry (14) biology (63) biosciences (13) blueprint (2) BNL lecture (1) BOSS (3) bridge contest (5) BSA (26) BSA distinguished lecture (13) BWIS (23) BWIS lecture (21) cancer research (13) catalysis (22) celebrations (4) CES (1) CFN (89) chemistry (61) commercial (43) community (21)

210

INDEX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

INDEX INDEX Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: INDEX Agency/Company /Organization: Criterion Planners Phase: Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Perpare a Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Implement the Plan" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property., "Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

211

Strong Links Between Teleconnections and Ecosystem Exchange Found at a Pacific Northwest Old-Growth Forest from Flux Tower and MODIS EVI Data  

SciTech Connect

Variability in three Pacific teleconnection patterns are examined to see if net carbon exchange at a low-elevation, old-growth forest is affected by climatic changes associated with these periodicities. Examined are the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), Pacific/North American Oscillation (PNA) and El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). We use nine years of eddy covariance CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and energy fluxes measured at the Wind River AmeriFlux site, Washington, USA and eight years of tower-pixel remote sensing data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to address this question. We compute a new Composite Climate Index (CCI) based on the three Pacific Oscillations to divide the measurement period into positive- (2003 and 2005), negative- (1999 and 2000) and neutral-phase climate years (2001, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2007). The forest transitioned from an annual net carbon sink (NEP = + 217 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 1999) to a source (NEP = - 100 g C m{sup -2} year{sup -1}, 2003) during two dominant teleconnection patterns. Net ecosystem productivity (NEP), water use efficiency (WUE) and light use efficiency (LUE) were significantly different (P < 0.01) during positive (NEP = -0.27 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 4.1 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.94 g C MJ{sup -1}) and negative (NEP = +0.37 g C m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, WUE = 3.4 mg C/g H{sub 2}O, LUE = 0.83 g C MJ{sup -1}) climate phases. The CCI was linked to variability in the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) but not to MODIS Fraction of absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR). EVI was highest during negative climate phases (1999 and 2000) and was positively correlated with NEP and showed potential for using MODIS to estimate teleconnection-driven anomalies in ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange in old-growth forests. This work suggests that any increase in the strength or frequency of ENSO coinciding with in-phase, low frequency Pacific oscillations (PDO and PNA) will likely increase CO{sub 2} uptake variability in Pacific Northwest conifer forests.

Wharton, S; Chasmer, L; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

2009-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

212

The effects of atmospheric pressure plasma on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the effects of atmospheric plasma on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) forests. Tall and high CNTs forests have been successfully grown on a large scale using a newly developed system called atmospheric pressure ... Keywords: Atmospheric pressure, Carbon nanotubes, Mass production, Plasma effects, Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

Seok Seung Shin; Bum Ho Choi; Young Mi Kim; Jong Ho Lee; Dong Chan Shin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson USDA-Forest Service, NCFES, Rhinelander, WI, U.S.A. Introduction Growth of trees and all plants depends up- on maintaining a positive carbon balance despite to multiple environ- mental stresses (Chapin et aL, 1987; Osmond et al., 1987). Light, carbon, water

Recanati, Catherine

214

Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with potential applications in such energy-related technologies such as production of biofuels and reduction of carbon dioxide. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures...

216

Climate change cripples forests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with potential applications in such energy-related technologies such as production of biofuels and reduction of carbon dioxide. LANL Green Building Going green earns Laboratory...

217

Indexing uncertain categorical data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract the cleansed value directly is highly desirable. Data cleansing applications often result in uncertainty in Uncertainty in categorical data is commonplace inmany the "cleaned " value of an attribute. Many cleansing tools applications, includingdata cleaning, database integration, provide alternative corrections with associated likelihood. and biological annotation. In such domains, the correct For example, data collected from sensors is notoriously imvalue of an attribute is often unknown, but may be se- precise. As part ofan ongoing project at Purdue University, lectedfrom a reasonable number ofalternatives. Current the movement of nurses is being tracked in order to study database management systems do notprovide a convenient theirbehavior and effectiveness ofcurrent practices. Nurses meansfor representing or manipulating this type ofuncer- carry RFID tags as they move about a hospital. Numerous tainty. In this paper we extend traditional systems to ex- readers located around the building report the presence of plicitly handle uncertainty in data values. Wepropose two tags in their vicinity. The collected data is stored centrally index structuresfor efficiently searching uncertain categor- in the form "Nurse 10 inRoom 5 at 10:05 am. " Each nurse ical data, one basedon the R-tree andanother basedon an carries multiple tags. The variability in the detection range inverted index structure. Using these structures, weprovide of readers and the presence of interfering objects makes it a detailed description ofthe probabilistic equality queries impossible to position nurses accurately. Thus the applithey support. Experimental results using real andsynthetic cation may not be able to identify with certainty a single datasets demonstrate how these index structures can effec- location for the nurse at all times. A similar application is tively improve theperformance ofqueries through the use discussed in [18]. ofinternalprobabilistic information. In the context of automatic data integration, deep web data in the form of dynamic HTML pages can be used to generate relational data [23]. This is a challenging problem

Sarvjeet Singh; Chris Mayfield; Sunil Prabhakar; Rahul Shah; Susanne Hambrusch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

219

Argonne Transportation Site Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Site Index General Information About TTRDC Media Center Current News News Archive Photo Archive Transportation Links Awards Contact Us Interesting Links Working with Argonne Research Resources Experts Batteries Engines & Fuels Fuel Cells Management Materials Systems Assessment Technology Analysis Tribology Vehicle Recycling Vehicle Systems Facilities Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Powertrain Test Cell 4-Wheel Drive Chassis Dynamometer Battery Test Facility Engine Research Facility Fuel Cell Test Facility Tribology Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Photo Tour Vehicle Recycling Partnership Plant Publications Searchable Database: patents, technical papers, presentations

220

Anatomy of a Rainfall Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One particular index has been commonly used to monitor precipitation in drought-prone regions such as the West African Sahel and the Brazilian Northeast. The construction of this index involves standardizing the annual total rainfall for an ...

Richard W. Katz; Michael H. Glantz

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NPP Boreal Forest: Jdras, Sweden  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

low water storage capacity. Land use history in the region includes forest grazing, burning for crops and grazing, charcoal burning, tar-burning, logging and felling for paper...

222

DOE Patents Database - Site Index  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Site Index Home Advanced Search About Patent News Recent Inventions Technology Transfer Resources DOE Innovations FAQ Help RSS Contact Us...

223

Index Sets and Vectorization  

SciTech Connect

Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid index sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid index sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.

Keasler, J A

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characterizing forest fire activity in Turkey by compound Poisson and time series models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large forest fires are major disturbances that strongly influence the carbon cycling and vegetation dynamics of Turkish ecosystems. We suggest that compound Poisson model could provide suitable description for the total annual area burned by forest fires and for fire size distribution in Turkey. This paper also provides a time series model that reveals trends in annual number of fires and area burned in Turkey. We support this argument using forest fires occurred in Turkey between 1937 and 2009. We also find that the Poisson model simulates large fire occurrences well and the total burned area is modeled by a compound Poisson process.

Hatice . ekim; Cem Kad?lar; Gamze zel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mosquito Control in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 454-A April 22, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of...

226

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

Index of /2006_SNAPCollab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SNAPCollab SNAPCollab Icon Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [ ] Agenda.pdf 07-Sep-2007 17:56 9.7K [ ] Lab-UCB-map.pdf 07-Sep-2007 17:56 479K [TXT] RegistrationList.htm 07-Sep-2007 17:56 26K [ ] RegistrationList.pdf 07-Sep-2007 17:56 48K [ ] collab_meeting-8-1_c..> 07-Sep-2007 17:56 121K [IMG] collab_meeting-8.png 07-Sep-2007 17:56 180K [IMG] collab_meeting-9.png 07-Sep-2007 17:56 33K [DIR] hotel_files/ 07-Sep-2007 17:56 - [TXT] hotels.htm 07-Sep-2007 17:56 8.6K [ ] hotels.pdf 07-Sep-2007 17:56 1.2M [TXT] index.htm 07-Sep-2007 17:56 18K

228

prairie restoration index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purpose Purpose This is the first section of a "How to" guide designed for those individuals interested in restoring an area of land back to native prairie. To better facilitate your search for specific information, select one or all of the main topics associated with prairie parcel restoration listed below. Index History/Introduction of Prairie Restoration Selecting a Site Starting/Planning Seedbed Preparation. Seed (Amount, Acquiring and Preparation) Planting Watering General Identification (Grasses, Forbs, Flowers, Keeping Track) Burning - Enriching Reference Materials, Burning Permit and Seed Sources Information Identification Keys - Grasses and Forbs Illustrated Guide to Native Prairie Species Watch List for Native Prairie Plants This report was written by Lawrence Cwik as part of his participation in

229

Solar index generation and delivery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Index, or, more completely defined as the Service Hot Water Solar Index, was conceptualized during the spring of 1978. The purpose was to enhance public awareness to solar energy usability. Basically, the Solar Index represents the percentage of energy that solar would provide in order to heat an 80 gallon service hot water load for a given location and day. The Index is computed by utilizing SOLCOST, a computer program, which also has applications to space heating, cooling, and heat pump systems and which supplies economic analyses for such solar energy systems. The Index is generated for approximately 68 geographic locations in the country on a daily basis. The definition of the Index, how the project came to be, what it is at the present time and a plan for the future are described. Also presented are the models used for the generation of the Index, a discussion of the primary tool of implementation (the SOLCOST program) and future efforts.

Lantz, L.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

231

AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009 Experiment Planning COPS Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Science Plan (PDF, 12.4M) Outreach COPS Backgrounder (PDF, 306K) Posters AMF Poster, German Vesion Researching Raindrops in the Black Forest News Campaign Images AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany Main Site: 48° 32' 24.18" N, 08° 23' 48.72" E Altitude: 511.43 meters In March 2007, the third deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will take place in the Black Forest region of Germany, where scientists will study rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. ARM

232

NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Profile of the Pasoh Forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Kira, T., N. Manokaran, and S. Appanah. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Pasoh, Malaysia, 1971-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and productivity of a lowland tropical forest in the Pasoh Forest Reserve, Malaysia, were determined from 1971 to 1973, under the auspices of the International Biological Programme. From 1970 to 1978, intensive research on lowland rain forest ecology and dynamics took place under a joint research project between the University of Malaya (UM) and the

233

Carbon Jungle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jungle Jungle Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Jungle Place El Segundo, California Zip 90246 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Jungle's mission is to decrease CO2 in the atmosphere by planting and managing tree plantations, increasing awareness of the facts behind increased CO2 in the atmosphere, and giving companies a means to participate in carbon credit trading. References Carbon Jungle[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Jungle is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "Carbon Jungle" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Jungle&oldid=343237" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

234

Applied Parallel Metadata Indexing  

SciTech Connect

The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data with meaningful labels and searach the archive using standard and user-defined metadata, while maintaining security. last summer, I developed the backend to a tool that adheres to these design goals. The backend works by importing GPFS metadata into a MongoDB cluster, which is then indexed on each attribute. This summer, the author implemented security and developed the user interfae for the search tool. To meet security requirements, each database table is associated with a single user, which only stores records that the user may read, and requires a set of credentials to access. The interface to the search tool is implemented using FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace). FUSE is an intermediate layer that intercepts file system calls and allows the developer to redefine how those calls behave. In the case of this tool, FUSE interfaces with MongoDB to issue queries and populate output. A FUSE implementation is desirable because it allows users to interact with the search tool using commands they are already familiar with. These security and interface additions are essential for a usable product.

Jacobi, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Climate Change and Forest VIRGINIA H. DALE, LINDA A. JOYCE, STEVE McNULTY, RONALD P NEILSON, MATTHEW P AYRES,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

).For- est disturbances influence how much carbon is stored in trees or dead wood. All these natural in maturevegetation (Lugoand Scatena 1995).Hurricanescan also resultin buriedvegetation and carbon sinks. Windstorms. This understanding, however, is complicated by the diverse goals of forest man- agement (e.g.,fiber products

237

1CHILE'S FRONTIER FORESTS: CONSERVING A GLOBAL TREASURE FRONTIER FORESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Claes Hall Aracruz Celulose Sweden Sharon Haines International Paper United States Matti Karjula Stora; The World Bank, World Wildlife Fund; The Nature Conservancy; Aracruz Celulose; Forest and Paper Association

238

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Requirements Lessons Learned Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Lessons Learned Quarterly Report Cumulative Index Guidance Requirements Lessons...

239

XI. Index of Primary Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XI Index of Primary Contacts XI Index of Primary Contacts A Aaron, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Aceves, Salvador M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Adams, Stephen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .713 Adzic, Radoslav. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384 Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .511 Ahmed, S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .451 Ahn, Channing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262, 267 Alam, Mohammad S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .509 Andersen, Cindi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .811 Anton, Donald L.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230, 243 Arduengo III, Anthony J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274

240

Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

plantation, forest-to-acacia plantation, forest-to-rubber plantation, and forest-to-oil palm plantation. We determined annual equivalent values for each option, and the...

242

Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a...

243

Dispersion Parameters over Forested Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unique set of micrometeorological data was obtained during a 196770 multidisciplinary environmental field program in a tropical forest environment. The program was under the sponsorship of the Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) and was ...

R. T. Pinker; J. Z. Holland

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

Luxmoore, R.J.

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain  

SciTech Connect

This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2-unresponsive clone partitioned C into pathways associated with passive defense and cell wall thickening. These results indicate that there is significant variation in gene expression patterns between different tree genotypes. Consequently, future efforts to improve productivity or other advantageous traits for carbon sequestration should include an examination of genetic variability in CO2 responsiveness.

Karnosky, David F (deceased); Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J (for DF Karnosky)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solar Index generation and delivery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Index, more completely defined as the Service Hot Water Solar Index, was conceptualized during the spring of 1978 with direction from a US Government interoffice agency committee which was headed by the Department of Energy. The purpose was to enhance public awareness of solar energy usability. Basically, the Solar Index represents the percentage of energy that solar would provide in order to heat an 80-gallon service hot water load for a given location and day. The Index is computed by utilizing SOLCOST, a computer program, which in addition to solar service hot water systems, has the ability to estimate thermal performance of space heating, cooling, and heat pump systems. It also supplies economic analyses for these solar energy systems. The Index is generated daily for most large metropolitan locations in the country. The definition of the Index, how the project came to be, what it is at the present time, and a plan for the future are presented. Also presented are the models used for the generation of the Index, a discussion of the primary tool of implementation (the SOLCOST Program), and future efforts.

Lantz, L.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Prediction of leaf area index in almonds by vegetation indexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three levels of scale for determining leaf area index (LAI) were explored within an almond orchard of alternating rows of Nonpareil and Monterey varieties using hemispherical photography and mule lightbar (MLB) at ground level up to airborne and satellite ... Keywords: Canopy light interception, EVI, GMI, LADP, LAI, Leaf area index, MASTER, MCARI, MLB, Multispectral indices, NDVI, NDWI, RMSE, SR, VI, Vegetation indices, fPAR

Jose L. Zarate-Valdez; Michael L. Whiting; Bruce D. Lampinen; Samuel Metcalf; Susan L. Ustin; Patrick H. Brown

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

249

Site Index | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Index Index SHARE ORNL from A to Z User Fa A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z This alphabetical index includes links to commonly requested information resources on ORNL's public webservers. Use the alphabetical links below to navigate quickly through the index. If you can't find what you need here, try the Search page. A Accounts Payable Acrobat Reader Software Agricola (agriculture database) Air Quality Conditions and Forecast Airport - Knoxville American Institute of Chemical Engineers American Museum of Science and Energy (AMSE) AmeriFlux Network Annual Review Series ASER - Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report Ask a Librarian! - email ORNL Library Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Archive Atomic Trades and Labor Council Automated External Defibrillator Locations

250

Project Definition Rating Index (PDRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Environmental Management (EM) Project Definition Rating Index (EM-PDRI) is a modification of a commercially developed planning tool that has been tested by an EM team specifically for...

251

Winter_2009_Index.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * ISSUE NO. 82, WINTER 2009 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION ANNUAL INDEX OF ARTICLES Clean Coal Today...

252

Forest Service Special Use Authorization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Service Special Use Authorization Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Forest Service Special Use Authorization Details...

253

Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shuzhen Nong, and helpful comments on previous versions of the manuscript by Michael Roberts. The authors take responsibility for all remaining errors. The opinions expressed are the authors only and do not necessarily When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically examine micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private land uses in a comprehensive analysis of the contiguous United States. The econometric estimates are used to simulate landowner responses to sequestration policies. Key commodity prices are treated as endogenous and a carbon sink model is used to predict changes in carbon storage. Our estimated marginal costs of carbon sequestration are greater than those from previous engineering cost analyses and sectoral optimization models. Our estimated sequestration supply function is similar to the carbon abatement supply function from energy-based analyses, suggesting that forest-based carbon

Ruben N. Lubowski; Andrew J. Plantinga; Robert N. Stavins

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Comparing simulations of three conceptually different forest models with National Forest Inventory data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although they were originally introduced for different purposes, forest models are often used today for scenario development, which includes forest production as one aspect of forest development. However, studies using an independent data set to compare ... Keywords: Climate change, Ecosystem model, Forest growth, Increment, Sensitivity, Simulator

Markus O. Huber; Chris S. Eastaugh; Thomas Gschwantner; Hubert Hasenauer; Georg Kindermann; Thomas Ledermann; Manfred J. Lexer; Werner Rammer; Stefan SchRghuber; Hubert Sterba

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Forest Resource Assessment Global Forest Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Global Forest Resource Assessment Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: www.fao.org/forestry/fra/fra2010/en/ Global Forest Resource Assessment Screenshot References: Global Forest Research Assessment[1] Overview "FAO, in cooperation with its member countries, has monitored the world's forests at 5 to 10 year intervals since 1946. These global assessments provide valuable information to policy-makers in countries, to international negotiations, arrangements and organizations related to forests and to the general public. The Global Forest Resources Assessment

256

Carbon stored in human settlements: the conterminous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban areas are home to more than half of the worlds people, responsible for 470 % of anthropogenic release of carbon dioxide and 76 % of wood used for industrial purposes. By 2050 the proportion of the urban population is expected to increase to 70 % worldwide. Despite fast rates of change and potential value for mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions, the organic carbon storage in human settlements has not been well quantified. Here, we show that human settlements can store as much carbon per unit area (2342 kg C m 2 urban areas and 716 kg C m 2 exurban areas) as tropical forests, which have the highest carbon density of natural ecosystems (425 kg C m 2). By the year 2000 carbon storage attributed to human settlements of the conterminous United States was 18 Pg of carbon or 10 % of its total land carbon storage. Sixty-four percent of this carbon was attributed to soil, 20 % to vegetation, 11 % to landfills, and 5 % to buildings. To offset rising urban emissions of carbon, regional and national governments should consider how to protect or even to increase carbon storage of human-dominated landscapes. Rigorous studies addressing carbon budgets of human settlements and vulnerability of their carbon storage are needed.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 Darien, Panama, 1967-1968 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Tropical moist forest near Darien (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Golley, F. B. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Darien, Panama, 1967-1968. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a transitional moist/dry tropical forest were determined in 1967-68 at Darien Province, Panama. NPP was not estimated. Situated about 160 km ESE of Panama City, close to the town of Santa Fe, the Darien study site consisted of two plots, about 8 km apart, one of

258

NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Litter trap and throughfall collector in the Chamela forest (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Maass, M., and A. Martinez-Yrizar. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Chamela, Mexico, 1982-1995. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Net primary productivity (NPP) of a tropical dry deciduous forest was estimated, based on the integration of ecosystem data obtained in various years between 1982 and 1995, at the Chamela Biological Station of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). The Biosphere Reserve Chamela-Cuixmala, Jalisco, is situated near the

259

NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: View across the forest canopy near Atherton (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Stocker, G. C. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Atherton, Australia, 1974-1985. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Litterfall was determined over 3-4 years (1974/5-1978) for two tropical rainforest sites and for 5 years (1980-1985) for a third study site near Atherton, Queensland, in northeast Australia. Although net primary production (NPP) was not determined, the extensive site description data and the rarity of measurements on tropical forests south of the Equator

260

NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Forest after clearing of secondary growth at the Kade site (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Nye, P. H., and D. J. Greenland. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Kade, Ghana, 1957-1972. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a secondary tropical forest were determined in the late 1950s at the Kade Agricultural Research Station of the former University College, Ghana. Net primary production (NPP) was estimated on the basis of standing biomass accumulation and litter fall. Later studies on litter and wood fall and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

In Search of the Rain Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil extraction in Ecuador, the appropriation and industrialization of herbal medicine in the forests of Belize, a critical history

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 02 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest ii Vol. 1, No. 2, July ­ September 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Board Dr. Urs Geiser Zurich University, Switzerland Dr. Mamoona Wali Muhammad Pakistan Forest Institute

Richner, Heinz

263

SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;SDPISustainable Development Policy Institute Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 Development Policy Institute Pakistan Forest Digest iii Vol. 1, No. 1, April ­ June 2010 Quarterly Pakistan Forest Digest Vol. 01, No. 01 ISBN: 2218-8045 April ­ June 2010 Contents P. No Introductions: Pakistan

Richner, Heinz

264

Global Carbon Biomass Tables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table 1c. Mixed Forest Classes Table 1d. NaturalBurnt Forest Mosaic Classes Table 1e. CropForest Mosaic Classes Table 1f. Shrub Cover Classes Table 1g. Grassland Classes Table...

265

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

266

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances  

SciTech Connect

Digests and indexes for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name Index; Headers and Digests; Legal Citations Index; Subject Index; and Facility Index.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Climate controls on forest soil C isotope ratios in the Southern Appalachian Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combination with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. The authors hypothesize that, if other environmental factors are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.

Garten, C.T. Jr.; Cooper, L.W.; Post, W.M. III; Hanson, P.J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Climate controls on forest soil C isotope ratios in the southern Appalachian Mountains  

SciTech Connect

A large portion of terrestrial carbon (C) resides in soil organic carbon (SOC). The dynamics of this large reservoir depend on many factors, including climate. Measurements of {sup 13}C:{sup 12}C ratios, C concentrations, and C:N ratios at six forest sites in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (USA) were used to explore several hypotheses concerning the relative importance of factors that control soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and SOC turnover. Mean {delta}{sup 13}C values increased with soil depth and decreasing C concentrations along a continuum from fresh litter inputs to more decomposed soil constituents. Data from the six forest sites, in combination with data from a literature review, indicate that the extent of change in {delta}{sup 13}C values from forest litter inputs to mineral soil (20 cm deep) is significantly associated with mean annual temperature. The findings support a conceptual model of vertical changes in forest soil {delta}{sup 13}C values, C concentrations, and C:N ratios that are interrelated through climate controls on decomposition. We hypothesize that, if other environmental factors (like soil moisture) are not limiting, then temperature and litter quality indirectly control the extent of isotopic fractionation during SOM decomposition in temperate forest ecosystems.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Cooper, Lee W [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Microsoft Word - Final Newsletter Index.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANNUAL INDEX SEQUESTRATION IN THE NEWS .............................................................................. 1 SEQUESTRATION POLICY & TRADING ............................................................... 11 SEQUESTRATION EVENTS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ............................................ 16 SEQUESTRATION PUBLICATIONS......................................................................... 17 SEQUESTRATION LEGISLATION ........................................................................... 24 INDEX.............................................................................................................................. 25 CONTACT INFORMATION........................................................................................ 28

270

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) Forest Conservation Act (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the

271

index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to the C-Mod Experiment Introduction to the C-Mod Experiment Physics Research High-Energy- Density Physics Waves & Beams Technology & Engineering Useful Links 2006 Program Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda, January 25- 27, 2006 Wednesday, January 25, 2006 1:00 pm Executive Session Richard Groebner 1:15 pm Welcome & Charge Miklos Porkolab 1:25 pm Comments from DoE Adam Rosenberg 1:30 pm Program Overview Earl Marmar 2:30 pm C-Mod Research for Integrated Scenarios on ITER Amanda Hubbard 3:30 pm Break 3:40 pm C-Mod Facility and Contributions to ITER Jim Irby 4:40 pm Executive Session 5:10 pm Dinner (off-site) Thursday, January 26, 2006 8:30 am Macro-Stability Bob Granetz 9:15 am ICRF Steve Wukitch 10:00 am Lower Hybrid Ron Parker 10:30 am Break 10:45 am Plasma Boundary Bruce Lipschultz 11:30 am Pedestal Physics

272

Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP Baseline Tool - 2004 Home CRA - 2004 Final Recertification Decision CRA Comments & Responses CCA - 1996 CRA CARDs & TSDs CCA CARDs & TSDs Regulatory Tools The Environmental...

273

Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11 081385 The Effects of Longitudinal and Transverse Driving J. Rosenzweig Bunch Shape on the Plasma Wake Field Accelerator Experiment 12 082185 DOE Presentation 81285...

274

INDEX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STANDARD RESEARCH STANDARD RESEARCH SUBCONTRACT (EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION or NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION) [FOR UNCLASSIFIED WORK] NO. ______________________ (DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY M&O CONTRACTOR) NATI _____________________________________ NAME ADDRESS Subcontractor: Attention: Address City, State, Zip Phone: Fax: E-Mail: Contractor's Procurement Representative [Contract Administrator]: Proc. Rep Title: ___________________ Phone #: Fax #: E-Mail: Introduction This is a cost-reimbursement, no-fee, standard subcontract for unclassified research and development work, not related to nuclear, chemical, biological, or radiological weapons of mass destruction or the

275

INDEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F................................................................................................................................................................ 145 G............................................................................................................................................................... 164 H............................................................................................................................................................... 177 I.................................................................................................................................................................. 194 J................................................................................................................................................................. 216 K............................................................................................................................................................... 219 L................................................................................................................................................................ 221

Doylestown Pa

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enhanced Raw Materials Forest Products Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sterility in Forest Trees................................................................................................... 2

Hq Program Managers

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

1988 Bulletin compilation and index  

SciTech Connect

This document is published to provide current information about the national program for managing spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste. This document is a compilation of issues from the 1988 calendar year. A table of contents and one index have been provided to assist in finding information.

NONE

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Transportation environment data bank index  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to determine the environment intensities to which shipping containers will be exposed, a ''Data Bank'' of environmental information has been established by Sandia Laboratories, Division 1285 for the ERDA Division of Environmental Control Technology. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. (auth)

Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Optimal deployment of solar index  

SciTech Connect

There is a growing trend, generally caused by state-specific renewable portfolio standards, to increase the importance of renewable electricity generation within generation portfolios. While RPS assist with determining the composition of generation they do not, for the most part, dictate the location of generation. Using data from various public sources, the authors create an optimal index for solar deployment. (author)

Croucher, Matt

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

282

Carbon Nanotube GHz Nano-Resonator Shengdong Li1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotube GHz Nano-Resonator Shengdong Li1 , Zhen Yu1 , Sheng-Feng Yen1 , Peter J. Burke1 walled carbon nanotube. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes are measured. Using a semiconducting signal processing components based on carbon nanotubes. Index Terms -- Nanotechnology, Resonators, Tuning

Tang, William C

283

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

284

Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Limited Enterprises Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited Place London, United Kingdom Zip WC2A 2AZ Sector Carbon Product Carbon Trust Enterprises creates and invests in new, high growth, carbon reducing businesses. Typically the company focuses on use of mature technologies rather than on technology innovations. References Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Trust Enterprises Limited" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Trust_Enterprises_Limited&oldid=343250"

285

A Review of the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership Facility Readiness Preparation Proposals Screenshot References: A Review of R-PP1 This working paper is part of a series of regular updates reviewing the Readiness...

286

Evironmental protection in Malaysia with sustainable forest management practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Malaysia has achieved a very significant development socio-economically since independent in 1957. Large tracts of forest have been converted to give way to settlements and agricultural and industrial areas. Logging is still being carried out annually. ... Keywords: environmental protection, forest certification, forest harvesting, sustainable forest management, tropical forest resources

Dato'Hj Dahlan Hj. Taha; Hj. Kamaruzaman Jusoff

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Microsoft Word - CBS News Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Science Newsletter Index Building Science Newsletter Index All CBS Newsletters that are in print are also available on the web at: http://eetd.lbl.gov/cbs/newsletter/CBSNews.html Articles are listed here by title in the order they appear. Summer 1998 (This is the final issue. See new EETD Newsletter, beginning Spring 99.) Reducing the Federal Energy Bill - Berkeley Lab's Work with the Federal Energy Management Program. (Allan Chen, p.1.) News from the DC Office: Regional Builder Option Packages: A Simplified Guide for Constructing Energy Star Homes (Donald Mauritz, p.3.) A Survey: Indoor Air Quality in Schools. (Joan Daisey and William Angell, p. 4.) International Energy-Efficiency Standards. (Mirka Della Cava, p.5.) Energy Plus: The Merger of BLAST and DOE-2. (Dru Crawley, p.6.)

288

NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Morrison, I. K., and N. W. Foster. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Mississagi, Canada, 1970-1973. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil were determined for a 30-year old pine forest in northern Ontario, Canada, and a detailed nutrient budget published. The 30-year old stand was compared with nearby 20-year old and 65-year old stands, all of which were growing on a glaciofluvial flat. Net primary productivity (NPP) was not directly estimated, but data exist on above-ground tree growth and litterfall.

289

NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Rencz, A. N., and A. N. D. Auclair. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada, 1974. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of a boreal ecosystem (subarctic lichen woodland) was determined at Schefferville, Canada, during the 1974 growing season. The main objective was to describe a "typical" lichen woodland, a vegetation type found in the transitional zone between boreal forest and tundra on well-drained, nutrient-poor podzolic soils. Such areas are occupied sparsely by black spruce trees (Picea mariana) with low growth

290

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas (NATCARB). (Acknowledgement to the WESTCARB web site at http://www.westcarb.org/index.htm)

291

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation provides a landscape-level perspective on the impacts of ice storm disturbance, clarifies the effects on ecosystem dynamics, and will aid future forest management plans. The study was conducted in Ouachita National Forest (ONF) in west-central Arkansas and southeastern Oklahoma and examined approximately 6000 km2 of forest between 150 and 800 m elevation. Normalized Difference Vegeation Index (NDVI) difference values were calculated using two Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes to identify NDVI changes that potentially were associated with ice storm damage to the forests. Forty-six geolocated field sites were used to determine the relationship of NDVI difference to actual forest damage caused by the ice storm by counting the number of downed tree boles intersecting a 100 m transect. These field sites encompassed a broad range of each of the physical variables (i.e. elevation, slope, and aspect), forest type, and degree of damage. The linear regression model determined the relationship between NDVI difference and ice storm damage. Elevation, slope, and aspect were calculated based on individual pixels from the DEM. Categories of forest damage were based on NDVI difference values. A chi-square test of correspondence and Cramers V test were then used to analyze relationships of damage to abiotic and biotic variables. The strong, negative relationship observed in the linear regression model suggested that NDVI was representative of ice storm damage in the study area. The chi-square test of correspondence indicated the abiotic and biotic variables all had associations with NDVI difference results (pice storm damage followed closely by slope and aspect. Moderate elevations, moderate slopes, and windward aspects received the highest percentage of major storm damage. Forest type displayed a weak relationship with the extent of damage. The topographic patterns of ice storm damage are similar to patterns found in previous research. Topography influenced spatial patterns of ice storm damage. Elevation, slope, and aspect were all found to be important variables influencing the degree of ice storm damage. Knowledge concerning these spatial patterns is critical for future studies of ecosystem dynamics and forest management practices.

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

294

Governance of Forests Initiative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests Initiative Forests Initiative Jump to: navigation, search Name Governance of Forests Initiative Agency/Company /Organization World Resources Institute Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.wri.org/project/gov Country Brazil, Indonesia UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References WRI-Forests [1] Overview "The Governance of Forests Initiative (GFI) is a collaboration between WRI, the Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazonia (IMAZON), and the Instituto Centro de Vida (ICV) to develop a framework of indicators for assessing and improving governance in the forest sector, as an essential precursor to debating whether and how to unleash market forces to

295

Major role of marine vegetation on the oceanic carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The carbon burial in vegetated sediments, ignored in past assessments of carbon burial in the ocean, was evaluated using a bottom-up approach derived from upscaling a compilation of published individual estimates of carbon burial in vegetated habitats (seagrass meadows, salt marshes and mangrove forests) to the global level and a top-down approach derived from considerations of global sediment balance and a compilation of the organic carbon content of vegeatated sediments. Up-scaling of individual burial estimates values yielded a total carbon burial in vegetated habitats of 111 Tmol C y ?1. The total burial in unvegetated sediments was estimated to be 126 Tg C y ?1, resulting in a bottom-up estimate of total burial in the ocean of about 244 Tg C y ?1, two-fold higher than estimates of oceanic carbon burial that presently enter global carbon budgets. The organic carbon

C. M. Duarte; J. J. Middelburg; N. Caraco

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

APPENDIX C Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Protect Forests From Harm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on insect and disease activity in the state. Because the current aerial survey is conducted by different1 APPENDIX C ­ Colorado Statewide Forest Resource Assessment Data Gaps Protect Forests From Harm o. Need updated LANDFIRE data on the current condition of Colorado's lodgepole pine forests. Need a fuel

297

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% China's forest products trade falls nearly 18% 11/08/2009 - 09:05 According to China's latest Customs statistics, foreign trade of China's forest products in the first five months showed a year-on-year general downturn. The total value of foreign trade of China

298

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Machine Learning Benchmarks and Random Forest Regressionerror on a suite of benchmark datasets. As the basethe Machine Learning Benchmark Problems package; see http://

Segal, Mark R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Discriminant Random Forest (DRF) Classification Methodology  

Jupiter Laser Facility. ... State-of-the-art methodologies that perform this type of classification include Support Vector Machines, Neural Networks, and Random Forest.

300

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Classify Forest Disturbances to Grow Understanding of Climate Change Daniel Hayes, shown here outside of Nome, Alaska, traveled to the Arctic in June to study climate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Christian veneer dryer: Forest products fact sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new closed rotary drum dryer for the forest products industry.

NREL

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

302

Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Forest Partners Place San Francisco, California Zip 94111 Product San Francisco-based project developer focused on building...

303

Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

Cernusak, Lucas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Winter, Klaus [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Dalling, James [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Holtum, Joseph [James Cook University; Jaramillo, Carlos [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Korner, Christian [University of Basel; Leakey, Andrew D.B. [University of Illinois; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Poulter, Benjamin [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Turner, Benjamin [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Wright, S. Joseph [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, July--December 1993. Volume 38, Index 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digests and indexes for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. These information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name Index; Digests and Headers; Legal Citations Index; Subject Index, and Facility Index.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The index $n$ of a power law power spectrum of primordial density fluctuations, $P(k) \\propto k^n$, has been estimated using many different techniques. The most precise compare the COBE DMR large angular scale $\\Delta T$ to the amplitude of the large scale structure, but these are also the most model-dependent. The COBE DMR $\\Delta T$ has also been compared to the degree-scale $\\Delta T$ from several experiments. And finally, a relatively model-independent value of $n$ can derived from the COBE data alone, but the small range of angular scales covered by COBE limits the precision of these methods.

Edward L. Wright

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Global Vegetation Data: Leaf Area Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leaf Area Index Data Available The ORNL DAAC announces the availability of a global data set containing approximately 1000 estimates of leaf area index (LAI) for a variety of...

307

High index contrast platform for silicon photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on silicon-based high index contrast (HIC) photonics. In addition to mature fiber optics or low index contrast (LIC) platform, which is often referred to as Planar Lightwave Cirrcuit (PLC) or Silica ...

Akiyama, Shoji, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

UV Index Widget | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Description The UV Index Widget displays the ultraviolet (UV) Index providing a daily forecast of the expected risk of overexposure to the sun for a user-specified area of interest...

309

Ardour Global Indexes LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 10016 Product New-York based company that manages the Ardour Global Indexes, a set of alternative energy financial indicators. References Ardour Global Indexes LLC1 LinkedIn...

310

Indexing Flower Patent Images Using Domain Knowledge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe a new approach to indexing a specialized database using the color and spatial domain knowledge available for the database. They illustrate their approach by using it to solve the problem of indexing flower images when searching a ...

Madirakshi Das; R. Manmatha; Edward M. Riseman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

COMPOSITE INDEX OF HANFORD ENGINEERING STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Atomic Production Operation composite index refers to subjects contained in the nine handbooks and manuals published under the Hanford Engineering Standard Program. This index is described in TID-4100(Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Agency/Company /Organization: Center for Global Development Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps Website: www.cgdev.org/section/initiatives/_active/forestmonitoringforactionfor Cost: Free Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) Screenshot References: FORMA[1] "Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) uses freely available satellite data to generate rapidly updated online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions by paying to keep forests intact."

313

EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

45: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest Industries, Combustors 1,2, and 3, Port Wentworth, Chatham County, Georgia EIS-0045: Coal Conversion Program, Continental Forest...

314

Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before...

315

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

316

EIS-0442: Forest Service Reauthorization of Transmission Lines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utah and Nebraska for Routine Maintenance Practices including Changes in Vegetation Management EIS-0442: Forest Service Reauthorization of Transmission Lines on Forest Service...

317

Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

318

APPROACHES TO SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT IN PARCELIZED LANDSCAPES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The holistic, landscape-based approach of Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) in the United States emphasizes the importance of addressing three components of forest management: ecology, community, (more)

Baumflek, Michelle

319

Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nature climate change features forest research Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

320

Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Polticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

Balbinotto Neto, Gicomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

322

Parallelizing an Index Generator for Desktop Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combination of search terms. The search uses an inverted index that lists the files in which a given term in a given document. Should a term be entered into the index every time it is found, or should the term a term has been looked up in the index, a search must check whether the pair (term, filename) had been

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

323

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

324

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

325

Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Gallandat 1996). Numerous reports also highlight damages caused by cattle grazing on trees and seedlings, and its ill effects on soil, water and environment (Bolt et al. 1978; Clary and Medin, 1990; and Kovalchik and Elmore, 1992). In Journal of Bhutan... in Broadleaf Forests 105 Rubia, Rubus and Solonum form the bulk of the cattle-feed. The number of Viola, Pilea, Elatostema and Aporosa are high but their contribution to herbage production for animal intake is very little as they are tiny...

Norbu, Lungten

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Nitrogen and Phosphorus Availability in Forests of Varying Ages in the Bartlett Experimental Forest White Mountains, New Hampshire.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Human-induced changes such as nitrogen deposition and forest harvest can alter biogeochemical cycling in temperate forests. However, it is still unclear what impacts increased N (more)

Ratliff, Tera Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

www.elsevier.com/locate/envpol Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capsule: Urban trees currently store 700 million tons of carbon, with an annual sequestration rate of 22.8 million tons. Based on field data from 10 USA cities and national urban tree cover data, it is estimated that urban trees in the coterminous USA currently store 700 million tonnes of carbon ($14,300 million value) with a gross carbon sequestration rate of 22.8 million tC/yr ($460 million/year). Carbon storage within cities ranges from 1.2 million tC in New York, NY, to 19,300 tC in Jersey City, NJ. Regions with the greatest proportion of urban land are the Northeast (8.5%) and the southeast (7.1%). Urban forests in the north central, northeast, south central and southeast regions of the USA store and sequester the most carbon, with average carbon storage per hectare greatest in southeast, north central, northeast and Pacific northwest regions, respectively. The national average urban forest carbon storage density is 25.1 tC/ha, compared with 53.5 tC/ha in forest stands. These data can be used to help assess the actual and potential role of urban forests in reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide, a dominant greenhouse gas. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

David J. Nowak; Daniel E. Crane

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of Nontropical Forest Cover on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The albedo of a forest with snow on the ground is much less than that of snow-covered low vegetation such as tundra. As a result, simulation of the Northern Hemisphere climate, when fully forested south of a suitably chosen taiga/tundra boundary (...

J. Otterman; M-D. Chou; A. Arking

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gas Turbine Fault Diagnosis using Random Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, Random Forests are used in a critical and at the same time non trivial problem concerning the diagnosis of Gas Turbine blading faults, portraying promising results. Random forests-based fault diagnosis is treated as a Pattern Recognition ...

Manolis Maragoudakis; Euripides Loukis; Panayotis-Prodromos Pantelides

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

All that jazz in the random forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the problem of automatic identification of instruments in audio records, in a frame-by-frame manner. Random forests have been chosen as a classifier. Training data represent sounds of selected instruments which originate from ... Keywords: music information retrieval, random forests, sound recognition

El?bieta Kubera; Miron B. Kursa; Witold R. Rudnicki; Rados?aw Rudnicki; Alicja A. Wieczorkowska

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Steiner Forest Orientation Problems Marek Cygan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steiner Forest Orientation Problems Marek Cygan1 , Guy Kortsarz2 , and Zeev Nutov3 1 Institute with orientation constra- ints. Given a directed graph D and a collection of ordered node pairs P let P[D] = {(u, v) P : D contains an uv-path}. In the Steiner Forest Orientation problem we are given an undirected

Kortsarz, Guy

332

Steiner Forest Orientation Problems Marek Cygan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steiner Forest Orientation Problems Marek Cygan1 , Guy Kortsarz2 , and Zeev Nutov3 1 IDSIA with orientation constra- ints. Given a directed graph D and a collection of ordered node pairs P let P[D] = {(u, v) P : D contains a uv-path}. In the Steiner Forest Orientation problem we are given an undirected

Kortsarz, Guy

333

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Tropical Forest Trust | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tropical Forest Trust Tropical Forest Trust Name Tropical Forest Trust Address The Forest Trust 721 NW Ninth Avenue, Suite 195 Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97209 Region Pacific Northwest Area Year founded 1999 Website http://www.tft-forests.org/ Coordinates 45.5284073°, -122.6803494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5284073,"lon":-122.6803494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

SAR Imagery: Rain Forests, South America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Images of Rain Forests in South America Images of Rain Forests in South America The ORNL DAAC now offers a CD-ROM volume containing Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the rain forest region of South America, including the Amazon Basin. The images were collected during 1995-1996 as part of an international project led by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) to map the world's rain forest regions to high resolution by means of SAR. The 4-disc volume--entitled "JERS-1 SAR Global Rain Forest Mapping Project: Vol. AM-1, South America"--is made available under the auspices of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). These CDs can be ordered through the ORNL DAAC at http://daac.ornl.gov/prepaks.shtml (look for the "LBA" listings).

336

Department of Energy Standards Index  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TSL-1-2002 TSL-1-2002 December 2002 Superseding DOE-TSL-1-99 May 1999 DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS LIST DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDARDS INDEX U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-TSL-1-2002 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards list (TSL) has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy (EH-53) on the basis of currently available technical information.

337

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

338

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

339

GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Measurement of carbon for carbon sequestration and site monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2 to 6 degree C increase in global temperature by 2050 has been predicted due to the production of greenhouse gases that is directly linked to human activities. This has encouraged an increase in the international efforts on ways to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as evidence for the link between atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change has been established. Suggestion that soils and vegetation could be managed to increase their uptake and storage of CO{sub 2}, and thus become 'land carbon sinks' is an incentive for scientists to undertake the ability to measure and quantify the carbon in soils and vegetation to establish base-line quantities present at this time. The verification of the permanence of these carbon sinks has raised some concern regarding the accuracy of their long-term existence. Out of the total percentage of carbon that is potentially sequestered in the terrestrial land mass, only 25% of that is sequestered above ground and almost 75% is hypothesized to be sequestered underground. Soil is composed of solids, liquids, and gases which is similar to a three-phase system. The gross chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) consists of 65% humic substances that are amorphous, dark-colored, complex, polyelectrolyte-like materials that range in molecular weight from a few hundred to several thousand Daltons. The very complex structure of humic and fulvic acid makes it difficult to obtain a spectral signature for all soils in general. The humic acids of different soils have been observed to have polymeric structure, appearing as rings, chains and clusters as seen in electron microscope observations. The humification processes of the soils will decide the sizes of their macromolecules that range from 60-500 angstroms. The percentage of the humus that occurs in the light brown soils is much lower than the humus present in dark brown soils. The humus of forest soils is characterized by a high content of fulvic acids while the humus of peat and grassland soils is high in humic acids. Similarly it is well known that the amount of carbon present in forest soils is lower than the amount present in grassland soils.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

Huston, M.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramLandslide Risk Case Studies in Forest Development Planning and Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ministry of Forests Forest Science ProgramThe use of trade, firm, or corporation names in this publication is for the information and convenience of the reader. Such use does not constitute an official endorsement or approval by the Government of British Columbia of any product or service to the exclusion of any others that may also be suitable. This document should be regarded as technical information and not as government policy. National Library of Canada Cataloguing in Publication Data Main entry under title. Landslide risk case studies in forest development planning and operations (Land management handbook, ISSN 0229-1622; 56) Includes bibliographical references: p.

Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine; Mike Wise; Glenn Moore; Doug Vandine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes. Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division Date and Time: Sunday, February 13, 2005 ~ 8:30 am-5:00 pm

344

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET...

345

Construction Price Indexes | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Price Indexes Price Indexes BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Construction Price Indexes Dataset Summary Description The Construction Price Indexes provide price indexes for single-family houses sold and for single-family houses under construction. The houses sold index incorporates the value of the land and is available quarterly at the national level and annually by region. The indexes for houses under construction are available monthly at the national level. The indexes are based on data funded by HUD and collected in the Survey of Construction (SOC). Tags {Laspeyres,Constant,Quality,Paasche,Output,Deflator,Fisher,Ideal,Index,absorption,apartment,authorized,authorization,build,building,built,characteristic,completed,completion,construction,contract,contractor,cost,development,dwelling,economic,existing,expenditures,family,financing,finished,floor,home,house,houses,housing,hud,indicator,index,issue,issuing,living,manufactured,market,metropolitan,microdata,month,multifamily,multiple,new,nonresidential,occupancy,occupants,occupied,office,one-unit,owner,permanent,permit,permits,price,private,privately-owned,public,quarters,rebuilt,region,regional,rent,rental,residential,rural,sale,sectional,single,single-family,site-built,size,sold,speculative,spending,stage,started,starts,structure,timeshare,under,unit,units,urban,u.s.,vacancy,valuation,zoning}

346

Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Main sources of information · Forest Products Annual Market Review, UNECE/FAOUNECE/FAO · Importance Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

347

forest certification in guatemala yale school of forestry & environmental studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the rules and regulations governing the forest concessions and stip- ulating mandatory certification

348

2012Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Forest Health Protection, USDA Forest Service, Lakewood, Colo. Brian Howell, Aerial Survey Program2012Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests Forest Stewardship through Active Management #12 Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colo. Susan Gray, Program Lead

Stephens, Graeme L.

349

Correspondence of pollen assemblages with forest zones across steep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest, a rural site near Petersham, Massachusetts pro- vides a chemical climatology for all seasons over

Gavin, Daniel G.

350

Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative Records Disposition Schedules Topic Index to the DOE Administrative...

351

Forest Road Building Regulations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Forest Road Building Regulations Forest Road Building Regulations < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Fuel Distributor Nonprofit Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 09/2010 State Wisconsin Program Type Environmental Regulations The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has regulations for building a forest road, if development requires one. Regulations include zoning ordinances and permits for stream crossing, grading, stormwater, and

352

Forest Investment Program (FIP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program (FIP) Program (FIP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Forest Investment Program (FIP) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climatefundsupdate. Program Start 2008 Country Brazil, Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Indonesia, Laos, Mexico, Peru South America, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Central America, South America References Forest Investment Program (FIP)[1] Forest Investment Program[2] Brazil Specific Documents[3] Democratic Republic of Congo Specific Documents[4] Ghana Specific Documents[5] Indonesia Specific Documents[6] Laos Specific Documents[7]

353

Forest succession at elevated CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Discriminant forest classification method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Supplement: Commodity Index Report | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplement: Commodity Index Report Supplement: Commodity Index Report Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Supplement: Commodity Index Report Dataset Summary Description Shows index traders in selected agricultural markets. These traders are drawn from the noncommercial and commercial categories. The noncommercial category includes positions of managed funds, pension funds, and other investors that are generally seeking exposure to a broad index of commodity prices as an asset class in an unleveraged and passively-managed manner. The commercial category includes positions for entities whose trading predominantly reflects hedging of over-the-counter transactions involving commodity indices, for example, a swap dealer holding long futures positions to hedge a short commodity index exposure opposite institutional traders, such as pension funds.

356

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

357

An index 2F2 hypergeometric transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a new one-parameter family of index hypergeometric transforms associated with the relativistic pseudoharmonic oscillator by using coherent states analysis.

Mouayn, Zouhair

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

An index 2F2 hypergeometric transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct a new one-parameter family of index hypergeometric transforms associated with the relativistic pseudoharmonic oscillator by using coherent states analysis.

Zouhair Mouayn

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

359

NIST Elemental Data Index Version History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RA (2011), Elemental Data Index (version 2.2). ... the Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the ... to two new, online databases: "Energy Levels of ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Detection of Forest Structures in the Monongahela National Forest Using LiDAR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mapping of structural elements of a forest is important for forestry management to provide a baseline for old and new-growth trees while providing height (more)

Norman, Dominique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Index (click to jump links) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Emissions from Electricity Generation Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 115. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2002 to 2025, to 8,142 million metric tons (Figure 115). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year from 2002 to 2025. Carbon dioxide emissions in the residential sector, including emissions

362

Allied Carbon Credit GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Credit GmbH Carbon Credit GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Allied Carbon Credit GmbH Place Hessen, Germany Sector Carbon Product Frankfurt-based carbon advisory and consultancy firm. References Allied Carbon Credit GmbH[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Allied Carbon Credit GmbH is a company located in Hessen, Germany . References ↑ "Allied Carbon Credit GmbH" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Allied_Carbon_Credit_GmbH&oldid=342020" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

363

Ecophysiology of forest and savanna vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and S. Scott (1998), Carbon dioxide transfer over a CentralJ. , et al. (1995), Carbon dioxide uptake by an undisturbedComparative measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes from two

Lloyd, J.; Goulden, M. L.; Ometto, J. P.; Patino, S.; Fyllas, N. M.; Quesada, C. A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Hydrological Processes 18:and productivity in Puerto-Rico's luquillo mountains.experimental forest Puerto Rico. US Forest Serv Gen Tech Rep

Templer, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases | OSTI,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases DOE Science Showcase - Carbon Capture research in DOE Databases Information Bridge : Natural materials for carbon capture. ... Realistic costs of carbon capture ... Technology and international climate policy Energy Citations Database : What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions ... Effects of warming on the structure and function of a boreal black spruce forest ... ScienceCinema : Carbon Smackdown ... Extrapolate the Past or Invent the Future ... Two Billion Cars: What it means for Climate and Energy Policy ... DOE Data Explorer : Big Sky Carbon Atlas... NATCARB Interactive Maps ... Videos of experiments from ORNL's Gas Hydrate Research DOE Green Energy : Thinking Like a Whole Building: A Whole Foods Market New Construction Case

366

NPP Tropical Forest: Luquillo, Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994 Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Lugo, A. E., F. Scatena, and C. F. Jordan. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: Luquillo, Puerto Rico, 1963-1994. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of lower montane tropical forest has been determined at various study sites within the Luquillo Experimental Forest from 1963 to the present. The Luquillo Experimental Forest is situated in the Luquillo Mountains of eastern Puerto Rico (18.32 N 65.82 W), about 35 km east-southeast of San Juan, and operates under the auspices of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico. Its total area is about 11,000

367

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1999 State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of Natural Resources The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the

368

Tropical Forest Foundation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tropical Forest Foundation Tropical Forest Foundation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tropical Forest Foundation Name Tropical Forest Foundation Address 2121 Eisenhower Ave. Suite 200 Place Alexandria, Virginia Zip 22314 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Phone number 703.518.8834 Website http://tropicalforestfoundatio Coordinates 38.8013734°, -77.0668734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8013734,"lon":-77.0668734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Program on Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forests Forests Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Program on Forests Name Program on Forests Address 1818 H Street NW Place Washington D.C. Zip 20433 Phone number 1.202.522.1142 Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Coordinates 38.898957°, -77.04256° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.898957,"lon":-77.04256,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil [Amazonas]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Piedade, M. T. F., and W. J. Junk. 2001. NPP Tropical Forest: Manaus, Brazil, 1963-1990. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and components of productivity for several types of tropical forest were determined for a number of study sites around Manaus, Brazil, from 1963 to the present. The study sites include several (0.2 ha) stands of terra firme (dry land) forest at " 64" to the northeast of Manaus, towards Itacoatiara (approximately 3.0 S 59.7 W, near the " Egler" Reserve), riverine forest in the 10 km x 10 km " Reserve" (2.95 S 59.95 W, 26 km

371

Plasma Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamo Experiments Cary Forest PPPL Colloquium 5 th June 2013 Wednesday, June 5, 13 So many dynamos (s men dnuh-mz), 1. a phrase which reads the same backwards and...

372

NPP Tropical Forest: La Selva, Costa Rica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

view a series of images from this site). Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Clark, D. A. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: La Selva, Costa Rica, 1969-1985. Data set. Available...

373

Turbulence Spectra and Eddy Diffusivity over Forests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objectives of this observational study are to examine the stability dependence of velocity and air temperature spectra and to employ the spectral quantities to establish relations for eddy diffusivity over forests. The datasets chosen ...

Xuhui Lee

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

NPP Tropical Forest: Barro Colorado, Panama  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barro Colorado, Panama, 1969-1990 PHOTOGRAPH Photograph: Buttressed tree at the Barro Colorado tropical forest site (click on the photo to view a series of images from this...

375

Ground Plane Identification Using LIDAR in Forested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To operate autonomously in forested environments, unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) must be able to identify the load-bearing surface of the terrain (i.e. the ground). This paper presents a novel two-stage approach for ...

McDaniel, Matt W.

376

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database (NDP-068) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp068 data Data PDF PDF Appendix A is reprint of Brown et al. paper in Geocarto International, Vol. 8; copyright 1993 Geocarto International Centre and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) image Contributors Sandra Brown1 Louis R. Iverson2 Anantha Prasad2 Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences University of Illinois Urbana, Illinois 1Present address: Winrock International, Arlington, Virginia 2Present address: United States Forest Service, Northeast Research Station, Delaware, Ohio Prepared by Tammy W. Beaty, Lisa M. Olsen, Robert M. Cushman, and Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

377

Appendix B -1 Appendix B: Acronym Index  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the San Poil IBIS Interactive Biodiversity Information System IDEQ Idaho Department of Environmental Quality IDFG Idaho Department of Fish and Game IDPR Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation IDL The Idaho Department of Lands IDWR Idaho Department of Water Resources IFPA Idaho Forest Practices Act IMP

378

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

dioxide; manufacture products that store carbon; produce and use carbon-neutral renewable energy; continuously work to reduce our own emissions of greenhouse gases; and...

379

A MANUAL FOR CATALOGING and INDEXING DOCUMENTS FOR DATABASE ACQUISITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4432 Rev. 1 July, 1978 A Manual for Cataloging and IndexingEnvironment Division A Manual for Cataloging and Indexing

Schwartz, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portfolio Portfolio Jump to: navigation, search Name BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://wbcarbonfinance.org/Rou Country Albania, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Honduras, India, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Nicaragua, Niger, Uganda Southern Europe, Eastern Asia, South America, Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, Southern Asia, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Europe, Central America, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References BioFund Projects[1] Background "The BioCarbon Fund provides carbon finance for projects that sequester or conserve greenhouse gases in forests, agro- and other ecosystems. Through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 Jump to: navigation, search Name NIES Low-Carbon Society Scenarios 2050 Agency/Company /Organization National Institute for Environmental Studies Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning Website http://2050.nies.go.jp/LCS/ind Program Start 2009 Country Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam UN Region Eastern Asia References 2050 Low-Carbon Society Scenarios (LCSs)[1] National and Local Scenarios National and local scenarios available from the activity webpage: http://2050.nies.go.jp/LCS/index.html References ↑ "2050 Low-Carbon Society Scenarios (LCSs)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=NIES_Low-Carbon_Society_Scenarios_2050&oldid=553682"

383

A Water Vapor Index from Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for deriving a water vapor index is presented. An important feature of the index is the fact that it does not rely on radiosondes. Thus, it is not influenced by problems associated with radiosondes and the extent to which the horizontal ...

Larry M. McMillin; David S. Crosby; Mitchell D. Goldberg

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dynamic maintenance of web indexes using landmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work on incremental crawling has enabled the indexed document collection of a search engine to be more synchronized with the changing World Wide Web. However, this synchronized collection is not immediately searchable, because the keyword index ... Keywords: inverted files, update processing

Lipyeow Lim; Min Wang; Sriram Padmanabhan; Jeffrey Scott Vitter; Ramesh Agarwal

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Multiscalar Drought Index Sensitive to Global Warming: The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a new climatic drought index: the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI). The SPEI is based on precipitation and temperature data, and it has the advantage of combining multiscalar character with the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguera; Juan I. Lpez-Moreno

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method of identifying features in indexed data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of identifying features in indexed data, especially useful for distinguishing signal from noise in data provided as a plurality of ordered pairs. Each of the plurality of ordered pairs has an index and a response. The method has the steps of: (a) providing an index window having a first window end located on a first index and extending across a plurality of indices to a second window end; (b) selecting responses corresponding to the plurality of indices within the index window and computing a measure of dispersion of the responses; and (c) comparing the measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value. Advantages of the present invention include minimizing signal to noise ratio, signal drift, varying baseline signal and combinations thereof.

Jarman, Kristin H. (Richland, WA); Daly, Don Simone (Richland, WA); Anderson, Kevin K. (Richland, WA); Wahl, Karen L. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 Year 2003 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 PDF[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Healthy Forests Initiative (or HFI), officially the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-148), is a law originally proposed by President George W. Bush in response to the widespread forest fires during the summer of 2002.[1] The main thrusts of the law are to thin overstocked stands, clear away vegetation and trees to create shaded fuel breaks, provide funding and guidance to reduce or eliminate hazardous fuels in National Forests, improve forest fire fighting, and research new methods to

388

Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest, savannas, deserts, temperate grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra, and chaparral. The carbon cycle is an important mechanism in the coupling of terrestrial ecosystems with climate through biological fluxes of CO{sub 2}. The influence of terrestrial ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} can be modeled via several means at different timescales. Important processes include plant dynamics, change in land use, as well as ecosystem biogeography. Over the past several decades, many terrestrial ecosystem models (see the 'Model developments' section) have been developed to understand the interactions between terrestrial carbon storage and CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere, as well as the consequences of these interactions. Early TECMs generally adapted simple box-flow exchange models, in which photosynthetic CO{sub 2} uptake and respiratory CO{sub 2} release are simulated in an empirical manner with a small number of vegetation and soil carbon pools. Demands on kinds and amount of information required from global TECMs have grown. Recently, along with the rapid development of parallel computing, spatially explicit TECMs with detailed process based representations of carbon dynamics become attractive, because those models can readily incorporate a variety of additional ecosystem processes (such as dispersal, establishment, growth, mortality etc.) and environmental factors (such as landscape position, pest populations, disturbances, resource manipulations, etc.), and provide information to frame policy options for climate change impact analysis.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Berry, Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

391

The European Forest Institute and the Finnish Forest Research Institute: The supply of woody biomass from the forests in the EU can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass from the forests in the EU can be significantly increased The supply of woody biomass from. The theoretical biomass potential from the European forests in 2010 is nearly 1.3 billion m3 including bark and woody biomass from early thinnings in young forests. The potential is, however, reduced to about 750

392

A disconnect between O horizon and mineral soil carbon - Implications for soil C sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing inputs of carbon to soil is one means of potentially increasing carbon sequestration in soils for the purpose of mitigating projected increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The effect of manipulations of aboveground carbon input on soil carbon storage was tested in a temperate, deciduous forest in east Tennessee, USA. A 4.5-year experiment included exclusion of aboveground litterfall and supplemental litter additions (three times ambient) in an upland and a valley that differed in soil nitrogen availability. The estimated decomposition rate of the carbon stock in the O horizon was greater in the valley than in the upland due to higher litter quality (i.e., lower C/N ratios). Short-term litter exclusion or addition had no effect on carbon stock in the mineral soil, measured to a depth of 30 cm, or the partitioning of carbon in the mineral soil between particulate- and mineral-associated organic matter. A two-compartment model was used to interpret results from the field experiments. Field data and a sensitivity analysis of the model were consistent with little carbon transfer between the O horizon and the mineral soil. Increasing aboveground carbon input does not appear to be an effective means of promoting carbon sequestration in forest soil at the location of the present study because a disconnect exists in carbon dynamics between O horizon and mineral soil. Factors that directly increase inputs to belowground soil carbon, via roots, or reduce decomposition rates of organic matter are more likely to benefit efforts to increase carbon sequestration in forests where carbon dynamics in the O horizon are uncoupled from the mineral soil.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

394

CHINA AND FOREST TRADE IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION: IMPLICATIONS FOR FORESTS AND LIVELIHOODS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Chinese Forest Products Exporters © 2008 Forest Trends and Sidley Austin LLP ISBN 1 Sidley Austin LLP (http://www.sidley.com): Sidley is a global law firm, with more than 1800 lawyers in 16 energy projects, as well as representing clients in climate change related litigation. The group

395

Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

396

Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

397

Urban Forest Assessment --Roanoke, Virginia 2 Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from US EPA's Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID). Forecasted marginal carbon

Virginia Tech

398

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Agency/Company /Organization: Forest Trends, The Climate, Community and Biodiversity (CCB) Alliance, The Rainforest Alliance, Flora and Fauna International Partner: United Nations Development Programme, U.S. Agency for International Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.forest-trends.org/documents/files/doc_2436.pdf Cost: Free Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects Screenshot References: Manual for Social Impact Assessment of Land-Based Carbon Projects[1]

399

Carbon Disclosure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Disclosure Project Disclosure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Disclosure Project Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1R 0NE Product A secretariat for 143 institutional investors with USD 20 trn under management, it aims to encourage the development of a common emissions measurement methodology and to facilitate its integration into general investment analysis. References Carbon Disclosure Project[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Disclosure Project is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Disclosure Project" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Disclosure_Project&oldid=343232

400

Transportation Services Index and the Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Index (TSI), an economic measure of freight and passenger movements, 1 marked the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) entry into the company of federal statistical agencies that produce monthly U.S. economic indicators. The TSI consists of three component indexes: a freight index, a passenger index, and a combined (or total) index. Figure 1 shows the freight and passenger indexes as recently displayed on the BTS website. The TSI is the broadest monthly measure of U.S. domestic transportation services and, as such, provides the best current measure available of these services. As an index, the TSI refl ects real monthly changes in freight and passenger services in the United States. After development of the TSI, followed by additional research, it became clear the TSI moved in conjunction with other indicators of the national economy. Cycles of various kinds, depths, and durations occur frequently in the U.S. economy. Of these, the business cycles of recession and expansion, and the growth cycle are of particular interest to economists. The TSI, as presently published on the BTS website, spans the time period from 1990 to the present and covers two recessions. But, extending the TSI back to 1979 allows coverage of four recessions 2 and numerous growth cycles. By comparing the turning points in the extended TSI with other economic data series, it is possible to ascertain whether and how transportation services 1

Peg Young, Ph.D.; Ken; Notis Gary Feuerberg, Ph.D.; Long Nguyen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Forest biomass supply logistics for a power plant using the discrete-event simulation approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the logistics of supplying forest biomass to a potential power plant. Due to the complexities in such a supply logistics system, a simulation model based on the framework of Integrated Biomass Supply Analysis and Logistics (IBSAL) is developed in this study to evaluate the cost of delivered forest biomass, the equilibrium moisture content, and carbon emissions from the logistics operations. The model is applied to a proposed case of 300 MW power plant in Quesnel, BC, Canada. The results show that the biomass demand of the power plant would not be met every year. The weighted average cost of delivered biomass to the gate of the power plant is about C$ 90 per dry tonne. Estimates of equilibrium moisture content of delivered biomass and CO2 emissions resulted from the processes are also provided.

Mobini, Mahdi [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Procedure for determining the distribution ranking index  

SciTech Connect

The Distribution Ranking Index (DRI) has been developed as a simple but effective means to indicate the inherent, acute hazards of a material that might be released in a transportation accident. Utilizing existing Dow resources and procedures, it is one of the methods used for prioritization of chemicals in Dow`s distribution related process risk management effort. Seven individual hazard indexes are considered for a material. The values range from 1 to 4 with 4 representing the most severe hazard. The highest value from any hazard index determines the overall DRI. 3 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

Latino, M.A. [Dow Chemical Co., Freeport, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Trade, transport, and sinks extend the carbon dioxide responsibility of countries: An editorial essay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and the dynamics of ecosystem sinks need be considered in post-Kyoto climate negotiations as they increasingly affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Currently, the allocation of responsibility for greenhouse gas mitigation is based on territorial emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, process emissions and some land-use emissions. However, at least three additional factors can significantly alter a country's impact on climate from carbon dioxide emissions. First, international trade causes a separation of consumption from production, reducing domestic pollution at the expense of foreign producers, or vice versa. Second, international transportation emissions are not allocated to countries for the purpose of mitigation. Third, forest growth absorbs carbon dioxide and can contribute to both carbon sequestration and climate change protection. Here we quantify how these three factors change the carbon dioxide emissions allocated to China, Japan, Russia, USA, and European Union member countries. We show that international trade can change the carbon dioxide currently allocated to countries by up to 60% and that forest expansion can turn some countries into net carbon sinks. These factors are expected to become more dominant as fossil-fuel combustion and process emissions are mitigated and as international trade and forest sinks continue to grow. Emission inventories currently in wide-spread use help to understand the global carbon cycle, but for long-term climate change mitigation a deeper understanding of the interaction between the carbon cycle and society is needed. Restructuring international trade and investment flows to meet environmental objectives, together with the inclusion of forest sinks, are crucial issues that need consideration in the design of future climate policies. And even these additional issues do not capture the full impact of changes in the carbon cycle on the global climate system.

Peters, Glen P [Center for International Climate and Energy Research (CICERO), Oslo, Norway; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hertwich, Edgar G. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Saikku, Laura [University of Helsinki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Poverty and Forests Linkages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty and Forests Linkages Poverty and Forests Linkages Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Poverty and Forests Linkages Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/Documents/pdf/livelihoods/PovertyForestsLinkage Country: India, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Guinea, Laos, Tanzania Southern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, Western Africa, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa Coordinates: 28.86°, 81.56° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.86,"lon":81.56,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

Berkeley Lab A to Z Index: C  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Metrology California Science Project (CSP) Cancer & Carcinogens: Carcinogenic Potency Database Project Cancer Research: Popular Articles about Cancer Research Here Carbon Cycle...

406

Predicted Effects of Prescribed Burning and Timber Management on Forest Recovery and Sustainability at Fort Benning, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to use a simple compartment model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict forest recovery on degraded soils and forest sustainability, following recovery, under different regimes of prescribed fire and timber management. This report describes the model and a model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clearcutting on stand recovery and sustainability at Fort Benning, GA. I developed the model using Stella{reg_sign} Research Software (High Performance Systems, Inc., Hanover, NH) and parameterized the model using data from field studies at Fort Benning, literature sources, and parameter fitting. The model included (1) a tree biomass submodel that predicted aboveground and belowground tree biomass, (2) a litter production submodel that predicted the dynamics of herbaceous aboveground and belowground biomass, (3) a soil C and N submodel that predicted soil C and N stocks (to a 30 cm soil depth) and net soil N mineralization, and (4) an excess N submodel that calculated the difference between predicted plant N demands and soil N supplies. There was a modeled feedback from potential excess N (PEN) to tree growth such that forest growth was limited under conditions of N deficiency. Two experiments were performed for the model-based analysis. In the first experiment, forest recovery from barren soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning and with or without timber management by thinning or clearcutting. In the second experiment, simulations began with 100 years of predicted forest growth in the absence of fire or harvesting, and sustainability was predicted for a further 100 years either with or without prescribed burning and with or without forest management. Four performance variables (aboveground tree biomass, soil C stocks, soil N stocks, and PEN) were used to evaluate the predicted effects of timber harvesting and prescribed burning on forest recovery and sustainability. Predictions of forest recovery and sustainability were directly affected by how prescribed fire affected PEN. Prescribed fire impacted soil N supplies by lowering predicted soil C and N stocks which reduced the soil N pool that contributed to the predicted annual flux of net soil N mineralization. On soils with inherently high N availability, increasing the fire frequency in combination with stand thinning or clearcutting had little effect on predictions of forest recovery and sustainability. However, experiments with the model indicated that combined effects of stand thinning (or clearcutting) and frequent prescribed burning could have adverse effects on forest recovery and sustainability when N availability was just at the point of limiting forest growth. Model predictions indicated that prescribed burning with a 3-year return interval would decrease soil C and N stocks but not adversely affect forest recovery from barren soils or sustainability following ecosystem recovery. On soils with inherently low N availability, prescribed burning with a 2-year return interval depressed predicted soil C and N stocks to the point where soil N deficiencies prevented forest recovery as well as forest sustainability following recovery.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

UPI: A Primary Index for Uncertain Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertain data management has received growing attention from industry and academia. Many efforts have been made to optimize uncertain databases, including the development of special index data structures. However, none ...

Kimura, Hideaki

408

Drought Index Mapping at Different Spatial Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the influence of spatial interpolation and aggregation of data to depict drought at different spatial units relevant to and often required for drought management. Four different methods for drought index mapping were ...

Jinyoung Rhee; Gregory J. Carbone; James Hussey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Unified Monsoon Index for South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified index for both the summer and winter monsoons over south China (SC) is proposed for the purpose of studying their interannual variability. By examining the monthly distribution of the meridional flow ? over the AsiaPacific region from ...

Er Lu; Johnny C. L. Chan

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Estimating UV Index Climatology over Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly UV index values at 45 sites in Canada were estimated using a statistical relationship between UV irradiance and global solar radiation, total ozone, and dewpoint temperature. The estimation method also takes into account the enhancement of ...

V. E. Fioletov; J. B. Kerr; L. J. B. McArthur; D. I. Wardle; T. W. Mathews

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

412

Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Nature Bulletin No. 10 April 14, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation FIRE IS THE ENEMY OF FIELD AND FOREST There have been 112 fires in the forest preserves since January 1, burning over 612 acres, including 150 acres of fine woodland and young forest plantings. There need not have been ONE if people only understood the damage done by forest and grass fires. Every spring and every fall, thousands of acres of prairie and vacant subdivisions are burnt off. Some of these fires jump over into forest preserves. Many fires start inside the preserves, or along their highway borders, from matches, cigarettes or pipe bottle thrown aside by careless people. Some start from picnic fires. A few are kindled by boys who have seen their parents or neighbors do the same thing at home.

413

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Partner: Program on Forests Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, Resource assessment Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.profor.info/profor/sites/profor.info/files/Benefit_Sharing_WEB.pdf Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing Screenshot References: Rethinking Forest Partnerships and Benefit Sharing[1] "This study uses an evidence-based approach to provide insights into developing and maintaining collaborative arrangements in the forest sector. It aims to inform discussions and approaches to forest partnership and

414

Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Change Technical Cooperation Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "In Indonesia, the US Forest Service has a new partnership with the Indonesian Ministry of Forests aimed at improving forest governance by strengthening ties between field operations and headquarters in order to manage and conserve forests on a landscape-scale. " References ↑ "US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation" Retrieved from

415

Sublimation of Snow from Coniferous Forests in a Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improved representations of snow interception by coniferous forest canopies and sublimation of intercepted snow are implemented in a land surface model. Driven with meteorological observations from forested sites in Canada, the United States, and ...

Richard Essery; John Pomeroy; Jason Parviainen; Pascal Storck

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Physiological responses of a black spruce forest to weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Saskatche- wan and Manitoba, Canada, J. Geophys. Res. ,Picea mariana) forest in Manitoba for 16,500 hours fromana (Mill. ) BSP) forest in Manitoba from March 1994 to Oc-

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

SNOWMIP2: An Evaluation of Forest Snow Process Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Hemisphere has large areas that are forested and seasonally snow covered. Compared with open areas, forest canopies strongly influence interactions between the atmosphere and snow on the ground by sheltering the snow from wind and ...

Richard Essery; Nick Rutter; John Pomeroy; Robert Baxter; Manfred Sthli; David Gustafsson; Alan Barr; Paul Bartlett; Kelly Elder

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Comments on Measuring Turbulent Exchange Within and Above Forest Canopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual problems of measuring the turbulent exchange in and above forests (e.g., site requirements of micrormeteorological observations, aerodynamic characteristics of forests, observations of the crown-produced mixing layer, flux-profile ...

Stanislaw J. Tajchman

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

An old-growth forest on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Old-Growth Forest on the Oak Ridge Reservation Old-growth forests are increasingly rare around the globe. One occurs in the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park on the...

420

Tests of the lattice index theorem  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the lattice index theorem and the localization of the zero modes for thick classical center vortices. For nonorientable spherical vortices, the index of the overlap Dirac operator differs from the topological charge although the traces of the plaquettes deviate only by a maximum of 1.5% from trivial plaquettes. This may be related to the fact that even in Landau gauge some links of these configuration are close to the nontrivial center elements.

Jordan, Gerald; Hoellwieser, Roman; Faber, Manfried; Heller, Urs M. [Atomic Institute, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); American Physical Society, One Research Road, Box 9000, Ridge, New York 11961-9000 (United States)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Carbon particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Scaling up of Carbon Exchange Dynamics from AmeriFlux Sites to a Super-Region in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to evaluate carbon exchange dynamics across a region of North America between the Great Plains and the East Coast. This region contains about 40 active carbon cycle research (AmeriFlux) sites in a variety of climatic and landuse settings, from upland forest to urban development. The core research involved a scaling strategy that uses measured fluxes of CO{sub 2}, energy, water, and other biophysical and biometric parameters to train and calibrate surface-vegetation-atmosphere models, in conjunction with satellite (MODIS) derived drivers. To achieve matching of measured and modeled fluxes, the ecosystem parameters of the models will be adjusted to the dynamically variable flux-tower footprints following Schmid (1997). High-resolution vegetation index variations around the flux sites have been derived from Landsat data for this purpose. The calibrated models are being used in conjunction with MODIS data, atmospheric re-analysis data, and digital land-cover databases to derive ecosystem exchange fluxes over the study domain.

Hans Peter Schmid; Craig Wayson

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

REDD+ In Dryland Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dryland Forests Dryland Forests Jump to: navigation, search Name REDD+ In Dryland Forests: Issues and Prospects for Pro-poor REDD in the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.iied.org/pubs/pdfs/ Country Namibia, Zambia, Mozambique UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

425

How Communities Manage Forests | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

How Communities Manage Forests How Communities Manage Forests Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: How Communities Manage Forests Agency/Company /Organization: FORZA Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Background analysis Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.rightsandresources.org/documents/files/doc_1687.pdf Country: Bhutan, Bulgaria, Nepal, Kyrgyzstan, United Kingdom, Slovenia, Switzerland, Vietnam UN Region: Central Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

426

NPP Tropical Forest: Khao Chong, Thailand  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965 Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Eye-level view of forest interior at Khao Chong (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Kira, T. 1998. NPP Tropical Forest: Khao Chong, Thailand, 1962-1965. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a tropical rain forest was determined at the Khao Chong study site, under the auspices of the Joint Thai-Japanese Biological Expedition to South-East Asia. Biomass increment within a 40 m x 40 m study area for all trees greater than 4.5 cm dbh (diameter at breast height, 130 cm) was monitored between

427

Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12 miles southwest of the boundary of LANL has not entered Lab property at this time. June 26, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

428

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements American Forest & Paper Association Logo The American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) supports the Climate VISION initiative to address climate change through enhanced research in technology and science, incentives, and voluntary efforts from all sectors of the American economy. The members of AF&PA have undertaken a series of programs through which they are collectively committed to meeting the President's intensity reduction goals. These programs include inventorying and reporting on greenhouse gases, actions to enhance sequestration in managed forests and products, development and implementation of improved technologies, efforts to improve energy efficiency, use of cogeneration and increased use of renewable energy, and recycling. AF&PA expects that these programs will

429

NPP Tropical Forest: Marafunga, Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971 Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971 [PHOTOGRAPH] Photograph: Profile of tropical forest at Marafunga (click on the photo to view a series of images from this site) Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Edwards, P. J., and P. J. Grubb. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: Marafunga, Papua New Guinea, 1970-1971. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of different vegetation components and soil for a lower montane secondary rain forest were determined in 1970-71 at Marafunga in the highlands of Papua New Guinea. The only component of net primary production (NPP) determined at Marafunga was litterfall, although

430

NPP Tropical Forest: Magdalena Valley, Colombia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Magdalena Valley, Colombia, 1970-1971 Magdalena Valley, Colombia, 1970-1971 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Folster, H. 1999. NPP Tropical Forest: Magdalena Valley, Colombia, 1970-1971. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass, litterfall, and nutrient content of above-ground vegetation and soil were determined for a tropical seasonal evergreen forest at Magdalena Valley, Colombia, during an 18-month period in 1970 and 1971. The study was sponsored by the German Research Foundation. Of primary interest were biomass and nutrient dynamics of a forest stand that had developed atop a perched water table on a typical valley terrace. Perched water tables give rise to pseudogley soils with low pH, prolonged

431

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Critical Nanotechnology Needs in the Forest Products Industry ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the Forest Products Industry White Paper ... allow substitution of sustainable light weight materials ... wood based composites, paper and paperboard ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Front Range Forest Health Partnership Phase 1 feasibility study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Front Range Forest Health Partnership is an alliance of individuals, citizen groups, federal, state, private, and nonprofit organizations that formed to promote forest health restoration and reduce fire risks on Colorado's Front Range. The partnership promotes selective thinning to restore forest health and supports economically feasible end uses for wood waste materials. The Phase I study was initiated to determine the environmental and economic feasibility of using wood wastes from forested and urban areas for the production of fuel-grade ethanol.

Volkin, P

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idahos interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

Travis L. Mcling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Index to the AEC/ERDA/DOE Air Cleaning Conferences  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive index to the papers in the second through sixteenth AEC/ERDA/DOE Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference is discussed. The index will be published in early 1981 and will be designated as Volume 3 of the proceeding of the sixteenth conference. The index has three parts, a straight numeric tabulation, an author index, and a key word in context (KWIC) index. (JGB)

Burchsted, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of Forest Structure and Leaf Area in Secondary Forests Regenerating on Abandoned Pastures in Central Amaznia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area of secondary forest (SF) regenerating from pastures is increasing in the Amazon basin; however, the return of forest and canopy structure following abandonment is not well understood. This study examined the development of leaf area ...

Ted R. Feldpausch; Susan J. Riha; Erick C. M. Fernandes; Elisa V. Wandelli

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EAST TEXAS FOREST INVENTORY (ETFI) PILOT PROJECT REMOTE SENSING PHASE Dr. Daniel R. Unger, Remote Resources Institute Arthur Temple College of Forestry Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, Texas the forest resources of East Texas based on the premise that the quantification and qualification of forest

Hung, I-Kuai

439

Changing Climate, Changing Forests: The Impacts of Climate Change on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a science and policy program director with Harvard Forest, in Petersham, MA. JACQUELINE MOHAN Orwig, Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, MA Daniel Parry, SUNY-College of Environmental Stinson, Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, MA Kathleen A. Theoharides, Defenders of Wildlife

440

A companion modelling approach applied to forest management planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist the Societe Civile des Terres du Larzac (SCTL) in its effort to develop alternative forest management plans, a group of researchers and extension officers proposed applying a companion modelling approach. The objective was to support forest ... Keywords: Companion modelling, Forest management, Livestock farming, Multi-agent system, Participatory modelling

C. Simon; M. Etienne

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "forest carbon index" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Validation of the strain index: poultry processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of the Strain Index and compare it to predictions based on the presence of generic risk factors within turkey processing. Data was gathered and a Strain Index Score was assigned to a total of 56 jobs-by-sides at a turkey A job was classified as 'problem' or 'safe' based on the presence or absence of a generic risk factor. The morbidity classification for jobs-by-sides was 'positive' if there was at least one recorded distal upper extremity disorder corresponding to that job and that side of the body and 'negative' if no such disorders were recorded. The Strain Index classified 39 jobs-by-sides as 'problem' and 17 as 'safe.' Forty-two of the jobs-by-sides were 'positive.' Among categorical variables, intensity of exertion, duration of exertion, hand/wrist posture, speed of work, and duration per day ratings were significantly greater for 'problem' jobs-by-sides compared to 'safe' jobs-by-sides. Among continuous variables, the percent duration of exertion processing facility. The hazard classification for a job was 'problem' if the Strain Index Score was five or greater and 'safe' if the Strain Index score was less than five. The generic risk factors considered in this study included repetitiveness, pinch grasp, hand - arm vibration, and cold temperature. The Strain Index Scores were significantly greater for 'problem' jobs-by-sides compared to 'safe' jobs-by-sides. The Strain Index ratings for intensity of exertion, duration of exertion, and duration per day were significantly greater for 'positive' jobs compared to 'negative' jobs. Among continuous variables, percent duration of exertion, production cycle time, and the Strain Index Score were significantly greater for 'positive' compared to 'negative' jobs-by-sides. Two generic risk factors, cold temperature and pinch grasp, were negatively associated with morbidity. As a screening tool to identify 'positive' versus 'negative' jobs-by-sides in this study, the Strain Index methodology had a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 79%, positive predictive value 92%, and negative predictive value of 65%. The results of this study concur with the Strain Index methodology that exertional demands of a task best explain the occurrence of distal upper extremity disorders within a job.

Knox, Kristine Renee

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Global Leaf Area Index Data from Field Measurements, 1932-2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published estimates of leaf area index (LAI), covering the period Published estimates of leaf area index (LAI), covering the period 1932-2000, have been compiled at the ORNL DAAC into a single data set to support model development and EOS MODIS product validation. Like net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI) is a key parameter for global and regional models of biosphere/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide, water vapor, etc. This data set provides a benchmark of typical values and ranges of LAI for a variety of biomes and land cover types, in support of model development and validation of satellite-derived remote-sensing estimates of LAI and other vegetation parameters. For example, maximum values for point measurements are unlikely to be approached or exceeded for area-weighted LAI, which is what satellites and

443

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Production, prices, employment and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices, employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1992. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, second quarter 1997. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood, volume and average prices in stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1996. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Provides current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, first quarter 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report includes current information on lumber and plywood production and prices; employment in the forest industries; international trade in logs, lumber, and plywood; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbon&oldid271960" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

460

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Place New York, New York Zip 10170 Product AirShares is a commodity pool for exchange-traded futures contracts for EUAs. References AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AirShares_EU_Carbon_Allowances_Fund&oldid=341942" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

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461

Event:IETA Carbon Forum North America | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IETA Carbon Forum North America IETA Carbon Forum North America Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png IETA Carbon Forum North America: on 2012/10/01 "Carbon Forum North America -IETA's flagship North American event-will be one of the best opportunities of the year to network with the North American and global carbon markets, browse exhibits showcasing the work of leading companies, and learn what you need to know about this rapidly evolving sp