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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

FOREIGN RESEARCH AND POWER REACTOR PRELIMINARY LIST  

SciTech Connect

Foreign research and power reactors are tabulated. Nuclear power buildup goals are given for each nation on which information is available. (J.H.D.)

Ullmann, J.W.

1959-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

3

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

4

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

5

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

6

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

7

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

Matos, J.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

10

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters  

SciTech Connect

Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

13

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors for the Power Reactors Michael J. Smith Michael J. Smith NAC International NAC International Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne Crowne Plaza Plaza Ravinia Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Project Purpose Project Purpose * Bridge the gap in foreign obligated (FO) inventory tracking for US power reactor RISs between 10/1/01 and 9/30/03 * Provide input for 10/1/03 FO beginning inventories in the NMMSS Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne

15

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

16

ADMINISTRATION OF ORNL RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Organization of the ORNL Operations division for administration of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Low Intensity Testing Reactor, and the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor is described. (J.R.D.)

Casto, W.R.

1962-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

17

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community August 19, 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - Each year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

18

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy...

19

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reactor sharing experience at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a number of examples of how educational institutions in the Boston area and elsewhere that do not possess nuclear reactors for training and research purposes have successfully enriched their programs through utilization of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) with assistance from the Reactor Sharing Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Clark, L. Jr.; Fecych, W.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Decommssioning Of Research Reactor: Problemsand Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the preparation for decommissioning the Research Reactor in Salaspils (Latvia) and the experience of decommissioning the Research Reactor in Sosny (Belarus) show that the problem of decommissioning research reactors is acute for countries that have no NPPs or their own nuclear industry. It also is associated with regulatory framework, planning and design, dismantling technologies, decontamination of radioactive equipment and materials, spent fuel and radioactive waste management, etc. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the IAEA research reactor database, there are about 300 research reactors worldwide [1]. At present over 30% of them have lifetimes of more than 35 years, 60% of more than 25 years. After the Chernobyl accident, significant efforts were made by many countries to modernize old research reactors aiming, first of all, at ensuring safe operation. However, a large number of aging research reactors will be facing shutdown in the near future. The problem of decommis...

Alexander Mikhalevich

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

BNL | Our History: Reactors as Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> See also: Accelerators > See also: Accelerators Brookhaven History: Using Reactors as Research Tools BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the Laboratory's first big machine and the first peace-time reactor built in the United States following World War II. The reactor's primary mission was to produce neutrons for scientific experimentation and to refine reactor technology. At the time, the BGRR could accommodate more simultaneous experiments than any other reactor. Scientists and engineers from every corner of the U.S. came to use the reactor, which was not only a source of neutrons for experiments, but also an excellent training facility. Researchers used the BGRR's neutrons as tools for studying atomic nuclei and the structure of solids, and to investigate many physical, chemical and

24

Research Reactors Division | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States,...

25

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory has three nuclear reactors on its site that were used for scientific research. The reactors are all shut down, and the Laboratory is addressing environmental issues associated with their operations. photo of BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - Beginning operations in 1950, the graphite reactor was used for research in medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and nuclear engineering. One of the most significant achievements at this facility was the development of technetium-99m, a radiopharmaceutical widely used to image almost any organ in the body. The graphite reactor was shut down in 1969. Parts of it have been decommissioned, with the remainder to be addressed by 2011. More history

26

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

27

Cleanup at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphite Research Reactor placeholder Remotely operated robot known as a BROKK manipulator In April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Lab, and the regulatory agencies...

28

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee In mid-February, 2001 The University Research Reactor (URR) Task Force (TF), a sub-group of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was asked to: * Analyze information collected by DOE, the NERAC "Blue Ribbon Panel," universities, and other sources pertaining to university reactors including their research and training capabilities, costs to operate, and operating data, and * Provide DOE with clear, near-term recommendations as to actions that should be taken by the Federal Government and a long-term strategy to assure the continued operation of vital university reactor facilities in

29

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

USA NRC/RSR Data Bank System and Reactor Safety Research Data Repository (RSRDR)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through its Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the NRC/RSR Data Bank Program to collect, process, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. An increasing number of requests for data and/or calculations generated by NRC Contractors led to the initiation of the program which allows timely and direct access to water reactor safety data in a manner most useful to the user. The program consists of three main elements: data sources, service organizations, and a data repository.

Maskewitz, B.F.; Bankert, S.F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Relicensing of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) is owned and operated by MIT, a nonprofit university. The current reactor, MITR-II, is a 5-MW, light water-cooled and heavy water-moderated reactor that uses materials test reactor-type fuel. Documents supporting application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for relicensing of MITR were submitted in July 1999. A power upgrade from 5 to 6 MW was also requested. The relicensed reactor (MITR-III) will be the third reactor operated by MIT. This paper describes MITR-I and MITR-II, and design options considered for MITR-III. Selected problems addressed during the relicensing studies are also described, namely core tank aging evaluation, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, and step reactivity insertion analysis.

Lin-Wen Hu; John A. Bernard; Susan Tucker

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Feasibility Study (PDF) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PDF) Record of Decision (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Pile (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the Bioshield (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Cap (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Explanation of Significant Differences (PDF) (4/12) NYSDEC Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (5/12) USEPA Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (6/12) DOE BGRR ESD Transmittal Letter (PDF) (7/12) Remedial Design Implementation Report (PDF) (12/11) Completion Reports Removal of the Above-Ground Ducts and Preparation of the Instrument House (708) for Removal (PDF) - April 2002 Below-Ground Duct Outlet Air Coolers, Filters and Primary Liner Removal (PDF) - April 2005 Canal and Deep Soil Pockets Excavation and Removal (PDF) - August

35

License extension for the MIT research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 8, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the operating license for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research reactor (MITR) by extending its expiration date from May 7, 1996, to August 8, 1999. This increase of 2.25 yr in the duration of the license was for the purpose of recapturing construction time. Extensions of this type have routinely been granted to power plants. The significance of the present action is that it is the first such extension ever granted to a research reactor. This paper describes the basis for the amendment request and the supporting safety analysis.

Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

rod system. * Note: Does not include the steam turbine generator portion of the power plant. - Sensitive nuclear technology: Any information (including information...

37

Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 March Safer nuclear reactors could result from research Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los...

38

The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL in Australia. ... The TAS will be based on a thermal beam at the reactor face. ...

39

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community August 19, 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - Each year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) - through its participation in two multilateral R&D information exchange agreements - gains access to approximately 80,000 foreign energy-related research summaries. One agreement is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in Paris while the other is under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The IEA information collection, which totals more than 3.5 million items, is made available to U.S. researchers by OSTI, an Office of Science program located in Oak Ridge, TN. This agreement, called the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE), is managed by

40

Basic and Applied Science Research Reactors - Reactors designed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Medical ... Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply Our goal is to fuel research and test reactors with low-enriched uranium. Y-12 tops the short list of the...

42

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

43

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,, *' ; . Final Radiological Condition of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa _, . AGENCY: Office of Operational Safety, Department of Energy ' ACTION: Notice of Availability of Archival Information Package SUMMARY: The'Office of Operational Safety of the Department O i Energy (DOE) has reviewed documentation relating to the decontamination and decommissioning operations conducted at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa and has prepared an archival informati0.n package to permanently document the results of the action and the site conditions and use restriction placed on the . site at the tim e of release. This review is based on post-decontamination survey data and other pertinent documentation referenced in and included in the archival package. The material and

44

Sterile Neutrino Search Using China Advanced Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the feasibility of a sterile neutrino search at the China Advanced Research Reactor by measuring $\\bar {\

Guo, Gang; Ji, Xiangdong; Liu, Jianglai; Xi, Zhaoxu; Zhang, Huanqiao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy - Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

48

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Research Reactors Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Division (RRD) is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for...

50

Global estimation of potential unreported plutonium in thermal research reactors  

SciTech Connect

As of November, 1993, 303 research reactors (research, test, training, prototype, and electricity producing) were operational worldwide; 155 of these were in non-nuclear weapon states. Of these 155 research reactors, 80 are thermal reactors that have a power rating of 1 MW(th) or greater and could be utilized to produce plutonium. A previously published study on the unreported plutonium production of six research reactors indicates that a minimum reactor power of 40 MW (th) is required to make a significant quantity (SQ), 8 kg, of fissile plutonium per year by unreported irradiations. As part of the Global Nuclear Material Control Model effort, we determined an upper bound on the maximum possible quantity of plutonium that could be produced by the 80 thermal research reactors in the non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS). We estimate that in one year a maximum of roughly one quarter of a metric ton (250 kg) of plutonium could be produced in these 80 NNWS thermal research reactors based on their reported power output. We have calculated the quantity of plutonium and the number of years that would be required to produce an SQ of plutonium in the 80 thermal research reactors and aggregated by NNWS. A safeguards approach for multiple thermal research reactors that can produce less than 1 SQ per year should be conducted in association with further developing a safeguards and design information reverification approach for states that have multiple research reactors.

Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II. Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started operating in August 1950. In the next 18 years, an estimated 25,000 scientific experiments were carried out at the BGRR using neutrons produced in the facility's 700-ton graphite core, made up of more than 60,000 individual graphite blocks. The BGRR was placed on standby in 1968 and then permanently shut down as the next-generation reactor, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), was

52

The LEU conversion status of U.S. Research Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of US research and test reactors and estimates uranium densities needed to convert reactors with power levels 21 MW from HEU ({ge} 20% U-235) to LEU (<20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each reactor need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J. E.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? BGRR The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned to ensure the complex is in a safe and stable condition and to reduce sources of groundwater contamination. The BGRR contained over 8,000 Curies of radioactive contaminants from past operations consisting of primarily nuclear activation products such as hydrogen-3 (tritium) and carbon-14 and fission products cesium-137 and strontium-90. The nature and extent of contamination varied by location depending on historic uses of the systems and components and releases, however, the majority of the contamination (over 99 percent) was bound within the graphite pile and biological shield. Radioactive contamination was identified in the fuel handling system deep

54

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Cleanup Actions - Cleanup Actions Since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was shut down in 1968, many actions have been taken as part of the complex decommissioning. The actions undertaken throughout the BGRR complex ensure that the structures that remain are in a safe and stable condition and prepared it for long-term surveillance and maintenance. Regulatory Requirements The decommissioning of the BGRR was conducted under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1992, an Interagency Agreement (PDF) among the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) became effective. The IAG provided the overall framework for conducting environmental restoration activities at

55

Computer-Based Model of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a model of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) in which both the reactor's neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behaviors are replicated. The purpose of the model is to support control studies and the development of techniques for the automated diagnosis of reactivity transients. In particular, comparison of the model's predictions with actual measurements from the reactor will allow determination of whether the reactor is functioning as expected.

John A. Bernard; Lin-Wen Hu

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Opportunities for the Precision Study of Reactor Antineutrinos at Very Short Baselines at US Research Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: pieter.mumm@nist.gov #12;2 past reactor experiments HFIR, ORNL NBSR, NIST ATR, INL available baselines at US research reactors 3 neutrino fit 3+1 neutrino fit Tuesday, August 7, 12 NIST ILL HFIR ATR SONGSNIST ILL HFIR ATR SONGS 10. 100 1000 core size reactor power reactorpower(MWth) 1meter ILL HFIR NBSR

57

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

58

An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - ... Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland

60

Research on Very High Temperature Gas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high temperature gas reactors are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated advanced reactors that show potential for generating low-cost electricity via gas turbines or cogeneration with process-heat applications. This investigation addresses the development status of advanced coatings for nuclear-fuel particles and high-temperature structural materials and evaluates whether these developments are likely to lead to economically competitive applications of the very high temperature gas reactor concept.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of multiple structures and systems that were necessary to operate and maintain the reactor. The most recognizable features of the complex include the Building 701 officeshigh...

62

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands READY TO CONVERT - The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands, has

63

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

64

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

65

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

66

Present Status Of Research Reactor Decommissioning Program In Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, Indonesia has 3 research reactors: MTR-type multipurpose reactor of 30 MW at Serpong site, TRIGA-type research reactor of 1 MW at Bandung site, and small TRIGA - type reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Research Center. The oldest one is the TRIGA reactor at Bandung site, which went critical at 250 kW in 1964, then was operated at maximum of 1000 kW by 1971. The reactor has operated for a total of 35 years. There is no decision for decommissioning this reactor; however, slowly but surely, it will be an object for a near-future decommissioning program. Anticipation of the situation is necessary. For the Indonesian case, early decommissioning strategy for a research reactor and restricted use of the site for another nuclear installation is favorable under high land pricing, availability of radwaste repository, and cost analysis. Graphite from Triga reactor reflector is recommended for direct disposal after conditioning, without volume reduction treatment. Development of human ...

Mulyanto And Gunandjar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

68

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These 123 agreements are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

70

Engineering activities at the MIT research reactor in support of power reactor technology  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research reactor (MITR-II) is a 5-MW(thermal) light-water-cooled and-moderated reactor (LWR) with in-core neutron and gamma dose rates that closely approximate those in current LWRs. Compact in-pile loops that simulate pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) thermal hydraulics and coolant chemistry have been designed for installation in the MITR-II. A PWR loop has been completed and is currently operating in the reactor. A BWR loop is under construction, and an in-pile facility for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack (IASCC) testing is being designed. Another major area of research and on-line testing is the closed-loop, nonlinear, digital control of various reactor parameters, including the power level, temperature, and net energy production.

Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Driscoll, M.J.; Kohse, G.E.; Ballinger, R.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Automated startup of the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This summary describes the development, implementation, and testing of a generic method for performing automated startups of nuclear reactors described by space-independent kinetics under conditions of closed-loop digital control. The technique entails first obtaining a reliable estimate of the reactor's initial degree of subcriticality and then substituting that estimate into a model-based control law so as to permit a power increase from subcritical on a demanded trajectory. The estimation of subcriticality is accomplished by application of the perturbed reactivity method. The shutdown reactor is perturbed by the insertion of reactivity at a known rate. Observation of the resulting period permits determination of the initial degree of subcriticality. A major advantage to this method is that repeated estimates are obtained of the same quantity. Hence, statistical methods can be applied to improve the quality of the calculation.

Kwok, K.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Compilation of data and descriptions for United States and foreign liquid metal fast breeder reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of design and engineering information pertaining to liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors which have operated, are operating, or are currently under construction, in the United States and abroad. All data has been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. (auth)

Appleby, E.R.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Uranium dendrites These tiny branches, or "dendrites," of pure uranium form when engineers

75

Below Core Plate Inspections for Foreign Material in Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period 20002011, 24 U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs) experienced fuel cladding failures by debris-induced fretting over 38 cycles (source: EPRI Fuel Reliability Database). In 2006, U.S. chief nuclear officers endorsed the Zero-by- Ten initiative with the stated goal of reducing all fuel failures to zero by 2010. This effort was very successful, but some failure mechanisms continue to occur. Currently, the mechanism most prominent in PWRs is grid to rod fretting. ...

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Final technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986. [Academic and research utilization of reactor  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the 17-month period of the grant, May 1, 1985 - September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The period encompassed MIT's fiscal year utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research, nuclear materials research and development, radiochemistry and trace analysis, nuclear medicine, radiation health physics, computer control of reactors, dose reduction in nuclear power reactors, reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT, and MIT research reactor. This paper provides detailed information on this research academic utilization.

Harling, O.K.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

77

DISMANTLING OF THE REACTOR BLOCK OF THE FRJ-1 RESEARCH REACTOR (MERLIN)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the past procedure in dismantling the reactor block of the FRJ-1 research reactor (MERLIN). Furthermore, it gives an outlook on future activities up to the final removal of the reactor block. MERLIN is an abbreviation for Medium Energy Research Light Water Moderated Industrial Nuclear Reactor. The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) was shut down in 1985 and the fuel elements removed from the facility. After dismantling the coolant loops and removing the reactor tank internals with subsequent draining of the reactor tank water, the first activities for dismantling the reactor block were carried out in summer 2001. The relevant license was granted in late July 2001 by the licensing authority specifying 8 incidental provisions. After dismantling the reactor extension (gates of the thermal columns and steel platforms surrounding the reactor block), a heavy-load platform including a casing around the reactor block was constructed. Two ventilation systems with a volume flow of 10,000 and 2 ,000 m3/h will, moreover, serve to avoid a spread of contamination. The reactor block will be dismantled in three phases divided according to upper, central and bottom sections. Dismantling the upper section started in August 2002. This section as well as the bottom section can probably be completely measured for clearance. For this reason, the activities have so far been carried out manually using mechanical and thermal techniques. The central section will probably have to be largely disposed of as radioactive waste. This is the region of the former reactor core in which the experimental devices are also integrated. Most of this work will probably have to be carried out by remote handling. More than 80 % of the dismantled materials of the reactor block can probably be measured for clearance. For this purpose, a clearance measurement device was taken into operation in the FRJ-1. On this occasion, the limits of clearance measurement have become evident. For concrete, which constitutes the largest portion of the dismantled materials by volume, an additional conditioning step has become necessary to fulfill the clearance criteria, whereas waste packages with steel components largely have to be reconditioned once more at a later stage. Material measured for clearance will be disposed of conventionally (recycling, landfill) after inspection by the official expert and clearance by the regulatory authority. Dismantled parts that cannot be measured for clearance will be transferred to the Decontamination Department of the Research Centre. From the present perspective, the dismantling of the reactor block will be completed within the first six months of 2003.

Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C.; Poeppinghaus, J.; Cremer, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

LEU conversion status of US research reactors, September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States from the use of fuels containing highly- enriched uranium (HEU, greater than or equal to 20%) to the use of fuels containing low-enriched uranium (LEU, < 20%). Estimates of the uranium densities required for conversion are made for reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW that are not currently involved in the LEU conversion process.

Matos, J.E.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Research reactor usage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in support of university research and education  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a US Department of Energy laboratory which has a substantial history of research and development in nuclear reactor technologies. There are a number of available nuclear reactor facilities which have been incorporated into the research and training needs of university nuclear engineering programs. This paper addresses the utilization of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility (ARMF) and the Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurement Facility (CFRMF) for thesis and dissertation research in the PhD program in Nuclear Science and Engineering by the University of Idaho and Idaho State University. Other reactors at the INEL are also being used by various members of the academic community for thesis and dissertation research, as well as for research to advance the state of knowledge in innovative nuclear technologies, with the EBR-II facility playing an essential role in liquid metal breeder reactor research. 3 refs.

Woodall, D.M.; Dolan, T.J.; Stephens, A.G. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology.

84

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel`s waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts.

McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S K

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the samples burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

are here Home Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted...

91

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Role of research reactors in training of NPP personnel with special focus on training reactor VR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research reactors play an important role in providing key personnel of nuclear power plants a hands-on experience from operation and experiments at nuclear facilities. Training of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) staff is usually deeply theoretical with an extensive utilisation of simulators and computer visualisation. But a direct sensing of the reactor response to various actions can only improve the personnel awareness of important aspects of reactor operation. Training Reactor VR-1 and its utilization for training of NPP operators and other professionals from Czech Republic and Slovakia is described. Typical experimental exercises and good practices in organization of a training program are demonstrated. (authors)

Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Frybort, J.; Huml, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: Improved fuel particle performance Reactor physics Economics Proliferation resistance Power conversion system modeling Safety analysis Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a masters degree thesis. Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for numerous repetitive calculations has been developed. Use of the code has focused on scoping studies for MPBR design features and proliferation issues. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. Detailed gas reactor physics calculations have also been performed with the MCNP and VSOP codes. Furthermore, studies on the proliferation resistance of the MPBR fuel cycle has been initiated using these code Issues identified during the MPBR research has resulted in a NERI proposal dealing with turbo-machinery design being approved for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup meter and modularization techniques, were also funded in which the MIT team will be a participant. A South African MPBR fuel testing proposal is pending ($7.0M over nine years).

Petti, David Andrew

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THE ARGONNE ADVANCED RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The core design and the fuel element concept for the high-flux Argonne Advanced Research Reactor are presented. The core is cooled and moderated by light water and utilizes beryllium as a reflector. The fuel element assembly is rhomboidal in cross section and consists of 27 plates fastened together at their edges by dovetailed locking keys, and at each end by end fittings. Each fuel plate is 40 mils thick and contains a uniform dispersion of highly enriched UO/ sub 2/ particles, up to a maximum of 37 wt%, in a matrix of sintered stainless steel powder. A 5 mil thick stainless steel cladding is metallurgically bonded to each side of the fueled matrix. (N.W.R.)

Adolph, N.R.; Silberstein, M.S.; Weinstein, A.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MCNP-model for the OAEP Thai Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An MCNP input was prepared for the Thai Research Reactor, making extensive use of the MCNP geometry`s lattice feature that allows a flexible and easy rearrangement of the core components and the adjustment of the control elements. The geometry was checked for overdefined or undefined zones by two-dimensional plots of cuts through the core configuration with the MCNP geometry plotting capabilities, and by a three-dimensional view of the core configuration with the SABRINA code. Cross sections were defined for a hypothetical core of 67 standard fuel elements and 38 low-enriched uranium fuel elements--all filled with fresh fuel. Three test calculations were performed with the MCNP4B-code to obtain the multiplication factor for the cases with control elements fully inserted, fully withdrawn, and at a working position.

Gallmeier, F.X.; Tang, J.S.; Primm, R.T. III

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High uranium density dispersion fuel for the reduced enrichment of research and test reactors program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work describes the fabrication of a high uranium density fuel for the Reduced Enrichment of Research and Test Reactors Program. In an effort to (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

Sarah Roberts

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

The inverse kinetics method and PID compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the development of a model describing the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), the application of the inverse kinetics method to calculate the (more)

Garnas, Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The initial results of research on two-step cascades in the Dalat research reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By the financial support of Vietnam Atomic Energy Commission and kind cooperation of Frank Laboratory, in the year of 2005 a measure system based on summation of amplitude pulses was established on the tangential channel of Dalat Research Reactor. After a serial of testing, the measure system was explored. In this, we would like to show the initial results were gotten with 36-Cl isotope.

Nguyen Xuan Hai; Pham Dinh Khang; Vuong Huu Tan; Ho Huu Thang; A. M. Sukhovoj; V. A. Khitrov

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Independent Verification of Research Reactor Operation (Analysis of the Georgian IRT-M Reactor by the Isotope Ratio Method)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energys Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) develops technologies to aid in implementing international nuclear safeguards. The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) was successfully developed in 2005 2007 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Republic of Georgias Andronikashvili Institute of Physics as a generic technology to verify the declared operation of water-moderated research reactors, independent of spent fuel inventory. IRM estimates the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of trace impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.The Isotope Ratio Method is a technique for estimating the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.

Cliff, John B.; Frank, Douglas P.; Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Little, Winston W.; Reid, Bruce D.; Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Abramidze, Sh; Rostomashvili, Z.; Kiknadze, G.; Dzhavakhishvily, O.; Nabakhtiani, G.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

108

NREL: Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Nationals Foreign Nationals At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), collaboration is key to conducting scientific research at our institution in Golden, Colorado. Because an international scope is essential to our development program, we invite outstanding scholars from other countries to become an integral part of our organization through the Foreign National Assignment Program. This program enables people with new ideas and talents from around the world to contribute to research of mutual interest at the Laboratory while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research. As a foreign national, you'll need information about immigration and the various types of visas. You can also find numerous helpful links to the State Department, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Social

109

Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program, Status Report: Foreign Research on Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) research outside the United States. The term ''enhanced geothermal systems'' refers to the use of advanced technology to extract heat energy from underground in areas with higher than average heat flow but where the natural permeability or fluid content is limited. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from low permeability hydrothermal to hot dry rock.

McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

111

Foreign investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on the effects of foreign direct investment in the United States. GAO examines foreign investment in four industries: baking, where possible control over bank lending is of concern; petroleum, where questions about increased dependence on foreign oil have arisen; chemicals, where the foreign-owned share of U.S. assets is among the highest of all industry sectors; and biotechnology, an emerging sector of potentially strategic commercial importance. In this report, GAO spells out the policy concerns in each sector, identifies the data available to analyze these concerns, and evaluates the concerns.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the 17-month period of its grant, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The reactor was operated 4115 hours during FY 1986 and for 6080 hours during the entire 17-month period, an average of 82 hours per week. Utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research; nuclear materials research and development; radiochemistry and trace analysis; nuclear medicine; radiation health physics; computer control of reactors; dose reduction in nuclear power reactors; reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT; MIT Research Reactor. Data on the above utilization for FY 1986 show that the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) engaged in joint activities with nine academic departments and interdepartmental laboratories at MIT, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, and 22 other universities and nonprofit research institutions, such as teaching hospitals.

Not Available

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs.

Robert M. Edwards

2003-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gas release driven dynamics in research reactors piping  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the physical and chemical processes of radiolysis gas production, air absorption, diffusion controlled gas release and transport in the coolant cleaning system of the research reactor FRM II, which is now being in routine power operation in Munich, Germany, lead to the following conclusions: 1) The steady state pressure distribution in the siphon pipe allows that the horizontal part of the siphon pipe is filled with air. The air is isolated by about 1 m water column from the main pipe of the coolant cleaning system (CCS). This is a stable steady state. It has two positive impacts on the normal operation of the CCS: (a) there is effectively no bypass flow; (b) The air can not be transported through the pipe and therefore no deterioration of the pump performance is expected from the function of the siphon pipe. 2) Radiolysis gas production for coolant, that initially does not contain dissolved air, does not lead to any problem for the system. The gases are dissolved in the coolant at 2.2 bar and are not released for pressures reduction to about 1 bar, which is the minimum pressure in the CCS. 3) Assuming hypothetically a radiolysis gas production for coolant, which initially does contain dissolved air close to its saturation, leads to gas slug formation and its transport up to the pump. This could reduce the pump head and could lead to distortion of the normal operation. Systematic measurement of the hydrogen in the primary system at 100% power indicated, that this state is not realized in the system. The observed H{sub 2} concentration was between 0.016 e-6 and 0.380 e-6 which is of no concern at all. (authors)

Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov; Roloff-Bock, Iris; Schlicht, Gerhard [Framatome ANP, P.O. Box 3220, D-91058, Erlangen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Risk management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors  

SciTech Connect

In November of 1986, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was shut down by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) due to a concern regarding embrittlement of the reactor vessel. A massive review effort was undertaken by ORNL and the Department of Energy (DOE). This review resulted in an extensive list of analyses and design modifications to be completed before restart could take place. The review also focused on the improvement of management practices including implementation of several of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) requirements. One of the early items identified was the need to perform a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) on the reactor. It was decided by ORNL management that this PRA would not be just an exercise to assess the ``bottom`` line in order to restart, but would be used to improve the overall safety of the reactor, especially since resources (both manpower and dollars) were severely limited. The PRA would become a basic safety tool to be used instead of a more standard deterministic approach to safety used in commercial reactor power plants. This approach was further reinforced, because the reactor was nearly 25 years old at this time, and the design standards and regulations had changed significantly since the original design, and many of the safety issues could not be addressed by compliance to codes and standards.

Flanagan, G.F.; Linn, M.A.; Proctor, L.D.; Cook, D.H.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Thermal-hydraulic aspects of flow inversion in a research reactor  

SciTech Connect

PARET, a neutronics and thermal-hydraulics computer code, has been modified to account for natural convection in a reactor core. The code was then used to analyze the flow inversion that occurs in a reactor with heat removal by forced convection in the downward direction after a pump failure. Typical results are shown for a number of parameters. Research reactors normally operating much above ten MW are predicted to experience nucleate boiling in the event of a flow inversion. Comparison with experimental results from the Belgian BR2 reactor indicated general agreement although nucleate boiling that was analytically predicted was not noted in the BR2 data.

Smith, R.S.; Woodruff, W.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

120

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium April 11, 2005 - 11:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the Bush administration's aggressive effort to reduce the amount of weapons-grade nuclear material worldwide, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun to convert research reactors from using highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium fuel (LEU) at the University of Florida and Texas A&M University. This effort, by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, are the latest steps

122

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility Assessment of a Core Vacuum for Foreign Material and Activity Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for increased fuel reliability and radioactive source term reduction motivated EPRI to investigate methods for removing small foreign material and activated corrosion products from reactor vessels. Several methods exist to remove these materials from above the core plate of the reactor vessel, but there has been limited research and development of techniques to remove them from underneath the core plate. This report investigates the development of a core vacuum to remove debris and corrosion pro...

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Wyant, F.J.; Thome, F.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A Brief History i-l Research Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stainless steel sam- ples in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at tem- peratures of 380 to 680" with up/cm' to balance the gas pressure were used m their calculation. A comparison of the results with HFIR and the HFIR ex- perimental data is presented in section 5. Applications of the model to various fusion designs

126

In accounts of seminal neutron research at ORNL's Graphite Reactor,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requested permission to set up an X-ray diffractometer he had brought from the University of Chicago for his of the Graphite Reactor. "I was a student at the University of Chicago in 1942 when Enrico Fermi was doing his. 25 Scrooge (OR Playhouse) Nov. 27 Football: UT vs. Kentucky Dec. 4 Fiddler on the Roof Dec. 11 Best

127

Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Materials Research Needs for Near-Term Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Material

John R. Weeks

129

Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

Chiang, Keng-Yen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Decommissioning Anddismantling Of The Research Reactor Salaspils. I. Conceptual Study And The First Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Research Reactor Salaspils (SRR) and to dis pense with nuclear energy in future. The reactor is out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umweltlechnik GmbH at 1998-1999 years. The Latvian government decided in October 26 1999 to start the direct dismantling to "green field" at 2001 year. The first decommissioning and dismantling results from preparation measures in 1999 year are presented and discussed. The main efforts was devoted to collecting and conditioning of "historical" radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside of reactor hall. All non-radioactive equipments and materials outside of reactor buildings were free-released and dismantled for reusing and conventional disposing. Weakly contaminated materials from reactor hall were collected and removed for free-release measurements. 1.0 INTRODUCTION The res...

Andris Abramenkovs Ministry; Andris Abramenkovs; Arnis Ezergailis; State Enterprise vides Projekti; Dzintars Kalnin

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOEs Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

MITR-III: Upgrade and relicensing studies for the MIT Research Reactor. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

The current operating license of the MIT research reactor will expire on May 7, 1996 or possibly a few years later if the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission agrees that the license period can start with the date of initial reactor operation. Driven by the imminent expiration of the operating license, a team of nuclear engineering staff and students have begun a study of the future options for the MIT Research Reactor. These options have included the range from a major rebuilding of the reactor to its decommissioning. This document reports the results of a two year intensive activity which has been supported by a $148,000 grant from the USDOE contract Number DEFG0293ER75859, approximately $100,000 of internal MIT funds and Nuclear Engineering Department graduate student fellowships as well as assistance from international visiting scientists and engineers.

Trosman, H.G. [ed.; Lanning, D.D.; Harling, O.K.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Leu conversion status of U.S. research reactors: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy, the RERTR Program has summarized the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States and has made estimates of the uranium densities that would be needed to convert the reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) (greater than or equal to 20% U-235) to Lightly Enriched Uranium (LEU) (less than 20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each of the reactors need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Education program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor for pre-college science teachers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pre-College Science Teacher (PCST) Seminar program has been in place at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Nuclear Reactor Laboratory for 4 yr. The purpose of the PCST program is to educate teachers in nuclear technology and to show teachers, and through them the community, the types of activities performed at research reactors. This paper describes the background, content, and results of the MIT PCST program.

Hopkins, G.R.; Fecych, W.; Harling, O.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program.

Travelli, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Major Safety Aspects of Advanced Candu Reactor and Associated Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu{sup R} Reactor design is built on the proven technology of existing Candu plants and on AECL's knowledge base acquired over decades of nuclear power plant design, engineering, construction and research. Two prime objectives of ACR-700TM1 are cost reduction and enhanced safety. To achieve them some new features were introduced and others were improved from the previous Candu 6 and Candu 9 designs. The ACR-700 reactor design is based on the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, the same as with all Candu reactors. The major novelty in the ACR-700 is the use of slightly enriched fuel and light water as coolant circulating in the fuel channels. This results in a more compact reactor design and a reduction of heavy water inventory, both contributing to a significant decrease in cost compared to Candu reactors, which employ natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant. The reactor core design adopted for ACR-700 also has some features that have a bearing on inherent safety, such as negative power and coolant void reactivity coefficient. Several improvements in engineered safety have been made as well, such as enhanced separation of the safety support systems. Since the ACR-700 design is an evolutionary development of the currently operating Candu plants, limited research is required to extend the validation database for the design and the supporting safety analysis. A program of safety related research and development has been initiated to address the areas where the ACR-700 design is significantly different from the Candu designs. This paper describes the major safety aspects of the ACR-700 with a particular focus on novel features and improvements over the existing Candu reactors. It also outlines the key areas where research and development efforts are undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the design. (authors)

Bonechi, M.; Wren, D.J.; Hopwood, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density (more)

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment (more)

Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

N-Reactor Department research and development budget for FY-1967 and revision of budget for FY-1966  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the N-Reactor research and development budget for fiscal year 1967 and modifications of the budget for fiscal year 1966.

1965-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% {sup 235}U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and 3.8 gU/cm{sup 3} are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively.

Bretscher, M. M.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comprehensive Thermal Hydraulics Research of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; David Petti; Hyung Kang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Research Reactor Preparations for the Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium from Romania  

SciTech Connect

In June 2009 two air shipments transported both unirradiated (fresh) and irradiated (spent) Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel from two research reactors in Romania to the Russian Federation for conversion to low enriched uranium. The Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti (SCN Pitesti) shipped 30.1 kg of HEU fresh fuel pellets to Dimitrovgrad, Russia and the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) shipped 23.7 kilograms of HEU spent fuel assemblies from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both HEU shipments were coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), were managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), and were conducted in cooperation with the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Both shipments were transported by truck to and from respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at secure nuclear facilities in Russia until the material is converted into low enriched uranium. These shipments resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the research reactor preparations and license approvals that were necessary to safely and securely complete these air shipments of nuclear fuel.

K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin; C. Paunoiu; M. Ciocanescu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information concerning: analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU; changes to technical specifications mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; changes in the Safety Analysis Report mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; and copies of all changed pages of the SAR and the technical specifications.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

MYRRHA a multi-purpose hybrid research reactor for high-tech applications  

SciTech Connect

MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator driven system (ADS) in development at SCK-CEN. MYRRHA is able to work both in subcritical (ADS) as in critical mode. In this way, MYRRHA will allow fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for generation IV (GEN IV) systems, material developments for fusion reactors, radioisotope production and industrial applications, such as Si-doping. MYRRHA will also demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling the three components (accelerator, spallation target and subcritical reactor) at reasonable power level to allow operation feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. MYRRHA is based on the heavy liquid metal technology and so it will contribute to the development of lead fast reactor (LFR) technology and in critical mode, MYRRHA will play the role of European technology pilot plant in the roadmap for LFR. In this paper the historical evolution of MYRRHA and the rationale behind the design choices is presented and the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system is described. (authors)

Abderrahim, H. A.; Baeten, P. [SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Monte Carlo simulation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The three-dimensional continuous-energy MCNP Monte Carlo code is used to develop a versatile and accurate reactor physics model of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor 2 (MITR-2). The validation of the model against existing experimental data is presented. Core multiplication factors as well as fast neutron in-core flux measurements were used in the validation process. The agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is very good, which indicates that the Monte Carlo model is correctly simulating the MITR-2.

Redmond, E.L. II; Yanch, J.C.; Harling, O.K. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor.  

SciTech Connect

An initial safety study for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor was completed. The study compares safety parameters and example transients for reactor cores with HEU and LEU fuels. Reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters and control rod worths were calculated for cores with HEU(36%) UAl alloy fuel and UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, and with LEU (19.75%)UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel that has a uranium density of about 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. A preliminary fuel conversion plan was developed for transition cores that would convert the BRR from HEU to LEU fuel after the process is begun.

Pond, R. B.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Maraczy, C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

None

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

STORED ENERGY: GROWTH AND ANNEALING STATUS OF GRAPHITE MODERATOR IN THE BNL RESEARCH REACTOR. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The present sthtus, past annealing procedures and experiences, future annealing procedures, annealing sehedule, revised annealing procedure (1958), procedure for combating a graphite fire in fuel channel, high-temperature stored energy, and graphite burning experiments are reportcd for the BNL Research Reactor. The following subjccts are discussed in the appendixes: control of radiation damage in a graphitc reactor; annealing of graphite moderator structure in the BNL; annealing operation in BNL graphite reactor; effect of pile radiation on mechanical and other properties of graphite; neutron sensing instrumentation; instrumentation for sensing fuel failures; thermocouple pattern for enriched fuel loading; environmental hazard from a molten fuel element; retention of volatile flssion products on filters; retention of volatile fission products on water tube coolers; retention of volatile fission products in molten fuel plates; and release of the lowtemperature stored energy in the BEPO Pile. (W.L.H.)

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent significant programs to develop the technology.

DUONG,HENRY; POLANSKY,GARY F.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; SIEGEL,MALCOLM D.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

U.S. Department of Energy Instrumentation and Controls Technology Research for Advanced Small Modular Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation, controls, and human-machine interfaces (ICHMI) are essential enabling technologies that strongly influence nuclear power plant performance and operational costs. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that ICHMI research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to resolve the technical challenges that may compromise the effective and efficient utilization of modern ICHMI technology and consequently inhibit realization of the benefits offered by expanded utilization of nuclear power. Consequently, key DOE programs have substantial ICHMI RD&D elements to their respective research portfolio. This article describes current ICHMI research to support the development of advanced small modular reactors.

Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Revised ROD for FEIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

720 720 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 144 / Thursday, July 25, 1996 / Notices 1995 (44 U. S. C. Chapter 35) requires that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) provide interested Federal agencies and the public an early opportunity to comment on information collection requests. OMB may amend or waive the requirement for public consultation to the extent that public participation in the approval process would defeat the purpose of the information collection, violate State or Federal law, or substantially interfere with any agency's ability to perform its statutory obligations. The Director of the Information Resources Group publishes this notice containing proposed information collection requests prior to submission of these requests to OMB. Each proposed information collection,

158

REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

Roman, W.G.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Budapest research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in Hungary. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current HEU (36%) fuel and with a proposed LEU (19.75%) fuel. Cycle lengths, thermal neutron fluxes, and rod worths were calculated in equilibrium-type cores for each type of fuel. Relative to the HEU fuel, the LEU fuel has up to a 50% longer fuel cycle length, but a 7-10% smaller thermal neutron flux in the experiment locations. The rod worths are smaller with the LEU fuel, but are still large enough to easily satisfy the BRR shutdown margin criteria. Irradiation testing of four VVR-M2 LEU fuel assemblies that are nearly the same as the proposed BRR LEU fuel assemblies is currently in progress at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute.

Pond, R. B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEVELOPMENT OF A FAST-RELEASE ELECTRO-MAGNET FOR POOL-TYPE RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data and observations of the design parameters and physical configurations which lead to faster-release cylindrical flat-faced electromagnets are given. Detailed drawings and operating characteristics are presented for an electromagnet suited to the requirements of a pool-type research reactor using either gravity drop or additional accelerating force. This electromagnet embodies the experimentally developed techniques for attaining fast release. (auth)

Michelson, C.

1958-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

M. A. Stanojev Pereira; J. G. Marques; R. Pugliesi

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Reactor physics teaching and research in the Swiss nuclear engineering master  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2008, a Master of Science program in Nuclear Engineering (NE) has been running in Switzerland, thanks to the combined efforts of the country's key players in nuclear teaching and research, viz. the Swiss Federal Inst.s of Technology at Lausanne (EPFL) and at Zurich (ETHZ), the Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI) at Villigen and the Swiss Nuclear Utilities (Swissnuclear). The present paper, while outlining the academic program as a whole, lays emphasis on the reactor physics teaching and research training accorded to the students in the framework of the developed curriculum. (authors)

Chawla, R. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

IGORR-1: Proceedings of the first meeting of the international group on research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Many organizations, in several countries, are planning or implementing new or upgraded research reactor projects, but there has been no organized forum devoted entirely to discussion and exchange of information in this field. Over the past year or so, informal discussions resulted in widespread agreement that such a forum would serve a useful purpose. Accordingly, a proposal to form a group was submitted to the leading organizations known to be involved in projects to build or upgrade reactor facilities. Essentially all agreed to join in the formation of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) and nominated a senior staff member to serve on its international organizing committee. The first IGORR meeting took place on February 28--March 2, 1990. It was very successful and well attended; some 52 scientists and engineers from 25 organizations in 10 countries participated in 2-1/2 days of open and informative presentations and discussions. Two workshop sessions offered opportunities for more detailed interaction among participants and resulted in identification of common R D needs, sources of data, and planned new facilities. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

West, C.D. (comp.)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel. The currently selected LEU fuel design contains 18 ...

Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Foreign Direct Investment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 June 2001 ii iii Contents Foreign Affiliates' Role in U.S. Energy Industry Operations ..............................................................................1 Foreign Direct Investment: The International Transactions Accounts ..............................................................8 U.S. Companies' Direct Investment Abroad in Energy ......................................................................................14 Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................19

170

NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for Poland's MARIA research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Reactor kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, and control rod reactivity worths have been calculated for the MARIA Research Reactor (Swierk, Poland) for M6-type fuel assemblies with {sup 235}U enrichments of 80% and 19.7%. Kinetic parameters were evaluated for family-dependent effective delayed neutron fractions, decay constants, and prompt neutron lifetimes and neutron generation times. Reactivity feedback coefficients were determined for fuel Doppler coefficients, coolant (H{sub 2}O) void and temperature coefficients, and for in-core and ex-core beryllium temperature coefficients. Total and differential control rod worths and safety rod worths were calculated for each fuel type. These parameters were used to calculate generic transients for fast and slow reactivity insertions with both HEU and LEU fuels. The analyses show that the HEU and LEU cores have very similar responses to these transients.

Bretscher, M. M.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

ORNL/TM-2012/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2/380 2/380 Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program September 2012 Prepared by Cyrus Smith Randy Nanstad Robert Odette Dwight Clayton Katie Matlack Pradeep Ramuhalli Glenn Light DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900

174

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Regulatory Experiences for the Decommissioning of the Research Reactor in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first research reactor in Korea (KRR-1, TRIGA Mark-II) has operated since 1962, and the second one (KRR-2, TRIGA Mark-III), since 1972. Both of them were phased out in 1995 due to their lives and the operation of a new research reactor, HANARO (30 MW thermal power) operated by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). After deciding the shutdown by the Nuclear Development and Utilization Committee in March 1996, KAERI began to prepare the decommissioning plan, including the environmental impact assessment, and submitted the plan to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) in December 1998. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) reviewed document and prepared the review report in 1999. KINS is an organization of technical expertise which performs regulatory functions, entrusted by the MOST in accordance with the Atomic Energy Act and its Enforcement Decree. The review report written by KINS was consulted by the Special Committee on Nuclear Safety in January 2000. The committee submitted their consultation results to the Nuclear Safety Commission for the final approval by the Minister of MOST. The license was issued in November 2000. With the consent of the Korean government to the US Record of Decision, the spent fuel of KRR-1 and 2 was safely transported to the United States in July 1998. The decontamination and dismantling of KRR-2 was completed at the end of 2005 but the decommissioning of KRR-1 has been suspended by the problem for the memorial of the reactor. After the decommissioning of the research reactor is finished, the site will be returned to the site owner, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). In this paper, the state-of-art and lessons learnt from recent regulatory activities for decommissioning of KRR- 2 are summarized. In conclusion: since the shutdown of KRR-1 and 2 had been decided, the safe assessment and licensing review were carried out after applying for decommissioning plan of those research reactors by operator. Through the safety assessment and license review, the plan was approved in 2000. The D and D of KRR-2 except Reactor hall of KRR-1 has been performed safely and completed in 2005. On the other hand the integrated safety for the decommissioning has been confirmed by regulatory team inspection. The radioactive waste arising from the dismantling work has been packed mainly in a 4 m{sup 3} containers and stored on site, reactor hall of KRR-2, until the LILW disposal facility is operational. For the whole dismantling work, with respect to the ALARA principle, not only worker protection from radiation and industrial hazard, but also the environment protection should be the first priority. Also much attention has been paid to the record keeping for the future decommissioning of nuclear power plants.

CHOI, Kyung-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, P.O Box 114, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Initiation of a phase-I trial of neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the New England Medical Center (NEMC), and Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) initiated a phase-1 trial of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on September 6, 1994, at the 5-MW(thermal) MIT research reactor (MITR). A novel form of experimental cancer therapy, BNCT is being developed for certain types of highly malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma and melanoma. The results of the phase-1 trials on patients with tumors in the legs or feet are described.

Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Yam, Chun-Shan [Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evaluation of differential shim rod worth measurements in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reasonable agreement between calculated and measured differential shim rod worths in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) has been achieved by taking into account the combined effects of negative reactivity contributions from changing fuel-moderator temperatures and of delayed photoneutrons. A method has been developed for extracting the asymptotic period from the shape of the initial portion of the measured time-dependent neutron flux profile following a positive reactivity insertion. In this region of the curve temperature-related reactivity feedback effects are negligibly small. Results obtained by applying this technique to differential shim rod worth measurements made in a wide variety of ORR cores are presented.

Bretscher, M.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Thermal-hydraulic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect

The thermal-hydraulic analysis performed for the needs of the conversion of the open pool 5MW Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) to a pure Low Enrichment (LEU) configuration is presented. The methodology was based on a complete set of neutronic calculations performed for the new core configuration, in compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. The hottest channel analysis approach was adopted, and peaking factors were used to account for fabrication or measuring uncertainties. Calculations were carried out using the numerical codes NATCON, PLTEMP and PARET provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two main different classes of conditions were considered, namely i) steady state normal operating conditions and ii) transient cases related to accidental events including reactivity feedback effects. For steady state operating conditions the behaviour of the new configuration was examined both for forced and natural convection cooling modes. Transient calculations considered several initiating events including reactivity insertion accidents (slow or fast reactivity insertion) and total or partial loss-of-flow accidents, i.e. in accordance to guidelines provided by the IAEA for research Reactors. (author)

Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus); Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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181

An analysis of radionuclide behavior in water pools during accidents at the Annular Core Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Physical and chemical phenomena that will affect the behavior of radionuclides released from fuel in the Annular Core Research Reactor during a hypothetical, core disruptive accident are described. The phenomena include boiling of water on heated clad, metal-water reactions, vapor nucleation to form aerosol particles, coagulation of aerosol particles, aerosol deposition within bubbles rising through the shield pool, vapor dissolution in the shield pool, and revaporization of radionuclides from the shield pool. A model of these phenomena is developed and applied to predict the release of radionuclides to the confinement building of the Annular Core Research Reactor. It is found that the shield pool provides overall decontamination factors for particulate of about 2.8 {times} 10{sup 5} and decontamination factors for noble gases of about 2.5--3.7. These results are found to be sensitive to the predicted clad temperature and bubble behavior in the shield pool. Slow revalorization of krypton, xenon and iodine from the shield pool is shown to create a prolonged, low-intensity source term of radioactive material to the confinement atmosphere.

Powers, D.A.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

Hanan, N. A.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment. Reactor pressure vessel Pumps and piping

Philip E. MacDonald

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Decommissioning of the Austrian 10 MW Research Reactor, Results and Lessons learned Paper  

SciTech Connect

After the decision to shut down the 10 MW ASTRA-MTR Research Reactor was reached in May 1998, the possible options and required phases for decommissioning and removal of the radioactive components were evaluated in a decommissioning study. To support the decisions at each phase, an estimate of the activity inventory in the various parts of the reactor and the waste volume to be expected was performed. Of the possible options an immediate dismantling to phase 1 of IAEA Technical Guide Lines after the immediately following, continued dismantling to phase 2 of these guide lines was identified as the most reasonable and under the auspices optimum choice. The actual decommissioning work on the ASTRA-Reactor began in January 2000 after its final shutdown on July 31, 1999. Preliminary evaluations of the activity inventory gave an estimated amount of 320 kg of intermediate level waste, of about 60 metric tons of contaminated and another 100 metric tons of activated low level radioactive waste. The activities were roughly estimated to be at 200 TBq in the intermediate level and 6 GBq in the low level. The structure of the decommissioning process was decided against cost-, time- and risk-optimization following the basic layout of the main tasks, e.g. the removing of the fuel, the recovering and the treatment of the intermediate level activities in the vicinity of the core, the handling and conditioning of the neutron exposed graphite and the Beryllium-elements. As an example, the dismantling of approx. 1400 metric tons of the biological shield is described in more detail from the determination of the dismantling technique to the clearing procedures and the deposition. The process of dismantling of the biological shield is presented in fast motion. The dismantling of the pump-room installations of the primary loop, the processing of the contaminated or activated metals, the dismantling of the ventilation system and the radiological clearance of the reactor building was done under optimized conditions and is explained in the following. Spent fuel was generally delivered to the US Department of Energy - DOE in several shipments over the operational time of the ASTRA reactor. With the last shipment in May 2001 all the remaining spent fuel elements out of the ASTRA reactor consignment were transferred to DOE. To reduce waste from concrete shielding, German regulations Dt.StrSchV, annex IV, table 1, two clearance values referring to 'clearance restricted for permanent deposit' and to a clearance for unrestricted re-use were used. In order to reduce the amount of an estimated 60 tons of slightly contaminated metals, it was determined that introducing re-melting procedures were the most economical way. To obtain radiological clearance of the reactor building, compliance with the release limits according to Austrian Radiation Protection Ordinance had to be proved to the regulatory body. There, in general, the limits for unrestricted release were defined as a maximum dose rate of 10 {mu}Sv effective for an individual person per year. The results of the regular yearly medical examinations of the staff indicated no influence of the work related to decommissioning. The readings of the personal dosimeters over the entire project amounted to a total of 85.6 mSv, averaging to 1.07 mSv per year and person. After finishing the decommissioning process, the material balance showed 89.6 % for unrestricted reuse, 6.6 % for conventional mass-dumping and 3.8 % of ILW and LLW. The project was covered by an extensive documentation. All operations within NES followed ISO 9000 quality insurance standards. Experiences and knowledge were presented to and shared with the community, e.g. AFR and IAEA throughout the project. (authors)

Hillebrand, G.; Meyer, F. [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES), Seibersdorf, Austria, Europe (Austria)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

When Do Commercial Reactors Permanently Shut Down?  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

For those wishing to obtain current data, the following resources are available: U.S. reactors, go to EIA's nuclear reactor shutdown list. (Note: As of April 30, 2010, the last U.S. reactor to permanently shut down was Big Rock Point in 1997.) Foreign Reactors, go to the Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) on the International Atomic Energy Agency's website.

Information Center

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

N-Reactor Department Research and Development budget for FY 1966 and revision of budget for FY 1965  

SciTech Connect

The N-Reactor Department Research and Development Program for FY 1965, 1966, and later years is structured to achieve the following general goals. (1) Assurance of a high level of nuclear safety; (2) Assurance of achieving full plant life; (3) Reduction in operating costs for a given production rate; (4) Increase in production rate without proportionate increase in operating costs; (5) Savings in capital outlays necessary to achieve stated reductions in operating cost or increases in production; (6) Production of new products of value; (7) Savings in capital outlays or operating costs to achieve a given level of plant safety. The program is divided into three general categories; Reactor, Metallurgy, and Co-Product. The Reactor category is further divided into physics studies, thermal hydraulics studies, zircaloy process tube development, control, instrument and system analyses, chemistry, engineering research and development, gas, atmosphere studies, graphite studies, and nuclear safety research.

1964-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan.  

SciTech Connect

The WWR-SM research reactor in Uzbekistan has operated at 10 MW since 1979, using Russian-supplied IRT-3M fuel assemblies containing 90% enriched uranium. Burnup tests of three full-sized IRT-3M FA with 36% enrichment were successfully completed to a burn up of about {approximately}50% in 1987-1989. In August 1998, four IRT-3M FA with 36% enriched uranium were loaded into the core to initiate conversion of the entire core to 36% enriched fuel. This paper presents the results of equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons of the reactor using HEU (90%) and HEU (36%) IRT-3M fuel and compares results with the performance of IRT-4M FA containing LEU (19.75%). The results show that an LEU (19.75%) density of 3.8 g/cm{sup 3} is required to match the cycle length of the HEU (90%) core and an LEU density 3.9 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU (36%) core.

Rakhmanov, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

Deen, J. R.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

Progressive Application Decommissioning Models for U.S. Power and Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents progressive engineering techniques and experiences in decommissioning projects performed by Bums and Roe Enterprises within the last fifteen years. Specifically, engineering decommissioning technical methods and lessons learned are discussed related to the Trojan Large Component Removal Project, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Decommissioning Project and the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Decommissioning Project Study. The 25 years since the 1979 TMI accident and the events following 9/11 have driven the nuclear industry away from excessive, closed/elitist conservative methods towards more pragmatic results-oriented and open processes. This includes the essential recognition that codes, standards and regulatory procedures must be efficient, effective and fit for purpose. Financial and open-interactive stakeholder pressures also force adherence to aggressive risk reduction posture in the area of a safety, security and operations. The engineering methods and techniques applied to each project presented unique technical solutions. The decommissioning design for each project had to adopt existing design rules applicable to construction of new nuclear power plants and systems. It was found that the existing ASME, NRC, and DOE codes and regulations for deconstruction were, at best, limited or extremely conservative in their applicability to decommissioning. This paper also suggests some practical modification to design code rules in application for decommissioning and deconstruction. The representative decommissioning projects, Trojan, SONGS and Brookhaven, are discussed separately and the uniqueness of each project, in terms of engineering processes and individual deconstruction steps, is discussed. Trojan Decommissioning. The project included removal of entire NSSS system. The engineering complexity was mainly related to the 1200 MW Reactor. The approach, process of removal, engineering method related to protect the worker against excessive radiation exposure, transportation, and satisfying applicable rules and regulations, were the major problems to overcome. The project's successful completed earned a patent award. SONGS Decommissioning. The reactor's spherical containment and weakened integrity was the scope of this decommissioning effort. The aspects of structure stability and method of deconstruction is the major part of the presentation. The economical process of deconstruction, aspects of structural stability, worker safety, and the protection of the surrounding environment from contamination is highlighted in this section. BGRR Decommissioning Study. BREI was commissioned by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to evaluate and analyze the stability, and progressive decommissioning, and removal of BGRR components. This analysis took the form of several detailed decommissioning studies that range from disassembly and removal of the unit's graphite pile to the complete environmental restoration of the reactor site. While most of the facility's decommissioning effort is conventional, the graphite pile and its biological shield present the greatest challenge. The studies develop a unique method of removing high-activity waste trapped in the graphite joints. (authors)

Studnicka, Z.; Lacy, N.H.; Nicholas, R.G.; Campagna, M.; Morgan, R.D. [Bums and Roe Enterprises, Inc., 800 Kinderkamack Road, Oradell, NJ 07649 (United States); Sawruk, W. [ABS Consulting, Inc., 5 Birdsong Court, Shillington, PA 19607 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Transient analyses and thermal-hydraulic safety margins for the Greek Research Reactor (GRRI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various core configurations for the Greek research reactor (GRR1) have been considered in assessing the safety issues of adding a beryllium reflector to the existing water reflected HEU core and the transition from HEU to an all LEU core. The assessment has included both steady-state and transient analyses of safety margins and limits. A small all fresh Be reflected HEU core with a rather large nuclear peaking factor can still be operated safely, and thus adding a Be reflector to the larger depleted HEU core should not pose a problem. The transition mixed core with 50% LEU elements has larger void and Doppler coefficients than the HEU reference core and gives a lower peak clad temperature under transient conditions. The transition cores should give ever increasing margins to plate melting and fission product release as LEU elements are added to the core.

Woodruff, W.L.; Deen, J.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Centre for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Preliminary neutronics calculations for conversion of the Tehran research reactor core from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5-MW highly enriched uranium (HEU)-fueled Tehran Research Reactor is considered for conversion to high-density, low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A preliminary neutronics calculation is performed as part of the conversion goal. In this study, two cores are considered: the HEU reference core and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, using standardized U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] plates with the option of different [sup 235]U loadings. Various possibilities are investigated for the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel elements with 20% enriched [sup 235]U loadings of 207 to 297 g [sup 235]U/element. For the same equilibrium cycle length, the fuels are compared for flux, power distribution, burnup, and reactivity.

Nejat, S.M.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics.)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characterization of wastes in and around early reactors at the Hanford Site: The use of historical research  

SciTech Connect

This paper will present the waste characterization knowledge that has been gained in the first, ``Large-Scale Remediation Study`` to be performed on the reactor areas (100 Areas) of the Hanford Site. Undertaken throughout the past year, this research project has identified thousands of pieces of buried hardware, as well as the volumes of liquid wastes in burial sites in the reactor areas. The author of this landmark study, Dr. Michele Gerber, will discuss historical research as a safe and cost-effective characterization tool.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

C-1 coproduct development for N Reactor: Excerpts from N-Reactor Department research and development budget for FY-1967 and revision of budget for FY-1966  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the production of weapon grade plutonium and tritium as an economically attractive mode of operation for N-Reactor. With the successful completion of the proposed research and development program coproduct production in N-Reactor could begin in January 1967. Approximately 5 kg of tritium could be produced at a reduction in unit total cost of up to $7 per gram equivalent when compared to other modes of operation of N-Reactor that yield only-weapon grade plutonium. Achieving this production level and unit cost requires a fuel and target design that will subject the materials to more severe temperature and exposure conditions than for the tube-in-tube design. Analyses of existing knowledge and experimental results obtained to date are very encouraging. However, there is a continuing need for additional experimental verification of the limiting conditions for both fuel and target to permit the specification of a production fuel and target design. The incremental cost of this program is estimated to be $1,055 million in FY-1965, $0.796 million in FY-1966 and $0.450 million in FY-1967 for a total of $2.3 million. The principal benefits to be derived from this expenditure of research and development funds are lower unit grade plutonium. When the reactor reaches equilibrium operation as a costs for both tritium and weapon dual-purpose reactor producing process steam for credit, it will be a highly competitive producer of plutonium and tritium in the AEC complex.

1965-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics computer codes and methodologies applied to SSTAR. Another section of the report details the SSTAR safety design approach which is based upon defense-in-depth providing multiple levels of protection against the release of radioactive materials and how the inherent safety features of the lead coolant, nitride fuel, fast neutron spectrum core, pool vessel configuration, natural circulation, and containment meet or exceed the requirements for each level of protection. The report also includes recent results of a systematic analysis by LANL of data on corrosion of candidate cladding and structural material alloys of interest to SSTAR by LBE and Pb coolants; the data were taken from a new database on corrosion by liquid metal coolants created at LANL. The analysis methodology that considers penetration of an oxidation front into the alloy and dissolution of the trailing edge of the oxide into the coolant enables the long-term corrosion rate to be extracted from shorter-term corrosion data thereby enabling an evaluation of alloy performance over long core lifetimes (e.g., 30 years) that has heretofore not been possible. A number of candidate alloy specimens with special treatments or coatings which might enhance corrosion resistance at the temperatures at which SSTAR would operate were analyzed following testing in the DELTA loop at LANL including steels that were treated by laser peening at LLNL; laser peening is an approach that alters the oxide-metal bonds which could potentially improve corrosion resistance. LLNL is also carrying out Multi-Scale Modeling of the Fe-Cr system with the goal of assisting in the development of cladding and structural materials having greater resistance to irradiation.

Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

200

Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimization of irradiation conditions for {sup 177}Lu production at the LVR-15 research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of lutetium in medicine has been increasing over the last few years. The {sup 177}Lu radionuclide is commercially available for research and test purposes as a diagnostic and radiotherapy agent in the treatment of several malignant tumours. The yield of {sup 177}Lu from the {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu nuclear reaction depends significantly on the thermal neutron fluence rate. The capture cross-sections of both reaction {sup 176}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 177}Lu and reaction {sup 177}Lu(n,{gamma}){sup 178}Lu are very high. Therefore a burn-up of target and product nuclides should be taken into account when calculating {sup 177}Lu activity. The maximum irradiation time, when the activity of the {sup 177}Lu radionuclide begins to decline, was found for different fluence rates. Two vertical irradiation channels at the LVR-15 nuclear research reactor were compared in order to choose the channel with better irradiation conditions, such as a higher thermal neutron fluence rate in the irradiation volume. In this experiment, lutetium was irradiated in a titanium capsule. The influence of the Ti capsule on the neutron spectrum was monitored using activation detectors. The choice of detectors was based on requirements for irradiation time and accurate determination of thermal neutrons. The following activation detectors were selected for measurement of the neutron spectrum: Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, Ag and W. (authors)

Lahodova, Z.; Viererbl, L.; Klupak, V. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic); Srank, J. [Nuclear Physics Inst. of the Academy of Sciences, Husinec-130, Rez 250 67 (Czech Republic)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensees final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

S.J. Roberts

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Comparison of shell-and-tube with frame-and-plate-type heat exchangers for the MIT research reactor upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a comparison of shell-and-tube with frame-and-plate-type heat exchangers for the proposed upgrade of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactor (MITR). The comparison is based on the following considerations: thermal-hydraulic performance, maintenance, personnel dose rate, and pricing.

Ser, Yorick, Hu, Lin-Wen [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis of in-core experiment activities for the MIT Research Reactor using the ORIGEN computer code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to devise a method for utilizing the ORIGEN-S computer code to calculate the activation products generated in in-core experimental assemblies at the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II). ORIGEN-S ...

Helvenston, Edward M. (Edward March)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Documents for Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. **Terrorist-sponsoring countries include: Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria. Requirements for Foreign Nationals (excluding nationals of sensitive...

206

DISPERSIONS OF URANIUM CARBIDES IN ALUMINUM PLATE-TYPE RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of employing uranium carbide aluminun dispersions in aluminum-base research reactor fuel elements was investigated This study was motivated by the need to obtain higher uranium loadings in these fuel elements. Although toe MTR-type unit, containing a 13 18 wt% U-Al alloy is a proven reactor component, fabrication problems of considerable magnitude arise when attempts are made to increase the uranium investment in the alloy to more than 25 wt.%. Au approach to these fabrication difficulties is to select a compound with significantly higher density tban UAl/sub 4/ or UAl/sub 3/ compounds of the alloy system which when dispersed in aluminum powder, will reduce the volume occupied by the brittle, fissile phase. The uranium carbides, with densities ranging from 11.68 to 13.63 g/cm/sup 3/), appear to be suited for this application and were selected for development as a fuel material for aluminum-base dispersions. Studies were conducted at 580 to 620 deg C to determine the chemical compatibility of carbides with aluminum in sub-size cold- pressed comparts as well as in full-size fabricated fuel plates. Procedures were also developed to prepare uranium carbides, homogernously disperse the compounds in aluminum, roll clad the dispersions to form composite plates, and braze the plates into fuel assemblies. Corrosion tests of the fuel material were conducted in 20 and 60 deg C water to determine the integrity of the fuel material in the event of sin inadventent cladding failure. In addition, specimens were prepared to evaluate penformance under extensive irradiation Prior to studying the uranium carbide-aluminum system, methods for preparing the carbides were investigated. Are melting uranium and carnon was satisfactory for obtaining small quantities of various carbides. Later, reaction of graphite with UO/sub 2/ was successfully employed in the preparation of large quantities of UC/sub 2/, Studies of the chemical compatibility of cold-pressed compacts containing 50 wt% uranium carbide dispersed in aluminum revealed a marked trend toward stebifity as the carbon content of the uranium carbide increased from 446 to 9.20% C. Severe volume increases occurred in monocarbide dispersions with attendant formation of large quantities of the uranium-allumnim inter-metallic compounds. Dicarbide dispersions, on the other band, exhibited negligible reaction with aluminum after extended periods at 580 and 620 deg C. However, it was demonstrated that hydrogen can promote a reaction in UC/sub 2/-Al compacts. The hydrogen appears to reduce the UC/sub 2/ to UC which can subsequently react with aluminum producing the previously noted deleterious effects. A growth study at 605 deg C of composite fuel plates containing 59 wt.% UC/sub 2/ revealed insignificant changes within processing periods envisioned for fuel element processing. However, plate elongations as high as 2.5% were observed after 100 hr at this temperature. Severe blistering which occurred on fuel plates fabricated in the initial stages of the investigation was attributed to gaseous hydrocarbons, and the condition was ellminated by vacuum degasification of cold-pressed compacts. With the exception of the degasification requirement, procedures for manufacturing UC- bearing fuel elements were identical to those specified for the Geneva Conference Reactor fuel elements. Dispersions of uranium dicarbide corroded catastrophically in 20 and 60 deg C water, thus limiting the application of this material However, spocimens were prepared and insented in the MTR to evaluate the irradiation behavior of this fuel because of its potential application in onganic- cooled reactors. (auth)

Thurber, W.C.; Beaver, R.J.

1959-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

207

License amendment for neutron capture therapy at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the issuance by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of a license amendment to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for the use of the MIT Research Reactor's (MITR-II) medical therapy facility beam for the treatment of humans using neutron capture therapy (NCT). This amendment is one of 11 required approvals. The others are those of internal MIT committees, review panels of the Tufts-New England Medical Center (NEMC), which is directing the program jointly with MIT, that of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and an NRC amendment to the NEMC hospital license. This amendment is the first of its type to be issued by NRC, and as such it establishes a precedent for the conduct of human therapy using neutron beams. Neutron capture therapy is a bimodal method for treating cancer that entails the administration of a tumor-seeking boronated drug followed by the irradiation of the target organ with neutrons. The latter cause boron nuclei to fission and thereby release densely ionizing helium and lithium nuclei, which destroy cancerous cells while leaving adjacent healthy cells undamaged. Neutron capture therapy is applicable to glioblastoma multiforme (brain tumors) and metastasized melanoma (skin cancer). Both Brookhaven National Laboratory and MIT conducted trials of NCT more than 30 yr ago. These were unsuccessful because the available boron drugs did not concentrate sufficiently in tumor and because the thermal neutron beams that were used did not enable neutrons to travel deep enough into the brain.

Bernard, J.A. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambride, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 20092013  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to declineeven with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

Idaho National Laboratory

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009201/span>3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to declineeven with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

Idaho National Laboratory

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Inspection methods for physical protection. Task II. Review of research reactor licensees' physical security practices  

SciTech Connect

Security systems and security procedures for the AFRRI reactor, the University of Maryland TRIGA reactor, and the University of Virginia CAVALIER and UVAR reactors are described.

1980-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Epithermal beam development at the BMRR (Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor): Dosimetric evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of an epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy (NCT) is desirable because of the increased tissue penetration relative to a thermal neutron beam. Over the past few years, modifications have been and continue to be made at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) by changing its filter components to produce an optimal epithermal beam. An optimal epithermal beam should contain a low fast neutron contamination and no thermal neutrons in the incident beam. Recently a new moderator for the epithermal beam has been installed at the epithermal port of the BMRR and has accomplished this task. This new moderator is a combination of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) bricks and aluminum (Al) plates. A 0.51 mm thick cadmium (Cd) sheet has reduced the thermal neutron intensity drastically. Furthermore, an 11.5 cm thick bismuth (Bi) plate installed at the port surface has reduced the gamma dose component to negligible levels. Foil activation techniques have been employed by using bare gold and cadmium-covered gold foil to determine thermal as well as epithermal neutron fluence. Fast neutron fluence has been determined by indium foil counting. Fast neutron and gamma dose in soft tissue, free in air, is being determined by the paired ionization chamber technique, using tissue equivalent (TE) and graphite chambers. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-700) have also been used to determine the gamma dose independently. This paper describes the methods involved in the measurements of the above mentioned parameters. Formulations have been developed and the various corrections involved have been detailed. 12 refs.

Saraf, S.K.; Fairchild, R.G.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Laster, B.H.; Fiarman, S.; Ramsey, E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Ioannina Univ. (Greece); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA). Health Science Center)

1989-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

215

Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

Bean, Malcolm K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of refined MCNPX-PARET multi-channel model for transient analysis in research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity insertion transients are often analyzed (RELAP, PARET) using a two-channel model, representing the hot assembly with specified power distribution and an average assembly representing the remainder of the core. For the analysis of protected by the reactor safety system transients and zero reactivity feedback coefficients this approximation proves to give adequate results. However, a more refined multi-channel model representing the various assemblies, coupled through the reactivity feedback effects to the whole reactor core is needed for the analysis of unprotected transients with excluded over power and period trips. In the present paper a detailed multi-channel PARET model has been developed which describes the reactor core in different clusters representing typical BR2 fuel assemblies. The distribution of power and reactivity feedback in each cluster of the reactor core is obtained from a best-estimate MCNPX calculation using the whole core geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The sensitivity of the reactor response to power, temperature and energy distributions is studied for protected and unprotected reactivity insertion transients, with zero and non-zero reactivity feedback coefficients. The detailed multi-channel model is compared vs. simplified fewer-channel models. The sensitivities of transient characteristics derived from the different models are tested on a few reactivity insertion transients with reactivity feedback from coolant temperature and density change. (authors)

Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCK-CEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olson, A. P. [RERTR Program, Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 10 (2013) Flibe-Tritium Research for Fission or Fusion Reactors at Kyushu University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is increasing interest in using ionic molten-salt Flibe not only as self-cooled tritium(T)-breeding material in a fusion reactor blanket but also as fuel solvent of molten-salt fission reactors. Application of Flibe to T-breeding fluid for a stellarator-type fusion reactor operated at a high magnetic field brings large simplification of its blanket structure, allowing continuous operation under high-beta plasma conditions. Using mixed Flibe-ThF 4+UF 4 fuel in molten salt fission reactors permits stable long-term operation without fuel exchange. When Flibe or Flinak is irradiated by neutrons, however, acid and corrosive TF is generated, and some T permeates through structural walls. In order to solve these problems, chemical conditions of Flibe are changed using the redox-control reaction, Be+2TF=BeF 2+T 2. In addition, permeation of hydrogen isotopes is lowered by enhancing T recovery rates. Part of Flibe-tritium researches are performed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the Japan-US collaboration work of JUPITER-II. Our own contributions to the topics are shortly introduced in this paper.

Satoshi Fukada

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Analysis of Accidents at the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 Using Proposed Mixed-Fuel (HEU and LEU) Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1991. The reactor is running successfully, with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. To save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, the use of less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements is being considered. The proposal calls for the HEU fuel elements to be placed near the thermal column to gain the required excess reactivity. In the present study the safety analysis of a proposed mixed-fuel core has been carried out at a calculated steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in reactivity-induced accidents involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, start-up accident, accidental drop of a fuel element on the core, flooding of a beam tube with water, and removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released, temperature, and reactivity were determined.

Bokhari, Ishtiaq H. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Pakistan)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part of a global effort to minimize the availability of ...

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AEC SYMPOSIUM FOR CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF IRRADIATED FUELS FROM POWER, TEST, AND RESEARCH REACTORS, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 20 AND 21, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented in this symposium of the technology currently available for processing spent fuels from research, test, and power reactors. Twenty-one papers are included. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper. (W.L.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PRELIMINARY HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BROOKHAVEN HIGH FLUX BEAM RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Beam Reactor, HFBR, is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water and designed to produce 40 Mw with a total epithermal flux of ~1.6 X 10/sup 15/cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ and a flector thermal maximum flux of 7 X 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, using a core formed by ETR plate-type fuel elements in a close-packed array. The hazards summary is given in terms of site description, reactor design, building design, plant operation, disposal of radioactive wastes and effluents, and safety analysis. (B.O.G.)

Hendrie, J.M.; Kouts, H.J.C.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

New-Hire Process for Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Nationals New-Hire Process for Foreign Nationals All foreign nationals including students and postdocs must complete this process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Before you...

225

MIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation #12;MIT MPBR Specifications Thermal Power 250 MW - 120 Mwe Target Thermal Efficiency 45 % Core for a pebble bed reactor power plant system with high efficiency and minimum capital cost ­ Net efficiency > 45;Plant With Space Frames #12;#12;For 1150 MW Electric Power Station Turbine Hall Boundary Admin Training

226

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Examples of the use of PSA in the design process and to support modifications at two research reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many, if not most, of the world`s commercial nuclear power plants have been the subject of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). A growing number of other nuclear facilities as well as other types of industrial installations have been the focus of plant-specific PSAs. Such studies have provided valuable information concerning the nature of the risk of the individual facility and have been used to identify opportunities to manage that risk. This paper explores the risk management activities associated with two research reactors in the United States as a demonstration of the versatility of the use of PSA to support risk-related decision making.

Johnson, D.H.; Bley, D.C.; Lin, J.C. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Fluid-Structure Interaction for Coolant Flow in Research-type Nuclear Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is scheduled to undergo a conversion of the fuel used and this proposed change requires an extensive analysis of the flow through the reactor core. The core consists of 540 very thin and long fuel plates through which the coolant (water) flows at a very high rate. Therefore, the design and the flow conditions make the plates prone to dynamic and static deflections, which may result in flow blockage and structural failure which in turn may cause core damage. To investigate the coolant flow between fuel plates and associated structural deflections, the Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) module in COMSOL will be used. Flow induced flutter and static deflections will be examined. To verify the FSI module, a test case of a cylinder in crossflow, with vortex induced vibrations was performed and validated.

Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory INS-O-13-05 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 16, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory" BACKGROUND In support of its research and development mission, the Department of Energy's national laboratories host thousands of foreign national visitors and assignees (foreign nationals) every year for research collaborations and access to scientific user facilities. During calendar year

230

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (DOE/EIS-218) (7/19/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

767 767 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 139 / Wednesday, July 19, 2000 / Notices The office is located in the Pentagon which is guarded. RETENTION AND DISPOSAL: Records are kept until the person is deceased or the person seeks removal of information, whichever is sooner. SYSTEM MANAGER(S) AND ADDRESS: Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. NOTIFICATION PROCEDURE: Individuals seeking to determine whether information about themselves is contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval Operations (N09BC), 2000 Navy Pentagon, Washington, DC 20350-2000. RECORD ACCESS PROCEDURES: Individuals seeking access to information about themselves contained in this system should address written inquiries to the Chief of Naval

231

Deciphering foreign language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we tackle the task of machine translation (MT) without parallel training data. We frame the MT problem as a decipherment task, treating the foreign text as a cipher for English and present novel methods for training translation models from ...

Sujith Ravi; Kevin Knight

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical analysis of the subcritical experiments performed at the IPEN/MB-01 reactor employing the coupled NJOY/AMPX-II/TORT systems was successfully accomplished. All the analysis was performed employing ENDF/B-VII.0. The theoretical approach follows all the steps of the subcritical model of Gandini and Salvatores. The theory/experiment comparison reveals that the calculated subcritical reactivity is in a very good agreement to the experimental values. The subcritical index ({xi}) shows some discrepancies although in this particular case some work still have to be made to model in a better way the neutron source present in the experiments. (authors)

Lee, S. M.; Dos Santos, A. [Inst. de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Cidade Universitaria, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Foreign Direct Investment in U  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 November 2000 Energy Information Administration/Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, the Team Leader for Financial Analysis (202) 586-1383. Specific technical information concerning this

235

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research...

238

A New Class of Risk-Importance Measures to Support Reactor Aging Management and the Prioritization of Materials Degradation Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US fleet of light water reactors ages, the risks of operation might be expected to increase. Although probabilistic risk assessment has proven a critical resource in risk-informed regulatory decision-making, limitations in current methods and models have constrained their prospective value in reactor aging management. These limitations stem principally from the use of static component failure rate models (which do not allow the impact of component aging on failure rates to be represented) and a very limited treatment of passive components (which would be expected to have an increasingly significant risk contribution in an aging system). Yet, a PRA captures a substantial knowledge base that could be of significant value in addressing plant aging. In this paper we will describe a methodology and a new class of risk importance measures that allow the use of an existing PRA model to support the management of plant aging, the prioritization of improvements to non-destructive examination and monitoring techniques, and the establishment of research emphases in materials science. This methodology makes use of data resources generated under the USNRC Proactive Management of Materials Degradation program which addresses the anticipated effects of numerous aging degradation mechanisms on a wide variety of component types.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Toyooka, Michael Y.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Light Water Reactors Technology Development - Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactors Light Water Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

240

Design of a low enrichment, enhanced fast flux core for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide, there is limited test reactor capacity to perform the required irradiation experiments on advanced fast reactor materials and fuel designs. This is particularly true in the U.S., which no longer has an operating ...

Ellis, Tyler Shawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

242

The Argonaut Reactor - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne Reactors > Training Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

243

Quarterly technical report on water reactor safety programs sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, April--June 1975  

SciTech Connect

The current water reactor safety activities of ANC are accomplished in four programs. The Semiscale Program consists of small-scale nonnuclear thermal- hydraulic experiments for the generation of experimental data that can be applied to analytical models describing loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) phenomena in water-cooled nuclear power plants. Emphasis is placed on acquiring system effects data from integral tests that characterize the most significant thermal- hydraulic phenomena during the depressurization (blowdown) and emergency cooling phase of a LOCA. The LOFT Program provides test data to support: (a) assessment and improvement of the analytical methods utilized for predicting the behavior of pressurized water reactors (PWR) under LOCA conditions; (b) evaluation of the performance of PWR engineered safety features (ESF), particularly the emergency core cooling system (ECCS); and (c) assessment of the quantitative margins of safety inherent in the performance of these safety features. The Thermal Fuels Behavior Program is a program designed to provide information on the behavior of reactor fuels under normal, off-normal, and accident conditions. The experimental portion is concentrated on testing of single fuel rods and fuel rod clusters under power-cooling-mismatch (PCM), loss-of-coolant, and reactivity initiated accident conditions. The Reactor Behavior Program encompasses the analytical aspects of predicting the response of nuclear power reactors under normal, abnormal, and accident conditions. The status of each program is reported. (auth)

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

AN EVALUATION OF THE URANIUM CONTAMINATION ON THE SURFACES OF ALCLAD URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOY RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL PLATES  

SciTech Connect

Reported radioactivity in the Low-Intensity Test Reactor (LITR) water coolant traceable to uranium contamination on the surfaces of the alclad uranium-- aluminum plate-tyne fuel element led to an investigation to determine the sources of uranium contamination on the fuel plate surfaces. Two possible contributors to surface contamination are external sources such as rolling-mill equipment, the most obvious, and diffusion of uranium from the uranium-aluminum alloy fuel into the aluminum cladding. This diffusion is likely because of the 600 deg C heat treatments used in the conventional fabrication process. Uranium determinations based on neutron activation analysis of machined layers from fuel plate surfaces showed that rolling-mill equipment, contaminated with highly enriched uranium, was responsible for transferring as much as 180 ppm U to plate surfaces. By careful practice where cleanliness is emphasized, surface contamination can be reduced to 0.6 ppm U/sup 235/. The residue remaining on the plate surface may be accounted for by diffusion of uranium from the fuel alloy into and through the cladding of the fuel plate. Data obtained from preliminary diffusion studies permitted a good estimate to be made of the diffusion coefficient of uranium into aluminum at 600 deg C: 2.5 x 10/sup -8/ cm//sec. To minimize diffusion while the plate-type aluminum-base research reactor fuel element is being processed, heat treatments at 600 deg C should be limited to 2.5 hr. The uranium contamination on the surfaces of the finished fuel plates should then be less than 0.6 ppm U / sup 235/ . This investigation also revealed that the solubility limit of uranium in aluminum at 600 deg C is approx 60 ppm. (auth)

Beaver, R.J.; Erwin, J.H.; Mateer, R.S.

1962-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

M-1 N-Reactor fuel development. Excerpts from N-Reactor Department Research and Development Budget for FY-1967 and Revision of Budget for FY-1966  

SciTech Connect

The use of metallic uranium fuel elements on a large scale in a pressurized water cooled graphite moderated power reactor environment in N-Reactor not only represents an extrapolation from previous Hanford fuel technology but it represents the only production-scale application of this concept in this country or abroad. Provision of a supporting technology is and will continue to be a major activity at Hanford as only a limited amount of directly applicable R&D will be available from other sites. The major benefit to be achieved through an extensive and continuing fuel program is attainment of the full capabilities of the N-Reactor at much reduced fuel cycle costs. The current N-Reactor fuel design represents the best engineering judgment of what is required for adequate performance. While the design is intentionally conservative, some features may not fully provide the level of performance required to sustain efficient reactor operation. Results of production-scale irradiation experience and special test irradiations will provide direction to a continuing program to correct any excesses or deficiencies in the initial fuel design. Reduction of unwarranted conservatism in the design will lower fuel fabrication costs, and correction of deficiencies will lower irradiation costs through increased time operated efficiency. Costs of this program are summarized for 1965, 66, and 67. The paper describes the scope of the program, its relationship to other programs, and technical progress in FY-1965 which included improved performance of the fuel elements even with the large number of rapid shutdowns of the reactor.

1965-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Applications of Nd:YAG laser micromanufacturing in High Temperature Gas Reactor research  

SciTech Connect

Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques are demonstrated in this publication. Research projects to determine the fission product transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles necessitate heat treatment studies as well as the manufacturing of a unique sealed system for experimentation at very high temperatures. This article describes firstly the design and creation of an alumina jig designed to contain 500 {mu}m diameter ZrO2 spheres intended for annealing experiments at temperatures up to 1600 C. Functional requirements of this jig are the precision positioning of spheres for laser ablation, welding and post weld heat treatment in order to ensure process repeatability and accurate indexing of individual spheres. The design challenges and the performance of the holding device are reported. Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining is reported. ZrO2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal fit for application in a high temperature environment. The technique is described along with a discussion of the problems experienced during the sealing process. Typical problems experienced were seating dimensions and the relative small size ({approx} 200 {mu}m) of these plugs that posed handling challenges. Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. In conclusion, this article demonstrates the application of Nd-YAG micromachining in an innovative way to solve practical research problems.

I. J. van Rooyen; C. A. Smal; J. Steyn; H. Greyling

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Chapter_6_Foreign_Interaction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foreign Interaction Foreign Interaction This chapter describes the security procedures adopted by DOE HQ to implement the requirements of the following Executive Order and DOE directives: * Executive Order 12344 (as prescribed by 42 U.S.C. 7158) * DOE Oder 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program * DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Appendix B, Section 4 * DOE Order 475.1, Counterintelligence Program * DOE Order 551.1C, Official Foreign Travel * DOE Manual 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual * DOE Order 552.1A, Change 1, Travel Policy and Procedures The directives have two objectives: the first objective is to protect DOE sensitive and classified information from being disclosed to foreign nationals, except when authorized by international

248

Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Visitors who are foreign nationals must complete and submit the Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire 30 days before accessing facilities. Unclassified Foreign National Visits.doc Description Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire More Documents & Publications NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security Calibration Facilities Ecosystem Management Team Environmental Justice Environmental Management System Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance

250

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Reactors Built, Being Built, or Planned contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1992. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. Information is presented on five parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export and Critical Assembly.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Re, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Seismic Safety Margins Research Programs. Assessment of potential increases in risk due to degradation of steam generator and reactor coolant pump supports. [PWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the NRC licensing review for the North Anna Units 1 and 2 pressurized-water reactors (PWRs), questions were raised regarding the potential for low-fracture toughness of steam-generator and reactor-coolant-pump supports. Because other PWRs may face similar problems, this issue was incorporated into the NRC Program for Resolution of Generic Issues. The work described in this report was performed to provide the NRC with a quantitative evaluation of the value/impact implications of the various options of resolving the fracture-toughness question. This report presents an assessment of the probabilistic risk associated with nil-ductility failures of steam-generator and reactor-coolant-pump structural-support systems during seismic events, performed using the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program codes and data bases.

Bohn, M. P.; Wells, J. E.; Shieh, L. C.; Cover, L. E.; Streit, R. L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Foreign Object Task Force Review Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foreign objects entering a steam generator (SG) can result in significant damage to tubing. Foreign objects have caused utilities to plug tubes, extend inspections, and, in some cases, shut down due to primary-to-secondary leakage.BackgroundTo gain a better understanding of the significance of the foreign object problem relative to SGs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) assembled a task force in 2005 made ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Progress on reactor programs and in general engineering research and development programs is summarized. Research and development are reported on water-cooled reactors including EBWR and Borax-V, sodium-cooled reactors including ZPR-III, IV, and IX, Juggernaut, and EBR-I and II. Other work included a review of fast reactor technology, and studies on nuclear superheat, thermal and fast reactor safety, and reactor physics. Effort was also devoted to reactor materials and fuels development, heat engineering, separation processes and advanced reactor concepts. (J.R.D.)

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT, MAY 1962  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported on water-cooled reactors, liquid-metal- cooled reactors, general reactor technology, plutonium recycle, advanced systems research and development, and nuclear safety. (M.C.G.)

1962-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Optimized Integration of the Decontamination Plan and the Radwaste Management Plan into Decommissioning Plan to the VVR-S Research Reactor from Romania  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the progress of the Decontamination Plan and Radioactive Waste Management Plan which accompanies the Decommissioning Plan for research reactor VVR-S located in Magurele, Ilfov, near Bucharest, Romania. The new variant of the Decommissioning Plan was elaborated taking into account the IAEA recommendation concerning radioactive waste management. A new feasibility study for VVR-S decommissioning was also elaborated. The preferred safe management strategy for radioactive wastes produced by reactor decommissioning is outlined. The strategy must account for reactor decommissioning, as well as rehabilitation of the existing Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant and the upgrade of the Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at Baita-Bihor. Furthermore, the final rehabilitation of the laboratories and reusing of cleaned reactor building is envisaged. An inventory of each type of radioactive waste is presented. The proposed waste management strategy is selected in accordance with the IAEA assistance. Environmental concerns are a part of the radioactive waste management strategy. In conclusion: The current version 8 of the Draft Decommissioning Plan which include the Integrated concept of Decontamination and Decommissioning and Radwaste Management, reflects the substantial work that has been incorporated by IFIN-HH in collaboration with SITON, which has resulted in substantial improvement in document The decommissioning strategy must take into account costs for VVR-S Reactor decommissioning, as well as costs for much needed refurbishments to the radioactive waste treatment plant and the Baita-Bihor waste disposal repository. Several improvements to the Baita-Bihor repository and IFIN-HH waste treatment facility were proposed. The quantities and composition of the radioactive waste generated by VVR-S Reactor dismantling were again estimated by streams and the best demonstrated practicable processing solution was proposed. The estimated quantities of materials to be managed in the near future raise some issues that need to be solved swiftly, such as treatment of aluminum and lead and graphite management. It is envisaged that these materials to be treated to Subsidiary for Nuclear Research (SCN) Pitesti. (authors)

Barariu, G. [National Authority for Nuclear Activity-Subsidiary of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Projects (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Transactions of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting  

SciTech Connect

This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 21st Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 25--27, 1993. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Foreign Oil Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transportation provides greater freedom, access, opportunity and choice for Americans from all walks of life and from all across the country. Ridership is up 25.1 percent since 1995, and the millions of Americans who use public transportation each weekday know it saves money and gasoline. This independent analysis looks for the first time at what public transportation saves both for individual households and for the nation as a whole. In addition, it explores a possible future where many more Americans would have the choice to take public transportation. It was commissioned from ICF International by the American Public Transportation Association. Public Transportation Reduces U.S. Foreign Oil Dependence Using conservative assumptions, the study found that current public transportation usage reduces U.S. gasoline consumption by 1.4 billion gallons each year. In concrete terms, that means: 108 million fewer cars filling up almost 300,000 every day. 34 fewer supertankers leaving the Middle East one every 11 days.

Linda Bailey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Monte Carlo methods of neutron beam design for neutron capture therapy at the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monte Carlo methods of coupled neutron/photon transport are being used in the design of filtered beams for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). This method of beam analysis provides segregation of each individual dose component, and thereby facilitates beam optimization. The Monte Carlo method is discussed in some detail in relation to NCT epithermal beam design. Ideal neutron beams (i.e., plane-wave monoenergetic neutron beams with no primary gamma-ray contamination) have been modeled both for comparison and to establish target conditions for a practical NCT epithermal beam design. Detailed models of the 5 MWt Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) together with a polyethylene head phantom have been used to characterize approximately 100 beam filter and moderator configurations. Using the Monte Carlo methodology of beam design and benchmarking/calibrating our computations with measurements, has resulted in an epithermal beam design which is useful for therapy of deep-seated brain tumors. This beam is predicted to be capable of delivering a dose of 2000 RBE-cGy (cJ/kg) to a therapeutic advantage depth of 5.7 cm in polyethylene assuming 30 micrograms/g 10B in tumor with a ten-to-one tumor-to-blood ratio, and a beam diameter of 18.4 cm. The advantage ratio (AR) is predicted to be 2.2 with a total irradiation time of approximately 80 minutes. Further optimization work on the MITR-II epithermal beams is expected to improve the available beams. 20 references.

Clement, S.D.; Choi, J.R.; Zamenhof, R.G.; Yanch, J.C.; Harling, O.K. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

2012 UMAR: 1994-2012 Foreign Puchases, Foreign Sales, and Inventories  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 16, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Delivery Year 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Foreign Purchases by U.S. Suppliers 21.1 20.2 21.7 20.4 22.6 21.0 17.4 18.7 22.7 18.2 30.2 27.0 26.1 21.6 24.1 26.7 25.0 19.3 20.2 Foreign Purchases by Owners and Operators of U.S. Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors 15.5 21.1 23.7 22.5 21.1 26.6 27.5 28.0 30.0 34.9 35.9 38.5 38.7 32.5 32.9 32.2 30.4 35.1 36.0 Total Foreign Purchases 36.6 41.3 45.4 43.0 43.7 47.6 44.9 46.7 52.7 53.0 66.1 65.5 64.8 54.1 57.1 58.9 55.3 54.4 56.2 U.S. Broker and Trader Purchases from Foreign Suppliers 22.3 18.3 17.8 15.7 21.7 19.2 15.8 18.3 18.6 15.8 26.4 24.0 24.0 18.9 21.3 26.8 24.7 19.6 20.2 Foreign Sales 17.7 9.8 11.5 17.0 15.1 8.5 13.6 11.7 15.4 13.2 13.2 20.5 18.7 14.8 17.2 23.5

262

Transactions of the twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting  

SciTech Connect

This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 25th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 20--22, 1997. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion of information exchanged during the course of the meeting, and are given in order of their presentation in each session.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central...

264

Drunk On Oil: Russian Foreign Policy 2000-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential linkages of oil to foreign policy decision-makingin Russian foreign policy aggression, oil prices wereof aggregation oil prices and foreign reserves have about

Brugato, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Biosciences Division: Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm) DOE Logo Search BIO ... Search Argonne Home > BIO home > Endurance Bioenergy Reactor(tm) BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications...

266

RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains unclassified information about facilities, built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1996. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters, and field offices of DOE; from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the U. S. reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from U.S. and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Utilization of MIT research reactor by Boston-area universities. Final report, July 1, 1978-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The guest institutions which used the MITR reactor during 1978-1979 are listed. The participation during previous years since the program began at MIT is also indicated. A summary of the type and amount of participation by local institutions is given.

Clark, L. Jr.; Janghorbani, M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

On multi-column foreign key discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A foreign/primary key relationship between relational tables is one of the most important constraints in a database. From a data analysis perspective, discovering foreign keys is a crucial step in understanding and working with the data. Nevertheless, ...

Meihui Zhang; Marios Hadjieleftheriou; Beng Chin Ooi; Cecilia M. Procopiuc; Divesh Srivastava

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Summary report on the HFED (High-Uranium-Loaded Fuel Element Development) miniplate irradiations for the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program  

SciTech Connect

An experiment to evaluate the irradiation characteristics of various candidate low-enriched, high-uranium content fuels for research and test reactors was performed for the US Department of Energy Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program. The experiment included the irradiation of 244 miniature fuel plates (miniplates) in a core position in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The miniplates were aluminum-based, dispersion-type plates 114.3 mm long by 50.8 mm wide with overall plate thicknesses of 1.27 or 1.52 mm. Fuel core dimensions varied according to the overall plate thicknesses with a minimum clad thickness of 0.20 mm. Tested fuels included UAl/sub x/, UAl/sub 2/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/SiAl, U/sub 3/Si, U/sub 3/Si/sub 1.5/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, U/sub 3/SiCu, USi, U/sub 6/Fe, and U/sub 6/Mn/sub 1.3/ materials. Although most miniplates were made with low-enriched uranium (19.9%), some with medium-enriched uranium (40 to 45%), a few with high-enriched uranium (93%), and a few with depleted uranium (0.2 to 0.4%) were tested for comparison. These fuel materials were irradiated to burnups ranging from /approximately/27 to 98 at. % /sup 235/U depletion. Operation of the experiment, measurement of miniplate thickness as the irradiation progressed, ultimate shipment of the irradiated miniplates to various hot cells, and preliminary results are reported here. 18 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

Senn, R.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annular Core Research Reactor facility Nuclear science photo At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a mixed...

273

The Innovations, Technology and Waste Management Approaches to Safely Package and Transport the World's First Radioactive Fusion Research Reactor for Burial  

SciTech Connect

Original estimates stated that the amount of radioactive waste that will be generated during the dismantling of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor will approach two million kilograms with an associated volume of 2,500 cubic meters. The materials were activated by 14 MeV neutrons and were highly contaminated with tritium, which present unique challenges to maintain integrity during packaging and transportation. In addition, the majority of this material is stainless steel and copper structural metal that were specifically designed and manufactured for this one-of-a-kind fusion research reactor. This provided further complexity in planning and managing the waste. We will discuss the engineering concepts, innovative practices, and technologies that were utilized to size reduce, stabilize, and package the many unique and complex components of this reactor. This waste was packaged and shipped in many different configurations and methods according to the transportation regulations and disposal facility requirements. For this particular project, we were able to utilize two separate disposal facilities for burial. This paper will conclude with a complete summary of the actual results of the waste management costs, volumes, and best practices that were developed from this groundbreaking and successful project.

Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Jim Chrzanowski; Mike Viola; Ron Strykowsky

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effect of changes in DOE pricing policies for enrichment and reprocessing on research reactor fuel cycle costs  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cycle costs with HEU and LEU fuels for the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor are updated to reflect the change in DOE pricing policy for enrichment services as of October 1985 and the published charges for LEU reprocessing services as of February 1986. The net effects are essentially no change in HEU fuel cycle costs and a reduction of about 8 to 10% in the fuel cycle costs for LEU silicide fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

1986-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Research into the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, lignin, and birch wood flour in the China Lake entrained-flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This experimental program used the China Lake entrained-flow pyrolysis reactor to briefly investigate the pyrolysis of pure cellulose, pure lignin, and birch wood flour. The study determined that the cellulose and wood flour do pyrolyze to produce primarily gaseous products containing significant amounts of ethylene and other useful hydrocarbons. During attempts to pyrolyze powdered lignin, the material melted and bubbled to block the reactor entrance. The pure cellulose and wood flour produced C/sub 2/ + yields of 12% to 14% by weight, which were less than yields from an organic feedstock derived from processed municipal trash. The char yields were 0.1% by weight from cellulose and 1.5% from birch wood flour - one to two orders of magnitude less than were produced from the trash-derived feedstock. In scanning electron microscope photographs, most of the wood flour char had a sintered and agglomerated appearance, although some particles retained the gross cell characteristics of the wood flour. The appearance of the char particles indicated that the material had once been molten and possibly vapor before it formed spheroidal particles about 1 ..mu..m diameter which agglomerated to form larger char particles. The ability to completely melt or vaporize lignocellulosic materials under conditions of high heating rates has now been demonstrated in a continuous flow reactor and promises new techniques for fast pyrolysis. This char was unexpectedly attracted by a magnet, presumably because of iron contamination from the pyrolysis reactor tube wall. The production of water-insoluble tars was negligible compared to the tars produced from trash-derived feedstock. The production of water-soluble organic materials was fairly low and qualitatively appeared to vary inversely with temperature. This study was of a preliminary nature and additional studies are necessary to optimize ethylene production from these feedstocks.

Diebold, J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reactor operations informal report, October 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This monthly progress report is divided into two parts. Part one covers the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and part two covers the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Information is given for each reactor covering the following areas: reactor operation; instrumentation; mechanical maintenance; occurrence reports; and reactor safety.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O.; Lettieri, V.; Holden, N.; Ports, D.; Petricek, R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Benchmarking foreign electronics technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report has been drafted in response to a request from the Japanese Technology Evaluation Center`s (JTEC) Panel on Benchmarking Select Technologies. Since April 1991, the Competitive Semiconductor Manufacturing (CSM) Program at the University of California at Berkeley has been engaged in a detailed study of quality, productivity, and competitiveness in semiconductor manufacturing worldwide. The program is a joint activity of the College of Engineering, the Haas School of Business, and the Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, under sponsorship of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and with the cooperation of semiconductor producers from Asia, Europe and the United States. Professors David A. Hodges and Robert C. Leachman are the project`s Co-Directors. The present report for JTEC is primarily based on data and analysis drawn from that continuing program. The CSM program is being conducted by faculty, graduate students and research staff from UC Berkeley`s Schools of Engineering and Business, and Department of Economics. Many of the participating firms are represented on the program`s Industry Advisory Board. The Board played an important role in defining the research agenda. A pilot study was conducted in 1991 with the cooperation of three semiconductor plants. The research plan and survey documents were thereby refined. The main phase of the CSM benchmarking study began in mid-1992 and will continue at least through 1997. reports are presented on the manufacture of integrated circuits; data storage; wireless technology; human-machine interfaces; and optoelectronics. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Bostian, C.W.; Hodges, D.A.; Leachman, R.C.; Sheridan, T.B.; Tsang, W.T.; White, R.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To achieve higher power levels, researchers now are turning their attention to advanced fuel designs. PNNL is developing a new metal fuel for light water reactors intended...

279

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned: 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the US for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1995. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: (1) a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; (2) tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and (3) tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company--working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1994. The Office of Scientific and Technical Information, US Department of Energy, gathers this information annually from Washington headquarters and field offices of DOE; from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); from the US reactor manufacturers who are the principal nuclear contractors for foreign reactor locations; from US and foreign embassies; and from foreign governmental nuclear departments. The book consists of three divisions, as follows: a commercial reactor locator map and tables of the characteristic and statistical data that follow; a table of abbreviations; tables of data for reactors operating, being built, or planned; and tables of data for reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. The reactors are subdivided into the following parts: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is a US company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Research Article Continuous Production of Lipase-Catalyzed Biodiesel in a Packed-Bed Reactor: Optimization and Enzyme Reuse Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright 2011 Hsiao-Ching Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. An optimal continuous production of biodiesel by methanolysis of soybean oil in a packed-bed reactor was developed using immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) as a catalyst in a tert-butanol solvent system. Response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design were employed to evaluate the effects of reaction temperature, flow rate, and substrate molar ratio on the molar conversion of biodiesel. The results showed that flow rate and temperature have significant effects on the percentage of molar conversion. On the basis of ridge max analysis, the optimum conditions were as follows: flow rate 0.1 mL/min, temperature 52.1 ? C, and substrate molar ratio 1: 4. The predicted and experimental values of molar conversion were 83.31 2.07 % and 82.81 .98%, respectively. Furthermore, the continuous process over 30 days showed no appreciable decrease in the molar conversion. The paper demonstrates the applicability of using immobilized lipase and a packed-bed reactor for continuous biodiesel synthesis. 1.

Hsiao-ching Chen; Hen-yi Ju; Tsung-ta Wu; Yung-chuan Liu; Chih-chen Lee; Cheng Chang; Yi-lin Chung; Chwen-jen Shieh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

WA_04-001_AMENDED_SILICATES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA00001PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignInventi.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

286

The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases  

SciTech Connect

The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

THERMIONIC SPACE POWER REACTOR SYSTEM RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT. Annual Summary Report, May 1, 1962-April 30, 1963  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to test and develop prototype fission-heated thermionic cells for space uses are reported. During the period, in-reactor tests were conducted on two W-clad U-bearing fuel emitters and one unclad type. Fuel emitter proof tests were also conducted which demonstrated 1000-hr operational capability of W-clad systems. Output power density and the temperature of heat rejection were found to have major effects on the weight- performance characteristics of the system. Advances in techniques related to W vapor deposition are reported. Descriptions of the fuel-emitter development, cell design and development, and testing of out-of-pile and in-pile cells are included. Operation of the clad-type test cells at design power and temperature led to selection of these cells for planned long-duration in-pile tests. (J.R.D.)

Elsner, N.B.; Holland, J.W.; Pidd, R.W.; Ream, J.T. Jr.; Wright, W.B.; Yang, L.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM, A BOILING WATER REACTOR RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. First Summary Report for March 1959-July 1960  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle Development Program is a basic development program for boiling and other water technology. It covers the areas of oxide fuel fabrication. irradiation. and examination; the physics of water-moderated reactore; and boiling-water heat transfer and stability. Schedules for the fuel- cycle program were examined. and it was concluded that portions of the Task A program should be conducted during the period May to Dec. 1959 in order to keep costs of the work as low as possible and to allow initiation of the fuel-cycle program at the earliest possible date after the Vallecitos BWR was returned to service. The basis for the scheduling of the work is discussed. and a chronological summary describing the content of the work is given. Technical progress is outlined and details are summarized. Subsequent reports issued monthly and quarterly will summarize the progress of the prognam. (W.D.M.)

Cook, W.H.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

290

Fuzzy control for nuclear reactor operation -- strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of four real fuzzy control applications at the MIT research reactor in the US, the FUGEN heavy water reactor in Japan, the BR1 research reactor in Belgium, and a TRIGA Mark III reactor in Mexico will be analyzed through an analysis of strengths, ... Keywords: Artificial Intelligence, Br1 Reactor, Fuzzy Control, Reactor Operation, Triga Mark Iii Reactor

Da Ruan; Jorge S. Bentez-Read

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fast Breeder Reactors for Energy Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

William M. Jacobi

292

Nuclear Reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Nuclear reactors created not only large amounts of plutonium needed for the weapons programs, but a variety of other interesting and useful radioisotopes. They produced...

293

Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply  

SciTech Connect

The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microsoft Word - 2010 Foreign Visit Request form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to submit a Foreign Visit Request. First Name Middle Initial or "NMI" Last Name Gender Date of Birth (MMDDYYYY) City of Birth Male Female Country of Birth Country...

295

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for...

296

2012 UMAR: 1994-2012 Foreign Puchases, Foreign Sales, and Inventories  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing ... deliveries, domestic, enrichers, enriched uranium, enrichment, fabricators, feed, foreign, fuel ...

297

Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Georgia Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Brian G. Horn U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission January 13, 2004 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA 004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA Overview of Meeting Overview of Meeting * Review how the Obligation Tracking System is working * Presentations: - Review of Government notification procedures - Establishment of the beginning Obligation Balances for sites

298

Transactions of the twenty-third water reactor safety information meeting to be held at Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 23rd Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 23--25, 1995. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory, Research, US NRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the nuclear industry, and from foreign governments and industry are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting and are given in the order of their presentation in each session.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies Advanced Reactor Technologies The Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) sponsors research, development and deployment (RD&D) activities through its Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC), and Advanced Small Modular Reactor (aSMR) programs to promote safety, technical, economical, and environmental advancements of innovative Generation IV nuclear energy technologies. The Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) will pursue these advancements through RD&D activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories and U.S. universities, as well as through collaboration with industry and international partners. These activities will focus on advancing scientific

300

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of the Republic of South Africa The Republic of South by extensive foreign fish- ing, have caused severe economic prob- lems in the industry. The tuna fishery plays expansion. Catch South Africa's 1979 total tuna catch of 7,500 metric tons (t) represents only slightly more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF RESEARCH IN THE INORGANIC MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY OPERATED BY BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY UNDER ITS MANAGEMENT AND INTEGRATION CONTRACT DE-AC05-980R22700; WAIVER ORO-674, W(C)-98-004 The Department of Energy (DOE) previously approved a class waiver [W(C)-96-006] of domestic and foreign patent rights in inventions made in the performance of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) relating to inorganic membrane technology, which were entered into by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. under prime contract DE-AC05-840R21400 and by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation under prime contract DE-AC05-960R22464. Those contractors performed cooperative research involving inorganic membrane

302

Assessment of foreign decommissioning technology with potential application to US decommissioning needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decommissioning technology developments that may represent significant improvements over decommissioning technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign decommissioning technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of decommissioning literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in decommissioning costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs.

Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Council on Foreign Relations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations January 13, 2005 - 9:47am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Abraham Thank you. It's an honor to be here with you today. For over 80 years the Council has played a leading role in guiding American foreign policy. As Leslie Gelb once said, "If the Council as a body has stood for anything ... it has been for American internationalism based on American interests." This body has not just stood for American internationalism and American interests, it has helped guarantee them. Scholars and historians have dubbed the last 100 years "the American Century," and there can be little doubt the Council on Foreign Relations helped make it so. As my tenure in the Bush Administration comes to a close, I wanted to

304

REPRESENTATIVES OF FOREIGN INTEREST STATEMENT AN INDIVIDUAL WHO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

firm: The specific relationship between the foreign firm and the United States firm: Percentage of time devoted to foreign firm: - 2 - Summary of duties with the United States...

305

H. R. 1001: A Bill to authorize appropriations for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors Program of the Department of Energy. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 18, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Bomb-Grade Uranium Export Substitution Act of 1993[close quotes]. The purpose of this Bill is to authorize appropriations for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors Program of the Department of Energy. This document presents Congressional findings and a statement of authorization of appropriations.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.

McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E. (INEEL); Shenoy, A.; Baccaglini, G. (General Atomics); Pletcher, R.H. (Iowa State U.); Wallace, J.M.; Vukoslavcevic, P. (U. Maryland); Jackson, J.D. (U. Manchester, UK); Kunugi, T. (Kyoto U., Japan); Satake, S.-i. (Tokyo U. Science, Japan)

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

The president and foreign policy choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous literature that analyzes the domestic factors that affect the timing and occurrence of president's foreign policies focuses primarily on policies of a conflictual nature such as the use of military force. Less is understood about the effects of domestic political variables on the likelihood that the president will engage in foreign policies of a cooperative nature. I theorize that presidential activity in particular matters of foreign policy is strategic and motivated by political benefits the president may accrue, such as reelection, an increase in approval ratings, and improvement in the domestic economy. This study analyzes the effects of the presidential electoral cycle, presidential approval ratings, status of the domestic economy, and budgetary constraint on the likelihood that the president will travel to a foreign nation for a summit meeting, travel abroad for ceremonial or goodwill purposes, give a speech on a matter of cooperative foreign policy, or take a position on foreign policy legislation of a cooperative nature. The findings indicate that domestic factors have little influence on the president's propensity to engage in cooperative foreign policies.

Carrothers, Matthew Arthur

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

EIS-0218: Revised Record of Decision  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

309

SPECIFICATIONS AND PROCEDURES USED IN MANUFACTURING U$sub 3$O$sub 8$- ALUMINUM DISPERSION FUEL ELEMENTS FOR CORE I OF THE PUERTO RICO RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A thin plate-type element containing a dispersion of 20% enriched U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ was developed and successfully used in the 5-Mw pool-type research reactor at the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center. The underlying criteria that guided the design are presented. The technological factors, such as compatibility, corrosion resistance, and irradiation behavior, which led to the selection of U/ sub 3/O/sub 8/ as the fissile compound and aluminum as the cladding and matrix material, are reviewed. The fabrication procedures developed and adopted for manufacturing the component are presented. The scheme involves incorporation of 55 wt% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ into aluminum compacts by powder metallurgy techniques, preparation of composite fuel plates by roll cladding, assembly of fuel plates into an integral unit by either the roll-swaging or pinning techniques, and corrosion protection of the element by an anodizing treatment to increase service life. Quality control measures adopted to ensure dimensional tolerances are described. Mechanical joining proved to be an economical method for assembling the pool-type fuel elements within dimensional specifications. (auth)

Kucera, W.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.; Beaver, R.J.

1963-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory. (author)

Ko, Y.-C. [Nuclear Science and Engineering Department, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hu, L.-W. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)], E-mail: lwhu@mit.edu; Olson, Arne P.; Dunn, Floyd E. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Validation of the MULCH-II code for thermal-hydraulic safety analysis of the MIT research reactor conversion to LEU.  

SciTech Connect

An in-house thermal hydraulics code was developed for the steady-state and loss of primary flow analysis of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR). This code is designated as MULti-CHannel-II or MULCH-II. The MULCH-II code is being used for the MITR LEU conversion design study. Features of the MULCH-II code include a multi-channel analysis, the capability to model the transition from forced to natural convection during a loss of primary flow transient, and the ability to calculate safety limits and limiting safety system settings for licensing applications. This paper describes the validation of the code against PLTEMP/ANL 3.0 for steady-state analysis, and against RELAP5-3D for loss of primary coolant transient analysis. Coolant temperature measurements obtained from loss of primary flow transients as part of the MITR-II startup testing were also used for validating this code. The agreement between MULCH-II and the other computer codes is satisfactory.

Ko, Y. C.; Hu, L. W.; Olson, A. P.; Dunn, F. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; MIT

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling-water nuclear reactor is described wherein control is effected by varying the moderator-to-fuel ratio in the reactor core. This is accomplished by providing control tubes containing a liquid control moderator in the reactor core and providing means for varying the amount of control moderatcr within the control tubes.

Treshow, M.

1961-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

Daniels, F.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE O 551.1D, Official Foreign Travel  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

New Web Service Tracks Foreign Tech Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Web Service Tracks Foreign Tech Regulations. ... To learn moreand to sign upgo to the Notify US Web site at www.nist.gov/notifyus.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval  

SciTech Connect

As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals (United Kingdom)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Foreign Interaction 6, Foreign Interaction HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction DOE has adopted significant controls over the interaction of its employees and contractors with foreign nationals. When authorized by a treaty or international agreement, some DOE classified information can be shared with foreign government representatives. Unclassified information can be shared with foreign nationals only after a senior DOE official has approved that exchange. No foreign national can be admitted to a HQ facility without the approval of a senior HQ official and then only when required information is placed in the Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS). There are also controls over some foreign travel performed by

318

Foreign Aid, Sustainable Development and Rapti IRDP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependency. For example, a prominent anthropologist of Nepal w .t " f . . .n es - ore.gn aId donors are sometimes seen as father- 242 Occasional Papers surrogates.... When this passive paternal dependency is applied to foreign aid, the only active agent... houses with western style amenities and plumbing, specifically for the purpose of renting to foreigners. These houses are well equipped and spacious by most western standards, many being located in large gardens surrounded by trees and greenery. Some...

Subedi, Madhusudan Sharma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

CONVECTION REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

1960-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains unclassified information about facilities built, being built, or planned in the United States for domestic use or export as of December 31, 1991. The book is divided into three major sections: Section 1 consists of a reactor locator map and reactor tables; Section 2 includes nuclear reactors that are operating, being built, or planned; and Section 3 includes reactors that have been shut down permanently or dismantled. Sections 2 and 3 contain the following classification of reactors: Civilian, Production, Military, Export, and Critical Assembly. Export reactor refers to a reactor for which the principal nuclear contractor is an American company -- working either independently or in cooperation with a foreign company (Part 4, in each section). Critical assembly refers to an assembly of fuel and assembly of fuel and moderator that requires an external source of neutrons to initiate and maintain fission. A critical assembly is used for experimental measurements (Part 5).

Simpson, B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

322

Foreign Direct Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002 Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002 Home > Energy Finance > Foreign Investment in U.S. Energy > Foreign Direct Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures, 2002 Acquisitions of U.S. Energy Assets by Foreign Investors in 2002 Remain High Foreign direct acquisitions are purchases, directly or indirectly, by the original foreign investor resulting in the ownership of 10 percent or more of the voting securities of an incorporated U.S. business enterprise or the equivalent interest in an unincorporated U.S. business. The purchases may include foreign assets owned by the U.S. business that is being acquired. Purchases of a U.S. business or asset by one foreign owner from another foreign owner are not included in the foreign

323

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

WA_01-012_DETROIT_DIESEL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

325

WA_01-016_FORD_MOTOR_CO_Waive_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Invent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeign...

326

WA_02_032_DOW_CHEMICAL_CO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

327

Reshaping Eurasia: Foreign Policy Strategies and Leadership Assets in Post-Soviet South Caucasus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil contract with the foreign oil companies without Russianleadership regarding foreign oil companies participation inPSAs signed by SOCAR and foreign oil companies. potential,

Alieva, Leila

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

WA_03_001_CHEVRON_TEXACO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignP...

329

WA_01_002_CREE_LIGHTING_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Inven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInv...

330

WA_02_055_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

331

WA_00_031_HONEYWELL_Waiver_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Right...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

332

WA_00_020_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentR...

333

WC_1990_015_CLASS_WAIVER_OF_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WC1990015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WC1990015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatent...

334

WA_01_039_PRAXAIR_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPaten...

335

WA_98_007_SOLAREX_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

336

WA_1993_038_TEXAS_INSTRUMENTS_INC_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign...

337

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ames Laboratory Research...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility - IA 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility (IA.03) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location:...

338

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

Research Areas | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation & Validation Nuclear Systems Technology Reactor Technology Research Highlights Facilities and Capabilities Educational Outreach Publications and Reports News and Awards...

340

Achievements: Nuclear Reactors designed/built by Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Argonne National Laboratory Reactors About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy - Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Achievements > Achievements > Legacy > Reactors: Modern-Day Alchemy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

342

Reactor Decommissioning Projects | Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

343

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

Wigner, E.P.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, PROGRESS REPORT, MAY 1961  

SciTech Connect

General research and development on water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors are reported along with specific developments on EBWR, BORAK-V, EBR-I, and EBR-H. Thermal and fast reactor safety studies are summarized in terms of fuel-coolant chemical reactions, kinetics of oxidation and ignition of reactor materials, core meltdown studies, and a sodium vapor pressure furnace. Evaluations were made of improved fast reactors for central station power and of a 50-Mwe Prototype Organic Power Reactor (POPR). Developments in instruments, reactcr fuels and materials, reactor components, heat engineering, separations processes, and advanced reactcrs are discussed. (M.C.G.)

1961-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT (FOR) JULY 1961  

SciTech Connect

A summary is presented of activities in reactor and general engineering research programs. Discussions are included for developments in EBWR, BORAX-V, ZPR-III. ZPR-VI, ZPR-IX, EBR-I, and EBR-II. Reactor safety studies were performed for fast and thermal reactors. Nuclear technology developments are discussed for applied nuclear and reactor physics, reactor fuels and materials development, heat engineering studies, separations processes, and advanced reactor concepts. (B.O.G.)

1961-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Analysis of a research reactor under anticipated transients without scram events using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulations for two series of anticipated transients phics. without scram (ATWS) events have been carried out for a small, hypothetical, research reactor based on the High Flux Australian Reador HIFAR using the RELAPS/MOD3.Z computer program. The first series simulated the ATWS events associated with pump transients and the second series simulated the ATWS events associated with heat exchanger transients. In the first series, two cases were simulated: (1) the non-availability of one of the two primary pumps and (2) the non-availability of one pump and 50 % operation of the other pimp. In the second series, three cases were simulated: (1) the non-availability of one of the three heat enchanters (2) the non-availability of two of the three heat enchanters and (3) the non-availability of all the three heat enchanters. To carry out the above simulations, modifications were incorporated to the critical heat flux (CHF) correlations of the RELAP program to account for the annular geometry of the fuel elements. The results of the simulated plump transients indicated that the mass flow rate would decrease to 270 Kg/s in the first transient and to 133 Kg/s in transient 2. The maximum rise in the coolant temperatures in the primly circuit would be 50C and the maximum rise in the central fuel element temperature would be 23[]C. The results of the first two cases of the heat exchanger transients indicated that the maximum rise in the coolant temperatures in the primary circuit would be 18.5[]C and the maximum rise in the central fuel element temperature would be 6[]C. However, during the simulation of the non-availability of all the three heat enchanters, primary coolant temperature started increasing rapidly. Void generation occurred in the central fuel element annuli at 408.5 seconds into the transient with saturation conditions being attained in the annulus. The phase change resulted in the expulsion of fluid from the annulus. Consequently, temperature in the second fuel ring exceeded 800K, resulting in its failure.

Hari, Sridhar

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RNSD Home RNSD Home Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Staff Details (CV/Bios) Publications Org Chart Contact Us ORNL Staff Only Research Groups Advanced Reactor Systems & Safety Nuclear Data & Criticality Safety Nuclear Security Modeling Radiation Safety Information Computational Center Radiation Transport Reactor Physics Thermal Hydraulics & Irradiation Engineering Used Fuel Systems Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division News Highlights U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure Martin Peng wins Fusion Power Associates Leadership Award

348

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in 2000 This report presents an analysis of foreign direct investment in U.S. energy resources and companies in 2000. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the ownership or control of 10 percent, or more, of a U.S. business (or asset) by a foreign entity. In this report a U.S. business with at least 10 percent foreign ownership is a "foreign- affiliated company" (FDI affiliate) and the foreign owner holding at least 10 percent ownership is the "parent." The report describes the role of foreign ownership in U.S. energy enterprises with respect to net investment (including net loans), energy operations, capital investment, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, this report examines patterns of direct investment in foreign

349

PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs October 17, 2011 - 2:50pm Addthis A highly efficient...

350

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov...

351

REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-00NT41027 ENTITLED "NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS"; W(A)-01-005, CH1058. Praxair has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions its employees may conceive or first actually reduce to practice in the performance of Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT41027. As brought out in the attached waiver petition, the work will focus on development of an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from a reaction of natural gas with pure methane. This process combines the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The total cost of this work under the

352

Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

Philip E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Considerations CLASS WANER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S U.S ..AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. GOVERNMENT'S U.S ..AND FOREIGN PATENT U.S. GOVERNMENT'S U.S ..AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE AND TO BE MADE BY SUCCESSFUL A W ARDEES, AND SUBA W ARDEES AND TEAM MEMBERS, IN THE COURSE OF WORK UNDER FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT DE-FOA- 0000324, FOR A U.S.- CHINA CLEAN ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER (CERC). W(C) 2010-007 On March 29, 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) intended to develop a U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This Center would facilitate joint research and development on clean energy by teams of scientists and engineers from the U.S. and China, as well as serve as a clearinghouse to help researchers in each country. Priority topics to be addressed through CERC are: 1. Building energy efficiency

354

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) - Reactors designed/built by Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integral Fast Reactor Integral Fast Reactor About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

355

WA_99_015_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandF...

356

WA_97_038_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomestican...

357

WA_03_033_GE_WIND_ENERGY_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

358

WA_00_012_3M_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Rights_u...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DomesticandForeignRightsu.pdf More Documents & Publications WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA03046INTERMAGNETICSGENERALCORPWaiverofDo...

359

WA_99_008_DUPONT_SUPERCONDUCTIVITY_Waiver_of_US_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandFo...

360

WA_01_007_SOLAR_TURBINES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA07012BOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaivero...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

WA_07_012_BOEING_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THEBOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeign.pdf WA01007SOLARTURBINESWaiverofDomesticandForeignpate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

362

WA_03_013_ANADARKO_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandFo...

363

WA_-01_001_PHILLIPS_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticand...

364

WA_1995_030_GOLDEN_PHOTON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

365

WA_04_020_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_In...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf More Documents & Publications...

366

WA_1993_004_SOLAR_TURBINE_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

367

Forecasting foreign exchange rates using kernel methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First, the all-important no free lunch theorems are introduced. Next, kernel methods, support vector machines (SVMs), preprocessing, model selection, feature selection, SVM software and the Fisher kernel are introduced and discussed. A hidden Markov ... Keywords: Forecasting, Foreign exchange, Kernel methods

Martin Sewell; John Shawe-Taylor

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reactor Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE...

370

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

371

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described wherein horizontal rods of thermal- neutron-fissionable material are disposed in a body of heavy water and extend through and are supported by spaced parallel walls of graphite.

Wigner, E.P.

1960-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

372

REACTOR SHIELD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

Alexander Bolonkin

2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Early Exploration - Reactors designed/built by Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Exploration Early Exploration About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

375

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

Grebe, J.J.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Characterization of Fast Reactor Irradiated Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the overall effort to understand the role of different material and environmental variables on irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in light water reactor (LWR) components, the Cooperative IASCC Research (CIR-II) Program has conducted irradiation experiments in the BOR-60 fast reactor near Dimitrovgrad, Russia. This project was a continuation of research on characterization of microstructure and microchemistry of stainless steel heats irradiated in the BOR-60 fast reactor, do...

2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF ADUAL-CORE BOILING SUPERHEAT REACTOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For research concerning economical applications of high temperature reactortechnology, a novel approach for creating a Boiling Superheat Reactor (BSR) byaugmenting an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (more)

Ross, Jacob

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN CERTAIN IDENTIFIED INVENTIONS TO SUCCESSFUL A W ARDEES MADE AND TO BE MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR THROUGH ARP A-E NONCOMPETITIVE AWARDS AND FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT NOS. DE-FOA-0000675, DE-FOA- 0000674, DE-FOA-0000672, DE-FOA-0000670, DE-FOA-0000474, DE-FOA-0000473 , DE- FOA-0000472, DE-FOA-0000471, DE-FOA-0000470. W(C) 2012-001 ARP A-E was established and charged with the following objectives: 1. To bring a freshness, excitement, and sense of mission to energy research that will attract many of the U.S.'s best and brightest minds-those of experienced scientists and engineers, and, especially, those of students and young researchers, including persons in the entrepreneurial world; 2. To focus on creative "out-of-the-box" transformational energy research that

380

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENTS U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO BY BDM OKLAHOMA, INC. UNDER ITS MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC22-94PC91008; W(C)-94-007, CH-0833 The Department of Energy (DOE) considers its Government-owned, Contractor-operated (GOCOs) laboratories, such as the Bartlesville Research Facility at the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), operated for DOE by BDM Oklahoma, Inc., as national resources capable of providing significant contributions to the development of new products and processes, creation ofjobs, enhancement of the skill level of the U.S. labor force, and improved U.S. competitiveness. Congress, recognizing this unique aspect of GOCO laboratories, enacted the National

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATION CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE BY PARTICIPANTS IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO BY SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ASSOCIATION, INC., UNDER ITS MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-84ER40150 - [W(C)-93-002; ORO-550] The Department of Energy (DOE) considers its Government-owned, Contractor- operated (GOCOs) laboratories, such as Southern University Research Association, Inc. (SURA), national resources capable of providing significant contribution to the development of new products and processes, creation of jobs, enhancement of the skill level of the U.S. labor force, and in improved U.S. competitiveness. Congress, recognizing this unique aspect of GOCO laboratories, enacted the

382

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND FOREIGN PATENT AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE BY BECHTEL NEVADA CORPORATION OR FCI ENVIRONMENTAL INC. IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC08-95-NV11863 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND FCI ENVIRONMENTAL INC. FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR PLATFORM FOR A VERSATILE SENSOR PROBE SYSTEM, W(A)-95-033, SAN 666. Background Bechtel Nevada Corporation (Bechtel) operates the research and production facilities for the Department of Energy under DOE M&O Contract DE-ACO8-96NV11718. Before Bechtel's M&O Contract became effective on January 1, 1996, EG&G Energy Measurements Division (EG&G/EM) of EG&G Inc. managed and operated the research facility for the Department of Energy under DOE M&O Contract DE-ACO3-93NV11265. In the course of its research activities for DOE, Bechtel and its predecessor EG&G/EM

383

Challenges in the Development of Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Past generations of nuclear reactors have been successively developed and the next generation is currently being developed, demonstrating the constant progress and technical and industrial vitality of nuclear energy. In 2000 US Department of Energy launched Generation IV International Forum (GIF) which is one of the main international frameworks for the development of future nuclear systems. The six systems that were selected were: sodium cooled fast reactor, lead cooled fast reactor, supercritical water cooled reactor, very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR), gas cooled fast reactor and molten salt reactor. This paper discusses some of the proposed advanced reactor concepts that are currently being researched to varying degrees in the United States, and highlights some of the major challenges these concepts must overcome to establish their feasibility and to satisfy licensing requirements.

P. Sabharwall; M.C. Teague; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; M.W. Patterson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |Welcome to U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management! We are looking forward to your visit or assignment with us. In order to comply with our security requirements and ensure that your time with the Department of Energy goes smoothly we need to obtain some information from you prior to your arrival. Please take a few minutes to provide the information requested below for each member of your party that is not a U.S. citizen and then return the form(s) to your host. Please be sure to comply with the deadlines your host has communicated to you for returning this form.| |Part 1: Completed by Visitor Please complete all questions below, as applicable. | |1.|Given (first) name (exactly as it appears on passport)| |

386

Subject: DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS (Title Transfer, Loan, and Abandonment) References: Atomic Energy Act Sections 161g and 161j., Title 42 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) sections 2201g, and 22201j 42 U.S.C 16312 (Public Law 109-58, title IX, section 972, Aug. 8, 2005, 119 Stat. 899), 41 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 102-36.380-395, Federal Management Regulation (FMR) DOE Order 580.1, Department of Energy Personal Property Program 4.c(3) DOE Guide 580.1-1, Department of Energy Personal Property Management Guide Chapter 11.8 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective immediately upon issuance. When Does This AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded, or canceled. Guidance in this Acquisition Letter shall

387

POWER REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

Zinn, W.H.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

389

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

Christy, R.F.

1958-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Catalytic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

Young, G.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Reactor Technologies » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program » Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents Light Water Reactor Sustainability Technical Documents April 30, 2013 LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program and EPRI's Long-Term Operations (LTO) Program. April 30, 2013 Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program - Integrated Program Plan The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a research and

395

Power Burst Facility (PBF) Reactor Reactor Decommissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Decommissioning Click here to view Click here to view Reactor Decommissioning Click on an image to enlarge A crane removes the reactor vessel from the Power Burst Facility...

396

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor is described comprising a plurality of horizontal trays containing a solution of a fissionable material, the trays being sleeved on a vertical tube which contains a vertically-reciprocable control rod, a gas-tight chamber enclosing the trays, and means for conducting vaporized moderator from the chamber and for replacing vaporized moderator in the trays. (AEC)

Wigner, E.P.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

397

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

Wende, Charles W. J. (West Chester, PA)

1976-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor is described that includes spaced vertical fuel elements centrally disposed in a pressure vessel, a mass of graphite particles in the pressure vessel, means for fluidizing the graphite particles, and coolant tubes in the pressure vessel laterally spaced from the fuel elements. (AEC)

Post, R.G.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a combination useful in a nuclear reactor and is comprised of a casing, a mass of graphite irapregnated with U compounds in the casing, and at least one coolant tube extending through the casing. The coolant tube is spaced from the mass, and He is irtroduced irto the space between the mass and the coolant tube. (AEC)

Starr, C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1959-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The design of control rods for nuclear reactors are described. In this design the control rod consists essentially of an elongated member constructed in part of a neutron absorbing material and having tube means extending therethrough for conducting a liquid to cool the rod when in use.

Anderson, H.L.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for research. The Brookhaven National Laboratory is using $39 million from the Recovery Act to decommission the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, the world's first reactor built solely for peaceful research purposes. Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab More Documents & Publications Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop 2011 ARRA Newsletters Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell

403

Reducing Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Foreign Lithium Dependence through Co-Production of Lithium from Geothermal Brine Kerry Klein 1 , Linda Gaines 2 1 New West Technologies LLC, Washington, DC, USA 2 Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, USA KEYWORDS Mineral extraction, zinc, silica, strategic metals, Imperial Valley, lithium ion batteries, electric- drive vehicles, battery recycling ABSTRACT Following a 2009 investment of $32.9 billion in renewable energy and energy efficiency research through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama in his January 2011 State of the Union address promised deployment of one million electric vehicles by 2015 and 80% clean energy by 2035. The United States seems poised to usher in its bright energy future,

404

REQUEST BY THE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORPORATION SUBCONTRACT NO. 85X-SZ581C UNDER PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE- AC05-960R22464; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-98-008 [ORO-740] The General Electric Company (GE) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Lockheed Martin Energy Research (LMER) Subcontract No. 85X-SZ581C under LMER Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-960R22464. In addition, GE wishes to acquire a nonexclusive, paid-up irrevocable, worldwide license to make, have made, and use certain subcontractors' inventions and discoveries made under this subcontract when the subcontractor has agreed to such license. The scope of the work is to achieve a cost

405

A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 20, 2013 December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. Now, researchers from Indiana University, with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), Penn State University, and the Institute of Research for Development in New Caledonia, have determined a remarkable expansion of the genome of the plant's critical energy-generating structures. Its mitochondria, the plant's energy-producing organelles, in an epic demonstration of horizontal gene transfer, have acquired six genome equivalents of foreign DNA -- one from a

406

State Administration for Foreign Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Administration for Foreign Exchange State Administration for Foreign Exchange Jump to: navigation, search TODO: More information needed This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China's State Administration For Foreign Exchange (SAFE) is also responsible for NGOs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_Administration_of_Foreign_Exchange http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2010/0520/Law-chokes-Chinese-NGOs-foreign-funding Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=State_Administration_for_Foreign_Exchange&oldid=306631" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

407

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 December 2004 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 The purpose of this foreign direct investment report is to provide an assessment of the extent of foreign ownership of energy assets in the United States. Section 657, Subpart 8 of the U.S. Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) requires an annual report to Congress which presents: "a summary of activities in the United States by companies which are foreign owned or controlled and which own or control United States energy sources and supplies ...." EIA intends the information in this report for use by the U.S. Congress, Government agencies, industry analysts, and the general public. Introduction

408

The management of foreign exchange risk, Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This edition of this introductory textbook to foreign exchange risk management considers: how to measure risk and accurately forecast exchange rates and use those forecasts; the principal hedging procedures; management approaches to risk including the use of export finance companies and management control and centralization. It is written by a team of corporate and banking practioners. Contents include: Measuring foreign exchange risk; Forecasting exchange rates; Using foreign exchange markets and forecasts; Hedging procedures; Management approaches to risk.

Ensor, R.; Antl, B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Heroic Framing of US Foreign Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986 reactor meltdown at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plantaffected by the tragedy at Chernobyl. We stand ready, as doof what happened at Chernobyl and what is happening now is

Shaw, Emily D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

An Assessment of the NIST Center for Neutron Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in research reactors. ... of the NIST reactor has been ... of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Recovery of Highly Enriched Uranium Provided to Foreign Countries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Recovery of Highly Enriched Uranium Provided to Foreign Countries, DOEIG-0638 Recovery of Highly Enriched...

412

How dependent is the United States on foreign oil? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... propane, and other liquids including biofuels and ... In 2012, about 57% of the ... How dependent is the United States on foreign oil? How many ...

413

Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign SUBJECT NUMBER ...  

SUBJECT: Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign Partners NUMBER: 4501 RESPONSIBILITY: Fermilab Chief Operating Officer REVISION: 01 APPROVED BY: Fermilab Chief ...

414

Foreign Direct Investment in cohesion to employment - case of Poland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This Thesis Work has examined the FDI effects on employment in the case of Poland. The main objective is proving how foreign capital inflows affect (more)

Todoroski, Hristijan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether ...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

416

EIA-856 MONTHLY FOREIGN CRUDE OIL ACQUISITION REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-856, Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D. C. 20585

417

Advances in reactor physics education: Visualization of reactor parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern computer codes allow detailed neutron transport calculations. In combination with advanced 3D visualization software capable of treating large amounts of data in real time they form a powerful tool that can be used as a convenient modern educational tool for reactor operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. Visualization is applicable not only in education and training, but also as a tool for fuel management, core analysis and irradiation planning. The paper treats the visualization of neutron transport in different moderators, neutron flux and power distributions in two nuclear reactors (TRIGA type research reactor and a typical PWR). The distributions are calculated with MCNP and CORD-2 computer codes and presented using Amira software. (authors)

Snoj, L.; Kromar, M.; Zerovnik, G. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Constitutional Origins of the President's Foreign Affairs Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of the executives authority over foreign affairs has been debated constantly over the life of the Constitution. Rather than try to discern the answer to this question from only the well-known Framers, this scholarly endeavor proposes to unlock the original understanding of the Constitution to the citizens, polemicists, and convention delegates who participated in one way or another in ratification. Recent scholarship in the nature of the executives foreign affair power has suffered from a lesser degree of scrutiny than other constitutional subjects. Few scholars have addressed the original source of authority and legitimacy of the Constitutionits ratificationas a means of determining whether the modern presidency continues to abuse or respect the powers the Constitution has invested in it. Those that have looked to the historical context of the Constitutions ratification and believe that public sentiment toward the executive was more characterized by fear rather than want of energy have reached their conclusion because of select sampling from an extraordinary era in American constitutionalism. The research will be divided among three major historical periods of American constitutionalism: (1) the pre-revolutionary era (early 1700s until 1775) while America was still comprised of 13 British colonies and most constitutional concerns where focused on Parliaments abuses of power and the Executives complicity; (2) the executive interregnum (1775 until the early 1780s) wherein the American public feared executive authority and experimented with a weak executive; and (3) the period of legislative fear (early 1780s to 1790s) that acted as a catalyst for James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and others to restore an energetic executive.

Thoma, Oliver

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

REACTOR UNLOADING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

Leverett, M.C.

1958-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

Treshow, M.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEMICAL RESEARCH AND LICENSING COMPANY FOR AN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 12:09 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2??9 TO RGCP-HO P. 02/03 4 12:09 FR IPL DOE CH 630 252 2??9 TO RGCP-HO P. 02/03 * * STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEMICAL RESEARCH AND LICENSING COMPANY FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO- DE-FC36-04G014152; ENTITLED "ADVANCES IN PROCESS INTENSIFICATION THROUGH MULTI-FUNCTIONAL REACTOR ENGINEERING"; W(A)-04-057;CH-1227 As set out in the attached waiver petition and in subsequent discussions with DOE Patent Counsel, Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR&L) has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made under the above-identified cooperative agreement by its employees and its subcontractors' employees, regardless of tier, except inventions made by subcontractors eligible to retain title to inventions

422

Increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and decreasing de-pendence on foreign oil are priorities of the U.S. De-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Increasing vehicle fuel efficiency and decreasing de- pendence on foreign oil are priorities manufacturing research facility in the DOE laboratory system. For more than ten years, it has worked with government and industry to address commercialization challeng- es, including cost and manufacturing

423

Neutronic reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels.

Lewis, Warren R. (Richland, WA)

1978-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Solid State Reactor Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

Mays, G.T.

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

REACTOR CONTROL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

Ruano, W.J.

1957-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide Early Argonne reactor lit the way for worldwide nuclear industry About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

428

Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database  

SciTech Connect

Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

WA_06_017_Waiver_of_The_Govt_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Rights_fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRights...

430

Surviving Through The Post-Cold War Era: The Evolution of Foreign Policy In North Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Foreign Policy of North Korea edited by Yang Sung ChulChange and Continuity in North Koreas Foreign Policy. Foreign Relations of North Korea During Kim Il Sungs Last

Yee, Samuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsins 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800C.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

REACTOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT, FEBRUARY 1962  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported on EBWR, BORAX-V, and development of liquid metal cooled reactors including EBR-I and -II. Developments in general reactor technology are reported in sections on physics, fuels, components, materials, engineering, and chemical separations. Other research and development is reported in advanced systems and nuclear ssfety. (J.R.D.)

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Developing objective measures of foreign-accent conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various methods have recently appeared to transform foreign-accented speech into its native-accented counterpart. Evaluation of these accent conversion methods requires extensive listening tests across a number of perceptual dimensions. This article ... Keywords: accent conversion, foreign accent recognition, speaker recognition, voice conversion

Daniel Felps; Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Can Trade and Foreign Direct Investment Signals Reduce International Conflicts?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the Cold War, the effect of international trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) on international conflict becomes more and more significant. After evaluating the international conflict, the paper uses system of simultaneous equations to do ... Keywords: foreign direct investment, information signal, international conflict, trade

Cai Jie; Yu Shunhong

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report reviews the patterns of foreign ownership interest in US energy enterprises, exclusive of portfolio investment (<10% ownership of a US enterprise). It profiles the involvement of foreign-affiliated US companies in the following areas: domestic petroleum production (including natural gas), reserve holdings, refining and marketing activities, coal production, and uranium exploration and development.

Not Available

1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

CIVILIAN POWER REACTOR PROGRAM. PART III. BOOK I. STATUS REPORT ON FAST REACTORS AS OF 1959  

SciTech Connect

A description of fast reactor types is given and the objectives of the AEC program on fast reactors are outlined. General research and development programs completed and in process on physics, fuel and materials, heat transfer, fluid flow, coolant chemistry, reactor safety, and components and systems are discussed. Reactors completed, under design and construction, and under study are described. (W.D.M.) A general description of ship and power plant, tabulation of principle characteristics, economics, potential advances, and necessary research and development are discussed in detail. (W.D.M.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

438

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

439

EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned 5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 30, 1998 EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia April 30, 1998 EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from

440

Nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

Pennell, William E. (Greensburg, PA); Rowan, William J. (Monroeville, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign research reactor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO BY THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNDER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-ACO3-76SF00098 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA [W(C) -91-ol; SAN 581 1 Background Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the Regents of the University of California (hereinafter Regents) under contract with the Department of Energy (DOE). DOE considers its Government-Owned, Contractor-Operated (GOCO) laboratories, such as LBL, national resources capable of providing significant contribution to the development of new products and processes, creation of jobs,

442

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENTS' U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GOVERNMENTS' U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS GOVERNMENTS' U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN CERTAIN IDENTIFIED INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC06-87RL10930 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND WESTINGHOUSE HANFORD COMPANY The Department of Energy (DOE), unlike most other Government agencies, employs contractors, both for-profit and nonprofit organizations, to manage and operate certain of its major research, production and weapons facilities, and its National Laboratories. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a large business, for-profit corporation, under Prime Contract DE-ACO6-87RL10930 with DOE, manages and operates certain of the Government-owned facilities at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. These Government-owned, Contractor-operated facilities have for some

443

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN U.S. AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS ARISING OUT OF THE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED UNDER THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO'S MISSION SUPPORT COMMITMENT FOR STRATEGIC COLLABORATIVE INITIATIVES SET FORTH IN APPENDIX D OF MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC02- 06CH11357 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) AND UCHICAGO ARGONNE , LLC, AS OPERATOR OF ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ANL); W(C) 08-008, CH-1454 The University of Chicago (University) is a nonprofit educational organization , which is the sole member of UChicago Argonne , LLC (the Contractor), which manages and operates the Government owned facilities of the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (Laboratory) in Argonne , Illinois under Prime Contract DE-AC02-

444

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S U. S. AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN PATENT FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENTS ENTERED INTO BY WESTINGHOUSE SAVANNAH RIVER COMPANY (WSRC), UNDER ITS MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT NO. DE-AC09-89SR18035 W(C)-93-009 The Department of Energy (DOE) considers its Government-owned, Contractor-operated (GOCOs) laboratories, such as WSRC, national resources capable of providing significant contribution to the development of new products and processes, creation of jobs, enhancement of the skill level of the U. S. labor force, and in improved U. S. competitiveness. Congress, recognizing this unique aspect of GOCO laboratories, enacted the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989, hereinafter "Act", (Public Law 101-189).

445

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC. FOR WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRAXAIR, INC. FOR WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PRAXAIR, INC. FOR WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION, DOE DOCKET NO. S- 115,861 MADE UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE