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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin, 2010 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 10,679.56 9,223.70 408.00 9,631.70 20,311.26 Alaska 920.68 1,080.60 88.05 1,168.65 2,089.33 Arizona 7,761.18 - - - 7,761.18 Arkansas 0.43 - - - 0.43 Colorado 21,831.81 748.98 1,446.25 2,195.23 24,027.04 Illinois 33,176.21 2,505.51

2

The Constitutional Origins of the President's Foreign Affairs Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of the executive’s authority over foreign affairs has been debated constantly over the life of the Constitution. Rather than try to discern the answer to this question from only the well-known Framers, this scholarly endeavor proposes to unlock the original understanding of the Constitution to the “citizens, polemicists, and convention delegates who participated in one way or another in ratification.” Recent scholarship in the nature of the executive’s foreign affair power has suffered from a lesser degree of scrutiny than other constitutional subjects. Few scholars have addressed the original source of authority and legitimacy of the Constitution—its ratification—as a means of determining whether the modern presidency continues to abuse or respect the powers the Constitution has invested in it. Those that have looked to the historical context of the Constitution’s ratification and believe that public sentiment toward the executive was more characterized by fear rather than want of energy have reached their conclusion because of select sampling from an extraordinary era in American constitutionalism. The research will be divided among three major historical periods of American constitutionalism: (1) the pre-revolutionary era (early 1700s until 1775) while America was still comprised of 13 British colonies and most constitutional concerns where focused on Parliament’s abuses of power and the Executive’s complicity; (2) the executive interregnum (1775 until the early 1780s) wherein the American public feared executive authority and experimented with a weak executive; and (3) the period of legislative fear (early 1780s to 1790s) that acted as a catalyst for James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and others to restore an energetic executive.

Thoma, Oliver

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) California Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

4

New Mexico Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) New Mexico Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

5

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " "State / Region ","Domestic ","Foreign ","Total "," " "Alabama ",14828,4508,19336," " "Alaska ",825,698,1524," " "Arizona ",13143,"-",13143," " "Arkansas ",13,"-",13," " "Colorado ",32427,894,33321," " "Illinois ",33997,285,34283," " "Indiana ",36714,"-",36714," " "Kansas ",176,"-",176," " "Kentucky Total ",131546,2821,134367," " " East ",107000,2707,109706," " " West ",24547,114,24660," " "Louisiana ",3746,"-",3746," "

6

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 (Thousand Short Tons) " "State / Region ","Domestic ","Foreign ","Total "," " "Alabama",18367,3744,22111," " "Alaska",957,546,1502," " "Arizona",13041,"-",13041," " "Colorado",37396,1239,38635," " "Illinois ",30611,440,31051," " "Indiana",34630,227,34857," " "Kansas",72,"-",72," " "Kentucky Total ",109413,3004,112417," " " Eastern ",87402,2816,90218," " " Western ",22011,188,22199," " "Louisiana",3889,"-",3889," " "Maryland",4502,1068,5571," "

7

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons)" " State / Region"," Domestic"," Foreign"," Total " "Alabama ",15552,3425,18977," " "Alaska ",847,311,1158," " "Arizona ",12971,"-",12971," " "Arkansas ",12,"-",12," " "Colorado ",33904,843,34748," " "Illinois ",32719,21,32740," " "Indiana ",35391,"-",35391," " "Kansas ",205,"-",205," " "Kentucky Total ",123129,791,123920," " " East ",98492,791,99284," " " West ",24636,"-",24636," " "Louisiana ",3810,"-",3810," "

8

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 " 3 " "(Thousand Short Tons) " "State / Region ","Domestic","Foreign","Total" "Alabama ",16639,3902,20541 "Alaska ",856,232,1088 "Arizona ",12093,"-",12093 "Arkansas ",6,"-",6 "Colorado ",34997,898,35895 "Illinois ",31751,55,31806 "Indiana ",35350,"-",35350 "Kansas ",154,"-",154 "Kentucky Total ",113241,906,114146 "East ",92391,890,93282 "West ",20849,15,20865 "Louisiana ",3959,"-",3959 "Maryland ",4955,596,5551 "Mississippi ",3739,"-",3739 "Missouri ",345,"-",345 "Montana ",36181,541,36721

9

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

Matos, J.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

U.S. Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) U.S. Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted - State of Origin (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

11

Domestic* Foreign* Total Alabama  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Alabama 5,432 4,214 9,646 Alaska 899 503 1,402 Arizona 12,806 - 12,806 Arkansas 2 - 2 Colorado 35,766 706 36,472 Illinois 26,664 284 26,949 Indiana 24,074 11 24,086 Kansas 170...

12

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Census Division Total South...

13

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Division Total West Mountain Pacific Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

14

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC13.7...

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC12.7...

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC11.7...

17

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

18

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(millions) Census Division Total West Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC14.7...

19

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

20

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1. Total Energy Consumption in U.S. Households by Origin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (million cords) ..... 21.4 19.8 0.8 0.6 0.3 19.3 Million Btu per Household3 Total Btu Consumption per Household, Fuels Used: Electricity Primary ...

22

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

23

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

24

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

25

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

26

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

27

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

31

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

32

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

33

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

34

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

35

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

36

Foreign investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report focuses on the effects of foreign direct investment in the United States. GAO examines foreign investment in four industries: baking, where possible control over bank lending is of concern; petroleum, where questions about increased dependence on foreign oil have arisen; chemicals, where the foreign-owned share of U.S. assets is among the highest of all industry sectors; and biotechnology, an emerging sector of potentially strategic commercial importance. In this report, GAO spells out the policy concerns in each sector, identifies the data available to analyze these concerns, and evaluates the concerns.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Timing of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients Undergoing Total Hip or Knee Replacement A Nationwide Cohort Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Limited evidence suggests that the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may be increased shortly after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. However, risk of AMI in these patients has not been compared against matched controls who have not undergone surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the timing of AMI in patients undergoing THR or TKR surgery compared with matched controls. Methods: Retrospective, nationwide cohort study within the Danish national registries. All patients who underwent a primary THR or TKR (n=95 227) surgery from

Arief Lalmohamed; Pharmd Peter Vestergaard; Dmsc Corinne Klop; Tjeerd P. Van Staa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Foreign Direct Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002 Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures for the Year 2002 Home > Energy Finance > Foreign Investment in U.S. Energy > Foreign Direct Investment Acquisitions and Divestitures, 2002 Acquisitions of U.S. Energy Assets by Foreign Investors in 2002 Remain High Foreign direct acquisitions are purchases, directly or indirectly, by the original foreign investor resulting in the ownership of 10 percent or more of the voting securities of an incorporated U.S. business enterprise or the equivalent interest in an unincorporated U.S. business. The purchases may include foreign assets owned by the U.S. business that is being acquired. Purchases of a U.S. business or asset by one foreign owner from another foreign owner are not included in the foreign

39

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign Fishery Developments The Tuna Fishery of the Republic of South Africa The Republic of South by extensive foreign fish- ing, have caused severe economic prob- lems in the industry. The tuna fishery plays expansion. Catch South Africa's 1979 total tuna catch of 7,500 metric tons (t) represents only slightly more

40

Domestic utility attitudes toward foreign uranium supply  

SciTech Connect

The current embargo on the enrichment of foreign-origin uranium for use in domestic utilization facilities is scheduled to be removed in 1984. The pending removal of this embargo, complicated by a depressed worldwide market for uranium, has prompted consideration of a new or extended embargo within the US Government. As part of its on-going data collection activities, Nuclear Resources International (NRI) has surveyed 50 domestic utility/utility holding companies (representing 60 lead operator-utilities) on their foreign uranium purchase strategies and intentions. The most recent survey was conducted in early May 1981. A number of qualitative observations were made during the course of the survey. The major observations are: domestic utility views toward foreign uranium purchase are dynamic; all but three utilities had some considered foreign purchase strategy; some utilities have problems with buying foreign uranium from particular countries; an inducement is often required by some utilities to buy foreign uranium; opinions varied among utilities concerning the viability of the domestic uranium industry; and many utilities could have foreign uranium fed through their domestic uranium contracts (indirect purchases). The above observations are expanded in the final section of the report. However, it should be noted that two of the observations are particularly important and should be seriously considered in formulation of foreign uranium import restrictions. These important observations are the dynamic nature of the subject matter and the potentially large and imbalanced effect the indirect purchases could have on utility foreign uranium procurement.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Foreign Direct Investment  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investment Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 in 1999 June 2001 ii iii Contents Foreign Affiliates' Role in U.S. Energy Industry Operations ..............................................................................1 Foreign Direct Investment: The International Transactions Accounts ..............................................................8 U.S. Companies' Direct Investment Abroad in Energy ......................................................................................14 Conclusion...............................................................................................................................................................19

42

Techniques for Intravascular Foreign Body Retrieval  

SciTech Connect

As endovascular therapies increase in frequency, the incidence of lost or embolized foreign bodies is increasing. The presence of an intravascular foreign body (IFB) is well recognized to have the potential to cause serious complications. IFB can embolize and impact critical sites such as the heart, with subsequent significant morbidity or mortality. Intravascular foreign bodies most commonly result from embolized central line fragments, but they can originate from many sources, both iatrogenic and noniatrogenic. The percutaneous approach in removing an IFB is widely perceived as the best way to retrieve endovascular foreign bodies. This minimally invasive approach has a high success rate with a low associated morbidity, and it avoids the complications related to open surgical approaches. We examined the characteristics, causes, and incidence of endovascular embolizations and reviewed the various described techniques that have been used to facilitate subsequent explantation of such materials.

Woodhouse, Joe B.; Uberoi, Raman, E-mail: raman.uberoi@orh.nhs.uk [Oxford University Hospitals (United Kingdom)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Documents for Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. **Terrorist-sponsoring countries include: Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria. Requirements for Foreign Nationals (excluding nationals of sensitive...

44

ONLINE FIRST ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Timing of Acute Myocardial Infarction in Patients Undergoing Total Hip or Knee Replacement A Nationwide Cohort Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Limited evidence suggests that the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may be increased shortly after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. However, risk of AMI in these patients has not been compared against matched controls who have not undergone surgery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the timing of AMI in patients undergoing THR or TKR surgery compared with matched controls. Methods: Retrospective, nationwide cohort study within the Danish national registries. All patients who underwent a primary THR or TKR (n=95 227) surgery from

Arief Lalmohamed; Pharmd Peter Vestergaard; Dmsc Corinne Klop; Tjeerd P. Van Staa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

NREL: Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Nationals Foreign Nationals At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), collaboration is key to conducting scientific research at our institution in Golden, Colorado. Because an international scope is essential to our development program, we invite outstanding scholars from other countries to become an integral part of our organization through the Foreign National Assignment Program. This program enables people with new ideas and talents from around the world to contribute to research of mutual interest at the Laboratory while also contributing to the transfer of the technology resulting from that research. As a foreign national, you'll need information about immigration and the various types of visas. You can also find numerous helpful links to the State Department, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the Social

46

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

47

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

48

New-Hire Process for Foreign Nationals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foreign Nationals New-Hire Process for Foreign Nationals All foreign nationals including students and postdocs must complete this process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Before you...

49

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

50

Deciphering foreign language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we tackle the task of machine translation (MT) without parallel training data. We frame the MT problem as a decipherment task, treating the foreign text as a cipher for English and present novel methods for training translation models from ...

Sujith Ravi; Kevin Knight

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Foreign Direct Investment in U  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in U.S. Energy in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 in 1998 November 2000 Energy Information Administration/Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy in 1998 Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, the Team Leader for Financial Analysis (202) 586-1383. Specific technical information concerning this

52

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Georgia Total s - s - s Georgia Truck s - s - s Indiana Total - 98 - - 98 Indiana Railroad - 98 - - 98 Kentucky Total - - 12 - 12 Kentucky Truck - - 12 - 12 Ohio Total - 30 - - 30 Ohio

53

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

54

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

55

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

56

Chapter_6_Foreign_Interaction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foreign Interaction Foreign Interaction This chapter describes the security procedures adopted by DOE HQ to implement the requirements of the following Executive Order and DOE directives: * Executive Order 12344 (as prescribed by 42 U.S.C. 7158) * DOE Oder 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program * DOE Order 470.4B, Safeguards and Security Program, Appendix B, Section 4 * DOE Order 475.1, Counterintelligence Program * DOE Order 551.1C, Official Foreign Travel * DOE Manual 552.1-1A, U.S. Department of Energy Travel Manual * DOE Order 552.1A, Change 1, Travel Policy and Procedures The directives have two objectives: the first objective is to protect DOE sensitive and classified information from being disclosed to foreign nationals, except when authorized by international

57

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Services » Calibration Facilities » Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Visitors who are foreign nationals must complete and submit the Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire 30 days before accessing facilities. Unclassified Foreign National Visits.doc Description Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire More Documents & Publications NEUP Foreign Travel Request Form FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security General Technical Base FAQS Qualification Card - Safeguards and Security Calibration Facilities Ecosystem Management Team Environmental Justice Environmental Management System Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance

58

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Georgia Railroad 23 - - - 23 Georgia Truck s - - - s Georgia Total 23 - - - 23 Indiana Railroad - 115 - - 115 Indiana Truck - 71 - - 71 Indiana Total - 186 - - 186 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Tennessee Truck

59

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Georgia Total s - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck s - 3 - 3 Ohio Total - 3 - - 3 Ohio River - 3 - - 3 Origin State Total 1,942 163 338 - 2,443 Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 River 741 3 - - 745 Truck 52 160

60

Foreign Oil Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transportation provides greater freedom, access, opportunity and choice for Americans from all walks of life and from all across the country. Ridership is up 25.1 percent since 1995, and the millions of Americans who use public transportation each weekday know it saves money and gasoline. This independent analysis looks for the first time at what public transportation saves – both for individual households and for the nation as a whole. In addition, it explores a possible future where many more Americans would have the choice to take public transportation. It was commissioned from ICF International by the American Public Transportation Association. Public Transportation Reduces U.S. Foreign Oil Dependence Using conservative assumptions, the study found that current public transportation usage reduces U.S. gasoline consumption by 1.4 billion gallons each year. In concrete terms, that means: 108 million fewer cars filling up – almost 300,000 every day. 34 fewer supertankers leaving the Middle East – one every 11 days.

Linda Bailey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Georgia Railroad 52 - - - 52 Georgia Truck s - 5 - 5 Georgia Total 52 - 5 - 57 Indiana Railroad - 65 - - 65 Origin State Total 1,855 304 313 - 2,472 Railroad 996 81 89 - 1,165

62

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Railroad 105 - 1 - 106 Georgia Truck s - 4 - 4 Georgia Total 105 - 5 - 110 Indiana Railroad - 106 - - 106 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,065 259 321 - 2,644

63

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Georgia Railroad 9 - - - 9 Georgia Truck 7 - 5 - 12 Georgia Total 16 - 5 - 21 Indiana Railroad - 126 - - 126 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,320 353 325 - 2,998 Railroad 848 137 83 - 1,068

64

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Georgia Truck s - 2 - 2 Indiana Railroad - 148 - - 148 Ohio Railroad - 25 - - 25 Ohio River - 18 - - 18 Ohio Total - 43 - - 43 Origin State Total 1,760 373 305 - 2,438 Railroad 1,040 191 80 - 1,311 River

65

PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central...

66

Drunk On Oil: Russian Foreign Policy 2000-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential linkages of oil to foreign policy decision-makingin Russian foreign policy aggression, oil prices wereof aggregation oil prices and foreign reserves have about

Brugato, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

68

Virus Origin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virus Origin Name: jordan Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Where did viruses come from? Replies: That depends what you mean. If you point to a virus right now, over...

69

By Coal Origin State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Florida Total - - 15 - 15 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Total 196 - 15 - 211 Georgia Railroad 189 - 1 - 190 Georgia Truck

70

On multi-column foreign key discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A foreign/primary key relationship between relational tables is one of the most important constraints in a database. From a data analysis perspective, discovering foreign keys is a crucial step in understanding and working with the data. Nevertheless, ...

Meihui Zhang; Marios Hadjieleftheriou; Beng Chin Ooi; Cecilia M. Procopiuc; Divesh Srivastava

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

72

Problems with packaged sources in foreign countries  

SciTech Connect

The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's (GTRI) Off-Site Source Recovery Project (OSRP), which is administered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), removes excess, unwanted, abandoned, or orphan radioactive sealed sources that pose a potential threat to national security, public health, and safety. In total, GTRI/OSRP has been able to recover more than 25,000 excess and unwanted sealed sources from over 825 sites. In addition to transuranic sources, the GTRI/OSRP mission now includes recovery of beta/gamma emitting sources, which are of concern to both the U.S. government and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This paper provides a synopsis of cooperative efforts in foreign countries to remove excess and unwanted sealed sources by discussing three topical areas: (1) The Regional Partnership with the International Atomic Energy Agency; (2) Challenges in repatriating sealed sources; and (3) Options for repatriating sealed sources.

Abeyta, Cristy L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matzke, James L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zarling, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tompkin, J. Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

2012 UMAR: 1994-2012 Foreign Puchases, Foreign Sales, and Inventories  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report Release Date: May 16, 2013 Next Release Date: May 2014 Delivery Year 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Foreign Purchases by U.S. Suppliers 21.1 20.2 21.7 20.4 22.6 21.0 17.4 18.7 22.7 18.2 30.2 27.0 26.1 21.6 24.1 26.7 25.0 19.3 20.2 Foreign Purchases by Owners and Operators of U.S. Civilian Nuclear Power Reactors 15.5 21.1 23.7 22.5 21.1 26.6 27.5 28.0 30.0 34.9 35.9 38.5 38.7 32.5 32.9 32.2 30.4 35.1 36.0 Total Foreign Purchases 36.6 41.3 45.4 43.0 43.7 47.6 44.9 46.7 52.7 53.0 66.1 65.5 64.8 54.1 57.1 58.9 55.3 54.4 56.2 U.S. Broker and Trader Purchases from Foreign Suppliers 22.3 18.3 17.8 15.7 21.7 19.2 15.8 18.3 18.6 15.8 26.4 24.0 24.0 18.9 21.3 26.8 24.7 19.6 20.2 Foreign Sales 17.7 9.8 11.5 17.0 15.1 8.5 13.6 11.7 15.4 13.2 13.2 20.5 18.7 14.8 17.2 23.5

74

WA_04-001_AMENDED_SILICATES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA00001PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignInventi.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

75

Microsoft Word - 2010 Foreign Visit Request form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to submit a Foreign Visit Request. First Name Middle Initial or "NMI" Last Name Gender Date of Birth (MMDDYYYY) City of Birth Male Female Country of Birth Country...

76

FOREIGN RESEARCH AND POWER REACTOR PRELIMINARY LIST  

SciTech Connect

Foreign research and power reactors are tabulated. Nuclear power buildup goals are given for each nation on which information is available. (J.H.D.)

Ullmann, J.W.

1959-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for ...

78

2012 UMAR: 1994-2012 Foreign Puchases, Foreign Sales, and Inventories  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing ... deliveries, domestic, enrichers, enriched uranium, enrichment, fabricators, feed, foreign, fuel ...

79

Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Georgia Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Foreign Obligations Implementation Status Brian G. Horn U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission January 13, 2004 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2 Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA 004 Crowne Plaza Ravinia Atlanta, GA Overview of Meeting Overview of Meeting * Review how the Obligation Tracking System is working * Presentations: - Review of Government notification procedures - Establishment of the beginning Obligation Balances for sites

80

American Foreign Policy: A Time for a Shift in Priorities and Instruments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the post 9/11 world of American Foreign Policy, where interdependence and globalization are variables that influence every aspect of world affairs, what should the priorities of the United States be and what instruments of foreign policy are the most effective? This question is one that the Untied States can no longer avoid. My hypothesis is that the United States needs to reevaluate its priorities and more importantly reeva luate its instruments of tatecraft if it desires to retain what power it has left. I support this hypothesis by using various articles from the Journal of Foreign Affairs, Andrew Bacevich’s American Empire and Chalmers Johnson’s Blowback. My paper focuses on comparing old priorities with new priorities, and it explains how the old instruments of foreign policy are no longer suitable for what the new priorities of a successful foreign policy seek to establish. I suggest what a new foreign policy should consist of and how to establish one. Politics have always been a tricky endeavor to understand and master, and there are numerous challenges to establishing a cohesive foreign policy. I outline what the greatest challenge to establishing a foreign policy is and how to overcome it. My points and supporting evidence are not original; however, the manner in which they are expressed will bring new light to the subject, and for the first time, several important points will be evaluated and compiled together. The paper has been laid out as a comparison between the Cold War Era policies and the post 9/11 policies. The reader will be able to distinguish the differences in the political climate and realize that the current policies are unsuitable.

Issa, Patrick 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Council on Foreign Relations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations January 13, 2005 - 9:47am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Abraham Thank you. It's an honor to be here with you today. For over 80 years the Council has played a leading role in guiding American foreign policy. As Leslie Gelb once said, "If the Council as a body has stood for anything ... it has been for American internationalism based on American interests." This body has not just stood for American internationalism and American interests, it has helped guarantee them. Scholars and historians have dubbed the last 100 years "the American Century," and there can be little doubt the Council on Foreign Relations helped make it so. As my tenure in the Bush Administration comes to a close, I wanted to

82

REPRESENTATIVES OF FOREIGN INTEREST STATEMENT AN INDIVIDUAL WHO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

firm: The specific relationship between the foreign firm and the United States firm: Percentage of time devoted to foreign firm: - 2 - Summary of duties with the United States...

83

The president and foreign policy choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous literature that analyzes the domestic factors that affect the timing and occurrence of president's foreign policies focuses primarily on policies of a conflictual nature such as the use of military force. Less is understood about the effects of domestic political variables on the likelihood that the president will engage in foreign policies of a cooperative nature. I theorize that presidential activity in particular matters of foreign policy is strategic and motivated by political benefits the president may accrue, such as reelection, an increase in approval ratings, and improvement in the domestic economy. This study analyzes the effects of the presidential electoral cycle, presidential approval ratings, status of the domestic economy, and budgetary constraint on the likelihood that the president will travel to a foreign nation for a summit meeting, travel abroad for ceremonial or goodwill purposes, give a speech on a matter of cooperative foreign policy, or take a position on foreign policy legislation of a cooperative nature. The findings indicate that domestic factors have little influence on the president's propensity to engage in cooperative foreign policies.

Carrothers, Matthew Arthur

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

DOE O 551.1D, Official Foreign Travel  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities governing official foreign travel by Federal and contractor employees.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

New Web Service Tracks Foreign Tech Regulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Web Service Tracks Foreign Tech Regulations. ... To learn more—and to sign up—go to the Notify US Web site at www.nist.gov/notifyus.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Foreign Interaction 6, Foreign Interaction HQFMSP Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction October 2013 2013 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 6, Foreign Interaction DOE has adopted significant controls over the interaction of its employees and contractors with foreign nationals. When authorized by a treaty or international agreement, some DOE classified information can be shared with foreign government representatives. Unclassified information can be shared with foreign nationals only after a senior DOE official has approved that exchange. No foreign national can be admitted to a HQ facility without the approval of a senior HQ official and then only when required information is placed in the Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS). There are also controls over some foreign travel performed by

87

Foreign Aid, Sustainable Development and Rapti IRDP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependency. For example, a prominent anthropologist of Nepal w .t " f . . .n es - ore.gn aId donors are sometimes seen as father- 242 Occasional Papers surrogates.... When this passive paternal dependency is applied to foreign aid, the only active agent... houses with western style amenities and plumbing, specifically for the purpose of renting to foreigners. These houses are well equipped and spacious by most western standards, many being located in large gardens surrounded by trees and greenery. Some...

Subedi, Madhusudan Sharma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nearly 69% of U.S. crude oil imports originated from five ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The combination of lower total U.S. crude oil imports and higher crude oil shipments from the top five foreign suppliers boosted their market share to about 69% of ...

89

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community August 19, 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - Each year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) - through its participation in two multilateral R&D information exchange agreements - gains access to approximately 80,000 foreign energy-related research summaries. One agreement is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) in Paris while the other is under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The IEA information collection, which totals more than 3.5 million items, is made available to U.S. researchers by OSTI, an Office of Science program located in Oak Ridge, TN. This agreement, called the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE), is managed by

90

WA_01-012_DETROIT_DIESEL_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeignRigh.pdf WA01-012DETROITDIESELWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

91

WA_01-016_FORD_MOTOR_CO_Waive_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Invent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeignInvent.pdf WA01-016FORDMOTORCOWaiveofDomesticandForeign...

92

WA_02_032_DOW_CHEMICAL_CO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pat...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPat.pdf WA02032DOWCHEMICALCOWaiverofDomesticandForeign...

93

Reshaping Eurasia: Foreign Policy Strategies and Leadership Assets in Post-Soviet South Caucasus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil contract with the foreign oil companies without Russianleadership regarding foreign oil companies’ participation inPSAs signed by SOCAR and foreign oil companies. potential,

Alieva, Leila

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

WA_03_001_CHEVRON_TEXACO_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignP...

95

WA_01_002_CREE_LIGHTING_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Inven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInven.pdf WA01002CREELIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignInv...

96

WA_02_055_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

97

WA_00_031_HONEYWELL_Waiver_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Right...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRight.pdf WA00031HONEYWELLWaiverDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

98

WA_00_020_PRAXAIR_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA00020PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentR...

99

WC_1990_015_CLASS_WAIVER_OF_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WC1990015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WC1990015CLASSWAIVEROFDomesticandForeignPatent...

100

WA_01_039_PRAXAIR_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatent.pdf WA01039PRAXAIRINCWaiverofDomesticandForeignPaten...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WA_98_007_SOLAREX_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Patent_Righ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA98007SOLAREXWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRi...

102

WA_1993_038_TEXAS_INSTRUMENTS_INC_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993038TEXASINSTRUMENTSINCWaiverofU.S.andForeign...

103

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in in 2000 This report presents an analysis of foreign direct investment in U.S. energy resources and companies in 2000. Foreign direct investment (FDI) is the ownership or control of 10 percent, or more, of a U.S. business (or asset) by a foreign entity. In this report a U.S. business with at least 10 percent foreign ownership is a "foreign- affiliated company" (FDI affiliate) and the foreign owner holding at least 10 percent ownership is the "parent." The report describes the role of foreign ownership in U.S. energy enterprises with respect to net investment (including net loans), energy operations, capital investment, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, this report examines patterns of direct investment in foreign

104

PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs October 17, 2011 - 2:50pm Addthis A highly efficient...

105

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov...

106

WA_99_015_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA99015FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandF...

107

WA_97_038_FORD_MOTOR_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomestican...

108

WA_03_033_GE_WIND_ENERGY_LLC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03033GEWINDENERGYLLCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

109

WA_00_012_3M_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Rights_u...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DomesticandForeignRightsu.pdf More Documents & Publications WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA03046INTERMAGNETICSGENERALCORPWaiverofDo...

110

WA_99_008_DUPONT_SUPERCONDUCTIVITY_Waiver_of_US_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandForeign.pdf WA99008DUPONTSUPERCONDUCTIVITYWaiverofUSandFo...

111

WA_01_007_SOLAR_TURBINES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA07012BOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaivero...

112

WA_07_012_BOEING_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Pate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THEBOEINGCOMPANYWaiverofdomesticandForeign.pdf WA01007SOLARTURBINESWaiverofDomesticandForeignpate.pdf WA03001CHEVRONTEXACOWaiverofDomesticandForeignPate...

113

WA_03_013_ANADARKO_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA03013ANADARKOPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandFo...

114

WA_-01_001_PHILLIPS_PETROLEUM_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA-01001PHILLIPSPETROLEUMWaiverofDomesticand...

115

WA_1995_030_GOLDEN_PHOTON_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1995030GOLDENPHOTONINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

116

WA_04_020_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_In...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf More Documents & Publications...

117

WA_1993_004_SOLAR_TURBINE_INC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf WA1993004SOLARTURBINEINCWaiverofDomesticandForeig...

118

Forecasting foreign exchange rates using kernel methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First, the all-important no free lunch theorems are introduced. Next, kernel methods, support vector machines (SVMs), preprocessing, model selection, feature selection, SVM software and the Fisher kernel are introduced and discussed. A hidden Markov ... Keywords: Forecasting, Foreign exchange, Kernel methods

Martin Sewell; John Shawe-Taylor

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Turkey's foreign dependence on energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey becomes more dependent on the external countries in energy production every year. As an average of the period 1994-2002 the total primary energy production has been 27.9 Mtoe, and consumption has been 73.06 Mtoe, so Turkey is dependent on external countries in petroleum, natural gas, and hard coal consumption. The external dependency rate of these fuels has been at levels of 89.3%, 96.6%, and 82%, respectively. In the projections of Turkey for 2020, the primary energy consumption is estimated to be 298 Mtoe, production is estimated to be 70 Mtoe, the ratio of production to consumption will be reduced to 23.5%, and this situation will cause serious risks for sustainable development. In other words, Turkey will have to import 76.5% of the energy that it consumes in the 2020s.

Uslu, T. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire Unclassified Foreign National Visits & Assignments Questionnaire |Welcome to U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management! We are looking forward to your visit or assignment with us. In order to comply with our security requirements and ensure that your time with the Department of Energy goes smoothly we need to obtain some information from you prior to your arrival. Please take a few minutes to provide the information requested below for each member of your party that is not a U.S. citizen and then return the form(s) to your host. Please be sure to comply with the deadlines your host has communicated to you for returning this form.| |Part 1: Completed by Visitor Please complete all questions below, as applicable. | |1.|Given (first) name (exactly as it appears on passport)| |

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Subject: DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS DOE PERSONAL PROPERTY FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS (Title Transfer, Loan, and Abandonment) References: Atomic Energy Act Sections 161g and 161j., Title 42 of the United States Code (U.S.C.) sections 2201g, and 22201j 42 U.S.C 16312 (Public Law 109-58, title IX, section 972, Aug. 8, 2005, 119 Stat. 899), 41 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 102-36.380-395, Federal Management Regulation (FMR) DOE Order 580.1, Department of Energy Personal Property Program 4.c(3) DOE Guide 580.1-1, Department of Energy Personal Property Management Guide Chapter 11.8 When is this Acquisition Letter (AL) Effective? This AL is effective immediately upon issuance. When Does This AL Expire? This AL remains in effect until superseded, or canceled. Guidance in this Acquisition Letter shall

122

Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil Arrival of New Samples: Unpack shipping containers. Treat any ice/melted water immediately. Decontaminate any "blue ice" packets with 70% ethyl alcohol. Collect any loose soil from container and heat-treat immediately. Immediately decontaminate shipping containers. Heat-treat wooden, metal, or cardboard shipping containers (using lowest heat). Treat plastic containers and coolers with 70% ethyl alcohol. Storage of Samples: Store dry samples in the locked storage cabinet in Room 431Z021 until they can be delivered to the appropriate beamline for analysis. Label containers with origin and arrival date. Log samples into the APS Soil Inventory book maintained in 431Z021.

124

State Administration for Foreign Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Administration for Foreign Exchange State Administration for Foreign Exchange Jump to: navigation, search TODO: More information needed This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. China's State Administration For Foreign Exchange (SAFE) is also responsible for NGOs http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/State_Administration_of_Foreign_Exchange http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Asia-Pacific/2010/0520/Law-chokes-Chinese-NGOs-foreign-funding Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=State_Administration_for_Foreign_Exchange&oldid=306631" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

125

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 December 2004 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2002 The purpose of this foreign direct investment report is to provide an assessment of the extent of foreign ownership of energy assets in the United States. Section 657, Subpart 8 of the U.S. Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) requires an annual report to Congress which presents: "a summary of activities in the United States by companies which are foreign owned or controlled and which own or control United States energy sources and supplies ...." EIA intends the information in this report for use by the U.S. Congress, Government agencies, industry analysts, and the general public. Introduction

126

The Use of Trust Regions in Kohn-Sham Total Energy Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the KS total energy optimization problem, which has beenthe original total energy minimization problem is. Secondly,the KS total energy minimiza- tion problem as min E total (

Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan C.; Wang, Lin-wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The management of foreign exchange risk, Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This edition of this introductory textbook to foreign exchange risk management considers: how to measure risk and accurately forecast exchange rates and use those forecasts; the principal hedging procedures; management approaches to risk including the use of export finance companies and management control and centralization. It is written by a team of corporate and banking practioners. Contents include: Measuring foreign exchange risk; Forecasting exchange rates; Using foreign exchange markets and forecasts; Hedging procedures; Management approaches to risk.

Ensor, R.; Antl, B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Recovery of Highly Enriched Uranium Provided to Foreign Countries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Recovery of Highly Enriched Uranium Provided to Foreign Countries, DOEIG-0638 Recovery of Highly Enriched...

129

How dependent is the United States on foreign oil? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... propane, and other liquids including biofuels and ... In 2012, about 57% of the ... How dependent is the United States on foreign oil? How many ...

130

Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign SUBJECT NUMBER ...  

SUBJECT: Procedure for MOUs Between Fermilab & Foreign Partners NUMBER: 4501 RESPONSIBILITY: Fermilab Chief Operating Officer REVISION: 01 APPROVED BY: Fermilab Chief ...

131

Foreign Direct Investment in cohesion to employment - case of Poland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This Thesis Work has examined the FDI effects on employment in the case of Poland. The main objective is proving how foreign capital inflows affect… (more)

Todoroski, Hristijan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Laboratory Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with Foreign Partners  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This memorandum establishes policy and procedures for any Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) between DOE National Laboratories and any foreign entity, whether ...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

EIA-856 MONTHLY FOREIGN CRUDE OIL ACQUISITION REPORT INSTRUCTIONS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA-856, “Monthly Foreign Crude Oil Acquisition Report ” Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D. C. 20585

134

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

135

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

136

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

137

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

138

WA_06_017_Waiver_of_The_Govt_US_and_Foreign_Patent_Rights_fo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRightsfo.pdf WA06017WaiverofTheGovtUSandForeignPatentRights...

139

Surviving Through The Post-Cold War Era: The Evolution of Foreign Policy In North Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Foreign Policy of North Korea edited by Yang Sung ChulChange and Continuity in North Korea’s Foreign Policy. ”Foreign Relations of North Korea During Kim Il Sung’s Last

Yee, Samuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Developing objective measures of foreign-accent conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various methods have recently appeared to transform foreign-accented speech into its native-accented counterpart. Evaluation of these accent conversion methods requires extensive listening tests across a number of perceptual dimensions. This article ... Keywords: accent conversion, foreign accent recognition, speaker recognition, voice conversion

Daniel Felps; Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Can Trade and Foreign Direct Investment Signals Reduce International Conflicts?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the Cold War, the effect of international trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) on international conflict becomes more and more significant. After evaluating the international conflict, the paper uses system of simultaneous equations to do ... Keywords: foreign direct investment, information signal, international conflict, trade

Cai Jie; Yu Shunhong

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report reviews the patterns of foreign ownership interest in US energy enterprises, exclusive of portfolio investment (<10% ownership of a US enterprise). It profiles the involvement of foreign-affiliated US companies in the following areas: domestic petroleum production (including natural gas), reserve holdings, refining and marketing activities, coal production, and uranium exploration and development.

Not Available

1994-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q2 by Origin State: Alabama Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Florida Railroad - - 8 - 8 Georgia Railroad 118 - - - 118 Georgia Truck s - 15 - 15 Georgia Total 118 - 15 - 133 Indiana Railroad - 83 - - 83 Indiana Truck 17 34 - - 50 Indiana Total 17 116 - - 133 Kentucky Railroad 83 - - - 83 Pennsylvania Railroad 95 - - - 95 Origin State Total 2,197 212 285 - 2,695 Railroad 1,171 95 40 - 1,305 River 855 - - - 855 Truck 171 118 245 - 534 2 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alaska

144

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors Presentation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances Beginning Foreign Obligation Balances for the Power Reactors for the Power Reactors Michael J. Smith Michael J. Smith NAC International NAC International Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne Crowne Plaza Plaza Ravinia Ravinia Atlanta, Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Project Purpose Project Purpose * Bridge the gap in foreign obligated (FO) inventory tracking for US power reactor RISs between 10/1/01 and 9/30/03 * Provide input for 10/1/03 FO beginning inventories in the NMMSS Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop Obligations Accounting Implementation Workshop January 13, 2004 January 13, 2004 Crowne

145

EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned 5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 30, 1998 EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia April 30, 1998 EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from

146

WA_1993_007_DOW_CHEMICAL_COMPANY_Waiver_of_U.S._and_Foreign_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andForeign.pdf WA1993007DOWCHEMICALCOMPANYWaiverofU.S.andF...

147

WA_00_003_DUKE_SOLAR_ENERGY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_P...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandForeignP.pdf WA00003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandForeignP.pdf WA00003DUKESOLARENERGYWaiverofDomesticandFor...

148

WA_02_005_LUMILEDS_LIGHTING_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_I...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignI.pdf WA02005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandForeignI.pdf WA02005LUMILEDSLIGHTINGWaiverofDomesticandFor...

149

WA_1993_020_GENERAL_MOTORS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Ri...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORSWaiverofDomesticandForeignRi.pdf More Documents & Publications WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA03019GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofDom...

150

ORISE: Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universiti...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients ORISE Staff Monitor How Well U.S. Does at Attracting and Retaining Foreign Scientists and Engineers International scientists in a...

151

Indochina becoming prime target for foreign investment in E and D  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Indochina is emerging as a prime target for investment in oil and gas exploration and development. The Southeast Asian subcontinent offers sharp contrasts: the booming, market oriented economy of Thailand with its friendly climate for foreign investment, compared with the flagging socialist economies of Myanmar (formerly Burma), Cambodia, Laos, and Viet Nam. The contrast extends to the Thai energy sector as well. Aggressive development of Thailand's gas reserves with foreign assistance and capital underpins the buoyant Thai economy and has helped it reduce its dependence on imports to 40% of total energy demand. That contrast may also give impetus to a window of opportunity for oil and gas companies to participate in little tested or rank exploration plays elsewhere in the region. Except for Thailand, the region has seen little exploration and almost none by private companies since the early 1970s. The other countries are just beginning to emerge from years of international isolation caused by war or civil strife, and some are seeking foreign private investment in oil and natural gas for the first time in more than a decade. The need for hard currency capital is keen. Accordingly, industry officials point to nations such as Cambodia offering among the most attractive terms for oil and gas investment in the world.

1992-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

152

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

153

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Kenai, AK Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

154

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to...

155

The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel, IG-0872  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel DOE/IG-0872 October 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 16, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert: "The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel" INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy and its workforce of 116,000 Federal and contractor personnel have numerous international exchanges and interactions at different levels and for a variety of important programmatic and other purposes. The Office of Inspector General is currently reviewing the Department's management of international offices and foreign assignments. As

156

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1990 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy enterprises, with respect to investment, energy operations, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, outward investment in energy is reviewed through an examination of US-based companies' patterns of investment in foreign petroleum. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment transactions.

Not Available

1992-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1991 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy enterprises, with respect to investment, energy operations, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, outward investment in energy is reviewed trough an examination of US-based companies` patterns of investment in foreign petroleum. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment transactions.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1990 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy enterprises, with respect to investment, energy operations, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, outward investment in energy is reviewed through an examination of US-based companies` patterns of investment in foreign petroleum. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment transactions.

Not Available

1992-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

The origin of mass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The origin of mass is one of the deepest mysteries in science. Neutrons and protons, which account for almost all visible mass in the Universe, emerged from a primordial plasma through a cataclysmic phase transition microseconds after the Big Bang. However, ... Keywords: Gordon Bell Prize categories: scalability and time to solution, SC13 proceedings

Peter Boyle, Michael I. Buchoff, Norman Christ, Taku Izubuchi, Chulwoo Jung, Thomas C. Luu, Robert Mawhinney, Chris Schroeder, Ron Soltz, Pavlos Vranas, Joseph Wasem

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study showed that certain influences in the global environment may have an impact on FDI’s regional or country choice of investment. The following research questions were explored. Are changes in FDI location choices due to elevated transportation costs? Has the emphasis on market changed to a stauncher stance toward efficiency factors due to current oil pricing? The data was tested by applying multiple linear regressions using archival data from Dun and Bradstreet, the World Bank, and the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). This study looked at data in snapshots of two years of a decade beginning with 1997 and ending with 2007. A broader dataset which has already been developed will be expanded to include the dramatic changes in oil prices pre Y2K and post Y2K. It was hypothesized that results will reflect that the cost of transportation will drive investment closer, rather than further, from the origin of investment. Due to the nature of FDI immobility, it is further hypothesized that emphasis will be placed on efficiency factors rather than market because of concern about transportation costs. The purpose will be to explore the features that affect the location of the foreign direct investment, and to address the differences in emphasis, if any, by decision-makers upon locations chosen because of the present transport costs. The findings of the tests were theoretically along the same lines as the hypothesis predicted. In 1997 market factors were dominant instead of efficiency factors. This was seen through the significance of GDP growth and the amount of roads paved. In 2007 exchange rates and distance showed significance, moving factors to a stauncher stance toward efficiency. A pooled regression showed the results of the effect of transportation cost over all. When looking at the variances at the 0.1 p level a rise in the level of FDI investment was found, concluding that the hypothesis and transportation cost results were counter intuitive.

Gressler, Kimberly

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

162

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q1 by Origin State: Alabama Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Florida Railroad - - 22 - 22 Georgia Railroad 45 - - - 45 Georgia Truck s - 20 - 21 Georgia Total 45 - 20 - 65 Hawaii Ocean Vessel s - - - s Indiana Railroad - 78 - - 78 Indiana Truck - 32 - - 32 Indiana Total - 110 - - 110 South Carolina Truck - - 2 - 2 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Texas Railroad 72 - - - 72 Origin State Total 2,213 284 378 - 2,875 Ocean Vessel s - - - s Railroad 1,066 82 106 - 1,255 River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Truck 37 202 272 - 511 2 / 58

163

Profiles of foreign direct investment in US energy, 1991. [Contains a table of completed foreign direct investment transactions for 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1991 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy enterprises, with respect to investment, energy operations, and financial performance. Additionally, since energy investments are made in a global context, outward investment in energy is reviewed trough an examination of US-based companies' patterns of investment in foreign petroleum. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment transactions.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

165

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

166

Careers at Brookhaven Lab | For New Foreign National Employees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

check may take a few days to clear (even when drawn from a U.S. bank in another state). Wire transfers from U.S. and foreign banks tend to take two (2) days, provided the funds...

167

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

OSTI Brings Foreign Research to U.S. Science Community August 19, 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - Each year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

168

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank Cars (Rail) (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8

169

Opportunities and obstacles for foreign investors in Turkish real estate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the Turkish real estate market from the viewpoint of foreign investors contemplating entering into that market. Since 2002, the government of Turkey has been implementing an aggressive economic reform ...

Halkali, Hasan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effective foreign investment in China : utilizing Taiwanese resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is no doubt that China is expanding its market potential because of its high economic growth and its entry into the World Trade Organizations. This Chinese expansion owes a great deal to foreign direct investment from ...

Takeuchi, Isao, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

When governments break contracts : foreign firms in emerging economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging economy governments commit to protect the property rights of foreign firms through a variety of contracts, from treaties to direct agreements. In an era of liberalized capital flows, these contracts are thought ...

Wellhausen, Rachel L. (Rachel Louise)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Foreign trade zones and bonded warehouses for luxury goods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore and compare the benefits of establishing and operating Foreign Trade Zones (FTZs) and Bonded Warehouses (BWs) for luxury goods in North America, using the case of the distribution network of Ralph Lauren Corporation ...

Petrova, Nadya (Nadya Naydenova)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Drunk On Oil: Russian Foreign Policy 2000-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10% of the world’s known oil reserves. 13 Russia holds the141 No new major oil reserves have been found since 2000,aggregation oil prices and foreign reserves have about the

Brugato, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Foreign Invention Rights under DOE Cooperative agreement No....  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inc. for an Advance Waiver of Domestic and Foreign Invention Rights under DOE Cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26- 98FT40007; W(A)-98-023, CH-0992 The Petitioner, McDermott...

175

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Foreign Material Exclusion Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foreign material exclusion (FME) is vital to the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The entry of foreign material (FM) into primary or secondary plant systems, equipment, and components can cause equipment degradation or inoperability, lost generation, fuel cladding damage, high radiation, and contamination levels that could spread throughout plant systems; it can also increase operations and maintenance (O&M) costs and adversely impact nuclear safety. The FME program is a plantwide ini...

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan...

177

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

178

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

179

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $7.51 $4.74 $3.37 -33.0 -28.8 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $21.73 $20.23 $13.30 -21.8 -34.3 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

180

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

182

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $3.97 $3.97 $4.52 6.7 13.7 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $10.21 $11.53 $11.95 8.2 3.7 Colorado Indiana $5.79 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $11.99 $12.87 W 7.3

183

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $8.16 $5.20 $3.75 -32.2 -27.9 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $23.60 $22.20 $14.77 -20.9 -33.5 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

184

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

185

Thermodynamic Origin of Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the thermodynamic function of life may shed light on its origin. Life, as are all irreversible processes, is contingent on entropy production. Entropy production is a measure of the rate of the tendency of Nature to explore available microstates. The most important irreversible process generating entropy in the biosphere, and thus facilitating this exploration, is the absorption and transformation of sunlight into heat. Here we hypothesize that life began, and persists today, as a catalyst for the absorption and dissipation of sunlight at the surface of shallow seas. The resulting heat is then efficiently harvested by other irreversible processes such as the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents. RNA and DNA are the most efficient of all known molecules for absorbing the intense ultraviolet light that could have penetrated the dense early atmosphere, and are remarkably rapid in transforming this light into heat in the presence of liquid water. From this perspective, the origin and evolution of life, inseparable from water and the water cycle, can be understood as resulting from the natural thermodynamic imperative of increasing the entropy production of the Earth in its interaction with its solar environment. A mechanism is proposed for the reproduction of RNA and DNA without the need for enzymes, promoted instead through UV light dissipation and the ambient conditions of prebiotic Earth.

K. Michaelian

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009 August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 0 * 0 0 4 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food Q 0 * 0 0 0 Q 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * 0 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 1 0 1 0 0 * * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

187

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

188

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 0 * 0 * 0 0 0 3121 Beverages * 0 * 0 0 0 0 0 3122 Tobacco * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0

189

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

190

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

191

Case for total engineering  

SciTech Connect

Unrecovered oil in Denver Basin Fields, remaining after waterflooding is giving operators cause for alarm, and has research engineers looking for ways to keep wells producing at an economical rate. Many waterfloods are approaching the economic limit, or will reach that point in 5 yr or so, and the floods are leaving 60% of the oil behind - 500 million bbl in the Colorado portion of the basin, and almost that amount in Nebraska. Steps are being taken to find ways of recovering this original oil in place. Besides laboratory experiments involving various recovery techniques, several field pilot projects are testing different mechanisms, as follows: (1) Pure Oil Co. has injected a slug of LPG into one well in a watered- out portion of the Adena reservoir; (2) Mobil Oil Co. has slugged Phegley Field, S. of Brush, Colo., with LPG; (3) Pan American Petroleum Corp. is operating a pilot fireflood in a watered-out portion of Sloss Field, Kimball County, Neb.; (4) Pan American is trying wettability reversal in an unwatered-out portion of Harrisburg Field, Banner County, Neb.; and (5) Marathon Oil Co. is trying LPG injection in Huntsman Field, Cheyenne County, Neb. These projects are classified ''top secret'' and results may not be known for some time.

060

1965-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

193

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009" August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,,"Furnace/Coke",,,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Oven Gases","Waste Gas",,"Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

194

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

195

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

196

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $13.29 $12.39 $13.93 2.4 12.5 Alabama Georgia $17.62 $17.84 $20.09 6.8 12.6 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $31.79 $27.66 $24.93 -11.5 -9.9 Colorado Arizona $25.97 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $34.20 $46.22 - 35.1 Colorado Colorado $13.04 $7.72 $8.13 -21.1 5.3

197

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $14.43 $13.59 $15.46 3.5 13.8 Alabama Georgia $19.13 $19.58 $22.30 8.0 13.9 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $34.52 $30.35 $27.67 -10.5 -8.8 Colorado Arizona $28.20 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $37.53 $51.30 - 36.7 Colorado Colorado $14.16 $8.47 $9.02 -20.2 6.6

198

Origin of solar magnetism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most promising model for explaining the origin of solar magnetism is the flux transport dynamo model, in which the toroidal field is produced by differential rotation in the tachocline, the poloidal field is produced by the Babcock--Leighton mechanism at the solar surface and the meridional circulation plays a crucial role. After discussing how this model explains the regular periodic features of the solar cycle, we come to the questions of what causes irregularities of solar cycles and whether we can predict future cycles. Only if the diffusivity within the convection zone is sufficiently high, the polar field at the sunspot minimum is correlated with strength of the next cycle. This is in conformity with the limited available observational data.

Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

REQUEST BY PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF PRAXAIR, INC.(PRAXAIR) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-FC26-00NT41027 ENTITLED "NOVEL REACTOR FOR THE PRODUCTION OF SYNTHESIS GAS"; W(A)-01-005, CH1058. Praxair has requested an advance waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights to inventions its employees may conceive or first actually reduce to practice in the performance of Contract No. DE-FC26-00NT41027. As brought out in the attached waiver petition, the work will focus on development of an advanced technology for producing synthesis gas from a reaction of natural gas with pure methane. This process combines the use of a short-reaction time catalyst with Praxair's gas mixing technology to provide a novel reactor system. The total cost of this work under the

200

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information All travelers should take the following precautions, no matter the destination: Wash hands often with soap and water. Because motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury among travelers, walk and drive defensively; avoid travel at night if possible and always use seat belts. Don't eat or drink dairy products unless you know they have been pasteurized. Never eat undercooked ground beef and poultry, raw eggs, and unpasteurized dairy products; raw shellfish is particularly dangerous to persons who have liver disease or compromised immune systems. Don't eat food purchased from street vendors; do not drink beverages with ice. Don't handle animals, including dogs and cats, to avoid bites and

202

PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs October 17, 2011 - 2:50pm Addthis A highly efficient catalyst to convert renewable crops into the product propylene glycol was discovered by scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and commercialized by the Archer Daniels Midland Company. | Image courtesy of PNNL. A highly efficient catalyst to convert renewable crops into the product propylene glycol was discovered by scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and commercialized by the Archer Daniels Midland Company. | Image courtesy of PNNL. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs

203

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

204

Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases Bush Administration Establishes Program to Reduce Foreign Oil Dependency, Greenhouse Gases April 10, 2007 - 12:34pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - In step with the Bush Administration's call to increase the supply of alternative and renewable fuels nationwide, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today established the nation's first comprehensive Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program. At a press conference today, EPA Administrator Johnson, joined by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator Nicole Nason, discussed the RFS program, increasing the use of alternative fuels and modernizing CAFÉ standards for cars. "The Renewable Fuel Standard offers the American people a hat trick - it

205

Hosting foreign educators | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnerships / Y-12/UT Collaboration / Hosting foreign educators Partnerships / Y-12/UT Collaboration / Hosting foreign educators Hosting foreign educators Posted: November 27, 2013 - 11:16am Six Indonesian educators (seated) met with Y-12, UTÂ’s Institute for Nuclear Security, and ORNL experts to learn about Y-12Â’s role in U.S. nuclear security. Y-12, in support of the University of Tennessee's Institute for Nuclear Security, recently welcomed a group of professors from Indonesia's Universitas Gadjah Mada, the only university in Indonesia that offers a nuclear engineering program. As part of a U.S. Department of State Nuclear Security Educator Study Tour, the professors are on a month-long tour of U.S. universities and nuclear sites, where they'll learn strategies and best practices to help them develop new nuclear security courses to implement in Indonesia.

206

PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs PNNL Breakthrough Leads to Less Foreign Oil, More American Jobs October 17, 2011 - 2:50pm Addthis A highly efficient catalyst to convert renewable crops into the product propylene glycol was discovered by scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and commercialized by the Archer Daniels Midland Company. | Image courtesy of PNNL. A highly efficient catalyst to convert renewable crops into the product propylene glycol was discovered by scientists at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and commercialized by the Archer Daniels Midland Company. | Image courtesy of PNNL. Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs "Not only can we reduce our use of petroleum, but we can make better use

207

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

208

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Total United States 311 Food 1,124 251 26 16 635 3 147 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 53 2 1 118 * 114 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 23 * * 52 * 95 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 3 9 1 18 * 31 1 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 33 2 1 126 1 1 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 34 1 1 83 * * 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 220 60 3 5 145 1 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 101 30 3 1 41 1 20 0 3121 Beverages 89 26 2 1 38 1 16 0 3122 Tobacco 13

209

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

210

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

211

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

212

Original Budget Expended  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to reduce phosphorus (P) loading in South Dakota by characterizing the P loading contributions of South Dakota soils and improving manure management strategies by better understanding the relationships that exist among soil test phosphorus (STP), saturation P, and runoff P for select benchmark soils. Information gained during the project was used to develop improved manure management BMPs based on soil and runoff P relationships. Stakeholder education and communication of effective manure management to livestock producers was a component of the project. The project determined correlations between STP and runoff P for five soils located across eastern South Dakota. This was two more than the three soil series planned in the original project. Other accomplishments included evaluating the correlations among P saturation and soil test P, and surface runoff P for the five benchmark soils. The data was used to develop manure management BMPs and guidelines to improve manure application strategies and protect water quality. This project was a major step to understanding sources of nonpoint source nutrient loading of South Dakota’s water resources. Information collected on South Dakota soils was essential for producer acceptance of phosphorus-based manure management.

Frank V. Schindler; David R. German; Ronald H. Gelderman; James R. Gerwing; Local Match (sdsu Plant; Sd Aes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Course mission: to explain and evaluate past and present United States foreign policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or bad? ...

Van Evera, Stephen

215

Regional economic function analysis of U.S. foreign-trade zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZs) are defined as designated areas in the United States where foreign merchandise is considered to be international commerce and not subject to U.S. customs duties unless or until it enters into the ...

Otsubo, Hirotoshi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The determinants of foreign direct investment in U.S. real estate : an empirical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis provides an empirical analysis of the determinants of foreign direct investment in commercial real estate (FDIRE) in the U.S. We examine the major factors that affect levels of FDIRE in the U.S. and foreign ...

Liang, Min, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

218

Why China? A study of why foreign hotel companies are rushing to develop new luxury hotels in China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Purpose: The purpose of this professional paper is to identify why China is currently the number one recipient of foreign investment from foreign multinational luxury… (more)

Hardingham, Sean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stay Rates of Foreign Doctorate Recipients from U.S. Universities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

... 1 2. Percentage of Foreign Students Receiving SE Doctorates in 2004 Who Were in the United States,...

220

Foreign investors play large role in U.S. shale industry - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... while foreign companies gain experience in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing that may be transferable to other regions. Plus, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Steam Generator Management Program: Foreign Object Prioritization Strategy for Triangular Pitch Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities typically perform foreign object search and retrieval (FOSAR) on the secondary side of steam generators (SGs) during refueling outages. Depending on the SG design and operating conditions, a FOSAR can identify from a few to a substantial number of foreign objects. Characterizing and removing the foreign objects requires substantial effort, as measured in both time and dose, and in many cases, the foreign objects are small or are located in a region of the tube bundle in which little or no tube ...

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

222

WA_03_019_GENERAL_MOTORS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCORPWaiverofDomesticandForeign.pdf More Documents & Publications WA01019GENERALELECTRICCORPWaiverofDomesticandForei.pdf WA1993020GENERALMOTORSWaiverofDomest...

223

DOE O 5639.8A, Security of Foreign Intelligence Information and Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes responsibilities and authorities for protecting Foreign Intelligence Information (FII) and Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities ...

1993-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

ATOC 7500-002 Climate Change, Energy, and Foreign Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATOC 7500-002 Climate Change, Energy, and Foreign Policy When: Fall 2012, T/Th 12:30-1:45 pm Where on most recent policy literature Primary Course Website: http://atoc.colorado.edu/~toohey/ATOC7500 Description: A discussion oriented class that examines how climate change and energy inform bi

Toohey, Darin W.

225

Foreign direct investment in the electricity sector: the Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect

So far, India is losing out in the competition against other emerging economies to attract more foreign direct investment to its electricity sector. This is in large part because the Indian approach towards power sector reforms is more haphazard than the more orderly and sensitive growth model of Singapore and Latin American economies. (author)

Sharma, A.K.; Vohra, Ekta

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

REQUEST BY SMITH INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SMITH INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOR AN SMITH INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT NO. DE- AC21-92MC28182, PHASE II; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)- 96-019 [ORO-635] Smith International, Inc. has made a timely request for an advance waiver of worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Phase II of Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC21-92MC28182. The scope of the work calls for the development, testing and tool hardening of a slim hole percussion air directional drilling system to be used with both conventional drill pipe and coiled tubing. The work is sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy. The total value (including in-kind contributions) of Phase II of the contract is $1,926,862,

227

Combinatorial aspects of total positivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study combinatorial aspects of an emerging field known as total positivity. The classical theory of total positivity concerns matrices in which all minors are nonnegative. While this theory was pioneered ...

Williams, Lauren Kiyomi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Total correlations and mutual information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In quantum information theory it is generally accepted that quantum mutual information is an information-theoretic measure of total correlations of a bipartite quantum state. We argue that there exist quantum states for which quantum mutual information cannot be considered as a measure of total correlations. Moreover, for these states we propose a different way of quantifying total correlations.

Zbigniew Walczak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unclassified Foreign National Visits Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory INS-O-13-05 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 16, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Unclassified Foreign National Visits and Assignments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory" BACKGROUND In support of its research and development mission, the Department of Energy's national laboratories host thousands of foreign national visitors and assignees (foreign nationals) every year for research collaborations and access to scientific user facilities. During calendar year

230

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

231

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

232

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

233

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

234

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

235

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

236

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

237

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

238

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

239

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

240

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

242

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

243

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

244

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

245

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

246

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

247

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

248

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

249

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

250

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

251

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

252

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

253

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

254

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

255

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

256

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

257

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

258

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

259

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

260

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

262

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

263

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60,000 to 79,999 80,000 or More Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

264

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators U.S. Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Energy Information...

265

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.7...

266

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC4.7...

267

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC8.7...

268

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East North Central West North Central Energy Information Administration: 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing...

269

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

270

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Housing Units (millions) Energy Information...

271

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.0 7.7 6.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q N Q 0.6 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

272

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System... 65.9 47.5 4.0 2.8 7.9 3.7 Without a Heat Pump... 53.5...

273

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

274

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it... 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System......

275

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

m... 3.2 0.2 Q 0.1 Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 14.9 11.1 3.9 Cordless...

276

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

m... 3.2 0.9 0.7 Q Telephone and Office Equipment CellMobile Telephone... 84.8 19.3 13.2 6.1 Cordless...

277

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q 0.5 Q Q Monitor is Turned Off... 0.5 N Q Q Q Q N Q Use of Internet Have Access to Internet Yes... 66.9...

278

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Four Most Populated States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four...

279

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

280

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer......

282

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 25.8 2.8 5.8 5.5 3.8 7.9 1.4 5.1 Use of Most-Used Ceiling Fan Used All Summer... 18.7 4.2 4.9 4.1 2.1 3.4 2.4 6.3...

283

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating Characteristics Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC5.4 Space Heating...

284

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.1 0.5 Q 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

285

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3.3 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.7 0.5 Q Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

286

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.8 0.3 0.4 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

287

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.1 Not Used at All... 2.9 0.4 Q 0.2 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools... 54.9...

288

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

at All... 2.9 1.4 0.4 0.4 0.7 Battery-Operated AppliancesTools Use Battery-Operated AppliancesTools......

289

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business Yes......

290

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 34.3 1.2 0.9 2.2 2.9 5.4 7.0 8.2 6.6 Adequacy of Insulation Well Insulated... 29.5 1.5 0.9 2.3 2.7 4.1...

291

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

292

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

293

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

294

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

295

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

296

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

297

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

298

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

299

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

300

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

302

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

303

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

304

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

305

PROFILES OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN U.S. ENERGY  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3OE/EIA-O466O3) 3OE/EIA-O466O3) PROFILES OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN U.S. ENERGY MAY 1995 1993 Elk This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Telephone orders may be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Main Order Desk (202) 512-1800 FAX: (202)512-2250 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as public and academic libraries, Federal, State, local and foreign governments, EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information and for answers to questions on energy statistics, please contact EIA's

306

Foreign National Tax Frequently Asked Questions 11/5/2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/2013 5/2013 Foreign National Tax Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) What is the difference between a resident alien and a nonresident alien for tax purposes? The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) classifies all foreign nationals as either resident aliens or nonresident aliens. Resident aliens are, for the most part, taxed in the same manner as U.S. citizens. The Internal Revenue Code (IRC), however, imposes an entirely different tax system on nonresident aliens. There are many differences between the two tax regimes, but perhaps the most significant is that resident aliens, like U.S. citizens, are taxed on their worldwide income, while nonresident aliens are taxed only on their U.S. source income. In addition, different income tax withholding and reporting requirements are imposed on payments made to nonresident

307

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

308

China Total Cloud Amount Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Total Cloud Amount Over China DOI: 10.3334CDIACcli.008 data Data image Graphics Investigator Dale P. Kaiser Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental...

309

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

310

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Foreign Object Task Force Review Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foreign objects entering a steam generator (SG) can result in significant damage to tubing. Foreign objects have caused utilities to plug tubes, extend inspections, and, in some cases, shut down due to primary-to-secondary leakage.BackgroundTo gain a better understanding of the significance of the foreign object problem relative to SGs, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) assembled a task force in 2005 made ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

U.S. Total Exports  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports...

312

Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-30. U.S. and Foreign ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

T-30. U.S. and Foreign Refinery Output and Capacity: FRS and Industry, 2009 ... Energy Information Administration, Forms EIA-820 (Annual Refinery Report) ...

313

EIA's Energy in Brief: How dependent are we on foreign oil?  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How dependent are we on foreign oil? The United States relied on net imports (imports minus exports) for about 45% of the petroleum (crude oil and petroleum products ...

314

WA_1995_039_USABC_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Rights_Unde...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ofDomesticandForeignRightsUnde.pdf More Documents & Publications WA1993032FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomesticandForeig.pdf WA97038FORDMOTORCOMPANYWaiverofDomes...

315

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award The Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award is designed to recognize special contributions made by the Department's LES/FSN's in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) and United States Government's (USG) foreign policy goals and objectives. The LES/FSN of the Year Award is the Department's most prestigious award for non- Federal locally employed staff serving the Department overseas, and recognizes their outstanding achievements for the period of 1 October through 30 September each year. This

316

U.S. Foreign Policy in the Post-Soviet Caspian States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The end of the Cold War forced the United States to formulate a new foreign policy that was no longer defined by the ideological… (more)

Shiver, Sandra L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Brown Abroad: An Empirical Analysis of Foreign Judicial Citation and the Metaphor of Cosmopolitan Conversation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of foreign law as a cosmopolitan conversation is moreappropriate. Cosmopolitan conversation has led to forms ofproduct resulting from cosmopolitan conversation. Another

Lyke, Sheldon Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The U.S. relies on foreign uranium, enrichment services to fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The U.S. relies on foreign uranium, enrichment services to fuel its nuclear power plants. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Uranium Marketing Annual Report.

319

Islam and Indonesia's foreign policy, with special focus on Jakata-Islamabad relations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] This study explores the roles of Islam in Indonesia's foreign policy. Indonesia is a country with the world's largest Muslim community, where the… (more)

Wicaksana, I Gede Wahyu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Table 3.13 U.S. Energy Activities by Foreign-Affiliated Companies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

reports. • 1997 forward—EIA, Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy, annual reports. Title: Word Pro - Untitled1 Author: James Created Date:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE O 5670.1A, Management and Control of Foreign Intelligence  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order provides for the management of and assign responsibilities for foreign intelligence activities of DOE. Cancels DOE 5670.1.

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE O 142.3A, Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order defines a program for unclassified foreign national access to DOE sites, information, technologies, and equipment. Cancels DOE O 142.3.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Original article Biomass of root and shoot systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Biomass of root and shoot systems of Quercus coccifera shrublands in Eastern Spain biomass of kermes oak shrublands (Quercus coccifera L.), an evergreen sclerophyllous species common- mass has been measured on 320 1-m2 plots. Total biomass varies with age and ranges between 0.4 (7

Recanati, Catherine

324

Inspection of the Secretary of Energy`s foreign travel  

SciTech Connect

On December 9, 1995, the Secretary of Energy requested that the Department`s Inspector General (IG) conduct a thorough examination of all Secretarial foreign travel from 1993 to December 1995 to include the purpose of each trip, the activities of each Federal participant in each trip, the funding of each trip, and claims for reimbursements for expenses by Federal trip participants. The Secretary also requested that the review include an assessment of travel authorization, voucher, traveler reimbursement, and auditing systems employed by the Department to identify steps that could be taken to reduce errors and improve accounting oversight. Additionally, the Secretary requested that the Inspector General conduct a thorough examination of the establishment and filling of the Department`s Ombudsman position. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) initiated a review into these matters and assigned primary responsibility for the review to the Office of Inspections. The purpose of this inspection was to conduct a thorough examination of the 16 Secretarial foreign trips from June 1993 to December 1995. This report focuses on the four trade missions because of their extent and cost. We examined a number of Departmental management systems and processes involved in planning and executing the 16 foreign trips. To determine the actual cost of the 16 trips, it was necessary to determine who participated in the trips and to identify the individual travel costs. We were required to perform extensive reviews of records and conduct a large number of interviews because the Department could not provide any specific documents that could accurately account for who actually participated on the 16 trips. Having identified who participated, it was then necessary to examine key aspects of the Department`s management systems. Our report contains 31 recommendations for corrective action.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

REQUEST BY EATON CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER GOLDEN TECHNOLOGIES COMPANY INC. SUB-SUBCONTRACT NO. GTC94MTC001; LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY SYSTEMS SUBCONTRACT NO. 86X-SP233C; DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-840R21400; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-94-011 [ORO-578] The Eaton Corporation (Eaton) has made a timely request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Sub- subcontract No. GTC94MTC001, with Golden Technologies Company, Inc. (GTC) Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) Subcontract No. 86X-SP233C (Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technologies). The petition was originally submitted as RFP SM400-86. Subsequently, the above-referenced sub-subcontract was executed

326

REQUEST BY NORTHERN INDIANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTHERN INDIANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY, FOR AN NORTHERN INDIANA PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY, FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORPORATION SUBCONTRACT NO. 4500013009, UNDER DOE PRIME CONTRACT DE-AC05-960R22464; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)-00-006; [ORO-750] Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO) has made a request for an advance waiver to worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (LMER) Subcontract No. 4500013009; Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-AC05-960R22464. This request was originally submitted by NIPSCO on September 28,1999 with NIPSCO's proposal to LMER, however, the waiver request was not forwarded at that time to DOE. Accordingly, NIPSCO has

327

The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved the nation from foreign rule. Historical sources suggest there were three principal vessel types involved in this event: V-shaped cargo ships for transporting provisions to the front, constructed in China’s Fukien Province; miscellaneous flat and round bottomed vessels made along the Yangtze River; and flat bottomed landing craft from Korea. In the recent past, the remains of the fleet were discovered at the Takashima underwater site in western Japan, unveiling numerous artifacts including weaponry, shipboard items, and sections of hull; however, between 1281 and the late twentieth century the site has seen major disturbances, and the artifacts are often in poor condition. Because the site contains the remains of ships built in China and Korea, the interpretation of the artifacts is also extremely complex. In order to determine the origin of the vessels, a logical framework is necessary. The author has created a timber category database, analyzed methods of joinery, and studied contemporary approaches to shipbuilding to ascertain the origins and types of vessels that composed the Mongol fleet. Although no conclusive statements can be made regarding the origins of the vessels, it appears that historical documents and archaeological evidence correspond well to each other, and that many of the remains analyzed were from smaller vessels built along the Yangtze River Valley. Large, V-shaped cargo ships and the Korean vessels probably represent a small portion of the timbers raised at the Takashima site. As the first research project of its kind in the region, this study is a starting point for understanding the real story of the Mongol invasion of Japan, as well as the history of shipbuilding in East Asia.

Sasaki, Randall James

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 1990 iJ Energy Information Administration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Farragut Bookstore 1510 H Street N.W. Washington, DC 20005 (202) 653-7697 FAX (202) 376-5055 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20402 (202) 783-3238 FAX (202)512-2233 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office c/o Mellon Bank P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of

329

Before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Before the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Fehner and Gosling, Origins of the Nevada Test...

330

Compact Totally Disconnected Moufang Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\Delta$ be a spherical building each of whose irreducible components is infinite, has rank at least 2 and satisfies the Moufang condition. We show that $\\Delta$ can be given the structure of a topological building that is compact and totally disconnected precisely when $\\Delta$ is the building at infinity of a locally finite affine building.

Grundhofer, T; Van Maldeghem, H; Weiss, R M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. Total 135,676 127,682 120,936 133,646 119,888 93,672 1936-2012 PAD District 1 78,197 73,348 69,886 88,999 79,188 59,594 1981-2012...

332

China's Foreign Policy under the New Leadership More Continuity than Change Fraser Cameron11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 China's Foreign Policy under the New Leadership ­ More Continuity than Change Fraser Cameron11 Introduction A year after the leadership changes in China it is timely to assess whether the new men at the helm (there are no women) will seek to change China's traditionally cautious foreign policy

Steels, Luc

333

Profiles of foreign direct investment in U.S. energy 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in US Energy 1993 describes the role of foreign ownership in US energy resources. This report also looks at the investment patterns of US energy companies in other countries. The data used in this report come from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US Department of Commerce, company annual reports, and public disclosures of investment activities.

NONE

1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award The Locally Employed Staff (LES)/Foreign Service National (FSN) of the Year Award is designed to recognize special contributions made by the Department's LES/FSN's in achieving the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) and United States Government's (USG) foreign policy goals and objectives. The LES/FSN of the Year Award is the Department's most prestigious award for non-Federal locally employed staff serving the Department overseas, and recognizes their outstanding achievements for the period of 1 October through 30 September each year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of

335

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

336

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

337

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

338

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

339

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

340

Original","Revised","Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"Original","Revised","Data" ,,"Original","Revised","Data" "Data Type","Product","End Use","PADD","State","Data 2003","Data 2003","Different" "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","U.S. TOTAL",,110032,110032 "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","PADD 1",,4232,4232 "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","PADD 1A",,2085,2085 "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","Connecticut","CT" "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","Maine","ME",536,536 "Sales","No. 1 Distillate","Residential","Massachusetts","MA",678,678

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sizzling Qatar boom sparked by foreign money, technology, and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International oil companies have collected advanced upstream and downstream technology and focused it on the small Persian Gulf emirate of Qatar, a roughly 110 mile long by 50 mile wide, thumb-like peninsula that juts out from Saudi Arabia. The emirate, in a burst of enlightened self interest, has opened its doors to international companies and is now riding a wave of foreign investment and new technology to major increases in oil, natural gas, and petrochemical production. The largest natural gas reserve in the world is under Qatari waters and is the driver for the activity that includes two LNG plants. Qatar has proven that you don`t need crude oil in the Persian Gulf to be important. Activities are discussed.

Aalund, L.R.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

342

Foreign firms to get equal opportunity in Mexican selloff plans  

SciTech Connect

Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) has not finalized details of its long-awaited petrochemical privatization program. However, the state oil group has made it clear the selloff schedule, due to begin during the next two months, will give equal investment opportunity to foreign firms, dashing the hopes of Mexican groups that they would be given first right of refusal in the privatization program. Meanwhile, Pemex has agreed with Shell Oil on a previously announced refining joint venture involving Shell's 225,000-bbl/day refinery at Deer Park, TX. Under the plan, Pemex will purchase a 50% stake in the refinery and join Shell in a $1-billion upgrade with would enable it to handle more Mexican crude. Sources believe that Shell and other US oil groups are interested in acquiring assets from Pemex Petroquimica.

Wood, A.; Alvarez, C.

1993-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

343

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

344

An analysis of job placement variables of foreign national Master of Business Administration (MBA) students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foreign national (international) students studying business at universities in the United States gain a valuable education, but they have a very difficult time finding work in the U.S because of a variety of cultural, communication, and employment visa issues. Campus career centers need to address the unique needs and concerns of their international student population in order to most effectively assist this select group in their job search. The purpose of this study was to examine the job placement variables of international students graduating from MBA programs across the United States in the 2001 class. A thorough review of the literature summarized the adjustment challenges facing international students, career services, and the job search challenges for international MBA students in particular. Data from 2570 international MBA students were examined to see whether there were differences in post-graduation jobs based on the students?? country of origin, years of work experience prior to the MBA program, and undergraduate major. The dependent variables examined were the base salary of the post-MBA job, the amount of signing bonus, the functional area of the student??s employment, the industry of the employer, and the geographic location of the new job. This study found that students from the North American region earned slightly higher salaries than students from Asia, and that European, North American and South American students received slightly higher signing bonuses than Asian students. The international students entered into similar functions and industries regardless of their country of origin. The majority of students, regardless of country of origin, stayed in the U.S. for employment. There was a direct correlation found between the number of years of prior work experience and the base salary of the student. Students with an undergraduate major in technology earned slightly higher salaries and signing bonuses. The results of this study will assist MBA career services professionals in how they counsel their international students in the job search and salary negotiations. The results may also assist MBA admissions professionals in deciding who to admit to their programs, as placement results are important measures of an MBA program??s success.

Scism, Darby Claire

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Table 5.4 Petroleum Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 5.4 Petroleum Imports by Country of Origin, 1960-2011: Year: Persian Gulf 2: Selected OPEC 1 Countries: Selected Non-OPEC 1 Countries: Total Imports

346

Primordial origins of Earth's carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we review the astrophysical origins of Earth's carbon, starting from the products of the Big Bang and culminating with the Earth's formation. We review the measured compositions of different primitive objects including comets, various classes of meteorites and interstellar dust particles. We discuss the composition of the Solar Nebula, especially with regards to the distribution of volatiles such as carbon. We discuss dynamical models of planetary formation from planetesimals and planetary embryos, and the timescale for volatile delivery to the growing Earth from different sources. Finally, we review Earth's carbon reservoirs. Throughout the chapter we highlight open questions related to planet formation, meteoritics, and geochemistry.

Marty, Bernard; Raymond, Sean N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The effect of own-firm and other-firm experience on foreign direct investment survival  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that foreign firms operating in a host country generate information spillovers that have potential value for later foreign direct investment. We test two predictions. First, we expect foreign direct investments by firms with experience in a host country to be more likely to survive than investments made by first-time entrants. Second, foreign direct investments will be more likely to survive the greater the foreign presence in the target industry at the time of investment, subject to two contingencies. The first contingency is that the relationship will be weak or nonexistent among firms with no experience in the host country, because these firms have difficulty evaluating and taking advantage of the information spillovers. The second contingency is that the presence of other foreign firms will not affect investment survival among firms that already have a presence in the target industry and undertake expansion. These firms already possess general information about the target industries and are unlikely to gain additional benefit from information spillovers. We find supportive evidence based on the survival to 1992 among 354 U.S. investments undertaken by foreign firms in manufacturing industries

J. Myles Shaver; Will Mitchell; Bernard Yeung

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

349

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

350

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

351

Microsoft Word - SEC J_Appendix D - Sensitive Foreign Nations Control  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

D, Page 1 D, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX D SENSITIVE FOREIGN NATIONS CONTROL 1. Pursuant to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Sensitive Foreign Nations Controls," "sensitive foreign nations" is one of the countries listed below: Algeria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus China (People's Republic of China) Cuba Georgia Hong Kong India Iran Iraq Israel Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Libya Moldova North Korea (Democratic People's Republic of) Pakistan Russia Sudan Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Turkmenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan 2. Due to the dynamic nature of world events, other countries may, at any time, become sensitive. Therefore, caution should be exercised with citizens of countries not listed above to

352

Detection of foreign body using fast thermoacoustic tomography with a multielement linear transducer array  

SciTech Connect

Current imaging modalities face challenges in clinical applications due to limitations in resolution or contrast. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging may provide a complementary modality for medical imaging, particularly for detecting foreign objects due to their different absorption of electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies. A thermoacoustic tomography system with a multielement linear transducer array was developed and used to detect foreign objects in tissue. Radiography and thermoacoustic images of objects with different electromagnetic properties, including glass, sand, and iron, were compared. The authors' results demonstrate that thermoacoustic imaging has the potential to become a fast method for surgical localization of occult foreign objects.

Nie Liming; Xing Da; Yang Diwu; Zeng Lvming; Zhou Quan [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China) and Institute of Laser Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

354

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

17.40 American Foreign Policy: Past, Present, and Future, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mission for this course is to explain and evaluate past and present United States policies. What caused the United States' past involvement in foreign wars and interventions? Were the results of U.S. policies good or ...

Van Evera, Stephen

356

The systemic and ideological sources of grand strategic doctrine : American foreign policy in the twentieth century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What explains the puzzling variation in America's foreign policy posture? This study proposes and tests a theory of American grand strategy that places an emphasis on two key variables: the ideological content of American ...

Green, Brendan Rittenhouse

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

West Coast (PADD 5) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Coast (PADD 5) Foreign Crude Oil Refinery Receipts by Tank Cars (Rail) (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

358

The drivers of foreign direct investment in telecommunications among developing countries : the role of government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the late 1980s, globalization of the world's economies and technological development created the conditions for the expansion of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in telecommunications. This tendency has been further ...

Cruz Alemán, Guillermo Alberto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Kazakhstan's Energy in Foreign Policy : Oil and Gas in the Multi-vector Policy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the relationship between Kazakhstan’s oil and gas resources and its multi-vector foreign policy. The relationship is explored by studying how oil and… (more)

Henriksen, Karl Erik Bragtvedt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Are Foreign Firms Privileged By Their Host Governments? Evidence From The 2000 World Business Environment Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the data from World Business Environment Survey (WBES) on over 10,000 firms across eighty one countries, this paper finds preliminary evidence that foreign firms enjoy significant regulatory advantages - as perceived ...

Huang, Yasheng

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Report on Inspection of the Secretary of Energy's Foreign Travel, DOE/IG-0397  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Inspectorl General (IG) conduct a thorough examination of all Secretarial foreign travel from 1993 to December 1995 to include the purpose of each trip, the activities of each Federal participant...

362

Communicative 2.0 : video games and digital culture in the foreign language classroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I explore two core concepts in today's youth entertainment culture that will increasingly become central in future attempts to design affordable foreign language learning materials that hope to bridge the chasm between ...

Purushotma, Ravi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

Laible, Philip D. (Villa Park, IL); Hanson, Deborah K. (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Foreign direct investment, intra-organizational proximity, and technological capability : the case of China's automobile industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three self-contained essays, each of which examines part of the causal link among inward/outward foreign direct investment (FDI), intra-organizational proximity, and in-house technology ...

Nam, Kyung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Map Data: Total Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Production Map Data: Total Production totalprod2009final.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Consumption...

366

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

367

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

368

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

369

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

370

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

371

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

372

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

373

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

374

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

375

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

376

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

377

Directory of financing sources for foreign energy projects  

SciTech Connect

The Office of National Security Policy has produced this Directory of Financing Sources for Foreign Energy Projects. The Directory reviews programs that offer financing from US government agencies, multilateral organizations, public, private, and quasi-private investment funds, and local commercial and state development banks. The main US government agencies covered are the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the Export-Import Bank of the US (EXIM Bank), Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), US Department of Energy, US Department of Defense, and the US Trade and Development Agency (TDA). Other US Government Sources includes market funds that have been in part capitalized using US government agency funds. Multilateral organizations include the World Bank, International Finance Corporation (IFC), Asian Development Bank (ADB), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), and various organizations of the United Nations. The Directory lists available public, private, and quasi-private sources of financing in key emerging markets in the Newly Independent States and other developing countries of strategic interest to the US Department of Energy. The sources of financing listed in this directory should be considered indicative rather than inclusive of all potential sources of financing. Initial focus is on the Russian Federation, Ukraine, india, China, and Pakistan. Separate self-contained sections have been developed for each of the countries to enable the user to readily access market-specific information and to support country-specific Departmental initiatives. For each country, the directory is organized to follow the project life cycle--from prefeasibility, feasibility, project finance, cofinancing, and trade finance, through to technical assistance and training. Programs on investment and export insurance are excluded.

La Ferla, L. [La Ferla Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Microsoft Word - Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2006 _embedded t&f_.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2006 - Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2006 Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 2006 This report provides an assessment of foreign ownership of energy assets in the United States. Section 657, Subpart 8 of the U.S. Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91) requires an annual report to Congress which presents: "a summary of activities in the United States by companies which are foreign owned or controlled and which own or control United States energy sources and supplies ...." The Energy Information Administration intends the information in this report for use by the U.S. Congress, U.S. Government agencies, industry analysts, and the general public. Findings ï‚· The U.S. electricity generating capacity owned by foreign direct investors fell 19 percent

379

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

380

ON THE ORIGIN OF INTERGRANULAR JETS  

SciTech Connect

We observe that intergranular jets, originating in the intergranular space surrounding individual granules, tend to be associated with granular fragmentation, in particular, with the formation and evolution of a bright granular lane (BGL) within individual granules. The BGLs have recently been identified as vortex tubes by Steiner et al. We further discover the development of a well-defined bright grain located between the BGL and the dark intergranular lane to which it is connected. Signatures of a BGL may reach the lower chromosphere and can be detected in off-band H{alpha} images. Simulations also indicate that vortex tubes are frequently associated with small-scale magnetic fields. We speculate that the intergranular jets detected in the New Solar Telescope (NST) data may result from the interaction between the turbulent small-scale fields associated with the vortex tube and the larger-scale fields existing in the intergranular lanes. The intergranular jets are much smaller and weaker than all previously known jet-like events. At the same time, they appear much more numerous than the larger events, leading us to the speculation that the total energy release and mass transport by these tiny events may not be negligible in the energy and mass-flux balance near the temperature minimum atop the photosphere. The study is based on the photospheric TiO broadband (1.0 nm) filter data acquired with the 1.6 m NST operating at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. The data set also includes NST off-band H{alpha} images collected through a Zeiss Lyot filter with a passband of 0.025 nm.

Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Goode, P. R.; Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States); Steiner, O. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The energy statecraft of Brazil: promoting biofuels as an instrument of Brazilian foreign policy, 2003-2010.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ‘conditionalist’ approach to the economic statecraft literature in International Relations and Foreign Policy Analysis seeks to establish the conditions under which economic instruments of… (more)

Dalgaard, Klaus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

origins.indd | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gosling, Origins of the Nevada Test Site Fehner and Gosling, Atmospheric Nuclear Weapons Testing, 1951-1963. Battlefield of the Cold War: The Nevada Test Site, Volume I...

383

Original Google Earth Links | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Original Google Earth Links Jump to: navigation, search Google Earth Google Earth.png Install Google Earth and explore: Renewable Energy Activity, by state Renewable Incentive...

384

Alkoholituotteen tuotteistaminen ja markkinointi : Ufo Shot Original.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Opinnäytetyössä käsitellään Ufo Shot Original – alkoholituotteen tuotekehitystä ja lanseerausta. Prosessin tavoite oli kehittää tuoteideasta Suomen alkoholimarkkinoilla menestyvä tuote. Ensisijainen tavoite oli ravintolamyynnin kasvatus, jonka… (more)

Pikkarainen, Joonas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Residential Energy Usage by Origin of Householder  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Energy Users > Residential Home Page > Energy Usage by Origin of Householder. Consumption and Expenditures. NOTE: To View and/or Print PDF's ...

386

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 2,550,203 FY2009 39,646,446 FY2010 64,874,187 FY2011 66,253,207 FY2012...

389

Fractionally total colouring Gn,p  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the fractional total chromatic number of G"n","p as p varies from 0 to 1. We also present an algorithm that computes the fractional total chromatic number of a random graph in polynomial expected time. Keywords: Fractional total colouring, Graph colouring, Random graphs

Conor Meagher; Bruce Reed

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Total Ore Processing Integration and Management  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the technical progress achieved for project DE-FC26-03NT41785 (Total Ore Processing Integration and Management) during the period 01 January through 31 March of 2006. (1) Work in Progress: Minntac Mine--Graphical analysis of drill monitor data moved from two-dimensional horizontal patterns to vertical variations in measured and calculated parameters. The rock quality index and the two dimensionless ({pi}) indices developed by Kewen Yin of the University of Minnesota are used by Minntac Mine to design their blasts, but the drill monitor data from any given pattern is obviously not available for the design of that shot. Therefore, the blast results--which are difficult to quantify in a short time--must be back-analyzed for comparison with the drill monitor data to be useful for subsequent blast designs. {pi}{sub 1} indicates the performance of the drill, while {pi}{sub 2} is a measure of the rock resistance to drilling. As would be expected, since a drill tends to perform better in rock that offers little resistance, {pi}{sub 1} and {pi}{sub 2} are strongly inversely correlated; the relationship is a power function rather than simply linear. Low values of each Pi index tend to be quantized, indicating that these two parameters may be most useful above certain minimum magnitudes. (2) Work in Progress: Hibtac Mine--Statistical examination of a data set from Hibtac Mine (Table 1) shows that incorporating information on the size distribution of material feeding from the crusher to the autogenous mills improves the predictive capability of the model somewhat (43% vs. 44% correlation coefficient), but a more important component is production data from preceding days (26% vs. 44% correlation coefficient), determined using exponentially weighted moving average predictive variables. This lag effect likely reflects the long and varied residence times of the different size fragments in the grinding mills. The rock sizes are also correlated with the geologic layers from which they originate. Additional predictive parameters include electric power drawn by the crusher and the inverse of the average grind index of the ore being milled.

Leslie Gertsch

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

392

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

410

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

411

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

412

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

413

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN INVENTIONS MADE IN THE PERFORMANCE OF RESEARCH IN THE INORGANIC MEMBRANE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY OPERATED BY BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY UNDER ITS MANAGEMENT AND INTEGRATION CONTRACT DE-AC05-980R22700; WAIVER ORO-674, W(C)-98-004 The Department of Energy (DOE) previously approved a class waiver [W(C)-96-006] of domestic and foreign patent rights in inventions made in the performance of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) relating to inorganic membrane technology, which were entered into by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. under prime contract DE-AC05-840R21400 and by Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation under prime contract DE-AC05-960R22464. Those contractors performed cooperative research involving inorganic membrane

414

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS CLASS WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER THE MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION AND ENHANCED PASSIVE REMEDIATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS ALTERNATIVE PROJECT TO PROJECT SUBCONTRACTORS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC09-96SR18500 AND TO THE LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER; (W(C)-2004-001) [ORO-785] This waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation of Chlorinated Solvents Alternative Project (MNA/EPR Alternative Project) subject inventions is intended to cover Project Subcontractors under DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 with Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), other than domestic small business and nonprofit organization project subcontractors and lower tier subcontractors covered

415

ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER THE DEPARTMENT'S ACCELERATED SITE TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT TO THE AWARDEES AND ANY LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER W(C)-98-003 CH- 0952 This is a waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in subject inventions made under awards issued in the Department of Energy's Accelerated Site Technology Deployment. The class waiver applies to the prime awardees and also to any lower tier subcontractors provided the other criteria for the class waiver are met. This class waiver does not apply to domestic small business and nonprofit organizations which are entitled to elect to retain title to their subject inventions pursuant to Public Law 96-517, as amended. This class waiver is

416

Chapter_4_Foreign_Ownership_Control_or_Influence_Facility_Clearance_and_Classified_Contract_Registration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence; Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence; Facility Clearance; and Classified Contract Registration This chapter summarizes the process that contractors undergo to be authorized to perform classified work for DOE HQ. The process involves three-steps: obtaining a Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence (FOCI) determination, obtaining a Facility Clearance; and registering classified contracts within DOE's Safeguards and Security Information Management System (SSIMS). At HQ, all these actions are performed within the Office of Information Security (HS- 92), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security. HS-92 has developed a website (see the Helpful Websites subsection, below) containing instructional handbooks for completing the forms identified in this chapter. These handbooks

417

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE WAIVER OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN THE U.S. GOVERNMENT'S DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS ARISING UNDER INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS AT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT- DESIGNATED TEST BED FACILITIES TO THE DEMONSTRATOR W(A)-95-011 AND TO THE LARGE BUSINESS LOWER TIER SUBCONTRACTORS THEREUNDER. This waiver of the U.S. Government's domestic and foreign patent rights in Innovative Technology Demonstration Projects' subject inventions is intended to cover Innovative Environmental Technology Demonstrators and lower tier subcontractors, other than domestic small business and nonprofit organization Demonstrators and lower tier subcontractors covered by Public Law 96-517, demonstrating innovative environmental technology, under contract or other agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE),

418

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

419

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

420

The Department of Energy's International Offices and Foreign Assignments, OAS-L-13-05  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy's Department of Energy's International Offices and Foreign Assignments OAS-L-13-05 January 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 January 16, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DEPUTY DIRECTOR FOR FIELD OPERATIONS, OFFICE OF SCIENCE FROM: David Sedillo Director, Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's International Offices and Foreign Assignments" BACKGROUND The mission of the Department of Energy and its semi-autonomous National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Foreign operators' oil and gas E and D action in Thailand gathering speed  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the pace of foreign operators' exploration and development campaigns in Thailand. A rapidly growing economy is spurring sharp growth in oil and gas demand in Thailand. Correspondingly the Thai government recently embarked on an ambitious energy program that focuses on increasing oil and gas production, expanding gas utilization, and building gas supply ties with neighboring countries. Key to the success of the domestic E D push has been the government's ability to attract foreign investment in Thai E D. although progress is sometimes slow in coming amid tough negotiations, efforts to improve contract terms are yielding green lights for key projects.

1991-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Mapping technological innovations through patent analysis: a case study of foreign multinationals and indigenous firms in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to expand the work on patenting activities of China. The characteristics of foreign multinationals and indigenous entities' patenting activities in the US patent system are examined in our analysis. This study also attempts to model ... Keywords: China, Foreign multinationals, Growth, Indigenous entities, Patents, Technological innovations

Chan-Yuan Wong; Xiao-Shan Yap

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

425

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

426

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

427

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

428

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

429

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

430

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

431

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

432

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

433

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

434

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

435

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

436

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

437

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

438

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Northeast Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

439

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Census Division Total Midwest Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

440

Total U.S. Housing Units.......................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(millions) Census Division Total South Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Million U.S. Housing Units...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas Capacity Total Number of Existing Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

442

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

443

Total Adjusted Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions,...

444

Total Adjusted Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

445

Total Sales of Distillate Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Oil Company Farm Electric Power Railroad Vessel Bunkering On-Highway Military Off-Highway All Other Period: Annual Download Series...

446

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

447

Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Former ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd)a New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 14. Refinery Sales During 2005

448

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

449

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

450

OriginOil Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Place Los Angeles, California Zip 90016 Product California-based OTC-quoted algae-to-oil technology developer. References OriginOil Inc1 LinkedIn Connections...

451

The Universe Adventure - Origins of the CMB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Origins of the CMB Decoupling of Matter The first light radiated after decoupling is now known as the CMB. During the first 380,000 years after the Big Bang, the universe was so...

452

How a Single T Cell Receptor Recognizes Both Self and Foreign MHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Single T Cell Receptor Recognizes Both a Single T Cell Receptor Recognizes Both Self and Foreign MHC The adaptive immune response enables the vertebrate immune system to recognize and respond to specific pathogens, with immunological memory allowing a stronger response upon subsequent re-exposure to a pathogen. Adaptive immunity relies on the capacity of immune cells to distinguish between the body's own cells and foreign invaders. ab T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize antigenic peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex proteins (MHC) as the central event in the cellular adaptive immune response. Despite undergoing an extensive education process in the thymus, mature T cells exhibit a high frequency of crossreactivity, or alloreactivity, toward foreign peptide-MHC to which they have not previously been exposed. Alloreactivity indicates an inherent ability of the TCR to crossreact with a broad range of self and foreign peptide-MHC ligands, which could be beneficial for immune surveillance of a universe of potential pathogens. However, it presents a major clinical problem for organ transplantation in that genetically mismatched tissue can be rejected in a graft-host alloresponse.

453

Test of English as a Foreign LanguageTM Leading. www.ets.org/toefl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test of English as a Foreign LanguageTM Listening. Learning. Leading. www.ets.org/toefl Information Internet-based testing ONLY. Information about TOEFL computer-based testing,TOEFL paper-based testing, and the Test of Spoken English is in a separate Bulletin. Read all of the information in this Bulletin

454

Foreign Policy and Complex Adaptive Systems: Exploring New Paradigms for Analysis and Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of information and communications technologies work for everyone? 7. How can ethical market economies#12;1 Foreign Policy and Complex Adaptive Systems: Exploring New Paradigms for Analysis and Action and sophisticated global enterprises? 13. How can growing energy demands be met safely and efficiently? 14. How can

455

Democratic Accountability in International Relations: Domestic Pressures and Constraints for Coercive Foreign Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My dissertation contributes to the accountability literature in international relations by examining the role constituents' preferences can potentially play in fomenting or constraining coercive foreign policies in democracies. In times of international crises, domestic audiences have specific coercive foreign policy preferences and will support executives who represent them when selecting coercive foreign policies. Executive actions will increase popular support or generate audience costs depending on whether these actions are consistent with the specific policy preferences that domestic audiences have given the threat a crisis poses to national security. To determine when audiences prefer economic or military coercion and how these preferences affect their evaluation of the executive I conduct three experiments, including a survey experiment conducted with a representative sample of Americans and an experiment conducted with a convenience sample in the United Kingdom. The results show interesting similarities and differences between the cross-national samples regarding foreign policy preferences and the public's propensity to support and punish leaders during times of international conflict. Mainly, I find that (1) the concept of audience costs can be expanded to cases of economic coercion, (2) under certain circumstances audience costs operate even in crises that are not very salient and (3) when there is a mismatch between public preferences and threats issued by the executive, audience costs do not operate at all.

Thomson, Catarina 1980-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear steam-generator transplant total rises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several utilities with pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are replacing leaking and corroded steam generators. Over half the PWRs face corrosion problems that will cost $50 million to $100 million per unit to correct. An alternative approach of installing new tube sleeves has only had one application. Corrosion prevention still eludes utilities, whose problems differ. Westinghouse units were the first to experience corrosion problems because they have almost all operated for a decade or more. Some advances in condenser and steam-generator technology should extend the component life of younger units, and some leaking PWR tubes can be plugged. Operating differences may explain why PWRs have operated for over 20 years on submarines using phosphate water chemistry, while the use of de-aerators in the secondary-systems of foreign PWRs may explain their better performance. Among the corrective steps recommended by Stone and Webster are tighter chemistry control, better plant layup practices, revamping secondary-system hardware, condensate polishing, and de-aerators. Research continues to find the long-term preventative. 2 tables. (DCK)

Smock, R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Bounds on the Solar Antineutrino total Flux and Energy spectrum from the SK experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for inverse beta decay electron antineutrinos has been carried out using the 825 days sample of solar data obtained at SK. The absence of a significant signal, that is, contributions to the total SK background and their angular variations has set upper bounds on a) the absolute flux of solar antineutrinos originated from ${}^8 B$ neutrinos $\\Phi_{\\bar{\

E. Torrente-Lujan

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

458

Foreign Influences and Consequences on the Nuragic Culture of Sardinia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although it is accepted that Phoenician colonization occurred on Sardinia by the 9th century B.C., it is possible that contact between Sardinia?s indigenous population and the Levantine region occurred in the Late Bronze Age (LBA). Eastern LBA goods found on the island are copper oxhide ingots and Aegean pottery. Previously, it has been suggested that Mycenaeans were responsible for bringing the eastern goods to Sardinia, but the presence of Aegean pottery shards does not confirm the presence of Mycenaean tradesmen. Also, scholars of LBA trade have explained the paucity of evidence for a Mycenaean merchant fleet. Interpretations of two LBA shipwrecks, Cape Gelidonya and Uluburun, indicate that eastern Mediterranean merchants of Cypriot or Syro-Canaanite origin, transported large quantities of oxhide ingots from the Levant towards the west. It remains possible that similar itinerant merchants conducted ventures bringing eastern goods to Sardinia while exploring the western Mediterranean. Trade in eastern goods may have stimulated the advancement that occurred in Nuragic culture in the LBA, resulting in the emergence of an elite social stratum in the Nuragic society. Archaeological evidence, such as elitist burials and increasingly complex architecture, supports the idea of cultural change due to internal competition. This „peer-polity? effect may have been incited because of limited accessibility to the exotic eastern goods and the „ownership? to the rights of this exchange.

Choltco, Margaret E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

460

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

462

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

463

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

464

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

465

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

466

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

467

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

468

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

469

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

470

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

471

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

472

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

473

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

474

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

475

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

476

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

477

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

478

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

479

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

480

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreign origin total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

482

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

483

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

484

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

485

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

486

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

487

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

488

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

489

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

490

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

491

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

492

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal",...

495

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

496

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

497

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

498

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

499

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

500

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000