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1

Detecting a Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background in the presence of a Galactic Foreground and Instrument Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting a stochastic gravitational wave background requires that we first understand and model any astrophysical foregrounds. In the millihertz frequency band, the predominate foreground signal will be from unresolved white dwarf binaries in the galaxy. We build on our previous work to show that a stochastic gravitational wave background can be detected in the presence of both instrument noise and a galactic confusion foreground. The key to our approach is accurately modeling the spectra for each of the various signal components. We simulate data for a gigameter Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) operating in the mHz frequency band detector operating with both 6- and 4-links. We obtain posterior distribution functions for the instrument noise parameters, the galaxy level and modulation parameters, and the stochastic background energy density. We find that we are able to detect a scale-invariant stochastic background with energy density as low as Omega_gw = 2e-13 for a 6-link interferometer and Omega_gw = 5e-13 for a 4-link interferometer with one year of data.

Matthew R. Adams; Neil J. Cornish

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

Neural networks and separation of background and foregrounds in astrophysical sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To have a first insight into the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the Planck Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Beaver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Beaver Nature Bulletin No. 246-A November 26, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEAVER The beaver was the first hydraulic engineer. Back in the days when our ancestors were still living in caves, the beaver had been building elaborate dams across streams, digging canals, and sleeping safely in artificial-island homes for thousands of years. This had a profound effect on streams and stream valleys in Europe, Siberia and most of North America, literally changing the face of the earth. Their dams held back flood waters in wet seasons, maintained the flow of streams in times of drought, and built up ground water supplies. The ponds above these dams, which were occasionally more than 1000 feet long, allowed sediment to settle out of the water and form broad meadows which eventually were occupied by tracts of timber and, now, some of our finest farmland. Waterfowl, fish, and a host of other living things thrived here because of the beaver.

4

beaver.html  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beavers - Mother Nature's Engineers Beavers - Mother Nature's Engineers Prairie Resources - Exhibit Home Do beavers live on Fermilab property? Yes. Several beavers' lodges can be spotted on Fermilab's site. Since beavers, Castor canadensis, are mostly nocturnal animals, they are rarely seen during the day. But a visitor might find evidence of the existence of about twenty resident beavers. Why are beavers called "Mother Nature's Engineers"? Beavers are born knowing how to build lodges and dams. They stand on their hind legs and cut down trees, while balancing on their tail. They cut down as many as 200 trees a year, mostly soft-wood trees such as cotton-woods or willows. This actually helps the groundcrew of Fermilab to curb the growth of unwanted trees. The beavers then start their building by holding large

5

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Beaver Valley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

6

NSA-Beaver Pond Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) Beaver Pond Site (NSA-BP) The storage tent and gas collectors NSA-BP site looking to the east. Visible is the investigator hut on drier land to the west and the boardwalk leading out to the tower site in the right portion of the image with the mounded beaver lodge visible in the middle of the image. The bridge and the 3 meter flux tower The beaver lodge The bridge from the flux tower This is the floating bridge leading from the flux tower back to the shore. The large tent for holding equipment is clearly visible on the shore. The TGB gas collectors on the beaver pond Back to the BOREAS Photo Page Index Other Sites: NSA Photos ||NSA-BP Photos | NSA-Fen Photos | NSA-OA Photos | NSA-OBS Photos | NSA-OJP Photos | NSA-UBS Photos | NSA-YJP Photos | NSA-Ops Photos

7

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3pa6040 892 7,119 91.1 PWR 885 7,874 101.6 1,777 14,994 96.3 Beaver Valley Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: ...

8

BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Medical Coordination Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven National Laboratory DOE/IG-0594 March 2003 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 March 3 1,2003 FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on Inspection of "Emergency Medical Coordination Memorandum of Agreement at Brookhaven National Laboratory" BACKGROUND Because of possible exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials and the potential for industrial accidents at Department of Energy (DOE) sites, the Department has established formalized agreements with local emergency medical providers. These arrangements are generally documented through memoranda of agreements (MOAs). These documents detail the m u

9

Beaver, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Beaver, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

10

Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

explains the potential health hazards associated with air quality related to the removal and storage of explains the potential health hazards associated with air quality related to the removal and storage of mill tailings and other contaminated materials. Background From 1942 to 1960, uranium ore was processed at the Monticello mill in southeast Utah. When the mill was closed, approximately 2.3 million cubic yards of low-level radioactive mill tailings, contaminated soil, and other miscellaneous debris remained on the site. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office, in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the State of Utah, is conducting the cleanup of the millsite and more than 400 area homes and businesses contaminated with mill tailings. The purpose of the cleanup is to minimize risks to the public and the

11

Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Format for the one pager: Report Statement/Recommendation Format for the one pager: Report Statement/Recommendation Background Pros/Cons discussion We would like to see good drafts by noon. 3/30/01. 11 circulate them as soon as I get them in. Any questions, give me a call. 456-7874 Charlie ___ ___ _8171 DOE015-1514 Martin, Adrienne ^ From: Anderson, Margot / / Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2001 723 PM To: 'Andrew D. Lundquisltovp.eop.gov%intemet' Subject: RE: 1 spoke with Charlie and we got it fixed. Thanksl -Original Message- From: Andrew D. Lundquist@ovp.eop.gov%intemet Imailto:Andrew D. Lundquistovp.eop.gov] Sent: Thursday March 29, 2001 7:18 PM To: Anderson. Margot Cc: Kelliher, Joseph; Kolevar, Kevin; Charles M. Smthovp.egov%htemet; Juleanna FR GOovsWeovp.eop.gov%intemet 'kmurphyiosec.doc.gov%intemet 'dina.eisOdo.treas.gov%intemer;

12

Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patent Rights in the New Patent Rights in the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for Inventions made by NIS institutes' employeess in the course of or under agreements entered into pursuant to the Fiscal Year 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act (P.L. 103- 87). W(C) 94-001 Background The dissolution of the Soviet Union and the drastic reductions in defense spending by the NIS have created an extremely difficult situation for the scientists and engineers who are responsible for the former Soviet Union's defense technology base. It is estimated that there are several tens of thousands of such scientists and engineers; they possess critical technical knowledge about weapons of mass destruction and are underemployed and undercompensated, and consequently, could contribute to

13

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BEAVER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAVER BEAVER Logo for BEAVER WINDOWS environment for the ESPII Fortran program which estimates the energy consumption of buildings using the ASHRAE Response Factor Method. BEAVER building energy simulation provides for user friendly input of data, processing and viewing of the results. BEAVER estimates the energy consumption of a building hourly over a given period of time taking into account the site location, the building structure and the type of building services installed to maintain the desired environmental conditions. It enables a designer to investigate alternatives and make energy comparisons quickly and effectively for a very wide range of building configurations and air conditioning systems using actual measured climatic data. A comprehensive range of air handling systems, primary plant and control

14

SPIDER OPTIMIZATION. II. OPTICAL, MAGNETIC, AND FOREGROUND EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

SPIDER is a balloon-borne instrument designed to map the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with degree-scale resolution over a large fraction of the sky. SPIDER's main goal is to measure the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves through their imprint on the polarization of the CMB if the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, is greater than 0.03. To achieve this goal, instrumental systematic errors must be controlled with unprecedented accuracy. Here, we build on previous work to use simulations of SPIDER observations to examine the impact of several systematic effects that have been characterized through testing and modeling of various instrument components. In particular, we investigate the impact of the non-ideal spectral response of the half-wave plates, coupling between focal-plane components and Earth's magnetic field, and beam mismatches and asymmetries. We also present a model of diffuse polarized foreground emission based on a three-dimensional model of the Galactic magnetic field and dust, and study the interaction of this foreground emission with our observation strategy and instrumental effects. We find that the expected level of foreground and systematic contamination is sufficiently low for SPIDER to achieve its science goals.

O'Dea, D. T.; Clark, C. N.; Contaldi, C. R. [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Ade, P. A. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Amiri, M.; Burger, B.; Davis, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Benton, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bock, J. J.; Crill, B. P.; Dore, O.; Filippini, J. P. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bond, J. R.; Farhang, M. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Bonetti, J. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Bryan, S. [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chiang, H. C.; Fraisse, A. A. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Fissel, L. M.; Gandilo, N. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Motion detection in complex and dynamic backgrounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the detection of moving objects, background subtraction methods are widely used. In case the background changes, we need to update the background in real-time for the reliable detection of foreground objects. An adaptive Gaussian mixture model (GMM) ...

Daeyong Park; Junbeom Kim; Jaemin Kim; Seongwon Cho; Sun-Tae Chung

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beaver County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

17

Big Beaver, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigBeaver,Pennsylvania&oldid227745" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

18

Beaver City Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corporation (Utility Company) Corporation (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Beaver City Corporation Place Utah Utility Id 1434 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Demand Service- Above 7.5 kW or at City Option Commercial General Commercial Service Commercial Irrigation Service Commercial Residential Service Residential Residential Service Outside City Limits Residential Street Lighting- Customer Owner Lighting Average Rates

19

Determining foreground contamination in cosmic microwavebackground observations: Diffuse Galactic emission in the MAXIMA-Ifield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) can be contaminated by diffuse foreground emission from sources such as Galactic dust and synchrotron radiation. In these cases, the morphology of the contaminating source is known from observations at different frequencies, but not its amplitude at the frequency of interest for the CMB. We develop a technique for accounting for the effects of such emission in this case, and for simultaneously estimating the foreground amplitude in the CMB observations. We apply the technique to CMB data from the MAXIMA-1 experiment, using maps of Galactic dust emission from combinations of IRAS and DIRBE observations, as well as compilations of Galactic synchrotron emission observations. The spectrum of the dust emission over the 150-450 GHz observed by MAXIMA is consistent with preferred models, but the effect on CMB power spectrum observations is negligible.

Jaffe, A.H.; Balbi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Ferreira, P.G.; Finkbeiner, D.; Hanany, S.; Lee, A.T.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot,G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2003-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Beaver County, Utah ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beaver County, Utah ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Beaver County, Utah ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimating the spectral indices of correlated astrophysical foregrounds by a second-order statistical approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first tests of a new method, the Correlated Component Analysis (CCA) based on second-order statistics, to estimate the mixing matrix, a key ingredient to separate astrophysical foregrounds superimposed to the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). In the present application, the mixing matrix is parameterized in terms of the spectral indices of Galactic synchrotron and thermal dust emissions, while the free-free spectral index is prescribed by basic physics, and is thus assumed to be known. We consider simulated observations of the microwave sky with angular resolution and white stationary noise at the nominal levels for the PLANCK satellite, and realistic foreground emissions, with a position dependent synchrotron spectral index. We work with two sets of PLANCK frequency channels: the low frequency set, from 30 to 143 GHz, complemented with the Haslam 408 MHz map, and the high frequency set, from 217 to 545 GHz. The concentration of intense free-free emission on the Galactic plane introduces a steep dependence of the spectral index of the global Galactic emission with Galactic latitude, close to the Galactic equator. This feature makes difficult for the CCA to recover the synchrotron spectral index in this region, given the limited angular resolution of PLANCK, especially at low frequencies. A cut of a narrow strip around the Galactic equator (|b|<3 deg), however, allows us to overcome this problem. We show that, once this strip is removed, the CCA allows an effective foreground subtraction, with residual uncertainties inducing a minor contribution to errors on the recovered CMB power spectrum.

A. Bonaldi; L. Bedini; E. Salerno; C. Baccigalupi; G. De Zotti

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

22

Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Biomass Facility Facility Boralex Beaver Livermore Falls Sector Biomass Location Androscoggin County, Maine Coordinates 44.1912416°, -70.1707037° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1912416,"lon":-70.1707037,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

IMAGING THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION: LIMITATIONS FROM FOREGROUND CONFUSION AND IMAGING ALGORITHMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tomography of redshifted 21 cm transition from neutral hydrogen using Fourier synthesis telescopes is a promising tool to study the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Limiting the confusion from Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds is critical to the success of these telescopes. The instrumental response or the point-spread function (PSF) of such telescopes is inherently three dimensional with frequency mapping to the line-of-sight (LOS) distance. EoR signals will necessarily have to be detected in data where continuum confusion persists; therefore, it is important that the PSF has acceptable frequency structure so that the residual foreground does not confuse the EoR signature. This paper aims to understand the three-dimensional PSF and foreground contamination in the same framework. We develop a formalism to estimate the foreground contamination along frequency, or equivalently LOS dimension, and establish a relationship between foreground contamination in the image plane and visibility weights on the Fourier plane. We identify two dominant sources of LOS foreground contamination-'PSF contamination' and 'gridding contamination'. We show that PSF contamination is localized in LOS wavenumber space, beyond which there potentially exists an 'EoR window' with negligible foreground contamination where we may focus our efforts to detect EoR. PSF contamination in this window may be substantially reduced by judicious choice of a frequency window function. Gridding and imaging algorithms create additional gridding contamination and we propose a new imaging algorithm using the Chirp Z Transform that significantly reduces this contamination. Finally, we demonstrate the analytical relationships and the merit of the new imaging algorithm for the case of imaging with the Murchison Widefield Array.

Vedantham, Harish; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi, E-mail: harish@rri.res.in [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microsoft Word - CX_Beaver Creek.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clearance Memorandum Clearance Memorandum Jay Marcotte Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to acquire the Beaver Creek property and to maintain this property for fish and wildlife habitat protection. Budget Information: Work Order # 00225478 Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00, 43451 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in uncontaminated land for habitat preservation or wildlife management, and only associated buildings that support these purposes. Uncontaminated means that there would be no potential for release of substances at a level, or in a form, that would pose a threat to public health or the environment.

26

Geology of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is located on the western margin on the Mineral Mountains in Beaver County, Utah. The bedrock geology of the area is presented. It is dominated by metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Precambrian age as well as felsic plutonic phases of the Tertiary Mineral Mountains Pluton. Rhyolite flows, domes, and pyroclastics reflect igneous activity between 0.8 and 0.5 million years ago. All lithologies present in the map area are described in detail with an emphasis on characteristics which will allow them to be distinguished in drill cuttings. The geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is structurally controlled with reservoir rocks demonstrating little primary permeability. North to north-northeast trending faults are the youngest structures in the area, and they control present fumarolic activity and recent hot spring activity which has deposited opaline and chalcedonic sinters. It is proposed here that the geothermal reservoirs are controlled primarily by intersections of the principal zones of faulting. Logs from Thermal Power Utah State 72-16, Getty Oil Utah State 52-21, and six shallow thermal gradient holes drilled by the University of Utah are presented in this report and have been utilized in the construction of geologic cross sections of the geothermal field.

Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; McKinney, D.B.; Hulen, J.B.; Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

COBE Observations of the Cosmic Infrared Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment on COBE measured the total infrared signal seen from space at a distance of 1 astronomical unit from the Sun. Using time variations as the Earth orbits the Sun, it is possible to remove most of the foreground signal produced by the interplanetary dust cloud [zodiacal light]. By correlating the DIRBE signal with the column density of atomic hydrogen measured using the 21 cm line, it is possible to remove most of the foreground signal produced by interstellar dust, although one must still be concerned by dust associated with H_2 (molecular gas) and H II (the warm ionized medium). DIRBE was not able to determine the CIRB in the 5-60 micron wavelength range, but did detect both a far infrared background and a near infrared background. The far infrared background has an integrated intensity of about 34 nW/m^2/sr, while the near infrared and optical extragalactic background has about 59 nW/m^2/sr. The Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on COBE has been used to constrain the long wavelength tail of the far infrared background but a wide range of intensities at 850 microns are compatible with the FIRAS data. Thus the fraction of the CIRB produced by SCUBA sources has large uncertainties in both the numerator and the denominator.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

Demagnified gravitational waves from cosmological double neutron stars and gravitational wave foreground cleaning around 1 Hz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gravitational waves (GWs) from cosmological double neutron star binaries (NS+NS) can be significantly demagnified by the strong gravitational lensing effect, and the proposed future missions such as the Big Bang Observer or Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory might miss some of the demagnified GW signals below a detection threshold. The undetectable binaries would form a GW foreground, which might hamper detection of a very weak primordial GW signal. We discuss the outlook of this potential problem, using a simple model based on the singular isothermal sphere lens profile. Fortunately, it is expected that, for a presumable merger rate of NS+NSs, the residual foreground would be below the detection limit {omega}{sub GW,lim}{approx}10{sup -16} realized with the Big Bang Observer/Deci-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory by correlation analysis.

Seto, Naoki [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Bolivia Background  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries Bolivia Last Updated: August 23, 2012 Background The energy sector is of political and economic significance to Bolivia, which is a ...

30

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Legal Background Legal Background Book 1 . . Project Rulison :.Contract: . . AEC, Austral Oil Company, and CER Geonuclear Corporation, . . . . , . . . . , . . February 1969 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULISON CONTRACT NO. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA REPRESENTED BY THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION and THE DEPARTMENT. OF THE INTERIOR and AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY INCORPORATED and CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Prepared by OFFICE OF THE CHIEF COUNSEL NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE FEBRUARY 1969 This page intentionally left blank UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION . NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE TABLE OF CONTENTS VII VIII XV XVI XVII SUBJECT - PAGE Definitions 2 Description of Project ~ulisdn 3

31

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

CMVRTC: Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

newsletters newsletters contacts tools latest news 12.05.2013 Next Quarterly meeting scheduled for February 19, 2014 (10 a.m. - 12 p.m. ET). read more ... More information CMVRTC Showcase Events CMVRTC Poster Sessions Related Projects Heavy Truck Duty Cycle Medium Truck Duty Cycle Fuel Tax Evasion Other technical director For more information, please contact Gary Capps, Technical Director, at cappsgj@ornl.gov or (865) 946-1285. Background Introduction Vision cmvrtc poster Benefits Technology Transfer Introduction The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) launched the Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor (CMVRTC) on August 7, 2007, in partnership with the Tennessee Departments of Safety and Transportation, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the

33

FOUR FUNDAMENTAL FOREGROUND POWER SPECTRUM SHAPES FOR 21 cm COSMOLOGY OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Contamination from instrumental effects interacting with bright astrophysical sources is the primary impediment to measuring Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) 21 cm power spectra-an effect called mode mixing. In this paper, we identify four fundamental power spectrum shapes produced by mode mixing that will affect all upcoming observations. We are able, for the first time, to explain the wedge-like structure seen in advanced simulations and to forecast the shape of an 'EoR window' that is mostly free of contamination. Understanding the origins of these contaminations also enables us to identify calibration and foreground subtraction errors below the imaging limit, providing a powerful new tool for precision observations.

Morales, Miguel F.; Hazelton, Bryna; Sullivan, Ian; Beardsley, Adam [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Bipole-dipole survey at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Thermal Area, Beaver County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bipole-dipole electrical resistivity survey at Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Beaver County, Utah was undertaken to evaluate the technique in a well-studied Basin and Range geothermal prospect. The major electrical characteristics of the area are clearly revealed but are not particularly descriptive of the geothermal system. More subtle variations of electrical resistivity accompanying the geothermal activity are detectable, although the influence of near-surface lateral resistivity variations imposes upon the survey design the necessity of a high station density. A useful practical step is to conduct a survey using transmitter locations and orientations which minimize the response of known features such as the resistivity boundary due to a range front fault. Survey results illustrate the effects of transmitter orientation and placement, and of subtle lateral resistivity variations. A known near-surface conductive zone is detected while no evidence is found for a deep conductive region.

Frangos, W.; Ward, S.H.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

HARMONIC IN-PAINTING OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND SKY BY CONSTRAINED GAUSSIAN REALIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The presence of astrophysical emissions between the last scattering surface and our vantage point requires us to apply a foreground mask on cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky maps, leading to large cuts around the Galactic equator and numerous holes. Since many CMB analysis, in particular on the largest angular scales, may be performed on a whole-sky map in a more straightforward and reliable manner, it is of utmost importance to develop an efficient method to fill in the masked pixels in a way compliant with the expected statistical properties and the unmasked pixels. In this Letter, we consider the Monte Carlo simulation of a constrained Gaussian field and derive it CMB anisotropy in harmonic space, where a feasible implementation is possible with good approximation. We applied our method to simulated data, which shows that our method produces a plausible whole-sky map, given the unmasked pixels, and a theoretical expectation. Subsequently, we applied our method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe foreground-reduced maps and investigated the anomalous alignment between quadrupole and octupole components. From our investigation, we find that the alignment in the foreground-reduced maps is even higher than the Internal Linear Combination map. We also find that the V-band map has higher alignment than other bands, despite the expectation that the V-band map has less foreground contamination than other bands. Therefore, we find it hard to attribute the alignment to residual foregrounds. Our method will be complementary to other efforts on in-painting or reconstructing the masked CMB data, and of great use to Planck surveyor and future missions.

Kim, Jaiseung; Naselsky, Pavel [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mandolesi, Nazzareno, E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk [INAF/IASF, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Discriminating between a Stochastic Gravitational Wave Background and Instrument Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of a stochastic background of gravitational waves could significantly impact our understanding of the physical processes that shaped the early Universe. The challenge lies in separating the cosmological signal from other stochastic processes such as instrument noise and astrophysical foregrounds. One approach is to build two or more detectors and cross correlate their output, thereby enhancing the common gravitational wave signal relative to the uncorrelated instrument noise. When only one detector is available, as will likely be the case with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), alternative analysis techniques must be developed. Here we show that models of the noise and signal transfer functions can be used to tease apart the gravitational and instrument noise contributions. We discuss the role of gravitational wave insensitive "null channels" formed from particular combinations of the time delay interferometry, and derive a new combination that maintains this insensitivity for unequal arm length detectors. We show that, in the absence of astrophysical foregrounds, LISA could detect signals with energy densities as low as $\\Omega_{\\rm gw} = 6 \\times 10^{-13}$ with just one month of data. We describe an end-to-end Bayesian analysis pipeline that is able to search for, characterize and assign confidence levels for the detection of a stochastic gravitational wave background, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach using simulated data from the third round of Mock LISA Data Challenges.

Matthew R. Adams; Neil J. Cornish

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Muon Collider Backgrounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

then, further improvements to the final focus have reduced the backgrounds by about an order of magnitude. Although challenging, in many ways the predicted background levels are...

39

Charting the New Frontier of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background are a gold mine for cosmology and fundamental physics. ESA's Planck satellite should soon extract all information from the temperature vein but will be limited concerning the measurement of the degree of polarization of the anisotropies. This polarization information allows new independent tests of the standard cosmological paradigm, improves knowledge of cosmological parameters and last but not least is the best window available for constraining the physics of the very early universe, particularly the expected background of primordial gravitational waves. But exploiting this vein will be a challenge, since the sensitivity required is {\\em at least} 10 times better than what Planck might achieve at best, with the necessary matching level of control of all systematics effects, both instrumental and astrophysical (foregrounds). We here recall the cosmological context and the case for CMB polarization studies. We also briefly introduce the SAMPAN project, a des...

Bouchet, F R; Camus, P; Dsert, F X; Piat, M; Ponthieu, N; Camus, Ph.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Determination of the Far-Infrared Cosmic Background Using COBE/DIRBE and WHAM Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far infrared wavelengths using COBE/DIRBE data is limited by the accuracy to which foreground interplanetary and Galactic dust emission can be modeled and subtracted. Previous determinations of the far infrared CIB (e.g., Hauser et al. 1998) were based on the detection of residual isotropic emission in skymaps from which the emission from interplanetary dust and the neutral interstellar medium were removed. In this paper we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) Northern Sky Survey as a tracer of the ionized medium to examine the effect of this foreground component on determination of the CIB. We decompose the DIRBE far infrared data for five high Galactic latitude regions into H I and H-alpha correlated components and a residual component. We find the H-alpha correlated component to be consistent with zero for each region, and we find that addition of an H-alpha correlated component in modeling the foreground emission has negligible effect on derived ...

Odegard, N; Dwek, E; Haffner, L M; Hauser, M G; Reynolds, R J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Development of Generic Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment Kentucky Guidance for Ambient Background Assessment January 8, 2004 Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet Introduction This guidance document is intended to assist in comparing site data and background data for sites undergoing environmental assessment. These procedures provide a simplified statistical procedure for determining if the site data is part of the background population. It also provides generic statewide background values for inorganic chemicals that may be used in lieu of collecting site-specific background samples. The statistical procedures may be used for site- specific data or the generic statewide values in Tables 1 and 2. This guidance does not preclude other appropriate statistical comparisons from being made, but rather a simplified screening

42

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis technique for blind component separation to polarised astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarised signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foregrounds and instrumental noise. We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated accordingly to the nominal performances of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the Planck satellite; the sky signal is modeled as a superposition of CMB, generated by a Gaussian, nearly scale invariant cosmological perturbation spectrum, and the existing simulated polarisation templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$ modes can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while $B$ modes can be detected, up to their turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$ if cosmological tensor amplitude...

Baccigalupi, C; De Zotti, G; Smoot, G F; Burigana, C; Maino, D; Bedini, L; Salerno, E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj THE LISA GRAVITATIONAL WAVE FOREGROUND: A STUDY OF DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact object binaries, mostly double white dwarfs, are expected to be a source of confusion-limited noise for the gravitational wave observatory LISA. In a specific frequency range, this foregound noise is predicted to rise above the instrumental noise sources and hinder the detection of other types of signals, e.g., gravitational waves arising from stellar mass objects inspiraling into massive black holes residing in the centers of galaxies or dense clusters. In many previous studies only detached populations of compact object binaries have been considered. Here, we investigate the influence of Galactic populations of compact mass transferring binaries on the shape and strength of the LISA signal and compare our results with the signal for detached binaries only. Our population synthesis includes all binary systems containing two compact remnants. It is found that 99.5 % of these systems are double white dwarfs, and therefore we consider only binaries consisting of two white dwarfs when calculating the LISA signal. We find that the contribution of the Roche-Lobe overflow binaries to the foreground noise is negligible at low frequencies and detached systems will set the level of the confusion-limited signal in this range. However, the mass transferring systems begin to dominate the signal at higher frequencies (at ? 7 mHz), presenting a potentially additional confusion-limited regime at higher frequencies. We present the LISA

Ashley J. Ruiter; Krzysztof Belczynski; Matthew Benacquista; Shane L. Larson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Hydrogen Conversion Background: The photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen has drawn properties In order to develop better materials for solar energy applications, in-depth photoelectrochemical simulated solar irradiance. Hydrogen production experiments are conducted in a sealed aluminum cell

Raftery, Dan

45

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km{sup 2}, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE/EA-1508: Environmental Assessment for the Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Rebuild Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BC-HT-EE Mitigation Action Plan Nov. 2005 1 BC-HT-EE Mitigation Action Plan Nov. 2005 1 Mitigation Action Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Beaver Creek-Hoyt-Erie Transmission Line Upgrade Project Morgan and Weld Counties, Colorado November 2005 BC-HT-EE Mitigation Action Plan Nov. 2005 2 Action Plan for Standard Project Practices and Mitigation Mitigation Action Identifier Responsible Party for Implementing Mitigation Action Party Responsible for Monitoring and Ensuring Compliance Construction Contractor Western Maintenance The contractor shall limit the movement of crews and equipment to the ROW, including access routes. The contractor shall limit movement on the ROW to minimize damage to residential yards, grazing land, crops, orchards, and property, and shall avoid marring the lands.

47

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE ANGULAR POWER SPECTRUM OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPIES IN THE WMAP DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies is one of the most important characteristics in cosmology that can shed light on the properties of the universe such as its geometry and total density. Using flat sky approximation and Fourier analysis, we estimate the angular power spectrum from an ensemble of the least foreground-contaminated square patches from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe W and V frequency band map. This method circumvents the issue of foreground cleaning and that of breaking orthogonality in spherical harmonic analysis because we are able to mask out the bright Galactic plane region, thereby rendering a direct measurement of the angular power spectrum. We test and confirm the Gaussian statistical characteristic of the selected patches, from which the first and second acoustic peaks of the power spectrum are reproduced, and the third peak is clearly visible, albeit with some noise residual at the tail.

Chiang, Lung-Yih [Institute of Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1, Rooservolt Road, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Fei-Fan, E-mail: lychiang@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Gravity and ground magnetic surveys of the Thermo Hot Springs KGRA region, Beaver County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period June to September 1976, gravity and ground magnetic surveys were made in the Thermo Hot Springs KGRA region which is located southwest of the town of Milford, Beaver County, Utah. The regional surveys comprised 273 new gravity and magnetic stations and incorporated 104 previous gravity stations over an area of approximately 620 km{sup 2}. The detailed surveys consisted of 9 east-west profiles in the immediate vicinity of the Thermo Hot Springs KGRA. The gravity data were reduced and are presented as terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly maps. Terrain corrections were made to a distance of 18.8 km. The regional gravity map shows the following features: (1) a large north-south trend with total relief of 5 mgal extending through the central portion of the study area; (2) an east-west trend with relief of about 7-8 mgal south of the Star Range and Shauntie Hills; (3) a north-south trend with 5 mgal relief east of Blue Mountain; and (4) a broad low of approximately 5 mgal closure southwest of the Shauntie Hills. The trends are probably caused by major faults and the gravity low is probably caused by the southern end of the Wah Wah Valley graben. The detailed gravity map indicates two possible east-west trending faults intersecting a major north-south trending fault in the immediate vicinity of the Thermo Hot Springs. The location of the hot springs appears to be fault controlled. To facilitate interpretation of the gravity data, the following processing and modeling techniques were used: (1) high-pass frequency filtering; (2) polynomial fitting; (3) second derivative; (4) strike filtering; (5) two-dimensional modeling; and (6) three-dimensional modeling. These techniques proved helpful as they more clearly delineated features of interest. The residual maps outlined an elongate north-south graben that extends through the survey area. The strike-filtered maps emphasize the major north-south and east-west faults of the region. Modeling provided reasonable depth estimates for bedrock in the vicinity of the hot springs and supported the structural interpretation for the hot springs area. The magnetic data are presented as total magnetic intensity anomaly maps for both the regional and detailed surveys. The regional map delineates a magnetic high with 600-gammas closure that corresponds to a Tertiary quartz monzonite intrusive in the northeast part of the survey area. An east-west trend with about 300-gammas relief is delineated south of the Shauntie Hills and Star Range and possibly corresponds to an east-west fault. The detailed magnetic map outlines an anomalous low with nearly 100-gammas closure associated with the Thermo Hot Springs. This magnetic low may reflect an alteration zone which is structurally controlled. The following processing and modeling techniques were applied to aid interpretation of the magnetic data: (1) low-pass frequency filtering; (2) strike-filtering; (3) pseudogravity; (4) two and one-half dimensional modeling; and (5) three-dimensional modeling. The low-pass filtering clearly delineates the intrusive and the east-west trend south of the Star Range. The strike-filtering outlines north-south and east-west trends which correlate with faults implied by gravity data. The pseudogravity map indicates that the magnetic and gravity anomalies are not caused by the same bodies. The two and one-half dimensional modeling in the hot springs area provides a possible model for an alteration zone which appears to be structurally controlled. The three-dimensional model of the Tertiary quartz monzonite intrusive indicates a relatively shallow, slightly elongate intrusion that continues to a depth of at least 1 km.

Sawyer, Robert F.; Cook, Kenneth L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Unitarity and singular backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the graviton Kaluza-Klein spectrum on a gravity-dilaton background with a naked singularity for all possible boundary conditions at the singularity which are consistent with unitary evolution. We apply methods from non-relativistic quantum mechanics with singular Schr\\"{o}dinger potentials. In general the spectrum contains a tachyon, a sign of instability. Only for a particular boundary condition at the singularity is the spectrum free of tachyons. In this case the lowest-lying graviton mode is massless. We argue that this result will also hold for other backgrounds with similar geometry near the curvature singularity. We complete our study with a brief discussion on radion perturbations and the Higgs mechanism on this singular background.

Nikos Brouzakis; Mariano Quiros

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

50

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

51

Determination of the Far-Infrared Cosmic Background Using COBE/DIRBE and WHAM Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determination of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far infrared wavelengths using COBE/DIRBE data is limited by the accuracy to which foreground interplanetary and Galactic dust emission can be modeled and subtracted. Previous determinations of the far infrared CIB (e.g., Hauser et al. 1998) were based on the detection of residual isotropic emission in skymaps from which the emission from interplanetary dust and the neutral interstellar medium were removed. In this paper we use the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM) Northern Sky Survey as a tracer of the ionized medium to examine the effect of this foreground component on determination of the CIB. We decompose the DIRBE far infrared data for five high Galactic latitude regions into H I and H-alpha correlated components and a residual component. We find the H-alpha correlated component to be consistent with zero for each region, and we find that addition of an H-alpha correlated component in modeling the foreground emission has negligible effect on derived CIB results. Our CIB detections and 2 sigma upper limits are essentially the same as those derived by Hauser et al. and are given by nu I_nu (nW m-2 sr-1) < 75, < 32, 25 +- 8, and 13 +- 3 at 60, 100, 140, and 240 microns, respectively. Our residuals have not been subjected to a detailed anisotropy test, so our CIB results do not supersede those of Hauser et al. We derive upper limits on the 100 micron emissivity of the ionized medium that are typically about 40% of the 100 micron emissivity of the neutral atomic medium. This low value may be caused in part by a lower dust-to-gas mass ratio in the ionized medium than in the neutral medium, and in part by a shortcoming of using H-alpha intensity as a tracer of far infrared emission.

N. Odegard; R. G. Arendt; E. Dwek; L. M. Haffner; M. G. Hauser; R. J. Reynolds

2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

52

Paducah Background Factsheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Factsheet Paducah Background Factsheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions, May 15, 2012 Paducah Background...

53

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarization from satelliteastrophysical maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the application of the fast independent component analysis (FASTICA) technique for blind component separation to polarized astrophysical emission. We study how the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarized signal, consisting of E and B modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foreground emission and instrumental noise. We implement Monte Carlo chains varying the CMB and noise realizations in order to assess the average capabilities of the algorithm and their variance. We perform the analysis of all-sky maps simulated according to the Planck satellite capabilities, modeling the sky signal as a superposition of the CMB and of the existing simulated polarization templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB E mode can be recovered on all scales up to lsimilar or equal to 1000, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while the B-mode power spectrum can be detected, up to its turnover at lsimilar or equal to 100, if the ratio of tensor to scalar contributions to the temperature quadrupole exceeds 30 per cent. The power spectrum of the cross-correlation between total intensity and polarization, TE, can be recovered up to lsimilar or equal to 1200, corresponding to the seventh TE acoustic oscillation.

Baccigalpi, C.; Perrotta, F.; Zotti, G.D.; Smoot, G.F.; Burigana,C.; Maino, D.; Bedini, L.; Salerno, E.

2004-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

54

Extracting cosmic microwave background polarisation from satellite astrophysical maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the application of the Fast Independent Component Analysis ({\\ica}) technique for blind component separation to polarized astrophysical emission. We study how the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarized signal, consisting of $E$ and $B$ modes, can be extracted from maps affected by substantial contamination from diffuse Galactic foreground emission and instrumental noise. {We implement Monte Carlo chains varying the CMB and noise realizations in order to asses the average capabilities of the algorithm and their variance.} We perform the analysis of all sky maps simulated according to the {\\sc Planck} satellite capabilities, modelling the sky signal as a superposition of the CMB and of the existing simulated polarization templates of Galactic synchrotron. Our results indicate that the angular power spectrum of CMB $E$-mode can be recovered on all scales up to $\\ell\\simeq 1000$, corresponding to the fourth acoustic oscillation, while the $B$-mode power spectrum can be detected, up to its turnover at $\\ell\\simeq 100$, if the ratio of tensor to scalar contributions to the temperature quadrupole exceeds 30%. The power spectrum of the cross correlation between total intensity and polarization, $TE$, can be recovered up to $\\ell\\simeq 1200$, corresponding to the seventh $TE$ acoustic oscillation.

C. Baccigalupi; F. Perrotta; G. De Zotti; G. F. Smoot; C. Burigana; D. Maino; L. Bedini; E. Salerno

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

OBSERVATIONAL SCAN-INDUCED ARTIFICIAL COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPY  

SciTech Connect

Reliably detecting the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is of great importance in understanding the birth and evolution of the universe. One of the difficulties in CMB experiments is the domination of measured CMB anisotropy maps by the Doppler dipole moment from the motion of the antenna relative to the CMB. For each measured temperature, the expected dipole component has to be calculated separately and then subtracted from the data. A small error in dipole direction, antenna pointing direction, sidelobe pickup contamination, and/or timing synchronism can introduce a significant deviation in the dipole-cleaned CMB temperature. After a full-sky observational scan, the accumulated deviations will be structured with a pattern closely correlated with the observation pattern with artificial anisotropies, including artificial quadrupole, octupole, etc., on large scales in the final CMB map. Such scan-induced anisotropies on large scales can be predicted by the true dipole moment and observational scan scheme. Indeed, the expected scan-induced quadrupole pattern of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission is perfectly in agreement with the published WMAP quadrupole. With the scan strategy of the Planck mission, we predict that scan-induced anisotropies will also produce an artificially aligned quadrupole. The scan-induced anisotropy is a common problem for all sweep missions and, like the foreground emissions, has to be removed from observed maps. Without doing so, CMB maps from COBE, WMAP, and Planck are not reliable for studying the CMB anisotropy.

Liu Hao; Li Tipei, E-mail: liuhao@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: litp@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

Background:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TABLE OF CONTENTS Recommended Browsers for iSupplier Portal Recommended Microsoft Internet Explorer Browser Settings (MSIE) Recommended Firefox Browser Settings Recommended...

57

Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are members of the superfamily of pore loop cation channels that are activated by the binding of cGMP or cAMP. The channels are important cellular switches which transduce changes in intracellular levels of cyclic nucleotides into changes of the membrane potential and the Ca 2+ concentration. CNG channels play a central role in the signal transduction pathways of vision and olfaction. We have studied the physiological significance of a particular member of the CNG channel family, CNGB1. The two splicing variants of CNGB1, termed CNGB1a and CNGB1b, assemble with CNGA1 and CNGA2/4 to form the native tetrameric CNG channels of rod photoreceptors and olfactory neurons, respectively. retinitis pigmentosa [1]. Using a combination of electrophysiologcal

Martin Biel; Stylianos Michalakis; Xiangang Zong; Elvir Becirovic

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BOOK: The Superalloys: Fundamentals and Applications R. C. Reed, Cambridge ... New Messages, Rating, WEB RESOURCE: Handbook of Materials Selection

59

BACKGROUND  

Usually results in lowered chemical durability as measured ... F or more inf rmation about the science you see here, please contact: John McCloy, Ph.D.

60

Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web-based Tool for Converting Carbon Dioxide Isotope Measurements into Standardized delta13C and delta18O Values. ...

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

BACKGROUND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fax: 301/670-9884. Email: dominique@aeptec.com. John Dunfield. Microvision, Inc. 2203 Airport Way S., Ste. 100. Seattle, WA 98134 USA. ...

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

62

Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Patent Rights in the New Independent States (NIS) of the Former Soviet Union for Inventions made by NIS institutes' employeess in the course of or under agreements entered into...

63

Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the International City/County Management Association (IChz4). PTIs mission is to bring technology to local governments. Through collective research and development efforts in its member jurisdictions, PTI creates and adrances technology-based products, services, and enterprises for all cities and counties. Four active task forces, each composed of members of PTIs Urban Consortium WC)-which represents fifty of the nations largest and most progressive cities and urban counties--drive PTIs research and commercialization efforts. One of these task forces is the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), which was established to address critical energy needs of urban America.

D Emonstration; Economic; A Nalysis Of; U Rban; C Onsortium

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the environment, and methodologies for tracing life-cycle costs to a ... Global investments in sustainable energy (including wind, solar, and ...

65

MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAR Background Report MAR Background Report: Indigenous Protest in Brazil Hundreds of indigenous people demonstrated at the National Congress in Brasilia, capital of Brazil, following the announcement in the 1990s in the midst of extensive protests in Brazil and around the world. On February 8, an indigenous

Milchberg, Howard

66

IS THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ASYMMETRY DUE TO THE KINEMATIC DIPOLE?  

SciTech Connect

Parity violation found in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is a crucial clue for the non-standard cosmological model or the possible contamination of various foreground residuals and/or calibration of the CMB data sets. In this paper, we study the directional properties of the CMB parity asymmetry by excluding the m = 0 modes in the definition of parity parameters. We find that the preferred directions of the parity parameters coincide with the CMB kinematic dipole, which implies that the CMB parity asymmetry may be connected with the possible contamination of the residual dipole component. We also find that such tendency is not only localized at l = 2, 3, but in the extended multipole ranges up to l {approx} 22.

Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Kim, J.; Chen, S. [Niels Bohr Institute and Discovery Center, Blegdamsvej 17, 2100 Copenhagen, O (Denmark)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Background on Quantum Key Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Background on Quantum Key Distribution. ... If someone, referred to by cryptographers as Eve, tries to eavesdrop on the transmission, she will not ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Angola Background - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries Angola Last Updated: January 3, 2013 (Notes) Revised: January 8, 2013 (revision) full report Background Angola is the second-largest oil producer in Sub ...

69

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the North Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Technical report: Volume 77-4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km/sup 2/, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Low background techniques in XMASS  

SciTech Connect

The XMASS project aims to detect pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, neutrino-less double beta decay, and dark matter searches using ultra-pure liquid xenon. The first stage of XMASS project is concentrated on dark matter searches using 800 kg liquid xenon detector which requires low background and low threshold. Several techniques applied to XMASS detector for low background will be presented.

Takeda, Atsushi [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo, 456 Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka-cho, Hida, Gifu, 506-1205 (Japan)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

PRIMORDIAL GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTABILITY WITH DEEP SMALL-SKY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

We use the Bayesian estimation on direct T - Q - U cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps to forecast errors on the tensor-to-scalar power ratio r, and hence on primordial gravitational waves, as a function of sky coverage f{sub sky}. This map-based likelihood filters the information in the pixel-pixel space into the optimal combinations needed for r detection for cut skies, providing enhanced information over a first-step linear separation into a combination of E, B, and mixed modes, and ignoring the latter. With current computational power and for typical resolutions appropriate for r detection, the large matrix inversions required are accurate and fast. Our simulations explore two classes of experiments, with differing bolometric detector numbers, sensitivities, and observational strategies. One is motivated by a long duration balloon experiment like Spider, with pixel noise {proportional_to}{radical}(f{sub sky}) for a specified observing period. This analysis also applies to ground-based array experiments. We find that, in the absence of systematic effects and foregrounds, an experiment with Spider-like noise concentrating on f{sub sky} {approx} 0.02-0.2 could place a 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.014 boundary ({approx}95% confidence level), which rises to 0.02 with an l-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. We contrast this with a Planck-like fixed instrumental noise as f{sub sky} varies, which gives a Galaxy-masked (f{sub sky} = 0.75) 2{sigma}{sub r} Almost-Equal-To 0.015, rising to Almost-Equal-To 0.05 with the foreground residuals. Using as the figure of merit the (marginalized) one-dimensional Shannon entropy of r, taken relative to the first 2003 WMAP CMB-only constraint, gives -2.7 bits from the 2012 WMAP9+ACT+SPT+LSS data, and forecasts of -6 bits from Spider (+ Planck); this compares with up to -11 bits for CMBPol, COrE, and PIXIE post-Planck satellites and -13 bits for a perfectly noiseless cosmic variance limited experiment. We thus confirm the wisdom of the current strategy for r detection of deeply probed patches covering the f{sub sky} minimum-error trough with balloon and ground experiments.

Farhang, M.; Bond, J. R.; Netterfield, C. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Dore, O. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A celestial gamma-ray foreground due to the albedo of small solar system bodies and a remote probe of the interstellar cosmic ray spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the gamma-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids (MBAs), Jovian and Neptunian Trojan asteroids, and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the gamma-ray albedo for the Main Belt, Trojans, and Kuiper Belt strongly depends on the small-body size distribution of each system. Based on an analysis of the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) data we infer that the diffuse emission from the MBAs, Trojans, and KBOs has an integrated flux of less than ~6x10^{-6} cm^{-2} s^{-1} (100-500 MeV), which corresponds to ~12 times the Lunar albedo, and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). If detected by GLAST, it can provide unique direct information about the number of small bodies in each system that is difficult to assess by any other method. Additionally, the KBO albedo flux can be used to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions. The orbits of MBAs, Trojans, and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. Therefore, the asteroid gamma-ray albedo has to be taken into account when analyzing weak gamma-ray sources close to the ecliptic, especially near the Galactic center and for signals at high Galactic latitudes, such as the extragalactic gamma-ray emission. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center.

Igor V. Moskalenko; Troy A. Porter; Seth W. Digel; Peter F. Michelson; Jonathan F. Ormes

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Cosmic Microwave Background Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cosmic Microwave Background Cosmic Microwave Background CMB.jpg The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is relic radiation from a very early stage in the universe -- essentially a...

74

MAXIMA-1: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave BackgroundAnisotropy on angular scales of 10' to 5 degrees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a map and an angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first flight of MAXIMA. MAXIMA is a balloon-borne experiment with an array of 16 bolometric photometers operated at 100 mK. MAXIMA observed a 124 deg region of the sky with 10' resolution at frequencies of 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The data were calibrated using in-flight measurements of the CMB dipole anisotropy. A map of the CMB anisotropy was produced from three 150 and one 240 GHz photometer without need for foreground subtractions. Analysis of this CMB map yields a power spectrum for the CMB anisotropy over the range 36 {le} {ell} {le} 785. The spectrum shows a peak with an amplitude of 78 {+-} 6 {mu}K at {ell} {approx_equal} 220 and an amplitude varying between {approx} 40 {mu}K and {approx} 50 {mu}K for 400 {approx}< {ell} {approx}< 785.

Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; deBernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V.V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Lee, A.T.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Netterfield, C.B.; Oh, S.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant,C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Auto-Correlation Function of the extragalactic background light: I. Measuring gravitational shear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for measuring the shear induced by gravitational light deflection is proposed. It is based on analyzing the anisotropy induced in the auto-correlation function (ACF) of the extragalactic background light which is produced by very faint distant galaxies. The ACF can be measured `locally', and its anisotropy is caused by the tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution in the foreground of these faint background galaxies. Since the method does not require individual galaxy detection, it can be used to measure the shear of extremely faint galaxies which are not detectable individually, but are present in the noise. The shear estimated from the ACF of the noise provides an independent measurement which can be compared to the shear obtained from the distortion of individual galaxy images. Combining these two independent estimates clearly increases the sensitivity of shear measurements. In addition, our method may allow to determine the local magnification caused by the deflector if the auto-correlation function is caused by a large number density of faint galaxies; in this case, the intrinsic ACF may provide a `standard source' with respect to which shear and magnification can be obtained. Applications to real and synthetic data are shown and the feasibility of our new method is demonstrated. In particular, we present the shear maps obtained with our method for the double QSO 2345+007 and the cluster Cl0024+16 and compare them to published shear maps.

L. Van Waerbeke; Y. Mellier; P. Schneider; B. Fort; G. Mathez

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed gravity survey (comprising 231 stations over about 900 km/sup 2/) was made in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource area (KGRA) and vicinity, Millard and Beaver counties, Utah to assist in the appraisal of the potential of this area as a geothermal resource. The survey reinforced the results and information obtained in the previous regional gravity surveys comprising 522 stations. The gravity data from about 700 stations were reduced and compiled as a terrain-corrected (out to 20 km) Bouguer gravity anomaly map with 1-mgal contour interval. In August 1975, an aeromagnetic survey was flown over part of the survey area at a constant barometric elevation of 12,000 ft (3660 m). These aeromagnetic data are used to supplement the interpretation of the gravity data. The aeromagnetic field intensity residual anomaly map and the second-order polynomial residual aeromagnetic map (obtained by removing a second-order polynomial surface) are presented with a 20-gamma contour interval. Two north-south profiles and one east-west profile were selected for magnetic interpretative modeling. The two north-south profiles were also stacked and averaged over 6-km-wide strips and modeled. The occurrences of hydrothermal alteration, hot spring deposits, and flowing hot springs coincide with inferred fault zones. No evidence of extensive alteration can be interpreted from the magnetic data.

Cook, K.L.; Serpa, L.F.; Pe, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

APS USER TRAINING HISTORY Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USER TRAINING HISTORY USER TRAINING HISTORY Background The User Program Division Director has delegated to the CATs the authority to authorize the conduct of experiments because the CATs have accepted responsibility for: * identifying and evaluating the hazards posed by the experiment, * specifying controls appropriate to the hazards, and * verifying that controls are in place. One form of hazard control frequently made mandatory by law and laboratory policy is worker knowledge. The accepted means of verifying that a worker has the required knowledge is ensuring that the worker has completed appropriate training. With CAT input, the APS has developed the APS User Training History. This web-based tool enables designated CAT personnel to examine data characterizing ES&H training courses

78

Low background aspects of GERDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GERDA experiment operates bare Germanium diodes enriched in 76 Ge in an environment of pure liquid argon to search for neutrinoless double beta decay. A very low radioactive background is essential for the success of the experiment. We present here the research done in order to remove radio?impurities coming from the liquid argon the stainless steel cryostat and the front?end electronics. We found that liquid argon can be purified efficiently from 222 Rn . The main source of 222 Rn in GERDA is the cryostat which emanates about 55 mBq. A thin copper shroud in the center of the cryostat was implemented to prevent radon from approaching the diodes. Gamma ray screening of radio?pure components for front?end electronics resulted in the development of a pre?amplifier with a total activity of less than 1? mBq ? 228 Th .

Hardy Simgen; The GERDA collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Solar Background Document 5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Solar Background Document 5 Graph illustrating Chinese Development Bank financing to Chinese solar companies. Solar Background Document 5.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar...

80

Solar Background Document 6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Document 6 Graph illustrating solar cell production in the United States and China from 2002 to 2010. Solar Background Document 6.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solar Background Document 7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Background Document 7 Solar Background Document 7 Chart comparing global solar market in 2009 with the market today, illustrating the changing market conditions that Solyndra...

82

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Synchrotron Radiation at 33 GHz NOIiWNPQaa s x s sthe Cosmic Background Radiation Philip Michael Lubin Spacethe Cosmic Background Radiation. The ground-based experiment

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Robinson Gravitational Wave Background Telescope (BICEP): a bolometric large angular scale CMB polarimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Robinson Telescope (BICEP) is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometric array designed to study the polarization of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and galactic foreground emission. Such measurements probe the energy scale of the inflationary epoch, tighten constraints on cosmological parameters, and verify our current understanding of CMB physics. Robinson consists of a 250-mm aperture refractive telescope that provides an instantaneous field-of-view of 17 degrees with angular resolution of 55 and 37 arcminutes at 100 GHz and 150 GHz, respectively. Forty-nine pair of polarization-sensitive bolometers are cooled to 250 mK using a 4He/3He/3He sorption fridge system, and coupled to incoming radiation via corrugated feed horns. The all-refractive optics is cooled to 4 K to minimize polarization systematics and instrument loading. The fully steerable 3-axis mount is capable of continuous boresight rotation or azimuth scanning at speeds up to 5 deg/s. Robinson has begun its first season of observation at the South Pole. Given the measured performance of the instrument along with the excellent observing environment, Robinson will measure the E-mode polarization with high sensitivity, and probe for the B-modes to unprecedented depths. In this paper we discuss aspects of the instrument design and their scientific motivations, scanning and operational strategies, and the results of initial testing and observations.

K. W. Yoon; P. A. R. Ade; D. Barkats; J. O. Battle; E. M. Bierman; J. J. Bock; J. A. Brevik; H. C. Chiang; A. Crites; C. D. Dowell; L. Duband; G. S. Griffin; E. F. Hivon; W. L. Holzapfel; V. V. Hristov; B. G. Keating; J. M. Kovac; C. L. Kuo; A. E. Lange; E. M. Leitch; P. V. Mason; H. T. Nguyen; N. Ponthieu; Y. D. Takahashi; T. Renbarger; L. C. Weintraub; D. Woolsey

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

84

TEC Working Group Background | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Working Group Background TEC Working Group Background TEC Working Group Background Through the TEC/WG, DOE interacted with representatives of organizations at the state, tribal, and local levels to obtain input for program needs assessment, development and management, and to enhance their capability to carry out transportation emergency preparedness and safety activities specifically related to radioactive materials shipments. TEC membership included representatives from national, state, tribal and local government organizations, labor, industry and professional groups. Members meet semiannually to participate in plenary sessions, breakout work sessions, and in more specialized Topic Groups. To learn more about the history and background of TEC, please see the following documents:

85

TEC Working Group Background | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Background TEC Working Group Background Through the TEC/WG, DOE interacted with representatives of organizations at the state, tribal, and local levels to obtain input for program needs assessment, development and management, and to enhance their capability to carry out transportation emergency preparedness and safety activities specifically related to radioactive materials shipments. TEC membership included representatives from national, state, tribal and local government organizations, labor, industry and professional groups. Members meet semiannually to participate in plenary sessions, breakout work sessions, and in more specialized Topic Groups. To learn more about the history and background of TEC, please see the following documents: TEC Charter TEC Work Plan

86

Background Links | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Background Links Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

87

Second National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

information on the background and process materials that were used to produce the report: An Agenda for Climate Science Impacts Primary Sources of Information Data Sets References...

88

4.6.1.1. Background & Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

4. Process Modeling 4.6. Case Studies in Process Modeling 4.6.1. Load Cell Calibration 4.6.1.1. Background & Data. Description ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Countries Russia Background - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries Russia Last Updated: September 18, 2012 full report Background Russia holds the world's largest natural gas reserves, the second-largest coal reserves, and

90

Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Recent experience with backgrounds at the SLC  

SciTech Connect

During the 1990 SLC/Mark II runs, machine backgrounds visible in the new vertex detectors were studied. These detectors had active elements at radii from 3 to 17 cm and were subjected to backgrounds unique to linear colliders. We describe recent progress in identifying sources and developing control techniques. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Jacobsen, R.; Band, H.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.; Brown, K.; Burke, D.; Coupal, D.; DeStaebler, H.; Fujino, D.; Hearty, C.; Hertzbach, S.; Jaros, J.; Maruyama, T.; Tauchi, T.; Toge, N.; Turk, J.; Wagner, S.; Zeitlin, C.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Charged Hadron Properties in Background Electric Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a lattice calculation demonstrating a novel new method to extract the electric polarizability of charged pseudo-scalar mesons by analyzing two point correlation functions computed in classical background electric fields.

William Detmold; Brian C. Tiburzi; Andre Walker-Loud

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

93

First National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Workshops of the First National Climate Assessment In February 1997, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the Office of Science and...

94

Charged Hadron Properties in Background Electric Fields  

SciTech Connect

We report on a lattice calculation demonstrating a novel new method to extract the electric polarizability of charged pseudo-scalar mesons by analyzing two point correlation functions computed in classical background electric fields.

William Detmold, Brian C. Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Literature Review of Background Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continuously move through the environment, often via atmospheric transport. The subsequent deposition of particulates containing PAHs along with other sources of PAHs, such as natural vegetative decay, result in "background" PAHs in surficial soils. Even in pristine areas, surface and near surface soils can contain detectable levels of PAHs. This study provides data on the concentrations and distributions of background PAHs observed in environmental media. Such inf...

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Microsoft Word - Appendix A_Background.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Background Information, Remedial Action Histories, Background Information, Remedial Action Histories, Present Site Conditions U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page A-iii Contents A1.1 Location and Property Ownership ................................................................................1 A1.2 Physiography and Topography.....................................................................................4 A1.3 Hydrogeology ...............................................................................................................5 A1.3.1 Regional ...........................................................................................................5 A1.3.2 Chemical Plant .................................................................................................5

97

Cosmic microwave background constraints on dark energy dynamics: analysis beyond the power spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the distribution of the non-Gaussian signal induced by weak lensing on the primary total intensity cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. Our study focuses on the three point statistics exploiting an harmonic analysis based on the CMB bispectrum. By considering the three multipoles as independent variables, we reveal a complex structure of peaks and valleys determined by the re-projection of the primordial acoustic oscillations through the lensing mechanism. We study the dependence of this system on the expansion rate at the epoch in which the weak lensing power injection is relevant, probing the dark energy equation of state at redshift corresponding to the equivalence with matter or higher ($w_\\infty$). We evaluate the impact of the bispectrum observable on the CMB capability of constraining the dark energy dynamics. We perform a maximum likelihood analysis by varying the dark energy abundance, the present equation of state $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$. We show that the projection degeneracy affecting a pure power spectrum analysis in total intensity is broken if the bispectrum is taken into account. For a Planck-like experiment, assuming nominal performance, no foregrounds or systematics, and fixing all the parameters except $w_0$, $w_\\infty$ and the dark energy abundance, a percent and ten percent precision measure of $w_0$ and $w_\\infty$ is achievable from CMB data only. These results indicate that the detection of the weak lensing signal by the forthcoming CMB probes may be relevant to gain insight into the dark energy dynamics at the onset of cosmic acceleration.

Fabio Giovi; Carlo Baccigalupi; Francesca Perrotta

2004-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mission and Goals Mission and Goals Organization Chart and Contacts Background U.S. DRIVE Partnership Budget Timeline Program Activities Advisory Panels External Coordination U.S. Department of Energy Search help Home > About > Background Printable Version Background In the early 1970s, concern over our growing dependence on imported petroleum, coupled with concerns about our deteriorating air quality due to emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, spurred the Federal government to act. The timeline below provides policy and programmatic highlights for federally supported hydrogen and fuel cell R&D over the last three decades. Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell R&D Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.

99

National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Background and Process Print E-mail Please view the links below to find out more about the background and process of the National Climate Assessment: National Climate Assessment Development & Advisory Committee Charter ( PDF) National Climate Assessment Proposed 2013 Report Outline [updated on 12/08/2011] (PDF) Strategy On May 20th, 2011 the National Climate Assessment released the following two strategy documents: National Climate Assessment Strategy Summary National Climate Assessment Engagement Strategy Federal Register Notices November 18, 2013 National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC) Notice of Open Meeting pdf | html A Notice by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on 10/29/2013 This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC).

100

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background `The U.S. Government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an Integral part of the Federal system for safe and permanent disposal of the nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The MRS will accept shipments of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants, temporarily store the spent fuel above ground, and stage shipments of it to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. The law authorizing the MRS provides an opportunity for a State or an Indian Tribe to volunteer to host the MRS. The law establishes the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator, who Is 10 seek a State or an Indian Tribe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Background compensation for a radiation level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

Keefe, D.J.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Strange Metallic Behavior in Anisotropic Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We continue our analysis on conductivity in the anisotropic background by employing the D-brane probe technique, where the D-branes play the role of charge carriers. The DC and AC conductivity for massless charge carriers are obtained analytically, while interesting curves for the AC conductivity are also plotted. For massive charge carriers, we calculate the DC and AC conductivities in the dilute limit and we fix the parameters in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory so that the background exhibits the same scaling behaviors as those for real-world strange metals. The DC conductivity at finite density is also computed.

Lee, Bum-Hoon; Park, Chanyong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Strange Metallic Behavior in Anisotropic Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We continue our analysis on conductivity in the anisotropic background by employing the D-brane probe technique, where the D-branes play the role of charge carriers. The DC and AC conductivity for massless charge carriers are obtained analytically, while interesting curves for the AC conductivity are also plotted. For massive charge carriers, we calculate the DC and AC conductivities in the dilute limit and we fix the parameters in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory so that the background exhibits the same scaling behaviors as those for real-world strange metals. The DC conductivity at finite density is also computed.

Bum-Hoon Lee; Da-Wei Pang; Chanyong Park

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

LRL background measurements program for ICBM discrimination  

SciTech Connect

Several proposals have been made for discriminating between Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles (ICBM) and decoys. Primary fundamental particles or high energy electromagnetic radiation can be scattered from or can activate the targets. The secondary radiation is observed by directional detectors that are positioned close-by and the information is transmitted to control centers on the ground. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory proposes a program for measurements of the natural space radiations. Eventually, the space backgrounds must be measured before a satisfactory discrimination system can be perfected. Past and scheduled background measurements are described and a measurement program is proposed.

1960-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale ME Turbine Test cell instructions Background: The Turbine Technologies Turbojet engine combustion gas backflow into the lab space. Test Cell preparation: 1. Turn on Circuit breakers # 16 of the turbine and check a few items: o Open keyed access door on rear of Turbine enclosure o Check Jet A fuel

Haller, Gary L.

106

Survey Background and Technical Information on CBECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types- service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey in the series begun in 1979. From 1979 to 1986, the survey was known as the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or NBECS.

107

First National Climate Assessment: Background and Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background and Process Print E-mail Background and Process Print E-mail Workshops of the First National Climate Assessment In February 1997, the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the Office of Science and Technology Policy initiated a series of Regional Climate Change Workshops with the goal of starting the process of examining the vulnerabilities of regions of the United States to climate variability and climate change. What was initially intended to be three or four workshops developed into a series of twenty, covering every state and territory of the United States. The workshops span from May 1997 to September 1998 and represented the first step in conducting a regional assessment. Each workshop was sponsored by one or more government agencies,and was carried out by coordinators from local institutions. For details on each workshop, including its geographic coverage, see:

108

Radioactive Background Evaluation by Atom Counting  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new method of measuring 85Kr background levels by direct counting of impurity atoms. The beta-decay of 85Kr is a significant radioactive background for experiments that use liquified noble gases to search for dark matter and measure the low-energy solar neutrino flux. While there are several proposed methods for reducing Kr levels in these experiments, an independent technique is needed for measuring very low Kr levels. By selectively exciting Kr atoms to a metastable state, capturing them in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), and detecting fluorescence from the trapped atoms, individual Kr atoms can be counted with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This approach offers both higher sensitivity and shorter measurement times than more conventional techniques, with an estimated sensitivity of 3 x 10-14 in only 3 hours of integration.

Orzel, Chad [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, NY 12308 (United States); McKinsey, Daniel [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Foreign Energy Company Competitiveness: Background information  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information to the report Energy Company Competitiveness: Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994). The main body of this publication consists of data uncovered during the course of research on this DOE report. This data pertains to major government energy policies in each country studied. This report also provides a summary of the DOE report. In October 1993, the Office of Energy Intelligence, US Department of Energy (formerly the Office of Foreign Intelligence), requested that Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepare a report addressing policies and actions used by foreign governments to enhance the competitiveness of their energy firms. Pacific Northwest Laboratory prepared the report Energy Company Competitiveness Little to Do With Subsidies (DOE 1994), which provided the analysis requested by DOE. An appendix was also prepared, which provided extensive background documentation to the analysis. Because of the length of the appendix, Pacific Northwest Laboratory decided to publish this information separately, as contained in this report.

Weimar, M.R.; Freund, K.A.; Roop, J.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A background free double beta decay experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new detection scheme for rejecting backgrounds in neutrino less double beta decay experiments. It relies on the detection of Cherenkov light emitted by electrons in the MeV region. The momentum threshold is tuned to reach a good discrimination between background and good events. We consider many detector concepts and a range of target materials. The most promising is a high-pressure 136Xe emitter for which the required energy threshold is easily adjusted. Combination of this concept and a high pressure Time Projection Chamber could provide an optimal solution. A simple and low cost effective solution is to use the Spherical Proportional Counter that provides two delayed signals from ionization and Cherenkov light. In solid-state double beta decay emitters, because of their higher density, the considered process is out of energy range. An alternative solution could be the development of double decay emitters with lower density by using for instance the aerogel technique. It is surprising that a technology used for particle identification in high-energy physics becomes a powerful tool for rejecting backgrounds in such low-energy experiments.

Ioannis Giomataris

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Observation of the submillimeter cosmic background spectrum  

SciTech Connect

An experimental measurement of the spectrum of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation is described. The experiment consists of measuring the night sky emission at an altitude of 39 km, correcting for the atmospheric molecular line emission, and placing limits on the contamination from sources of continuum radiation such as the apparatus itself and the earth. The observations were made on 24 July 1974 using a fully calibrated liquid-helium-cooled balloon- borne spectrophotometer. Important features of the apparatus include a cooled antenna, a polarizing interferometer, and a germanium bolometric detector. The characterization of the spectrophotometer includes the large angle response and emission of the antenna. The calibration of the instrument and corrections to the observed sky spectrum are based on measurements made during the flight. A simple model of the molecular line emission is used to determine the atmospheric contribution. The resulting spectrum covers the frequency range from 4 to 17 cm$sup -1$ and establishes that the cosmic background radiation follows the high frequency quantum cutoff for a 3K blackbody. A blackbody temperature of 2.99/sub -.$sub 14$/$sup +$.$sup 07$/K is deduced from our data. The present status of the cosmic background observations, which span more than three decades in frequency, is analyzed and it is concluded that they are all consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2.90 +- .04K (+- 1 SIGMA). This firmly supports the Big Bang cosmological model of the universe. (auth)

Woody, D.P.

1975-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE Vendor Communication Plan I. Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vendor Communication Plan Vendor Communication Plan I. Background On February 2, 2011, the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) issued a memorandum entitled "Myth-Busting: Addressing Misconceptions to Improve Communication with Industry during the Acquisition Process." In addition to identifying and refuting common misconceptions about vendor engagement, the memorandum directed agencies to develop high-level vendor communication plans to discuss how each agency will reduce unnecessary barriers, publicize communication opportunities, and prioritize engagement opportunities for high-risk, complex programs or those that fail to attract new vendors during re-competitions.

113

Cosmic string collision in cosmological backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

The collisions of cosmic string loops and the dynamics of junction formations in expanding backgrounds are studied. The key parameter controlling the dynamics of junction formation, the cosmic strings zipping and unzipping, is the relative size of the loops compared to the Hubble radius at the time of collision. We study analytically and numerically these processes for large superhorizon size loops, for small subhorizon size loops as well as for loops with the radii comparable to the Hubble radius at the time of collision.

Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoeini-Moghaddam, Salomeh [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Mo'allem University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khosravi, Shahram [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Mo'allem University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Decoherence in the cosmic background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the possibility of detecting nontrivial quantum phenomena in observations of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR), for example, if the Universe could be found in a coherent superposition of two states corresponding to different CBR temperatures. Such observations are sensitive to scalar primordial fluctuations but insensitive to tensor fluctuations, which are therefore converted into an environment for the former. Even for a free inflaton field minimally coupled to gravity, scalar-tensor interactions induce enough decoherence among histories of the scalar fluctuations as to render them classical under any realistic probe of their amplitudes.

Mariano Franco; Esteban Calzetta

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Superconducting Hair on Charged Black String Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behaviour of Dirac fermions in the background of a charged black string penetrated by an Abelian Higgs vortex is elaborated. One finds the evidence that the system under consideration can support fermion fields acting like a superconducting cosmic string in the sence that a nontrivial Dirac fermion field can be carried by the system in question. The case of nonextremal and extremal black string vortex systems were considered. The influence of electric and Higgs charge, the winding number and the fermion mass on the fermion localization near the black string event horizon was studied. It turned out that the extreme charged black string expelled fermion fields more violently comparing to the nonextremal one.

Lukasz Nakonieczny; Marek Rogatko

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Emergence of oscillons in an expanding background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a (1+1) dimensional scalar field theory that supports oscillons, which are localized, oscillatory, stable solutions to nonlinear equations of motion. We study this theory in an expanding background and show that oscillons now lose energy, but at a rate that is exponentially small when the expansion rate is slow. We also show numerically that a universe that starts with (almost) thermal initial conditions will cool to a final state where a significant fraction of the energy of the universe--on the order of 50%--is stored in oscillons. If this phenomenon persists in realistic models, oscillons may have cosmological consequences.

Farhi, E.; Guth, A. H.; Iqbal, N. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Graham, N. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States); Rosales, R. R. [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stamatopoulos, N. [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Theoretical Overview of Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theoretical basis for the prediction of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is very well developed. Very low amplitude density and temperature perturbations produce small gravitational effects, leading to an anisotropy that is a combination of temperature fluctuations at the surface of last scattering and gravitational redshifts both at last scattering and along the path to the observer. All of the primary anisotropy can be handled by linear perturbation theory, which allows a very accurate calculation of the predicted anisotropy from different models of the Universe.

E. L. Wright

2003-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

Caldwell, Karin D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chu, Tun-Jen (Salt Lake City, UT); Pitt, William G. (Orem, UT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

120

Electromagnetic polarizabilities: Lattice QCD in background fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chiral perturbation theory makes definitive predictions for the extrinsic behavior of hadrons in external electric and magnetic fields. Near the chiral limit, the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of pions, kaons, and nucleons are determined in terms of a few well-known parameters. In this limit, hadrons become quantum mechanically diffuse as polarizabilities scale with the inverse square-root of the quark mass. In some cases, however, such predictions from chiral perturbation theory have not compared well with experimental data. Ultimately we must turn to first principles numerical simulations of QCD to determine properties of hadrons, and confront the predictions of chiral perturbation theory. To address the electromagnetic polarizabilities, we utilize the background field technique. Restricting our attention to calculations in background electric fields, we demonstrate new techniques to determine electric polarizabilities and baryon magnetic moments for both charged and neutral states. As we can study the quark mass dependence of observables with lattice QCD, the lattice will provide a crucial test of our understanding of low-energy QCD, which will be timely in light of ongoing experiments, such as at COMPASS and HI gamma S.

W. Detmold, B.C. Tiburzi, A. Walker-Loud

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

89 Federal Register 89 Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 223 / Friday, November 20, 2009 / Notices Background The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 (16 U.S.C. 668dd-668ee) (Administration Act), as amended by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, requires us to develop a CCP for each national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the National Wildlife Refuge System, consistent with sound principles of fish and wildlife management, conservation, legal mandates, and our policies. In addition to outlining broad management direction on conserving wildlife and their habitats, CCPs identify wildlife-

122

SECOND SEASON QUIET OBSERVATIONS: MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION POWER SPECTRUM AT 95 GHz  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95 GHz. The 43 GHz results have been published in a previous paper, and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95 GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hr of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx}1000 deg{sup 2} with an effective angular resolution of 12.'8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C {sub l} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB, and BB power spectra between l = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r pipeline, and r = 1.2{sup +0.9} {sub -0.8} (r pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

Araujo, D.; Dumoulin, R. N.; Newburgh, L. B.; Zwart, J. T. L. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Chinone, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Cleary, K.; Reeves, R. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd M/C 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Monsalve, R.; Bustos, R. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Wehus, I. K. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Bronfman, L. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Church, S. E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Varian Physics Building, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Dickinson, C. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gaier, T., E-mail: ibuder@uchicago.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Collaboration: QUIET Collaboration; and others

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css background-image: url(../images/background.gif);  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/maroon_fusion.css body { background-image: url(../images/background.gif); ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css body { background-color: #3e5c5f; ../fusion/templates/mapguide/maroon/css/ maroon_fusion.css #ToolbarVertical { background: #500000; maroon_fusion.css #Toolbar { background

Ahmad, Sajjad

124

NERSC Continues Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis with the Planck Cluster NERSC Continues Tradition of Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis with the Planck...

125

DIRBE Minus 2MASS: Confirming the Cosmic Infrared Background at 2.2 Microns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar fluxes from the 2MASS catalog are used to remove the contribution due to Galactic stars from the intensity measured by DIRBE in four regions in the North and South Galactic polar caps. After subtracting the interplanetary and galactic foregrounds, a consistent residual intensity of 14.8 +/- 4.6 kJy/sr or 20.2 +/- 6.3 nW/m^2/sr at 2.2 microns is found. At 1.25 microns the residuals show more scatter and are a much smaller fraction of the foreground, leading to a weak limit on the CIRB of 12.0 +/- 6.8 kJy/sr or 28.9 +/- 16.3 nW/m^2/sr (1 sigma).

E. L. Wright

2000-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

126

Characterization of background reflectivity for MEDUSA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DARPA MEDUSA program goal is to detect, locate, and identify electro-optical threats in the vicinity of a moving platform. Laser sensing will be employed to find these threats by looking for anomalous reflections from threat sensors. However, the reflectivity variability (clutter) in both natural and manmade backgrounds will inherently limit target detection levels. In parallel with advanced component development by several aerospace contractors, a study of this clutter limitation was initiated in the long-wave (LW) and midwave (MW) infrared spectral regions to properly drive system design parameters. The analysis of clutter and associated limits on detection has been a major component of LANL efforts in laser remote sensing for non-proliferation. LANL is now analyzing existing data and conducting additional selected measurements in both the LWIR (9 and 10.6 pm) and MWIR (4.6 pm) in support of the DARPA program to increase our understanding of these clutter limitations and, thereby aid in the design and development of the MEDUSA system. The status of the LANL effort will be discussed. A variety of different natural and manmade target types have been investigated. Target scenes range from relatively low clutter sites typical of a southwestern desert to higher clutter downtown urban sites. Images are created by conducting raster scans across a scene interest. These images are then analyzed using data clustering techniques (e g K-means) to identify regions within the scene that contain similar reflectivity profiles. Data will be presented illustrating the reflectivity variability among different samples of the same target type, Le. within the same cluster, and among different data clusters. In general, it is found that the variability of reflectivities among similar targets is well represented by a log-normal distribution. Furthermore, manmade target tend to have higher reflectivities and more variability than natural targets. The implications of this observation for MEDUSA systems designed to locate and identify threat sensors will be discussed. The implications for chemical sensing applications will also be addressed.

Oldenborg, R. C. (Richard C.); Tiee, J. J. (Joe J.); Foy, B. R. (Bernard R.); Petrin, R. R. (Roger R.); Wilson, C. W. (Carl W.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Background to someone by E-mail Research and Background to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Research and Background on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Get Involved Partners Research & Background

128

Tentative Detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 2.2 and 3.5 microns Using Ground Based and Space Based Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic InfraRed Background (CIRB) is the sum total of the redshifted and reprocessed short wavelength radiation from the era of galaxy formation, and hence contains vital information about the history of galactic evolution. One of the main problems associated with estimating an isotropic CIRB in the near infrared (1-5 microns) is the unknown contribution from stars within our own galaxy. The optimal observational window to search for a background in the near-IR is at 3.5 microns since that is the wavelength region where the other main foreground, the zodiacal dust emission, is the least. It is not possible to map out the entire 3.5 micron sky at a resolution which will accurately estimate the flux from stars. However, since the CIRB is presumably isotropic, it can potentially be detected by selecting a smaller field and imaging it at good resolution to estimate the stellar intensity. We selected a 2x2 degree "dark spot" near the North Galactic Pole which had the least intensity at 3.5 microns after a zodiacal light model was subtracted from the all-sky maps generated by the Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment (DIRBE). The measured total intensity of the few bright stars in this field was combined with a model for the contribution from dimmer stars and subtracted from the zodi-subtracted DIRBE map. The contribution from the interstellar medium was also subtracted leaving a residual intensity at 2.2 microns of: 16.4+/-4.4 kJy/sr or 22.4+/-6 nW/m^2/sr, and at 3.5 microns: 12.8+/-3.8 kJy/sr or 11+/-3.3 nW/m^2/sr. [Abridged

V. Gorjian; E. L. Wright; R. R. Chary

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Study of alpha background in a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpha background, specifically from radon and its progeny in the uranium and thorium chains, has been a major issue in dark matter detectors. This work focuses on alpha background presence in the DMTPC experiment by examining ...

Yegoryan, Hayk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Background division, a suitable technique for moving object detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, background model does not have any robust solution and constitutes one of the main problems in surveillance systems. Researchers are working in several approaches in order to get better background pixel models. This is a previous step to apply ...

Walter Izquierdo-Guerra; Edel Garca-Reyes

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Role of Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program Background in the CERCLA Cleanup Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response Office of Emergency and Remedial Response April 26, 2002 OSWER 9285.6-07P OSWER 9285.6-07P page 2 of 13 Table of Contents Purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3 of 13 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 4 of 13 Definitions of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Assessment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 6 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7 of 13 Consideration of Background in Risk Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 8 of 13 Hypothetical Case Examples .

133

Microsoft PowerPoint - Powerpoint_Background.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

g g Radiation Radiation Radiation is everywhere Cosmic Inhaled Radon Inhaled Radon Bodies Plants Bodies Radioactive Elements We live in a sea of radiation... Rocks BACKGROUND RADIATION BACKGROUND RADIATION The average background radiation per person is 370 millirems per person is 370 millirems (mrem) per year. This varies widely depending on where someone lives and their someone lives, and their occupation, health and lifestyle. Background Radiation g Most background radiation is g natural. It is part of nat re It is part of nature. It has always been here. y People have always lived with it. Radiation comes from space- sun and cosmic rays Because this type of radiation is somewhat shielded by the atmosphere, y p the dose is higher at higher altitudes Background Radiation Exposure at Different Elevations

134

World Oil Transit Chokepoints Background - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries World Oil Transit Chokepoints Last Updated: August 22, 2012 full report Background World oil chokepoints for maritime transit of oil are a critical part ...

135

Countries East China Sea Background - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Countries East China Sea Last Updated: September 25, 2012 Background Although the East China Sea may have abundant oil and natural gas resources, unresolved

136

Background | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Frontier Intensity Frontier Cosmic Frontier Theoretical Physics Advanced Technology R&D Accelerator R&D Stewardship Mission Background HEP Accelerator R&D Expertise...

137

Background Long history of research and education in "nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). #12;Master Programme in Nuclear Engineering · Coupling education ­ research (reactor physics#12;Background · Long history of research and education in "nuclear engineering" at Chalmers. · "Nuclear engineering" = multi-disciplinary research area. #12;Background Establishment of the Sustainable

Lemurell, Stefan

138

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results Low Background Radiation Experiment Yields Interesting Preliminary Results May 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - New Mexico State University"s Low Background Radiation Experiment (LBRE), which takes place 2,150 feet below the earth"s surface at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, recently released some results about the project"s first two years of experimentation. The March 2011 edition of Health Physics printed an article titled "Exploring Biological Effects of Low Level Radiation from the Other Side of Background," summarizing some initial data taken from LBRE and from a sister experiment conducted at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute

139

AGN models for the X and gamma-ray backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origin of the X-ray background spectral intensity has been a long standing problem in high energy astrophysics research. Deep X-ray surveys carried out with ROSAT and ASCA combined with the broad band spectral results of Ginga and BeppoSAX satellites strongly support the hypothesis that the bulk of the X-ray background is due to the integrated contribution of discrete sources (mainly AGNs). At higher energies the unexpected findings of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory indicate that also the gamma-ray background is likely to be due to AGNs. I will discuss AGN--based models for the high energy backgrounds and how future observations will improve our understanding of the X and gamma-ray backgrounds and of the physics and evolution of AGNs.

Andrea Comastri

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Simulations Some results for probabilistic CSP 3/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal: Specification and proof methodologies for probabilistic concurrent systems Nondeterminism + Probability why necessary? ? Nondeterminism intrinsic to specification development la CSP ? underspecified components expressed using nondeterminism COMP ? OPTION ? underspecified COMP more specified ? Analysis of concurrent systems requires nondeterminism ?- internal choice of CSP 4/29 Background Testing theory pCSP Simulations Some results Background

Matthew Hennessy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Backgrounds To Higgs Boson Searches from Asymmetric Internal Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A class of potential backgrounds for Higgs boson searches in the W W to di-lepton channel at both the Tevatron and Large Hadron Collider is presented. Backgrounds from W photon production with external conversion of the on-shell photon in detector material to an asymmetric electron-positron pair, with loss of the trailing electron or positron has been treated adequately in Higgs searches. Here we consider analogous backgrounds from the production of a W with an off-shell photon and with the internal conversion of the off-shell photon in vacuum to an asymmetric lepton-anti-lepton pair. While the former process yields almost entirely electrons or positrons, the latter can give electron, positron, muon, and anti-muon backgrounds in roughly equal amounts. We estimate that asymmetric internal conversion backgrounds are comparable to the Higgs boson signal in the standard signal region of phase space. These processes also represent potential backgrounds for new physics searches in same-sign di-lepton channels. Some data driven methods to characterize asymmetric internal conversion backgrounds are suggested.

Richard C. Gray; Can Kilic; Michael Park; Sunil Somalwar; Scott Thomas

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

Scalar Wave Falloff in Asymptotically Anti-de Sitter Backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conformally invariant scalar waves in black hole spacetimes which are asymptotically anti-de Sitter are investigated. We consider both the $(2+1)$-dimensional black hole and $(3+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter spacetime as backgrounds. Analytical and numerical methods show that the waves decay exponentially in the $(2+1)$ dimensional black hole background. However the falloff pattern of the conformal scalar waves in the Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter background is generally neither exponential nor an inverse power rate, although the approximate falloff of the maximal peak is weakly exponential. We discuss the implications of these results for mass inflation.

S. F. J. Chan; R. B. Mann

1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Spinning Test Particle in Kalb-Ramond background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we explore the geodesic deviations of spinning test particles in a string inspired Einstein-Kalb Ramond background. Such a background is known to be equivalent to a spacetime geometry with torsion. We have shown here that the antisymmetric Kalb-Ramond field has significant effect on the geodesic deviation of a spinning test particle. A search for an observational evidence of such an effect in astrophysical experiments may lead to a better undestanding of the geometry of the background spacetime.

Debaprasad Maity; Soumitra SenGupta; Sourav Sur

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

DIRBE Minus 2MASS: the Cosmic Infrared Background at 3.5 Microns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar fluxes from the 2MASS catalog are used to remove the contribution due to Galactic stars from the intensity measured by DIRBE in 13 regions in the North and South Galactic polar caps. Allowing for a constant calibration factor between the DIRBE 3.5 micron intensity and the 2MASS 2.2 micron fluxes gives very small pixel to pixel scatter. After subtracting the interplanetary and Galactic foregrounds, a residual intensity of 16.1 +/- 4 kJy/sr or 13.8 +/- 3.4 nW/m^2/sr at 3.5 microns is found. A similar analysis at 2.2 microns gives a residual intensity of 17.6 +/- 4.4 kJy/sr or 24 +/- 6 nW/m^2/sr. The intercepts of the DIRBE minus 2MASS correlation at 1.25 microns show more scatter and are a much smaller fraction of the foreground, leading to a weak limit on the CIRB of 10.1 +/- 7.4 kJy/sr or 24.3 +/- 18 nW/m^2/sr (1 sigma).

Edward L. Wright; Benjamin D. Johnson

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

Beaver MCCs and Switchgear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Little Rock District Little Rock District MCC's and Switchgear Replacement Project The Following photo's list typical damage and faults of existing equipment Customer Funding 2014 480V Station Service Switchgear Currently the switchyard has only one available feeder. The shown AK 30 breaker is obsolete and needs repairs. Similar with other Breakers. Breakers have to be swapped to place parallel feeders into service. Motor Generator MCC This Center contains the DC generator and battery chargers. Most of the scavenged parts have been taken here to keep this gear as complete as possible. See notes Unit 1 Distribution MCC Parts have been removed to keep other circuits in service. Unable to get replacement parts Motor control centers are obsolete. We have to do unacceptable

146

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BEAVER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

147

The Muskrat -- Little Brother of the Beaver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants to build a house or lodge that has, inside, a warm living room reached by an underwater entrance. From this home they range out to feed on the succulent roots and stems of...

148

Evolution of the Ionizing Background at High Redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a Maximum-Likelihood analysis to constrain the value and evolution of the ionizing background for 2

Andrew Cooke; Brian Espey; Bob Carswell

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Higgs boson production at hadron colliders: Signal and background processes  

SciTech Connect

We review the theoretical status of signal and background calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. Particular emphasis is given to missing NLO results, which will play a crucial role for the Tevatron and the LHC.

David Rainwater; Michael Spira; Dieter Zeppenfeld

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

BACKGROUND INFORMATION New York State Data Exchange Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Provide recommendations to other state and federal environmental and public health agencies regarding between environmental and health agencies. Participating Organizations: New York State DepartmentBACKGROUND INFORMATION New York State Data Exchange Project New York State Data Exchange Project

151

Efficiency of background suppression for arterial spin labeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arterial spin labeling (ASL), a technique developed for the measurement of local tissue perfusion with MRI, is heavily dependent on distinguishing irrelevant static tissue signal from the labeled blood. Background suppression ...

Garcia, Dairon, 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Background Stratospheric Aerosol Variations Deduced from Satellite Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products from 1998 to 2004 have been analyzed for the tendency of changes in background stratospheric aerosol properties. The aerosol extinction coefficient E has apparently ...

Yu Liu; Xuepeng Zhao; Weiliang Li; Xiuji Zhou

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Determining Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Background in Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sediment remediation challenges at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites include defining sediment remedial zones, establishing risk-based remedial goals for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and determining background conditions in what are often highly industrialized waterways. This technical update describes the various tools and approaches developed over approximately the past decade to determine site-specific background PAH concentrations in sediments attributable to ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Comparing statistical tests for detecting soil contamination greater than background  

SciTech Connect

The Washington State Department of Ecology (WSDE) recently issued a report that provides guidance on statistical issues regarding investigation and cleanup of soil and groundwater contamination under the Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Regulation. Included in the report are procedures for determining a background-based cleanup standard and for conducting a 3-step statistical test procedure to decide if a site is contaminated greater than the background standard. The guidance specifies that the State test should only be used if the background and site data are lognormally distributed. The guidance in WSDE allows for using alternative tests on a site-specific basis if prior approval is obtained from WSDE. This report presents the results of a Monte Carlo computer simulation study conducted to evaluate the performance of the State test and several alternative tests for various contamination scenarios (background and site data distributions). The primary test performance criteria are (1) the probability the test will indicate that a contaminated site is indeed contaminated, and (2) the probability that the test will indicate an uncontaminated site is contaminated. The simulation study was conducted assuming the background concentrations were from lognormal or Weibull distributions. The site data were drawn from distributions selected to represent various contamination scenarios. The statistical tests studied are the State test, t test, Satterthwaite`s t test, five distribution-free tests, and several tandem tests (wherein two or more tests are conducted using the same data set).

Hardin, J.W.; Gilbert, R.O.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

No increase in background, manmade radioactivity for Los Alamos area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March » March » Man-Made Radioactivity For Los Alamos area No increase in background, manmade radioactivity for Los Alamos area Two aerial flyovers found that radioisotopes and their associated exposure rates are consistent with those expected from normal background radiation. March 19, 2013 High southwest aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory (left) and Los Alamos townsite (middle and right). High southwest aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory (left) and Los Alamos townsite (middle and right). The results are good news and the information will benefit the Lab and the community for years to come as we work toward cleanup and sustainability. Two aerial flyovers of the Los Alamos area to determine the presence of background and manmade radioactivity found that radioisotopes and their

157

Background: Today's Solyndra Solar Hearing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background: Today's Solyndra Solar Hearing Background: Today's Solyndra Solar Hearing Background: Today's Solyndra Solar Hearing September 14, 2011 - 12:04am Addthis Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs This morning, the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations is holding a hearing to discuss Solyndra Solar, the California-based solar manufacturer that declared bankruptcy last week. Jonathan Silver, Executive Director of the Department's Loan Programs Office, will be testifying. We've posted Jonathan's written testimony online. The testimony is very thorough and provides a good explanation of the loan process and the extensive reviews and analysis conducted by the Department between 2006 and 2009. He also explains the remarkable changes in the solar market since

158

Reducing 68Ge Background in Dark Matter Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Experimental searches for dark matter include experiments with sub-0.5 keV-energy threshold high purity germanium detectors. Experimental efforts, in partnership with the CoGeNT Collaboration operating at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, are focusing on energy threshold reduction via noise abatement, reduction of backgrounds from cosmic ray generated isotopes, and ubiquitous environmental radioactive sources. The most significant cosmic ray produced radionuclide is 68Ge. This paper evaluates reducing this background by freshly mining and processing germanium ore. The most probable outcome is a reduction of the background by a factor of two, and at most a factor of four. A very cost effective alternative is to obtain processed Ge as soon as possible and store it underground for 18 months.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO October 27, 1989 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Prepared by: R.F. Weston/Office of Technical Services BACKGROUND REVIEW OF THE BRUSH BERYLLIUM AND DIAMOND MAGNESIUM PLANTS IN LUCKEY, OHIO INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a program to identify and examine the radiological conditions at sites used in the early years of nuclear energy development by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer's Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). This program, the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), is administered by the Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy through the

160

Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Background Fact Sheet Background Fact Sheet Transfer of Depleted Uranium and Subsequent Transactions At the direction of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, over many months, the Energy Department (DOE) has been working closely with Energy Northwest (ENW), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and USEC Inc. (USEC) to develop a plan to address the challenges at USEC's Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP) that advances America's national security interests, protects taxpayers, and provides benefits for TVA and the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) electric ratepayers and business operations. BPA is ENW's sole customer, purchasing 100 percent of ENW's Columbia Generating Station's electric power as part of BPA's overall

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161

A Stable Magnetic Background in SU(2) QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the instability of the Savvidy-Nielsen-Olesen (SNO) vacuum we make a systematic search for a stable magnetic background in pure SU(2) QCD. It is shown that Wu-Yang monopole-antimonopole pair is unstable under vacuum fluctuations. However, it is shown that a pair of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole string configuration is stable, provided the distance between the two strings is small enough (less than a critical value). The existence of a stable monopole-antimonopole string background strongly supports that a magnetic condensation of monopole-antimonopole pairs can indeed generate a dynamical symmetry breaking, and thus a desired magnetic confinement of color, in QCD.

Y. M. Cho; D. G. Pak

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

162

Magnetic properties of the nucleon in a uniform background field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for the magnetic moment and magnetic polarisability of the neutron and the magnetic moment of the proton. These results are calculated using the uniform background field method on 32^3 x 64 dynamical QCD lattices provided by the PACS-CS collaboration as part of the ILDG. We use a uniform background magnetic field quantised by the periodic spatial volume. We investigate ways to improve the effective energy plots used to calculate magnetic polarisabilities, including the use of correlation matrix techniques with various source smearings.

Thomas Primer; Waseem Kamleh; Derek Leinweber; Matthias Burkardt

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Background X-ray Spectrum of Radioactive Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) is commonly used with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the elemental compositions and microstructures of a variety of samples. For example, the microstructures of nuclear fuels are commonly investigated with this technique. However, the radioactivity of some materials introduces additional X-rays that contribute to the EDS background spectrum. These X-rays are generally not accounted for in spectral analysis software, and can cause misleading results. X-rays from internal conversion [1], Bremsstrahlung [2] radiation associated with alpha ionizations and beta particle interactions [3], and gamma rays from radioactive decay can all elevate the background of radioactive materials.

Shannon Yee; Dawn E. Janney

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Arbitrary blade section design based on viscous considerations. Background information  

SciTech Connect

Background information is presented on an arbitrary blade section design method which is outlined in a joint paper. This information concerns the assumptions, the development, and the predictive capabilities of the viscous flow calculation tool used in the design procedure. General properties of laminar and turbulent, unseparated or separated compressible shear layers, necessary for the blade optimization procedure, are discussed.

Bouras, B.; Karagiannis, F.; Leoutsakos, G.; Giannakoglou, K.C.; Papailiou, K.D. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Thermal Turbomachinery Lab.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

State Agency Greenhouse Gas Reduction Report Card Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 State Agency Greenhouse Gas Reduction Report Card Background Under Section 12892), the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) is required to prepare an annual report describing state: · A list of those measures that have been adopted and implemented by the state agency with the actual GHG

166

Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic  

SciTech Connect

The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

Cronkite, E.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Al-Khwarizmi: The Father of Algebra Historical Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Al-Khwarizmi: The Father of Algebra Historical Background Abu Ja'far Muhammad ibn Musa al near the Aral Sea, historians believe that al-Khwarizmi was born in the city of Baghdad in present day Iraq (Calinger, 199). While little is known about his private life, al-Khwarizmi's work

168

Multi-chroic dual-polarization bolometric detectors for studies of the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are developing multi-chroic antenna-coupled TES detectors for CMB polarimetry. Multi-chroic detectors increase the mapping speed per focal plane area and provide greater discrimination of polarized galactic foregrounds with no increase in weight or cryogenic cost. In each pixel, a silicon lens-coupled dual polarized sinuous antenna collects light over a two-octave frequency band. The antenna couples the broadband millimeter wave signal into microstrip transmission lines, and on-chip filter banks split the broadband signal into several frequency bands. Separate TES bolometers detect the power in each frequency band and linear polarization. We will describe the design and performance of these devices and present optical data taken with prototype pixels. Our measurements show beams with percent level ellipticity, percent level cross-polarization leakage, and partitioned bands using banks of 2, 3, and 7 filters. We will also describe the development of broadband anti-reflection coatings for the high dielectric...

Suzuki, Aritoki; Edwards, Jennifer; Engargiola, Greg; Ghribi, Adnan; Holzapfel, William; Lee, Adrian T; Meng, Xiao Fan; Myers, Michael J; O'Brient, Roger; Quealy, Erin; Rebeiz, Gabriel; Richards, Paul; Rosen, Darin; Siritanasak, Praween

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Differential Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Differential Microwave Radiometer and the Cosmic Microwave Background Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page

170

Home Energy Score Research and Background | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Home Energy Score Residential Buildings » Home Energy Score » Home Energy Score Research and Background Home Energy Score Research and Background Scoring Tool v.2014 In January 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released the first major update to the Home Energy Scoring Tool. After more than a year of implementation and feedback from program Partners, DOE made significant improvements to the scoring tool's calculation methodology and user interface. A newly refined scoring system will allow inefficient homes to more easily move up the scale with investments in efficiency improvements. This enhanced mobility is expected to help motivate greater action among homeowners. The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) performed a variety of analyses to test the updated scoring tool. Analysis

171

Performance Oversight Group: Background and Guidelines for Presenters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Group: Oversight Group: Background and Guidelines for Presenters Carl Strawbridge Office of Integrated Planning and Performance Management (formerly OPPS) Dean Hoffer Office of Project Support Services (formerly OPMO) 1 11/29/2012 Overview * Why POG? * Background on Laboratory Changes to Project Management Processes * POG Charter - Purpose - Membership - Roles & Responsibilities - Procedures * POG pilot meeting agenda, December 10 * Discussion--Guidelines for Presenters * Questions/Clarifications/Suggestions 2 11/29/2012 Why POG * Fermilab is managing a large number of major scientific capital construction projects to meet the future science agenda for the lab - May be unique in this respect within the DOE complex * Existing project support and oversight mechanisms not suitable for

172

The autocorrelation function of the soft X-ray background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first positive detection of the X-ray background fluctuations at small angular scales is reported. ROSAT PSPC archive pointed observations are used to measure fluctuations at scales of 0.03 - 0.4 deg. The pointings have been selected from an area free from galactic contamination. At separations below 0.1 deg clusters of galaxies become a substantial source of the background fluctuations. The autocorrelation function of the fluctuations in the power law approximation has a slope of ~1 for all the data but is substantially flatter (with slope of ~0.7) when pointings containing bright clusters are removed. At separations 0.3 - 0.4 deg where the ACF estimates based on the ROSAT pointings and All-Sky Survey are available, both data sets give consistent results.

Andrzej M. Soltan; Michael J. Freyberg

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Moving branes in the presence of background tachyon fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compute the boundary state associated with a moving Dp-brane in the presence of the open string tachyon field as a background field. The effect of the tachyon condensation on the boundary state is discussed. It leads to a boundary state associated with a lower-dimensional moving D-brane or a stationary instantonic D-brane. The former originates from condensation along the spatial directions and the latter comes from the temporal direction of the D-brane worldvolume. Using the boundary state, we also study the interaction amplitude between two arbitrary Dp{sub 1}- and Dp{sub 2}-branes. The long-range behavior of the amplitude is investigated, demonstrating an obvious deviation from the conventional form, due to the presence of the background tachyon field.

Rezaei, Z., E-mail: z.rezaei@aut.ac.ir; Kamani, D., E-mail: kamani@aut.ac.ir [Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION  

SciTech Connect

We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Miller, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Perley, R. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1C1 (Canada)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Diffuse supernova neutrino background is detectable in Super-Kamiokande  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) provides an immediate opportunity to study the emission of MeV thermal neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae. The DSNB is a powerful probe of stellar and neutrino physics, provided that the core-collapse rate is large enough and that its uncertainty is small enough. To assess the important physics enabled by the DSNB, we start with the cosmic star formation history of Hopkins and Beacom (2006) and confirm its normalization and evolution by cross-checks with the supernova rate, extragalactic background light, and stellar mass density. We find a sufficient core-collapse rate with small uncertainties that translate into a variation of {+-}40% in the DSNB event spectrum. Considering thermal neutrino spectra with effective temperatures between 4-6 MeV, the predicted DSNB is within a factor 4-2 below the upper limit obtained by Super-Kamiokande in 2003. Furthermore, detection prospects would be dramatically improved with a gadolinium-enhanced Super-Kamiokande: the backgrounds would be significantly reduced, the fluxes and uncertainties converge at the lower threshold energy, and the predicted event rate is 1.2-5.6 events yr{sup -1} in the energy range 10-26 MeV. These results demonstrate the imminent detection of the DSNB by Super-Kamiokande and its exciting prospects for studying stellar and neutrino physics.

Horiuchi, Shunsaku [Department of Physics, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Dwek, Eli [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Design Considerations for Large Mass Ultra-Low Background Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Summary The objective of this document is to present the designers of the next generation of large-mass, ultra-low background experiments with lessons learned and design strategies from previous experimental work. Design issues divided by topic into mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements are addressed. Large mass low-background experiments have been recognized by the scientific community as appropriate tools to aid in the refinement of the standard model. The design of these experiments is very costly and a rigorous engineering review is required for their success. The extreme conditions that the components of the experiment must withstand (heavy shielding, vacuum/pressure and temperature gradients), in combination with unprecedented noise levels, necessitate engineering guidance to support quality construction and safe operating conditions. Physical properties and analytical results of typical construction materials are presented. Design considerations for achieving ultra-low-noise data acquisition systems are addressed. Five large-mass, low-background conceptual designs for the one-tonne scale germanium experiment are proposed and analyzed. The result is a series of recommendations for future experiments engineering and for the Majorana simulation task group to evaluate the different design approaches.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.; Orrell, John L.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

pn-CCDs in a Low-Background Environment: Detector Background of the CAST X-ray Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CAST experiment at CERN (European Organization of Nuclear Research) searches for axions from the sun. The axion is a pseudoscalar particle that was motivated by theory thirty years ago, with the intention to solve the strong CP problem. Together with the neutralino, the axion is one of the most promising dark matter candidates. The CAST experiment has been taking data during the last two years, setting an upper limit on the coupling of axions to photons more restrictive than from any other solar axion search in the mass range below 0.1 eV. In 2005 CAST will enter a new experimental phase extending the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. The CAST experiment strongly profits from technology developed for high energy physics and for X-ray astronomy: A superconducting prototype LHC magnet is used to convert potential axions to detectable X-rays in the 1-10 keV range via the inverse Primakoff effect. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a spin-off from space technology, a Wolter I type X-ray optics in combination with a prototype pn-CCD developed for ESA's XMM-Newton mission. As in other rare event searches, background suppression and a thorough shielding concept is essential to improve the sensitivity of the experiment to the best possible. In this context CAST offers the opportunity to study the background of pn-CCDs and its long term behavior in a terrestrial environment with possible implications for future space applications. We will present a systematic study of the detector background of the pn-CCD of CAST based on the data acquired since 2002 including preliminary results of our background simulations.

M. Kuster; S. Cebrian; A. Rodriquez; R. Kotthaus; H. Braeuninger; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; D. Kang; G. Lutz; L. Strueder

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

FY 2013 FRPC DATA REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS I. Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2013 FRPC DATA REPORTING INSTRUCTIONS I. Background Executive Order 13327, "Federal Real Property Asset Management" was created to promote the efficient and economical use of the Federal Government's real property assets. The E.O. established the interagency Federal Real Property Council (FRPC), established the role of the Senior Real Property Officer, and mandated the creation of a centralized real property database. This document provides instructions for populating the required data in FIMS so that the Department can report in accordance with the FY 2013 FRPC reporting requirements.

179

Imprint of Sterile Neutrinos in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of low-mass sterile neutrinos is suggested by the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrinos together with the LSND experiment. In typical four-flavor scenarios, neutrinos would contribute to a cosmic hot dark matter component and to an increased radiation content at the epoch of matter-radiation equality. These effects leave their imprint in sky maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) and may thus be detectable with the precision measurements of the upcoming MAP and PLANCK missions.

Steen Hannestad; Georg Raffelt

1998-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

A detection of bright features in the microwave background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the characterization of bright, compact features in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) detected during the June 1992 and June 1994 balloon flights of the Medium Scale Anisotropy Measurement (MSAM1-92 and MSAM1-94, respectively). Spectral flux densities are determined for each feature at 5.7, 9.3, and 16.5 cm^{-1}. No viable counterparts for these features were found in source catalogs at 5 GHz or at 100 \\mum. The measured spectrum of each feature is consistent with a temperature fluctuation in the CMBR. The existence of these features is consistent with adiabatic fluctuation models of anisotropy in the CMBR.

Kowitt, M S; Cottingham, D A; Fixsen, D J; Inman, C A; Meyer, S; Page, L A; Puchalla, J L; Ruhl, J E; Silverberg, R F

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

Wool fiberglass insulation manufacturing industry - background information for proposed standards  

SciTech Connect

A Standard of Performance for the control of emissions from wool fiberglass insulation manufacturing facilities is being proposed under authority of Section 111 of the Clean Air Act. This standard would apply to new, modified, or reconstructed wool fiberglass insulation manufacturing lines that utilize the rotary spin forming process and that commence construction on or after the date of proposal of the regulation. This document contains background information and environmental and economic impact assessments of the regulatory alternatives considered in developing the proposed standard. 79 references, 280 tables.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Upper Limits on a Stochastic Background of Gravitational Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) has performed a third science run with much improved sensitivities of all three interferometers. We present an analysis of approximately 200 hours of data acquired during this run, used to search for a stochastic background of gravitational radiation. We place upper bounds on the energy density stored as gravitational radiation for three different spectral power laws. For the flat spectrum, our limit of Omega_0<8.4e-4 in the 69-156 Hz band is ~10^5 times lower than the previous result in this frequency range.

Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Gonzlez, G; Goler, S; Grandclment, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grnewald, S; Gnther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Collapsing Inhomogeneous Dust Fluid in the Background of Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work, gravitational collapse of an inhomogeneous spherical star model, consisting of inhomogeneous dust fluid (dark matter) in the background of dark energy is considered. The collapsing process is examined first separately for both dark matter and dark energy and then under the combined effect of dark matter and dark energy with or without interaction. The dark energy is considered in the form of perfect fluid and both marginally and non-marginally bound cases are considered for the collapsing model. Finally dark energy in the form of anisotropic fluid is investigated and it is found to be similar to ref. [12

Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

On uncertainties associated with expected backgrounds in planned experiments  

SciTech Connect

The expected numbers of events of several backgrounds in experiment are estimated from Monte Carlo experiments. In the analysis we take into account an integrated luminosity of Monte Carlo experiments. The expected number of events allows to construct the distribution of probabilities of number of events which in real experiment may be observed (in accordance with formulae in [1]). The formulae allow to take into account statistical uncertainty of corresponding Monte Carlo experiment. The influence of systematics is determined by additional Monte Carlo experiments with expected number of events.

Bityukov, Sergey; Smirnova, Vera [Institute for high energy physics, 142281 Protvino (Russian Federation); Krasnikov, Nikolai [Institute for nuclear research RAS, Prospect 60-letiya Octyabrya, 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1?}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

1980-05-00T23:59:59.000Z

186

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-263 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS, AG London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the Untied States to Mexico and to Canada. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the principal booking location of the company's energy trading business; UBS

187

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Explanatory Notes Explanatory Notes The EIA-782 Surveys Background The EIA-782 surveys were implemented in 1983 to fulfill the data requirements necessary to meet En- ergy Information Administration (EIA) legislative mandates and user community data needs. The re- quirements include petroleum product price, market distribution, demand (or sales), and product supply data, which are needed for a complete evaluation of petroleum market performance. The EIA-782 series includes the Form EIA-782A, "Refiners'/Gas Plant Operators' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Re- port"; Form EIA-782B, "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report"; and Form EIA- 782C, "Monthly Report of Prime Supplier Sales of Petroleum Products Sold for Local Consumption."

188

Exelon Generation Company, LLC Order No. EA-249 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exelon Generation Company, LLC Exelon Generation Company, LLC Order No. EA-249 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On August 20, 2001, Exelon Generation Company, LLC (Exelon) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. Exelon proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export this energy on its own behalf to Canada. The energy to be exported would be delivered to Canada over the international electric transmission facilities owned and operated by the following:

189

ENMAX Energy Marketing Inc. Order No. EA-264 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENMAX Energy Marketing Inc. ENMAX Energy Marketing Inc. Order No. EA-264 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On February 20, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from ENMAX Energy Marketing, Inc. (ENMAX) to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada. ENMAX is an Alberta corporation having its principal place of business at Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ENMAX is a power marketer and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of ENMAX Energy Corporation, which in turn is a wholly owned subsidiary of ENMAX Corporation. ENMAX currently participates in the wholesale trading of

190

Carbon Sequestration, Media Background Briefing, June 16, 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Background Briefing June 16, 2003 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Product Manager The Fossil Energy Situation Fossil Fuels World's Dominant Energy Source United States 99 QBtu/yr; 85% Fossil Energy World 382 Quads/yr; 86% Fossil Energy Word Data from EIA96. Does not include non-grid-connected biomass. U.S. Data from Table 2 of EIA REA 97 & AEO 2002 Table A2 0.9% Coal 25% Coal 25% Oil 39% Gas 22% Nuclear 6% 7% 7% Coal 22% Gas 24% Nuclear 8% Oil 38% 4% Hydro Solar, Wind, Geo Biomass 3% 0.6% World - 1999 12.8 Trillion kWh - 63% Fossil Energy United States - 1999 3.2 Trillion kWh - 69% Fossil Energy Source: EIA International Energy Outlook 2001 Edison Electric Institute 2001 Renewables Oil Fossil Fuels World's Dominant Electricity Source

191

UBS AG, LONDON BRANCH Order No. EA-261 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On April 11, 2002, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from UBS AG, London Branch (UBS) for authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico. UBS, a Swiss corporation formed in 1998 by the merger of Union Bank of Switzerland and Swiss Bank Corporation, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. The designation "London Branch" indicates the

192

Indian Renewable Energy Status Report: Background Report for DIREC 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indian Renewable Energy Status Report Indian Renewable Energy Status Report Background Report for DIREC 2010 D. S. Arora (IRADe) | Sarah Busche (NREL) | Shannon Cowlin (NREL) | Tobias Engelmeier (Bridge to India Pvt. Ltd.) | Hanna Jaritz (IRADe) | Anelia Milbrandt (NREL) | Shannon Wang (REN21 Secretariat) NREL/TP-6A20-48948 October 2010 I R A D e NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

193

Non-Gaussianity and the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review in a pedagogical way the present status of the impact of non-Gaussianity (NG) on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies. We first show how to set the initial conditions at second-order for the (gauge invariant) CMB anisotropies when some primordial NG is present. However, there are many sources of NG in CMB anisotropies, beyond the primordial one, which can contaminate the primordial signal. We mainly focus on the NG generated from the post-inflationary evolution of the CMB anisotropies at second-order in perturbation theory at large and small angular scales, such as the ones generated at the recombination epoch. We show how to derive the equations to study the second-order CMB anisotropies and provide analytical computations to evaluate their contamination to primordial NG (complemented with numerical examples). We also offer a brief summary of other secondary effects. This review requires basic knowledge of the theory of cosmological perturbations at the linear level.

N. Bartolo; S. Matarrese; A. Riotto

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

194

Background-reducing X-ray multilayer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror. A multiple-layer "wavetrap" deposited over the surface of a layered, synthetic-microstructure soft x-ray mirror optimized for reflectivity at chosen wavelengths is disclosed for reducing the reflectivity of undesired, longer wavelength incident radiation incident thereon. In three separate mirror designs employing an alternating molybdenum and silicon layered, mirrored structure overlaid by two layers of a molybdenum/silicon pair anti-reflection coating, reflectivities of near normal incidence 133, 171, and 186 .ANG. wavelengths have been optimized, while that at 304 .ANG. has been minimized. The optimization process involves the choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs as well as the number thereof, and the distance therebetween for the mirror, and the simultaneous choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs, and their number and distance for the "wavetrap."

Bloch, Jeffrey J. (Los Alamos, NM); Roussel-Dupre' , Diane (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Barham W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror. A multiple-layer ``wavetrap`` deposited over the surface of a layered synthetic microstructure soft x-ray mirror optimized for reflectivity at chosen wavelengths is disclosed for reducing the reflectivity of undesired, longer wavelength incident radiation incident thereon. In three separate mirror designs employing an alternating molybdenum and silicon layered mirrored structure overlaid by two layers of a molybdenum/silicon pair anti-reflection coating, reflectivities of near normal incidence 133, 171, and 186 {Angstrom} wavelengths have been optimized, while that at 304 {Angstrom} has been minimized. The optimization process involves the choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs as well as the number thereof, and the distance therebetween for the mirror, and the simultaneous choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs, their number and distance for the ``wavetrap.``

Bloch, J.J.; Roussel-Dupre, D.; Smith, B.W.

1990-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields.

D. Y Stewart; P. F. Harrison; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Separating Signal From Background Using Ensembles of Rules  

SciTech Connect

Machine learning has emerged as a important tool for separating signal events from associated background in high energy particle physics experiments. This paper describes a new machine learning method based on ensembles of rules. Each rule consists of a conjuction of a small number of simple statements (''cuts'') concerning the values of individual input variables. These rule ensembles produce predictive accuracy comparable to the best methods. However their principal advantage lies in interpretation. Because of its simple form, each rule is easy to understand, as is its influence on the predictive model. Similarly, the degree of relevance of each of the respective input variables can be assessed. Graphical representations are presented that can be used to ascertain the dependence of the model jointly on the variables used for prediction.

Friedman, J.H.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characterization and modeling of a low background HPGe detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high efficiency, low background counting setup has been made at TIFR consisting of a special HPGe detector ($\\sim$70$\\%$) surrounded by a low activity copper+lead shield. Detailed measurements are performed with point and extended geometry sources to obtain a complete response of the detector. An effective model of the detector has been made with GEANT4 based Monte Carlo simulations which agrees with experimental data within 5$\\%$. This setup will be used for qualification and selection of radio-pure materials to be used in a cryogenic bolometer for the study of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in $^{124}$Sn as well as for other rare event studies. Using this setup, radio-impurities in the rock sample from India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) site have been estimated.

N. Dokania; V. Singh; S. Mathimalar; V. Nanal; S. Pal; R. G. Pillay

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

DARK MATTER POWERED STARS: CONSTRAINTS FROM THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of predominantly cold non-baryonic dark matter is unambiguously demonstrated by several observations (e.g., structure formation, big bang nucleosynthesis, gravitational lensing, and rotational curves of spiral galaxies). A candidate well motivated by particle physics is a weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP). Self-annihilating WIMPs would affect the stellar evolution especially in the early universe. Stars powered by self-annihilating WIMP dark matter should possess different properties compared with standard stars. While a direct detection of such dark matter powered stars seems very challenging, their cumulative emission might leave an imprint in the diffuse metagalactic radiation fields, in particular in the mid-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this work, the possible contributions of dark matter powered stars (dark stars, DSs) to the extragalactic background light (EBL) are calculated. It is shown that existing data and limits of the EBL intensity can already be used to rule out some DS parameter sets.

Maurer, A.; Raue, M.; Kneiske, T.; Horns, D. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Elsaesser, D. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Hauschildt, P. H., E-mail: andreas.maurer@physik.uni-hamburg.de [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Search for the Cosmic Neutrino Background and KATRIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been detected in 1964 by Penzias and Wilson. It shows today a remarkable constant temperature of T ~ 2.7 K independent of the direction. Present density is about 370 photons per cubic-cm. The size of the hot spots, which deviates only in the fifth decimal of the temperature from the average value, tells us, that the universe is flat. About 300 000 years after the Big Bang at a temperature of T = 3000 K already in the matter dominated era the electrons combine with the protons and 4He and the photons move freely in the neutral universe. So the temperature and distribution of the photons give us information of the universe 300 000 years after the Big Bang. Information about earlier times can, in principle, be derived from the Cosmic Neutrino Background. The neutrinos decouple already 1 second after the Big Bang at a temperature of about 10^{10} K. Today their temperature is ~ 1.95 K and the average density is 56 electron-neutrinos per cubic-cm. Registration of these neutrinos is an extremely challenging experimental problem which can hardly be solved with the present technologies. On the other hand it represents a tempting opportunity to check one of the key element of the Big Bang cosmology and to probe the early stages of the universe evolution. The search for the cosmic relic neutrinos with the induced beta decay Electron-neutrino + 3H --> 3He + e- is the topic of this contribution. The signal would show up by a peak in the electron spectrum with an energy of the neutrino mass above the Q value. We discuss the prospects of this approach and argue that it is able to set limits on the relic neutrino density in our vicinity.

Amand Faessler; Rastislav Hodak; Sergey Kovalenko; Fedor Simkovic

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

BL Lacertae Objects and the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tight correlation between gamma-ray and radio emission is found for a sample of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects detected by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray emission of BL Lac objects exhibits strong variability, and the detection rate of gamma-ray BL Lac objects is low, which may be related to the gamma-ray duty cycle of BL Lac objects. We estimate the gamma-ray duty cycle ~ 0.11, for BL Lac objects detected by EGRET and Fermi. Using the empirical relation of gamma-ray emission with radio emission and the estimated gamma-ray duty cycle, we derive the gamma-ray luminosity function (LF) of BL Lac objects from their radio LF. Our derived gamma-ray LF of BL Lac objects can almost reproduce that calculated with the recently released Fermi bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) sample. We find that about 45% of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) is contributed by BL Lac objects. Combining the estimate of the quasar contri...

Li, Fan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Making maps of the cosmic microwave background: The MAXIMAexample  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes cosmic microwave background (CMB) data analysis algorithms and their implementations, developed to produce a pixelized map of the sky and a corresponding pixel-pixel noise correlation matrix from time ordered data for a CMB mapping experiment. We discuss in turn algorithms for estimating noise properties from the time ordered data, techniques for manipulating the time ordered data, and a number of variants of the maximum likelihood map-making procedure. We pay particular attention to issues pertinent to real CMB data, and present ways of incorporating them within the framework of maximum likelihood map making. Making a map of the sky is shown to be not only an intermediate step rendering an image of the sky, but also an important diagnostic stage, when tests for and/or removal of systematic effects can efficiently be performed. The case under study is the MAXEMA-I data set. However, the methods discussed are expected to be applicable to the analysis of other current and forthcoming CMB experiments.

Stompor, R.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.D.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany,S.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lee, A.T.; Oh, S.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot,G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optical emission line monitor with background observation and cancellation  

SciTech Connect

A fiber optics based optical emission line monitoring system is provided in which selected spectral emission lines, such as the sodium D-line emission in coal combustion, may be detected in the presence of interferring background or blackbody radiation with emissions much greater in intensity than that of the emission line being detected. A bifurcated fiber optic light guide is adapted at the end of one branch to view the combustion light which is guided to a first bandpass filter, adapted to the common trunk end of the fiber. A portion of the light is reflected back through the common trunk portion of the fiber to a second bandpass filter adapted to the end of the other branch of the fiber. The first filter bandpass is centered at a wavelength corresponding to the emission line to be detected with a bandwidth of about three nanometers (nm). The second filter is centered at the same wavelength but having a width of about 10 nm. First and second light detectors are located to view the light passing through the first and second filters respectively. Thus, the second detector is blind to the light corresponding to the emission line of interest detected by the first detector and the difference between the two detector outputs is uniquely indicative of the intensity of only the combustion flame emission of interest. This instrument can reduce the effects of interferring blackbody radiation by greater than 20 dB.

Goff, David R. (Star City, WV); Notestein, John E. (Morgantown, WV)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Order Code RL31559 Proliferation Control Regimes: Background and Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weapons of mass destruction (WMD), especially in the hands of radical states and terrorists, represent a major threat to U.S. national security interests. Multilateral regimes were established to restrict trade in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and missile technologies, and to monitor their civil applications. Congress may consider the efficacy of these regimes in considering the potential renewal of the Export Administration Act, as well as other proliferation-specific legislation in the 110 th Congress. This report provides background and current status information on the regimes. The nuclear nonproliferation regime encompasses several treaties, extensive multilateral and bilateral diplomatic agreements, multilateral organizations and domestic agencies, and the domestic laws of participating countries. Since the dawn of the nuclear age, U.S. leadership has been crucial in developing the regime. While there is almost universal international agreement opposing the further spread of nuclear weapons, several challenges to the regime have arisen in recent years: India and Pakistan tested nuclear weapons in 1998, North Korea withdrew from the

Mary Beth Nikitin; Paul Kerr; Steve Bowman; Steven A. Hildreth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gamma ray astrophysics, the extragalactic background light, and new physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high energy gamma-rays are expected to be absorbed by the extragalactic background light over cosmological distances via the process of electron-positron pair production. However, recent observations of cosmologically distant emitters by ground based gamma-ray telescopes might be indicative of a higher-than-expected degree of transparency of the universe. One mechanism to explain this observation is the oscillation between photons and axion-like-particles (ALPs). Here we explore this possibility, focusing on photon-ALP conversion in the magnetic fields in and round gamma-ray sources and in the magnetic field of the Milky Way, where some fraction of the ALP flux is converted back into photons. We show that this mechanism can be efficient in allowed regions of the ALP parameter space, as well as in typical configurations of the Galactic Magnetic Field. As case example, we consider the spectrum observed from a HESS source. We also discuss features of this scenario which could be used to distinguish it from standard or other exotic models.

Serpico, Pasquale D.; /Fermilab

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND CONSTRAINTS OF DECAYING DARK MATTER PARTICLE PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

If a component of cosmological dark matter is made up of massive particles-such as sterile neutrinos-that decay with cosmological lifetime to emit photons, the reionization history of the universe would be affected, and cosmic microwave background anisotropies can be used to constrain such a decaying particle model of dark matter. The optical depth depends rather sensitively on the decaying dark matter particle mass m{sub dm}, lifetime {tau}{sub dm}, and the mass fraction of cold dark matter f that they account for in this model. Assuming that there are no other sources of reionization and using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-year data, we find that 250 eV {approx}< m{sub dm} {approx}< 1 MeV, whereas 2.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} yr {approx}< {tau}{sub dm}/f {approx}< 1.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} yr. The best-fit values for m{sub dm} and {tau}{sub dm}/f are 17.3 keV and 2.03 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} yr, respectively.

Yeung, S.; Chan, M. H.; Chu, M.-C., E-mail: mcchu@phy.cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories (Hong Kong)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Signatures of Cosmic Strings in the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a search for signatures of cosmic strings in the the Cosmic Microwave Background data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe. We used a digital filter designed to search for individual cosmic strings and found no evidence for them in the WMAP CMB anisotropies to a level of $\\Delta T/T \\sim 0.29$ mK. This corresponds to an absence of cosmic strings with $ G\\mu \\ga 1.07 \\times 10^{-5}$ for strings moving with velocity $v = c/\\sqrt{2}$. Unlike previous work, this limit does not depend on an assumed string abundance. We have searched the WMAP data for evidence of a cosmic string recently reported as the CSL-1 object, and found an ``edge'' with 2$\\sigma$ significance. However, if this edge is real and produced by a cosmic string, it would have to move at velocity $\\ga$ 0.94c. We also present preliminary limits on the CMB data that will be returned by the PLANCK satellite for comparison. With the available information on the PLANCK satellite, we calculated that it would be twice as sensitive to cosmic strings as WMAP.

Amy S. Lo; Edward L. Wright

2005-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

209

THE DIFFUSE GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND FROM TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE  

SciTech Connect

The origin of the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB) has been intensively studied but remains unsettled. Current popular source candidates include unresolved star-forming galaxies, starburst galaxies, and blazars. In this paper, we calculate the EGB contribution from the interactions of cosmic rays accelerated by Type Ia supernovae (SNe), extending earlier work that only included core-collapse SNe. We consider Type Ia events not only in star-forming galaxies, but also in quiescent galaxies that lack star formation. In the case of star-forming galaxies, consistently including Type Ia events makes little change to the star-forming EGB prediction, so long as both SN types have the same cosmic-ray acceleration efficiencies in star-forming galaxies. Thus, our updated EGB estimate continues to show that star-forming galaxies can represent a substantial portion of the signal measured by Fermi. In the case of quiescent galaxies, conversely, we find a wide range of possibilities for the EGB contribution. The dominant uncertainty we investigated comes from the mass in hot gas in these objects, which provides targets for cosmic rays; total gas masses are as yet poorly known, particularly at larger radii. Additionally, the EGB estimation is very sensitive to the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency and confinement, especially in quiescent galaxies. In the most optimistic allowed scenarios, quiescent galaxies can be an important source of the EGB. In this case, star-forming galaxies and quiescent galaxies together will dominate the EGB and leave little room for other contributions. If other sources, such as blazars, are found to have important contributions to the EGB, then either the gas mass or cosmic-ray content of quiescent galaxies must be significantly lower than in their star-forming counterparts. In any case, improved Fermi EGB measurements will provide important constraints on hot gas and cosmic rays in quiescent galaxies.

Lien, Amy; Fields, Brian D. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

210

Binary electrokinetic separation of target DNA from background DNA primers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the summary of LDRD project 91312, titled ''Binary Electrokinetic Separation of Target DNA from Background DNA Primers''. This work is the first product of a collaboration with Columbia University and the Northeast BioDefense Center of Excellence. In conjunction with Ian Lipkin's lab, we are developing a technique to reduce false positive events, due to the detection of unhybridized reporter molecules, in a sensitive and multiplexed detection scheme for nucleic acids developed by the Lipkin lab. This is the most significant problem in the operation of their capability. As they are developing the tools for rapidly detecting the entire panel of hemorrhagic fevers this technology will immediately serve an important national need. The goal of this work was to attempt to separate nucleic acid from a preprocessed sample. We demonstrated the preconcentration of kilobase-pair length double-stranded DNA targets, and observed little preconcentration of 60 base-pair length single-stranded DNA probes. These objectives were accomplished in microdevice formats that are compatible with larger detection systems for sample pre-processing. Combined with Columbia's expertise, this technology would enable a unique, fast, and potentially compact method for detecting/identifying genetically-modified organisms and multiplexed rapid nucleic acid identification. Another competing approach is the DARPA funded IRIS Pharmaceutical TIGER platform which requires many hours for operation, and an 800k$ piece of equipment that fills a room. The Columbia/SNL system could provide a result in 30 minutes, at the cost of a few thousand dollars for the platform, and would be the size of a shoebox or smaller.

James, Conrad D.; Derzon, Mark Steven

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Air Pollution Background Monitoring over the Former Soviet Union: Fifteen Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular air pollution observations in background areas over the former Soviet Union (FSU) were started in the 1980s. The air background monitoring network consisted of 16 stations working under the Integrated Monitoring (IM) Program. Several air ...

Sergey G. Paramonov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Multiscale Waves in an MJO Background and Convective Momentum Transport Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors use linear analysis for a simple model to study the evolution of convectively coupled waves (CCWs) in a background shear and background moisture mimicking the observed structure of the MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO). This is motivated ...

Boualem Khouider; Ying Han; Andrew J. Majda; Samuel N. Stechmann

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Impact of Altimeter Sampling Patterns on Estimates of Background Errors in a Global Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main limitations to current wave data assimilation systems is the lack of an accurate representation of the structure of the background errors. One method that may be used to determine background errors is the observational method of ...

Diana J. M. Greenslade; Ian R. Young

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Background Data Confidence Bounds Results The other side The Effectiveness of Internet Content Filters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Requires age screen for commercial porn. · Credit card number deemed adequate proof of age. #12;Background

Stark, Philip B.

217

Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring 37 Ar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Type-2 Fuzzy Mixture of Gaussians Model: Application to Background Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background modeling is a key step of background subtraction methods used in the context of static camera. The goal is to obtain a clean background and then detect moving objects by comparing it with the current frame. Mixture of Gaussians Model [1] is ...

Fida Baf; Thierry Bouwmans; Bertrand Vachon

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Determining Background Radiation Levels in Support of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for determining background radiation levels in support of surveys for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. Careful planning and data evaluation are essential for a valid survey. The report discusses important considerations for successful establishment of background levels for soils, surfaces, structures, and groundwater. It also explores alternatives to performing a formal background study.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Background Story  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Checking for Candidate Events Checking for Candidate Events The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second at CDF and DZero. The detectors detect most but not all of these collisions. When a collision is detected, computers must decide if the event is an interesting one for the current study. (While this decision is being made, the detector cannot process another event. Also, the detector needs a little time to recover from one event before detecting another. That is why the detector cannot detect all the collisions. Physicists try to minimize this down time.) To decide if an event is interesting, computers perform a quick preliminary data analysis looking for certain characteristics. This is done in a series of tests. Only if the event passes these tests does it "trigger" the

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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221

Background & Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

moths this week than last, and we caught at total of seven apple maggots on two red sticky spheres' or a turtle-like covering for their whole lives. Males are also round in shape, but they have wings once

222

Education Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Member of interactive software and hardware development team. Participated in development of Retail Interactive System and assisted in organization and management of commercial exhibitions and events.

Edmund S. L. Lam; Race Chinese; Nationality Singaporean; Ling Rules

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Background Experiment  

Gas and liquid samples analyzed Resin with known oxygen exposure irradiated for comparison Irradiated resin used in K d tests for comparison Co-60 ...

224

1. Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... XML file should appear on the left hand of ... Main screen panel click on the Compare devices tab. ... Highlight a particular MOC and then right click the ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Conceptual Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by an Electric Field Applications of the Photoelectric Effect Graphing Techniques and Curve-fitting Alignment with National Science Education Standards: This project...

226

Norway Background  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

well as developing new subsea technology, in which Norway is a global leader. ... Sea for production, and its infrastructure will be a hub for future developments.

227

VVSG Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... new voting system development and implementation scenarios not contemplated by the ... Following a Requirements Analysis released in 1999, ...

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

General Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...subdivided into cast and wrought. A large number of alloys have been invented and studied; many have been patented. However, the many alloys have been winnowed

229

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Summary of Summary of Property Damage Complaints andlor Claims \ P R O J E C T R U L I S O N I - S U M M A R Y O F P R O P E R T Y D A M A G E C O M P L A I N T S A N D / O R C L A I M S AS OF MARCH 31, 1970 'E: The m a t e r i a l contained h e r e i n i s n o t t o be p u b l i c l y d i s t r i b u t e d w i t h o u t t h e p r i o r Office ( ~ E c ) , y o @ oplc-9 - Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 -- Prepared By: % & c n U a i l b 0. Brush Approved: Las Vegas Branch General Adjustment Bureau, Inc. P r o j e c t R u l i s o n Summary o f Property Damage Complaints and/or Claims DISTRIBUTION: H. E. G r i e r , President, CER Geonuclear Corp., Las Vegas, Nev. (4) G. W. Frank, A u s t r a l O i l Co., Houston, Texas (4) W. E. Ogle, LASL, Los Alamos, N. !4. (2) H. L. Reynolds, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) Fred Holzer/Gene C. Rizer, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) L l o v d A. Lee, J. A. Blume & Assoc.. San Francisco. C

230

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Text of Decision Text of Decision March 16,1970 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULlSON L .. .. ---_ ---._._ /' Text of Decision March 76, 7970 Q - CHIEF JUDGE ALFRED A. ARRAJ United States District Court Denver, Colorado With Introductory Remarks By ROBERT E. MILLER Manager k v a d a Operations ~ffice:,>:?.;, .- ,.,:-. !c- - United states Atomic Energy Commission i. This page intentionally left blank UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION N E V A D A O P E R A T I O N S O F F I C E P. 0. e o x 14100 L A S V E G A S . N E V A D A 891 1 4 June ,1970 The P r o j e c t Rulison d e t o n a t i o n was conducted i n Western Colorado on September 10, 1969 as p a r t of a j o i n t g o v e r n m e n t - i n d u s t r y e x

231

10:30AM TODAY: Senior Administration Officials to Hold a Background  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0:30AM TODAY: Senior Administration Officials to Hold a Background 0:30AM TODAY: Senior Administration Officials to Hold a Background Conference Call Regarding Oil 10:30AM TODAY: Senior Administration Officials to Hold a Background Conference Call Regarding Oil June 23, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, Thursday, June 23 at 10:30AM ET, Senior Administration Officials will hold a background conference call regarding the ongoing oil supply disruptions in the Middle East and North Africa and the announcement this morning to release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in coordination with the International Energy Agency. The call will be on background with no embargo. WHO: Senior Administration Officials WHAT: Background conference call WHEN: Thursday, June 23, 2011 10:30AM ET RSVP: Media who want to attend this call should dial (877) 941-1706 and ask to join the "White House call." No passcode is necessary.

232

Applying Bayesian Neural Networks to Separate Neutrino Events from Backgrounds in Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A toy detector has been designed to simulate central detectors in reactor neutrino experiments in the paper. The samples of neutrino events and three major backgrounds from the Monte-Carlo simulation of the toy detector are generated in the signal region. The Bayesian Neural Networks(BNN) are applied to separate neutrino events from backgrounds in reactor neutrino experiments. As a result, the most neutrino events and uncorrelated background events in the signal region can be identified with BNN, and the part events each of the fast neutron and $^{8}$He/$^{9}$Li backgrounds in the signal region can be identified with BNN. Then, the signal to noise ratio in the signal region is enhanced with BNN. The neutrino discrimination increases with the increase of the neutrino rate in the training sample. However, the background discriminations decrease with the decrease of the background rate in the training sample.

Ye Xu; Yixiong Meng; Weiwei Xu

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

233

Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

L. Kaufmann; A. Rubbia

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

A COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED AND BACKGROUND SUBSIDENCE RATES IN TEXAS-LOUISIANA GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Kazmann, R. G. , 1978, Subsidence in the capital areageothermal-related subsidence rates derived from EDAW ESA111-5 Scale corpus Background Subsidence Rates Compared to

Lee, L.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

10:30AM TODAY: Senior Administration Officials to Hold a Background...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Officials will hold a background conference call regarding the ongoing oil supply disruptions in the Middle East and North Africa and the announcement this...

236

Software Note: Using probe secondary structure information to enhance Affymetrix GeneChip background estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are a primary research tool for assessing global gene expression. Background noise on microarrays comprises a significant portion of the measured raw data. A number of statistical techniques have been developed ... Keywords: Background correction, DNA microarray, Probe secondary structure

Raad Z. Gharaibeh; Anthony A. Fodor; Cynthia J. Gibas

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Anchor shot detection with diverse style backgrounds based on spatial-temporal slice analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anchor shot detection is a challenging and important task for news video analysis. This paper has put forward a novel anchor shot detection algorithm for the situations with dynamic studio background and multiple anchorpersons based on spatio-temporal ... Keywords: anchor shot detection, dynamic background, multiple anchorpersons, sequential clustering, spatio-temporal slice

Fuguang Zheng; Shijin Li; Hao Wu; Jun Feng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Examination of the Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) in Urban Background Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2005, EPRI collected several hundred soil samples from urban background locations in three States and analyzed them for 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This report presents the initial results of efforts to extract additional chemical data from the urban background PAH database and to explore those data using chemical forensic methods for statistical properties and trends.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

239

GPU-based Calculation for Scattering Characteristics of Complex Targets from Background Radiance in Infrared Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattering characteristic of complex targets from sky and ground background radiance plays an important role in engineering fields. Firstly, a 5-parameter BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distributional Function) model is introduced. Then MODTRAN is used ... Keywords: scattering characteristic, background radiance, BRDF, GPU, CUDA, optimization

Xing Guo, Zhensen Wu, Longxiang Linghu, Yufeng Yang, Yunhua Cao, Jiaji Wu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Comparison of segmentation algorithms for cow contour extraction from natural barn background in side view images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer vision techniques are a means to extract individual animal information such as weight, activity and calving time in intensive farming. Automatic detection requires adequate image pre-processing such as segmentation to precisely distinguish the ... Keywords: Background segmentation, Computer vision, Cow contour, Dairy cattle, Static background

T. Van Hertem; V. Alchanatis; A. Antler; E. Maltz; I. Halachmi; A. Schlageter-Tello; C. Lokhorst; S. Viazzi; C. E. B. Romanini; A. Pluk; C. Bahr; D. Berckmans

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The homogeneity theorem for supergravity backgrounds II: the six-dimensional theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that supersymmetry backgrounds of (1,0) and (2,0) six-dimensional supergravity theories preserving more than one half of the supersymmetry are locally homogeneous. As a byproduct we also establish that the Killing spinors of such a background generate a Lie superalgebra.

Figueroa-O'Farrill, Jos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Real-time robust background subtraction under rapidly changing illumination conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast robust background subtraction under sudden lighting changes is a challenging problem in many applications. In this paper, we propose a real-time approach, which combines the Eigenbackground and Statistical Illumination method to address this issue. ... Keywords: Background subtraction, EM, Eigenbackground, Illumination changes

Luc Vosters; Caifeng Shan; Tommaso Gritti

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Background Information re TIAA-CREF's Annuity Contract (October 2011) University of Arizona HR Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background Information re TIAA-CREF's Annuity Contract (October 2011) University of Arizona ­ HR Benefits TIAA-CREF Contract Background ­ October 2011 Optional Retirement Plan: Sponsor ­ Contract Holder. In TIAA-CREF's older annuity contracts, the participant was the account "owner". The plan sponsor could

Wong, Pak Kin

244

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report Docket No. EO-05-01. As supporting documentation for "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode" this memo documents the fact that the observed 24-hour SO2 background concentrations during periods when meteorological conditions produce the highest impacts from Unit 1. Derivation of 24-Hour Average SO2, Background for the Update 1 Report More Documents & Publications Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant"

245

Determination and Mitigation of Precipitation Effects on Portal Monitor Gamma Background Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to establish a correlation between precipitation and background gamma radiation levels at radiation portal monitors (RPM) deployed at various ports worldwide, and to devise a mechanism by which the effects of these precipitation-induced background fluctuations could be mitigated. The task of detecting special nuclear materials (SNM) by passive gamma spectroscopy is very difficult due to the low signal-to-noise ratio observed in an uncontrolled environment. Due to their low activities and the low energies of their characteristic gamma rays, the signals from many types of SNM can easily be obscured by background radiation. While this can be somewhat mitigated by taking regular background radiation measurements, even this cannot resolve the issue if background levels change suddenly and dramatically. Furthermore, any increase in background count rate will increase the statistical uncertainty of the count rate measurement, and thus decrease the minimum quantity of SNM that can be reliably detected. Existing research suggests that the advent of precipitation is the culprit behind many such large and sudden increases in background radiation. The correlation between precipitation and background levels was explored by in-situ testing on a full-scale portal monitor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and by comparing previously recorded background radiation and weather data from portal monitors located at ports worldwide. The first was utilized to determine the frequency and magnitude at which precipitation introduces background activity, and the second was used to quantify the effects of various quantities and types of precipitation in various parts of the world. Once this analysis was complete, various methods of mitigating these changes in background radiation were developed based on the collected data. Precipitation was found to be the most common culprit for rapid increases in background count rate, and was attributable to 85.6% of all such events. Based on extensive simulation via the Origen-ARP and MCNP software, a response function for the portal monitor was developed, and an algorithm designed to predict the contribution of the precipitation to the background count rate was developed. This algorithm was able to attenuate the contribution of precipitation to the background count rate by an average of 45% with very minimal over-correction. Such an algorithm could be utilized to adjust the alarm levels of the RPM to better allow it to compensate for the rise and fall in background count rate due to precipitation. Additionally, the relative contribution of precipitation which landed at various distances from the portal monitor to the increase in background count rate was measured via simulation. This simulation demonstrated that 37.2% of all background counts were due to the radon daughters which landed within a 2.76 m radius from the center of the portal monitor. This radius encompasses the area between the two portals. Based on this, several designs for shielding were simulated, the most successful of which was a concrete structure that was able to attenuate 71.3% of the background radiation caused by a given precipitation event at a materials cost of approximately $6,000 per RPM. This method is recommended as the primary means of mitigating this issue.

Revis, Stephen

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Beaver County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

186°, -100.5296115° 186°, -100.5296115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7440186,"lon":-100.5296115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Beaver Cove, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

60582°, -69.4606148° 60582°, -69.4606148° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.560582,"lon":-69.4606148,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

248

Beaver County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

812°, -80.365865° 812°, -80.365865° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.6367812,"lon":-80.365865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

249

Beaver County, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

266376°, -113.287085° 266376°, -113.287085° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3266376,"lon":-113.287085,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Sandy Beaver Teaching Professorships updated 11/28/11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Simmons 1988 John Crawford, Jr. Spencer F. Eccles Tom C. Korologos Dorothy Snow 1989 Bruce L Spencer Williams 1963 Grant Johannesen V. Fae Thomas Wallace Stegner G. Stanley McAllister 1964 Homer R W. Burt Robert L. Chambers Bryon A. Hunter #12;1979 Bernard P. Brockbank R. Adams Cowley, M

Arnold, Jonathan

251

City of Beaver City, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

252

Beaver Creek, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota: Energy Resources Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.6141384°, -96.3644807° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6141384,"lon":-96.3644807,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

The Cosmic Electron Background in Low Energy IACTs. Effect of the Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new generation of low threshold Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) may reach gamma-ray energies about 10 GeV with high sensitivities and very large collection areas. At these low energies cosmic electrons significantly contribute to the telescope background and are in principle indistinguishable from gamma-rays. In this paper we estimate the electron background expected for two configurations of the low energy IACT MAGIC. We discuss in particular the reduction of the background caused by the geomagnetic field at different locations on the Earth's surface.

J. Cortina; J. C. Gonzalez

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion in vacuum and argon gas backgrounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis discusses the following on resonant holographic measurements of laser ablation plume expansion: Introduction to laser ablation; applications of laser ablation; The study of plume expansion; holographic interferometry; resonant holographic interferometry; accounting for finite laser bandwidth; The solution for doppler broadening and finite bandwidth; the main optical table; the lumonics laser spot shape; developing and reconstructing the holograms; plume expansion in RF/Plasma Environments; Determining {lambda}{sub o}; resonant refraction effects; fringe shift interpretation; shot-to-shot consistency; laser ablation in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; theoretically modeling plume expansion in vacuum and low pressure, inert, background gas; and laser ablation in higher pressure, inert, background gas.

Lindley, R.A. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Validation of Cloud-Resolving Model Background Data for Cloud Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a cloud-resolving model are systematically compared with a variety of observations, both ground based and satellite, in order to better understand the mean background errors and their correlations. This is a step in the direction of ...

Rosanne Polkinghorne; Tomislava Vukicevic; K. Franklin Evans

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Neural networks and separation of cosmic microwave background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maps produced by large area surveys aimed at imaging primordial fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contain a linear mixture of signals by several astrophysical and cosmological sources (Galactic synchrotron,

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The diffusion of photovoltaics : background, modeling and initial reaction of the agricultural - irrigation sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper deals with the background, development and calibration of a model of innovation-diffusion, designed to help allocate government field test and demonstration resources in support of a photovoltaic technology ...

Lilien, Gary Louis

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Linear Theory Calculations for the Sea Breeze in a Background Wind: The Equatorial Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial coastal circulation is modeled in terms of the linear wave response to a diurnally oscillating heat source gradient in a background wind. A diurnal scaling shows that the solution depends on two parameters: a nondimensional coastal ...

Tingting Qian; Craig C. Epifanio; Fuqing Zhang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Hybrid Background Error Covariance Model for Assimilating Glider Data into a Coastal Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid background error covariance (BEC) model for three-dimensional variational data assimilation of glider data into the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) is introduced. Similar to existing atmospheric hybrid BEC models, the proposed model ...

Max Yaremchuk; Dmitri Nechaev; Chudong Pan

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Deepest Spectrum of the Universe? Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Background at High Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an ongoing experiment to search for the meta-galactic Lyman-continuum background at z~2-3. We are obtaining one of the deepest optical spectra ever, using LRIS/Keck-II to search for the fluorescent Ly-alpha emission from optically thick HI clouds. The null results of our pilot study (Bunker, Marleau & Graham 1998) placed a 3-sigma upper bound on the mean intensity of the ionizing background of J_{nu 0} radiation field. We have recently greatly extended our search, obtaining a 16-hour spectrum which is sensitive to UV background fluxes ~1E-21 erg/s/cm^2/Hz/sr (z~2.3 at 3-sigma, assuming the HI clouds are ~10arcsec in extent). We describe how the results of this study can be used to constrain the quasar luminosity function and the contribution of high-redshift star-forming galaxies to the ambient ionizing background.

Andrew J. Bunker; Francine R. Marleau; James R. Graham

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Background of SIFs and Stress Indices for Moment Loadings of Piping Components  

SciTech Connect

This report provides background information, references, and equations for twenty-four piping components (thirteen component SIFs and eleven component stress indices) that justify the values or expressions for the SIFs and indices.

E. A. Wais; E. C. Rodabaugh

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Wavelet Approach to Representing Background Error Covariances in a Limited-Area Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of orthogonal wavelets for the representation of background error covariances over a limited area is studied. Each wavelet function contains both information on position and information on scale: using a diagonal correlation matrix in ...

Alex Deckmyn; Lok Berre

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Role of Background Cloud Microphysics in the Radiative Formation of Ship Tracks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors investigate the extent to which the contrast brightness of ship tracks, that is, the relative change in observed solar reflectance, in visible and near-infrared imagery can be explained by the microphysics of the background cloud in ...

S. Platnick; P. A. Durkee; K. Nielsen; J. P. Taylor; S.-C. Tsay; M. D. King; R. J. Ferek; P. V. Hobbs; J. W. Rottman

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tracking quintessence and k-essence in a general cosmological background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive conditions for stable tracker solutions for both quintessence and k-essence in a general cosmological background, H^2 \\propto f(\\rho). We find that tracker solutions are possible only when \\eta = d ln f /d ln \\rho is constant, aside from a few special cases, which are enumerated. Expressions for the quintessence or k-essence equation of state are derived as a function of \\eta and the equation of state of the dominant background component.

Rupam Das; Thomas W. Kephart; Robert J. Scherrer

2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

266

Beam-induced backgrounds in the CLIC 3 TeV CM energy interaction region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Luminosity spectrum and accelerator background levels strongly influence the experimental conditions and have an important impact on detector design. The expected rates of the main beam-beam products at CLIC 3 TeV CM energy, taking into account for machine imperfections, are computed. Among the other machine-induced background the photon fans from the Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) photons emitted in the final doublet are evaluated.

B. Dalena; J. Esberg; D. Schulte

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

267

Walking solutions in the string background dual to N=1 SQCD-like theories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new solution in the string background dual to N=1 SQCD-like theories is presented. The gauge coupling in this solution has walking property. The Wilson loop calculations show that quark anti-quark potential makes phase transitions. Additionally the effect of flavours on other solutions in this background is investigated by considering some unflavoured solutions and perturbing them with small parameter x=(N{sub f})/(N{sub c})

Guerdogan, Omer Can [Istanbul Teknik Universitesi Fizik Boeuemue, 34469 Maslak Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: gurdogano@itu.edu.tr

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solar neutrino-electron scattering as background limitation for double beta decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The background on double beta decay searches due to elastic electron scattering of solar neutrinos of all double beta emitters with Q-value larger than 2 MeV is calculated, taking into account survival probability and flux uncertainties of solar neutrinos. This work determines the background level to be [1-2]E-7 counts /keV/kg/yr, depending on the precise Q-value of the double beta emitter. It is also shown that the background level increases dramatically if going to lower Q-values. Furthermore, studies are done for various detector systems under consideration for next generation experiments. It was found that experiments based on loaded liquid scintillator have to expect a higher background. Within the given nuclear matrix element uncertainties any approach exploring the normal hierarchy has to face this irreducible background, which is a limitation on the minimal achievable background for purely calorimetric approaches. Large scale liquid scintillator experiments might encounter this problem already while exploring the inverted hierarchy. Potential caveats by using more sophisticated experimental setups are also discussed.

N. F. de Barros; K. Zuber

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Background study for the pn-CCD detector of CERN Axion Solar Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searches for axions from the Sun converted into photons with energies up to around 10 keV via the inverse Primakoff effect in the high magnetic field of a superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype magnet. A backside illuminated pn-CCD detector in conjunction with an X-ray mirror optics is one of the three detectors used in CAST to register the expected photon signal. Since this signal is very rare and different background components (environmental gamma radiation, cosmic rays, intrinsic radioactive impurities in the set-up, ...) entangle it, a detailed study of the detector background has been undertaken with the aim to understand and further reduce the background level of the detector. The analysis is based on measured data taken during the Phase I of CAST and on Monte Carlo simulations of different background components. This study will show that the observed background level (at a rate of (8.00+-0.07)10^-5 counts/cm^2/s/keV between 1 and 7 keV) seems to be dominated by the external gamma background due to usual activities at the experimental site, while radioactive impurities in the detector itself and cosmic neutrons could make just smaller contribution.

S. Cebrin; A. Rodrguez; M. Kuster; B. Beltrn; J. M. Carmona; H. Gmez; R. Hartmann; I. G. Irastorza; R. Kotthaus; G. Luzn; J. Morales; A. Ortiz de Solrzano; J. Ruz; L. Strder; J. A. Villar

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 30, 2007 Facility News New Radar Wind Profiler Joins AMF Instrument Suite in Germany The 1290 MHz wind profiler (foreground) joins the eddy correlation system (background)...

271

Measurement of Neutron Background at the Pyhasalmi mine for CUPP Project, Finland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural neutron flux is one of significant kind of background in high-sensitive underground experiments. Therefore, when scheduling a delicate underground measurements one needs to measure neutron background. Deep underground the most significant source of neutrons are the U-Th natural radioactive chains giving a fission spectrum with the temperature of 2-3 MeV. Another source is the U-Th alpha-reactions on light nuclei of mine rock giving neutrons with different spectra in the 1-15 MeV energy region. Normal basalt mine rocks contain 1 ppm g/g of U-238 and less. Deep underground those rocks produce natural neutron fluxes of 10^{-7} - 10^{-6} cm^{-2}s^{-1} above 1 MeV. To measure such a background one needs a special techniques. In the Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, the neutron spectrometer was developed and built which is sensitive to such a low neutron fluxes. At the end of 2001 the collection of neutron data at the Pyhasalmi mine was started for the CUPP project. During 2002 the background and rough energy spectra of neutron at underground levels 410, 660, 990 and 1410 m were measured. The result of the measurement of the neutron background at different levels of the Pyhasalmi mine is presented and discussed. Data analysis is performed in different energy ranges from thermal neutrons up to 25 MeV and above.

J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. L. Matushko; A. A. Shikhin; V. E. Yants; J. Peltoniemi; T. Keranen

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

Does Tracking Affect the Importance of Family Background on Students Test Scores?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates whether tracking students according to ability affects the importance of family background on students educational test scores. Using data from the PISA 2003, PISA 2000 and the PIRLS 2001 studies this paper uses the cross-country variation in tracking policies to identify the effect of tracking. The results indicate that family background is more important in countries, which track students early in a simple cross section. Using a difference-in-differences methodology to control for unobserved country level variables I find, however, that the importance of family background does not increase after actual tracking has taken place. This result is very different to the findings of two concurrent papers using a similar approach. Both of these papers nd that tracking affects educational equity. Using a number of robustness checks, however, I find that the results presented in this research are robust to using different tracking measures, datasets and specications.

Fabian Waldinger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Solar-Driven Background Intensity Variations in a Focal Plane Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Portions of a series of end-of-life tests are described for a Sandia National Li~boratories- designed space-based sensor that utilizes a mercury-cadmium-telluride focal plane array. Variations in background intensity are consistent with the hypothesis that seasonal variations in solar position cause changes in the pattern of shadows falling across the compartment containing the optical elements, filter-band components, and focal plane array. When the sensor compartment is most fully illuminated by the sun, background intensities are large and their standard deviations tend to be large. During the winter season, when the compartment is most fully shadowed by surrounding structure, backgrounci intensities are small and standard deviations tend to be small. Details in the surrounding structure are speculated to produce transient shadows that complicate background intensifies as a function of time or of sensor position in orbit.

Eyer, H.H.; Guillen, J.L.L.; Vittitoe, C.N.

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Deepest Spectrum of the Universe? Constraints on the Lyman Continuum Background at High Redshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe an ongoing experiment to search for the meta-galactic Lyman-continuum background at z~2-3. We are obtaining one of the deepest optical spectra ever, using LRIS/Keck-II to search for the fluorescent Ly-alpha emission from optically thick HI clouds. The null results of our pilot study (Bunker, Marleau & Graham 1998) placed a 3-sigma upper bound on the mean intensity of the ionizing background of J_{nu 0} radiation field. We have recently greatly extended our search, obtaining a 16-hour spectrum which is sensitive to UV background fluxes ~1E-21 erg/s/cm^2/Hz/sr (z~2.3 at 3-sigma, assuming the HI clouds are ~10arcsec in extent). We describe how the results of this study can be used to constrain the quasar luminosity function and the contribution of...

Bunker, A J; Graham, J R; Bunker, Andrew J.; Marleau, Francine R.; Graham, James R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Effects of the background plasma temperature on the current filamentation instability  

SciTech Connect

The effects of thermal anisotropy of background plasma on the current-filamentation instability (CFI) in an asymmetric counterstreaming system are investigated with a fully relativistic kinetic model. It is found that both the temperature and the thermal anisotropy of the background plasma play important roles in the development of the CFI. It is also pointed out that the thermal anisotropy of the background plasma dominates over the space charge effect in suppressing the CFI. A parametric study of the CFI is presented in the context of fast ignition. A new way to suppress CFI and its detrimental effects on the fast electron beam divergence has been proposed. The results of the analytical estimations are verified by 2D3V particle-in-cell simulations.

Jia Qing [HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cai, Hong-bo; He, X. T. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); HEDPS, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Weiwu [Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 2101, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhu Shaoping [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Early Results on Radioactive Background Characterization for Sanford Laboratory and DUSEL Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring external sources of background for a deep underground laboratory at the Homestake Mine is an important step for the planned low-background experiments. The naturally occurring $\\gamma$-ray fluxes at different levels in the Homestake Mine are studied using NaI detectors and Monte Carlo simulations. A simple algorithm is developed to convert the measured $\\gamma$-ray rates into $\\gamma$-ray fluxes. A good agreement between the measured and simulated $\\gamma$-ray fluxes is achieved with the knowledge of the chemical composition and radioactivity levels in the rock. The neutron fluxes and $\\gamma$-ray fluxes are predicted by Monte Carlo simulations for different levels including inaccessible levels that are under construction for the planned low background experiments.

D. -M. Mei; C. Zhang; K. Thomas; F. Gray

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

Rapaka, Saikiran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Double parton interactions as a background to associated HW production at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study events with W+jets final state, produced in double parton (DP) interactions, as a background to the associated Higgs boson (H) and W production, with H {yields} b{bar b} decay, at the Tevatron. We have found that the event yield from the DP background can be quite sizable, what necessitates a choice of selection criteria to separate the HW and DP production processes. We suggest a set of variables sensitive to the kinematics of DP and HW events. We show that these variables, being used as an input to the artificial neural network, allow one to significantly improve a sensitivity to the Higgs boson production.

Bandurin, Dmitry; Golovanov, Georgy; Skachkov, Nikolai

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Cosmic microwave background map-making at the petascale and beyond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations is a long-standing computational challenge, driven by the exponential growth in the size of the data sets being gathered. Since this growth is projected to continue for at least the next ... Keywords: hybrid programming, petascale computing, sparse allreduce

Rajesh Sudarsan; Julian Borrill; Christopher Cantalupo; Theodore Kisner; Kamesh Madduri; Leonid Oliker; Yili Zheng; Horst Simon

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electrical axes of TESLA-type cavities (Theoretical background, development of measurement equipment, measurement results)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Electrical axes of TESLA-type cavities (Theoretical background, development of measurement equipment, measurement results) Anton Labanc, MHF-SL, DESY, January 2008 Abstract Cells in TESLA cavities. A short overview was already published at the TESLA Report 2007-01. This paper brings more details about

282

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer',  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL SPILL BACKGROUND Marcia K McNutt, Juan Lasheras, 'Franklin Shaffer', BlIIlehr to: pmbommer on the fate and behavior of spilled oil. Of course, since this spill originates a mile deep, some. ~ Lehr book chapter .pdf #12;Review of modeling procedures for oil spill weathering behavior William J

Fleskes, Joe

283

Can Solar Neutrinos be a Serious Background in Direct Dark Matter Searches?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coherent contribution of all neutrons in neutrino nucleus scattering due to the neutral current is examined considering the boron solar neutrinos. These neutrinos could potentially become a source of background in the future dark matter searches aiming at nucleon cross sections in the region well below the few events per ton per year.

J. D. Vergados; H. Ejiri

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL; Blessinger, Christopher S [ORNL; Guzzardo, Tyler [ORNL; Livesay, Jake [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gravitational lens magnification by Abell 1689: Distortion of the background galaxy luminosity function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravitational lensing magnifies the luminosity of galaxies behind the lens. We use this effect to constrain the total mass in the cluster Abell 1689 by comparing the lensed luminosities of background galaxies with the luminosity function of an undistorted field. Since galaxies are assumed to be a random sampling of luminosity space, this method is not limited by clustering noise. We use photometric redshift information to estimate galaxy distance and intrinsic luminosity. Knowing the redshift distribution of the background population allows us to lift the mass/background degeneracy common to lensing analysis. In this paper we use 9 filters observed over 12 hours with the Calar Alto 3.5m telescope to determine the redshifts of 1000 galaxies in the field of Abell 1689. Using a complete sample of 151 background galaxies we measure the cluster mass profile. We find that the total projected mass interior to 0.25h^(-1)Mpc is (0.48 +/- 0.16) * 10^(15)h^(-1) solar masses, where our error budget includes uncertainties from the photometric redshift determination, the uncertainty in the off-set calibration and finite sampling. This result is in good agreement with that found by number count and shear-based methods and provides a new and independent method to determine cluster masses.

S. Dye; A. N. Taylor; E. M. Thommes; K. Meisenheimer; C. Wolf; J. A. Peacock

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Project plan for the background soils project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

The Background Soils Project for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (BSPP) will determine the background concentration levels of selected naturally occurring metals, other inorganics, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated areas in proximity to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Paducah, Kentucky. The data will be used for comparison with characterization and compliance data for soils, with significant differences being indicative of contamination. All data collected as part of this project will be in addition to other background databases established for the PGDP. The BSPP will address the variability of surface and near-surface concentration levels with respect to (1) soil taxonomical types (series) and (2) soil sampling depths within a specific soil profile. The BSPP will also address the variability of concentration levels in deeper geologic formations by collecting samples of geologic materials. The BSPP will establish a database, with recommendations on how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide data to estimate the potential human and health and ecological risk associated with background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. BSPP data will be used or applied as follows.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

DETERMINATION OF LITHIUM BY FLAME EMISSION SPECTROMETRY Background Reading: Harris, 7th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF LITHIUM BY FLAME EMISSION SPECTROMETRY Background Reading: Harris, 7th ed., Chap of this experiment is to acquaint you with flame emission spectrometry. The determination of lithium, and all other. It uses a propane/air flame. #12;Lithium by Flame Emission, Page 2 Identify the burner with its nebulizer

Weston, Ken

288

Detecting of Coal Gas Weak Signals Using Lyapunov Exponent under Strong Noise Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In coal gas monitoring system, the early detecting of gas concentration is key technique for preventing the gas explosion because the coal gas signals are very weak under strong noise background in mining digging laneway. In this paper, the coal gas ... Keywords: Coal gas, weak signals, coal mine underground, Lyapunov exponent, Duffing chaotic oscillator

Ma Xian-Min

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A PORTABLE DOSE RATE INSTRUMENT FOR MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL BACK-GROUND RADIATION LEVELS  

SciTech Connect

An instrument of the ionization chamber type which is capable of measuring radiation dose rates down to and below those encountered in natural background was designed and constructed. It consists of a 40-liter ionization chamber coupled to a portable battery-powered electrometer. The chamber polarizing battery is a part of the chamber center electrode assembly and is located inside the chamber. (auth)

Rising, F.L.

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle evolution in a background gas under laser ablation conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics study of nanoparticle evolution in a background gas under laser ablation,7] are used to explain the evaporation­condensation process. Molecular dynamics (MD) method [4,5,8,9] directly simulates molecular movement and interactions and can be used to investigate the evaporation process

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

291

Does Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilaton Field Preserve Information?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model where chiral boson is coupled to a background dilaton field is considered to study the s-wave scattering of fermion by a back ground dilaton black hole. It is found that the scattering process of chiral fermion does not violate unitarity and information remains preserved. Faddevian anomaly plays a crucial role on the information scenario.

Anisur Rahaman

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

292

Background Rejection in the DMTPC Dark Matter Search Using Charge Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber (DMTPC) collaboration is developing a low pressure gas TPC for detecting Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP)-nucleon interactions. Optical readout with CCD cameras allows for the detection of the daily modulation of the direction of the dark matter wind. In order to reach sensitivities required for WIMP detection, the detector needs to minimize backgrounds from electron recoils. This paper demonstrates that a simplified CCD analysis achieves $7.3\\times10^{-5}$ rejection of electron recoils while a charge analysis yields an electron rejection factor of $3.3\\times10^{-4}$ for events with $^{241}$Am-equivalent ionization energy loss between 40 keV and 200 keV. A combined charge and CCD analysis yields a background-limited upper limit of $1.1\\times10^{-5}$ (90% confidence level) for the rejection of $\\gamma$ and electron events. Backgrounds from alpha decays from the field cage are eliminated by introducing a veto electrode that surrounds the sensitive region in the TPC. CCD-specific backgrounds are reduced more than two orders of magnitude when requiring a coincidence with the charge readout.

J. P. Lopez; D. Dujmic; S. Ahlen; J. B. R. Battat; C. Deaconu; P. Fisher; S. Henderson; A. Inglis; A. Kaboth; J. Monroe; G. Sciolla; H. Tomita; H. Wellenstein; R. Yamamoto

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

293

Spectral Tail of a Gravity Wave Train Propagating in a Shearing Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The causes of the appearance of a tail in the power spectrum of a gravity wave train in a shearing background terminating under the Hodges condition are studied. The power spectrum of this train for a wavenumber greater than the cutoff value has ...

Manuel Pulido; Giorgio Caranti

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DESIGN OF A THERMOSIPHON FOR COOLING LOW-BACKGROUND HPGE ARRAYS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT A two-phase nitrogen thermosiphon was developed for the new generation of low-background high-purity germanium (HPGe) arrays. The cooling system for these arrays has to be able to handle the heat load (>20 W) presented by a large detector mass while meeting stringent requirements necessary for low-background systems. The HPGe detector modules should operate as close to liquid nitrogen temperature (<80K) as possible to provide adequate operating conditions for a full range of HPGe impurity concentrations. In addition, exceptional temperature stability (<1 K) is needed to reduce electronic gain shifts due to changes in the front-end electronics operating temperature. In order to meet the background requirements of state-of-the-art systems these arrays are enclosed in passive lead and copper shielding up to 1 m thick. In this paper we present a cooling system for low-background experiments that complies with these stringent geometrical restrictions. Active cooling was integrated via a horizontal thermosiphon that can be fabricated using ultra-pure electroformed copper. It was charged with nitrogen to 434 kPa (63 PSIA) at 292 K, which provided a fill ratio of 10%. The results showed that the thermosiphon can effectively remove in excess of 25 W of heat load.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

Information Loss Paradox Tested on Chiral Fermion Coupled to a Background Dilatonic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model where chiral boson is coupled to a background dilatonic field is considered to study the s-wave scattering of fermion by a back ground dilatonic black hole. Unlike the conclusion drawn in \\cite{MIT} it is found that the presence of chiral fermion does not violate unitarity and information remains preserved. Regularization plays a crucial role on the information paradox.

Anisur Rahaman

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

Determining the Impact of Concrete Roadways on Gamma Ray Background Readings for Radiation Portal Monitoring Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissolution of the Soviet Union coupled with the growing sophistication of international terror organizations has brought about a desire to ensure that a sound infrastructure exists to interdict smuggled nuclear material prior to leaving its country of origin. To combat the threat of nuclear trafficking, radiation portal monitors (RPMs) are deployed around the world to intercept illicit material while in transit by passively detecting gamma and neutron radiation. Portal monitors in some locations have reported abnormally high gamma background count rates. The higher background data has been attributed, in part, to the concrete surrounding the portal monitors. Higher background can ultimately lead to more material passing through the RPMs undetected. This work is focused on understanding the influence of the concrete surrounding the monitors on the total gamma ray background for the system. This research employed a combination of destructive and nondestructive analytical techniques with computer simulations to form a model that may be adapted to any RPM configuration. Six samples were taken from three different composition concrete slabs. The natural radiologcal background of these samples was determined using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector in conjunction with the Canberra In-Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) and Genie 2000 software packages. The composition of each sample was determined using thermal and fast neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. The results from these experiments were incorporated into a Monte Carlo N-Particle (MNCP) photon transport simulation to determine the expected gamma ray count rate in the RPM due to the concrete. The results indicate that a quantitative estimate may be possible if the experimental conditions are optimized to eliminate sources of uncertainty. Comparisons of actual and simulated count rate data for 137Cs check sources showed that the model was accurate to within 15%. A comparison of estimated and simulated count rates in one concrete slab showed that the model was accurate to within 4%. Subsequent sensitivity analysis showed that if the elemental concentrations are well known, the carbon and hydrogen content could be easily estimated. Another sensitivity analysis revealed that the small fluctuations in density have a minimal impact on the gamma count rate. The research described by this thesis provides a method by which RPM end users may quantitatively estimate the expected gamma background from concrete foundations beneath the systems. This allows customers to adjust alarm thresholds to compensate for the elevated background due to the concrete, thereby increasing the probability of intercepting illicit radiological and nuclear material.

Ryan, Christopher Michael

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Estimation of Cosmic Induced Contamination in Ultra-low Background Detector Materials  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary This document presents the result of investigating a way to reliably determine cosmic induced backgrounds for ultra-low background materials. In particular, it focuses on those radioisotopes produced by the interactions with cosmic ray particles in the detector materials that act as a background for experiments looking for neutrinoless double beta decay. This investigation is motivated by the desire to determine background contributions from cosmic ray activation of the electroformed copper that is being used in the construction of the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The most important radioisotope produced in copper that contributes to the background budget is 60Co, which has the potential to deposit energy in the region of interest of this experiment. Cobalt-60 is produced via cosmic ray neutron collisions in the copper. This investigation aims to provide a method for determining whether or not the copper has been exposed to cosmic radiation beyond the threshold which the Majorana Project has established as the maximum exposure. This threshold is set by the Project as the expected contribution of this source of background to the overall background budget. One way to estimate cosmic ray neutron exposure of materials on the surface of the Earth is to relate it to the cosmic ray muon exposure. Muons are minimum-ionizing particles and the available technologies to detect muons are easier to implement than those to detect neutrons. We present the results of using a portable, ruggedized muon detector, the -Witness made by our research group, for determination of muon exposure of materials for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. From the muon flux measurement, this report presents a method to estimate equivalent sea-level exposure, and then infer the neutron exposure of the tracked material and thus the cosmogenic activation of the copper. This report combines measurements of the muon flux taken by the -Witness detector with Geant4 simulations in order to assure our understanding of the -Witness prototype. As a proof of concept, we present the results of using this detector with electroformed copper during its transport from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where the copper is grown, to the underground lab in Lead, South Dakota, where the experiment is being deployed. The development of a code to be used with the Majorana parts tracking database, designed to aid in estimating the cosmogenic activation, is also presented.

Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Greene, Austen T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A Confining Non-Local Four-Fermi Interaction from Yang-Mills Theory in a Stochastic Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive a non-local four-fermi term with a linear potential from Yang-Mills Theory in a stochastic background. The stochastic background is a class of classical configuration derived from the non-linear gauge.

Jose A. Magpantay

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations Across the Contiguous United States The United States Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) is a high-quality data set of daily and monthly records of basic meteorological variables from 1218 observing stations across the 48 contiguous United States. Daily data include observations of maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation amount, snowfall amount, and snow depth; monthly data consist of monthly-averaged maximum, minimum, and mean temperature and total monthly precipitation. Most of these stations are U.S. Cooperative Observing Network stations located generally in rural locations, while some are National Weather Service First-Order stations that are often located in more urbanized environments. The USHCN has been developed over the years at

300

Extracting Nucleon Magnetic Moments and Electric Polarizabilities from Lattice QCD in Background Electric Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nucleon properties are investigated in background electric fields. As the magnetic moments of baryons affect their relativistic propagation in constant electric fields, electric polarizabilities cannot be determined without knowledge of magnetic moments. We devise combinations of nucleon correlation functions in external electric fields to isolate both observables. Using an ensemble of anisotropic gauge configurations with dynamical clover fermions, we demonstrate how magnetic moments and electric polarizabilities can be determined from lattice QCD simulations in background electric fields. We obtain results for both the neutron and proton, however, our study is currently limited to electrically neutral sea quarks. The value we extract for the nucleon isovector magnetic moment is comparable to that obtained from measuring lattice three-point functions at similar pion masses.

Detmold, William; Walker-Loud, Andre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Background information for programs to improve the energy efficiency of Northwest residential rental property  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared for the Office of Conservation, Bonneville Power Administration. The report will be used by the Office as background information to support future analysis and implementation of electricity conservation programs for owners of residential rental housing in the Northwest. The principal objective of the study was to review market research information relating to attitudes and actions of Northwest rental housing owners and, to a lesser extent, tenants toward energy conservation and energy-efficiency improvements. Available market research data on these subjects were found to be quite limited. The most useful data were two surveys of Seattle rental housing owners conducted in late 1984 for Seattle City Light. Several other surveys provided supplemental market research information in selected areas. In addition to market research information, the report also includes background information on rental housing characteristics in the Northwest.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MaGe - a Geant4-based Monte Carlo framework for low-background experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo framework, MaGe, has been developed based on the Geant4 simulation toolkit. Its purpose is to simulate physics processes in low-energy and low-background radiation detectors, specifically for the Majorana and Gerda $^{76}$Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. This jointly-developed tool is also used to verify the simulation of physics processes relevant to other low-background experiments in Geant4. The MaGe framework contains simulations of prototype experiments and test stands, and is easily extended to incorporate new geometries and configurations while still using the same verified physics processes, tunings, and code framework. This reduces duplication of efforts and improves the robustness of and confidence in the simulation output.

Yuen-Dat Chan; Jason A. Detwiler; Reyco Henning; Victor M. Gehman; Rob A. Johnson; David V. Jordan; Kareem Kazkaz; Markus Knapp; Kevin Kroninger; Daniel Lenz; Jing Liu; Xiang Liu; Michael G. Marino; Akbar Mokhtarani; Luciano Pandola; Alexis G. Schubert; Claudia Tomei

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Central symmetry and antisymmetry of the microwave background inhomogeneities on Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a visual and numeric analysis of the deviation of the microwave background temperature on WMAP maps. We proved that the microwave background inhomogeneities possess the property of the central symmetry resulting from the two kinds of central symmetry of the opposite signs. After the computer modeling we have established the relation between the coefficient of the central symmetry and the values of the symmetrical and antisymmetrical components of the deviation of the temperature. The obtained distribution of the symmetry coefficient on the map of the celestial sphere in Mollweide projection testifies on a contribution of both kinds of central symmetry which is approximately equal on the average in absolute magnitude but opposite by sign and where one kind of the central symmetry prevails on some sections of the celestial sphere and another kind - on the others. The average resulting value of the symmetry coefficient on the sections with angular measures less than 15-200 varies within the range fr...

Kudriavtcev, Iurii

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN  

SciTech Connect

The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

Karam, P. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gamma-Ray Bursts, Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, and Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may be the origin of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation observed in GeV range. It has theoretically been discussed that protons may carry a much larger amount of energy than electrons in GRBs, and this large energy can be radiated in TeV range by synchrotron radiation of ultra-high-energy protons (\\sim 10^{20} eV). The possible detection of GRBs above 10 TeV suggested by the Tibet and HEGRA groups also supports this idea. If this is the case, most of TeV gamma-rays from GRBs are absorbed in intergalactic fields and eventually form GeV gamma-ray background, whose flux is in good agreement with the recent observation.

Tomonori Totani

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN  

SciTech Connect

The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

Karam, P. A.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum from the Full COBE/FIRAS Data Set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have refined the analysis of the data from the FIRAS (Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer) on board the COBE (COsmic Background Explorer). The FIRAS measures the difference between the cosmic microwave background and a precise blackbody spectrum. We find new tighter upper limits on general deviations from a blackbody spectrum. The RMS deviations are less than 50 parts per million of the peak of the CMBR. For the Comptonization and chemical potential we find $|y| < 15\\times10^{-6}$ and $|\\mu| < 9\\times10^{-5}$ (95\\% CL). There are also refinements in the absolute temperature, 2.728 $\\pm$ 0.004 K (95\\% CL), and dipole direction, $(\\ell,b)=(264.14^\\circ\\pm0.30, 48.26^\\circ\\pm0.30)$ (95\\% CL), and amplitude, $3.372 \\pm 0.007$ mK (95\\% CL). All of these results agree with our previous publications.

D. J. Fixsen; E. S. Cheng; J. M. Gales; J. C. Mather; R. A. Shafer; E. L. Wright

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

1983-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

310

RESULTS OF BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION TECHNIQUES ON THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM LOSS MONITORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor (BLM) designs have been made with the goal of significantly reducing background noise. This paper outlines this effort and analyzes the results. The significance of this noise reduction is the ability to use the BLM sensors [1], [2], [3] distributed throughout the SNS accelerator as a method to monitor activation of components as well as monitor beam losses.

Pogge, James R [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nonlinear Plasma Waves Excitation by Intense Ion Beams in Background Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Plasma neutralization of an intense ion pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, cosmic ray propagation, etc. An analytical electron fluid model has been developed to describe the plasma response to a propagating ion beam. The model predicts very good charge neutralization during quasi-steady-state propagation, provided the beam pulse duration {tau}{sub b} is much longer than the electron plasma period 2{pi}/{omega}{sub p}, where {omega}{sub p} = (4{pi}e{sup 2}n{sub p}/m){sup 1/2} is the electron plasma frequency and n{sub p} is the background plasma density. In the opposite limit, the beam pulse excites large-amplitude plasma waves. If the beam density is larger than the background plasma density, the plasma waves break. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of calculations utilizing a particle-in-cell (PIC) code. The cold electron fluid results agree well with the PIC simulations for ion beam propagation through a background plasma. The reduced fluid description derived in this paper can provide an important benchmark for numerical codes and yield scaling relations for different beam and plasma parameters. The visualization of numerical simulation data shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry and exit from the plasma.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gravitational Waves from Light Cosmic Strings: Backgrounds and Bursts with Large Loops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean spectrum and burst statistics of gravitational waves produced by a cosmological population of cosmic string loops are estimated using analytic approximations, calibrated with earlier simulations. Formulas are derived showing the dependence of observables on the string tension, in the regime where newly-formed loops are relatively large, not very much smaller than the horizon. Large loops form earlier, are more abundant, and generate a more intense stochastic background and more frequent bursts than assumed in earlier background estimates, enabling experiments to probe lighter cosmic strings of interest to string theory. Predictions are compared with instrument noise from current and future experiments, and with confusion noise from known astrophysical gravitational wave sources such as stellar and massive black hole binaries. In these large-loop models, current data from millisecond pulsar timing already suggests that the tension is less than about $10^{-10}$, a typical value expected in strings from brane inflation. LISA will be sensitive to stochastic backgrounds created by strings as light as $G\\mu\\approx 10^{-15}$, at frequencies where it is limited by confusion noise of Galactic stellar populations; however, for those lightest detectable strings, bursts are rarely detectable.

Craig J. Hogan

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

313

Influence of nitrogen background pressure on structure of niobium nitride films grown by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect

Depositions of niobium nitride thin films on Nb using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with different nitrogen background pressures (10.7 to 66.7 Pa) have been performed. The effect of nitrogen pressure on NbN formation in this process was examined. The deposited films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. Hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic {delta}-NbN phases resulted when growth was performed in low nitrogen background pressures. With an increase in nitrogen pressure, NbN films grew in single hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N phase. The formation of the hexagonal texture during the film growth was studied. The c/a ratio of the hexagonal {beta}-Nb{sub 2}N unit cell parameter increases with increasing nitrogen pressure. Furthermore, the N:Nb ratio has a strong influence on the lattice parameter of the {delta}-NbN, where the highest value was achieved for this ratio was 1.19. It was found that increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to change in the phase structure of the NbN film. With increasing nitrogen pressure, the film structure changes from hexagonal to a mixed phase and then back to a hexagonal phase.

Ashraf H. Farha, Ali O. Er, Yksel Ufuktepe, Ganapati Myneni, Hani E. Elsayed-Ali

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Neutrino background flux from sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by Pierre Auger Observatory results favoring a heavy nuclear composition for ultrahigh-energy (UHE) cosmic rays, we investigate implications for the cumulative neutrino background. The requirement that nuclei not be photodisintegrated constrains their interactions in sources, therefore limiting neutrino production via photomeson interactions. Assuming a dN{sub CR}/dE{sub CR{proportional_to}}E{sub CR}{sup -2} injection spectrum and photodisintegration via the giant dipole resonance, the background flux of neutrinos is lower than E{sub {nu}}{sup 2{Phi}}{sub {nu}{approx}1}0{sup -9} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} if UHE nuclei ubiquitously survive in their sources. This is smaller than the analogous Waxman-Bahcall flux for UHE protons by about 1 order of magnitude and is below the projected IceCube sensitivity. If IceCube detects a neutrino background, it could be due to other sources, e.g., hadronuclear interactions of lower-energy cosmic rays; if it does not, this supports our strong restrictions on the properties of sources of UHE nuclei.

Murase, Kohta [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); CCAPP, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Beacom, John F. [CCAPP, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Conditions for Debris-Background Ion Interactions and Collisionless Shock Wave Generation  

SciTech Connect

We use hybrid simulations and simple theoretical arguments to determine when debris ions streaming relative to background ions in a collisionless, magnetized plasma couple strongly enough to generate a magnetosonic shock wave. We consider three types of configurations: one-dimensional, the two-dimensional extension of the 1-D case, and a more complex 2-D geometry that contains some effects that would be found in a laser-produced, laboratory plasma. We show that the simulation results as well as previous Russian and LLNL results reduce to a simple condition (R{sub m}/{rho}{sub d} = equal mass radius/debris ion gyroradius {ge} 0.7) for the generation of a shock wave. Strong debris interaction with the background is characterized by the formation of a magnetic pulse that steepens and speeds up as it encounters the debris ions deflected by the magnetic field. The pulse further evolves into a shock. As the earlier work has indicated, the process also involves the generation of a transverse electric field perpendicular to the flow and the magnetic field that accelerates the background ions radially outward, which in turn causes the speedup of the pulse. With electric and magnetic field probes, the UCLA laser experiments should be able to detect these signatures of coupling as well as the generation of the shock wave.

Winske, Dan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

Analysis of background distributions of metals in the soil at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of its Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (CAP), the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Environmental Restoration Program conducted an evaluation of naturally occurring metals in soils at the facility. The purpose of the evaluation was to provide a basis for determining if soils at specific locations contained elevated concentrations of metals relative to ambient conditions. Ambient conditions (sometimes referred to as 'local background') are defined as concentrations of metals in the vicinity of a site, but which are unaffected by site-related activities (Cal-EPA 1997). Local background concentrations of 17 metals were initially estimated by LBNL using data from 498 soil samples collected from borings made during the construction of 71 groundwater monitoring wells (LBNL 1995). These concentration values were estimated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) guidance that was available at that time (USEPA 1989). Since that time, many more soil samples were collected and analyzed for metals by the Environmental Restoration Program. In addition, the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal-EPA) subsequently published a recommended approach for calculating background concentrations of metals at hazardous waste sites and permitted facilities (Cal-EPA 1997). This more recent approach differs from that recommended by the USEPA and used initially by LBNL (LBNL 2002). The purpose of the 2002 report was to apply the recommended Cal-EPA procedure to the expanded data set for metals that was available at LBNL. This revision to the 2002 report has been updated to include more rigorous tests of normality, revisions to the statistical methods used for some metals based on the results of the normality tests, and consideration of the depth-dependence of some sample results. As a result of these modifications, estimated background concentrations for some metals have been slightly revised from those presented in the original 2002 report. In cases where estimated background concentrations were reduced, site data were reviewed to assess whether significant changes to results of the RCRA CAP findings would result. This assessment indicated that no significant changes in RCRA CAP findings would result from the revisions.

Diamond, David; Baskin, David; Brown, Dennis; Lund, Loren; Najita, Julie; Javandel, Iraj

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Linking Family Background and Home Language with English Reading Comprehension amog Bi/Multilinguals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the links between family background and home language factors on English reading achievement among bi/multilingual students. To explore the potential predictors of English reading achievement among bi/multilinguals, the study included literacy related resource, family socio-economic status (SES), and immigration status as constructs for family background; while for home language factors, the study looked at the orthography of home language, language preference, and multilingualism. Additionally, the study assessed the roles of school level factors (i.e., low SES students and English language learners in school) on school reading performance. The International Association for Evaluation of Educational Achievements Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (IEA PIRLS, 2006) data of Singaporean fourth grade students were used. The data were potentially nested, therefore, the models formulated in this study had multilevel structures, student- and school-levels. The results indicated that number of childrens books at home was the strongest predictor among other family background variables including parental education. However, having childrens books in English had a very small influence on English reading scores of the bi/multilingual students. More interestingly, the study found that parental immigration status did not influence students English reading scores. Looking at home language factors, the study found that the orthography of home language linked to English reading. Importantly, the study found that Malay language, which shares the same orthography with English (i.e., alphabetic), showed the strongest link to the students English reading achievement. Other variables of home language did not significantly predict English reading after controlling for parental education.

Yulia, Astri

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

First measurement of low intensity fast neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technique to measure low intensity fast neutron flux has been developed. The design, calibrations, procedure for data analysis and interpretation of the results are discussed in detail. The technique has been applied to measure the neutron background from rock at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, a site used for dark matter and other experiments, requiring shielding from cosmic ray muons. The experiment was performed using a liquid scintillation detector. A 6.1 litre volume stainless steel cell was filled with an in-house made liquid scintillator loaded with Gd to enhance neutron capture. A two-pulse signature (proton recoils followed by gammas from neutron capture) was used to identify the neutron events from much larger gamma background from PMTs. Suppression of gammas from the rock was achieved by surrounding the detector with high-purity lead and copper. Calibrations of the detector were performed with various gamma and neutron sources. Special care was taken to eliminate PMT afterpulses and correlated background events from the delayed coincidences of two pulses in the Bi-Po decay chain. A four month run revealed a neutron-induced event rate of 1.84 +- 0.65 (stat.) events/day. Monte Carlo simulations based on the GEANT4 toolkit were carried out to estimate the efficiency of the detector and the energy spectra of the expected proton recoils. From comparison of the measured rate with Monte Carlo simulations the flux of fast neutrons from rock was estimated as (1.72 +- 0.61 (stat.) +- 0.38 (syst.))*10^(-6) cm^(-2) s^(-1) above 0.5 MeV.

E. Tziaferi; M. J. Carson; V. A. Kudryavtsev; R. Lerner; P. K. Lightfoot; S. M. Paling; M. Robinson; N. J. C. Spooner

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

320

Background and Derivation of ANS-5.4 Standard Fission Product Release Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This background report describes the technical basis for the newly proposed American Nuclear Society (ANS) 5.4 standard, Methods for Calculating the Fractional Release of Volatile Fission Products from Oxide Fuels. The proposed ANS 5.4 standard provides a methodology for determining the radioactive fission product releases from the fuel for use in assessing radiological consequences of postulated accidents that do not involve abrupt power transients. When coupled with isotopic yields, this method establishes the 'gap activity,' which is the inventory of volatile fission products that are released from the fuel rod if the cladding are breached.

Beyer, Carl E.; Turnbull, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Separating Signals from Non-Interfering Backgrounds using Probabilistic Event Weightings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common situation in experimental physics is to have a signal which can not be separated from a non-interfering background through the use of any cut. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining, on an event-by-event basis, a quality factor (Q-factor) that a given event originated from the signal distribution. This Q-factor can then be used as an event weight in subsequent analysis procedures, allowing one to more directly access the true spectrum of the signal.

Williams, M; Meyer, C A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

A peculiar object in M51: fuzzy star cluster or a background galaxy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: We study a peculiar object with a projected position close to the nucleus of M51. It is unusually large for a star cluster in M51 and we therefore investigate the three most likely options to explain this object: (a) a background galaxy, (b) a cluster in the disk of M51 and (c) a cluster in M51, but in front of the disk. Methods: We use HST/ACS and HST/NICMOS broad-band photometry to study the properties of this object. Assuming the object is a star cluster, we fit the metallicity, age, mass and extinction using simple stellar population models. Assuming the object is a background galaxy, we estimate the extinction from the colour of the background around the object. We study the structural parameters of the object by fitting the spatial profile with analytical models. Results: We find de-reddened colours of the object which are bluer than expected for a typical elliptical galaxy, and the central surface brightness is brighter than the typical surface brightness of a disc galaxy. It is therefore not likely that the object is a background galaxy. Assuming the object is a star cluster in the disc of M51, we estimate an age and mass of 0.7 Gyr and 2.2 x 10^5 \\msun, respectively (with the extinction fixed to E(B-V) = 0.2). Considering the large size of the object, we argue that in this scenario we observe the cluster just prior to final dissolution. If we fit for the extinction as a free parameter, a younger age is allowed and the object is not close to final dissolution. Alternatively, the object could be a star cluster in M51, but in front of the disc, with an age of 1.4 Gyr and mass M = 1.7 x 10^5 \\msun. Its effective radius is between ~12-25 pc. This makes the object a "fuzzy star cluster", raising the issue of how an object of this age would end up outside the disc.

R. A. Scheepmaker; H. J. G. L. M. Lamers; S. S. Larsen; P. Anders

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

323

Estimation of the Z->vv background to New Physics searches in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be viewed as bunches of incoming partons as depicted in Figure 1.6. The UE includes initial (ISR) and final state radiation (FSR), multiple interactions (scattering between other parton pairs from the same hadron pair), beam remnants (a fragment... of the hadron not taking part in the ISR or hard-scattering) and pileup (when more than one hadron in the beam interacts Theoretical Background 15 jet jet space time Figure 1.5.: Schematic representation of parton showering and hadronisation in the Lund...

Sandoval, Tanya

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Phase and amplitude retrieval of objects embedded in a sinusoidal background from its diffraction pattern  

SciTech Connect

Efforts of phase and amplitude retrieval from diffraction patterns have almost exclusively been applied for nonperiodic objects. We investigated the quality of retrieval of nonperiodic objects embedded in a sinusoidal background, using the approach of iterative hybrid input-output with oversampling. Two strategies were employed; one by filtering in the frequency domain prior to phase retrieval, and the other by filtering the phase or amplitude image after retrieval. Results obtained indicate better outcomes with the latter approach provided detector noise is not excessive.

Wu, Chu; Ng, Tuck Wah; Neild, Adrian

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 1e8 Rydberg atoms subject to 2.7 K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB), allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

Tscherbul, Timur V

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Rydberg atom detection of the temporal coherence of cosmic microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rydberg atoms immersed in cold blackbody radiation are shown to display long-lived quantum coherence effects on timescales of tens of picoseconds. By solving non-Markovian equations of motion with no free parameters we obtain the time evolution of the density matrix, and demonstrate that the blackbody-induced temporal coherences manifest as decaying quantum beats in time-resolved fluorescence intensities of the Rydberg atoms. A measurable fluorescence signal can be obtained with a cold trapped ensemble of 10^8 Rydberg atoms subject to suitably amplified cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) at 2.7 K, allowing for novel insights into previously unexamined quantum coherence properties of CMB.

Timur V. Tscherbul; Paul Brumer

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wave breaking phenomenon of lower-hybrid oscillations induced by a background inhomogeneous magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a fluid description, we study space-time evolution of lower hybrid modes in a cold quasi-neutral homogeneous plasma in presence of a background inhomogeneous magnetic field. Within a linear analysis, a dispersion relation with inhomogeneous magnetic field shows 'phase mixing' of such oscillations. A manifestation of 'phase mixing' is shown in 'mode coupling.' By using Lagrangian variables, an exact solution is presented in parametric form of this nonlinear time dependent problem. It is demonstrated that initially excited lower hybrid modes always break via phase mixing phenomenon in presence of an inhomogeneous magnetic field. Breaking of such oscillations is revealed by the appearance of spikes in the plasma density profile.

Maity, Chandan; Chakrabarti, Nikhil [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sengupta, Sudip [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Federal Facility Compliance Act, Proposed Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume. Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Facility Compliance Act Site Treatment Plan discusses the options of radioactive waste management for Ames Laboratory. This is the background volume which discusses: site history and mission; framework for developing site treatment plans; proposed plan organization and related activities; characterization of mixed waste and waste minimization; low level mixed waste streams and the proposed treatment approach; future generation of TRU and mixed wastes; the adequacy of mixed waste storage facilities; and a summary of the overall DOE activity in the area of disposal of mixed waste treatment residuals.

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Automatic Table Ground Truth Generation and a Background-Analysis-Based Table Structure Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first describe an automatic table ground truth generation system which can efficiently generate a large amount of accurate table ground truth suitable for the development of table detection algorithms. Then a novel background-analysis-based, coarse-to-fine table identification algorithm and an X-Y cut table decomposition algorithm are described. We discuss an experimental protocol to evaluate the table detection algorithms. For a total of having vin table entities and a total cell entities, our table detection algorithm takes line, word segmentation results as input and obtains around cell correct detection rates.

Yalin Wang; Ihsin T. Phillips; Robert Haralick

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The charged current neutrino cross section for solar neutrinos, and background to \\BBz\\ experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar neutrinos can interact with the source isotope in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments through charged current and neutral current interactions. The charged-current product nucleus will then beta decay with a Q-value larger than the double beta decay Q-value. As a result, this process can populate the region of interest and be a background to the double beta decay signal. In this paper we estimate the solar neutrino capture rates on three commonly used double beta decay isotopes, \

H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Comparison of estimated and background subsidence rates in Texas-Louisiana geopressured geothermal areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comparison of background and potential geopressured geothermal development-related subsidence rates is given. Estimated potential geopressured-related rates at six prospects are presented. The effect of subsidence on the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast is examined including the various associated ground movements and the possible effects of these ground movements on surficial processes. The relationships between ecosystems and subsidence, including the capability of geologic and biologic systems to adapt to subsidence, are analyzed. The actual potential for environmental impact caused by potential geopressured-related subsidence at each of four prospects is addressed. (MHR)

Lee, L.M.; Clayton, M.; Everingham, J.; Harding, R.C.; Massa, A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. (Ebasco Services, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOES A ''STOCHASTIC'' BACKGROUND OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES EXIST IN THE PULSAR TIMING BAND?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of gravitational waves (GWs) from a simulated population of binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on pulsar timing array data sets. We construct a distribution describing the binary SMBH population from an existing semi-analytic galaxy formation model. Using realizations of the binary SMBH population generated from this distribution, we simulate pulsar timing data sets with GW-induced variations. We find that the statistics of these variations do not correspond to an isotropic, stochastic GW background. The ''Hellings and Downs'' correlations between simulated data sets for different pulsars are recovered on average, though the scatter of the correlation estimates is greater than expected for an isotropic, stochastic GW background. These results are attributable to the fact that just a few GW sources dominate the GW-induced variations in every Fourier frequency bin of a five-year data set. Current constraints on the amplitude of the GW signal from binary SMBHs will be biased. Individual binary systems are likely to be detectable in five-year pulsar timing array data sets where the noise is dominated by GW-induced variations. Searches for GWs in pulsar timing array data therefore need to account for the effects of individual sources of GWs.

Ravi, V.; Wyithe, J. S. B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Hobbs, G.; Shannon, R. M.; Manchester, R. N.; Yardley, D. R. B.; Keith, M. J., E-mail: v.vikram.ravi@gmail.com [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Gauss-Bonnet Quintessence: Background Evolution, Large Scale Structure and Cosmological Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a string-inspired dark energy scenario featuring a scalar field with a coupling to the Gauss-Bonnet invariant. Such coupling can trigger the onset of late dark energy domination after a scaling matter era. The universe may then cross the phantom divide and perhaps also exit from the acceleration. We discuss extensively the cosmological and astrophysical implications of the coupled scalar field. Data from the Solar system, supernovae Ia, cosmic microwave background radiation, large scale structure and big bang nucleosynthesis is used to constrain the parameters of the model. A good Newtonian limit may require to fix the coupling. With all the data combined, there appears to be some tension with the nucleosynthesis bound, and the baryon oscillation scale seems to strongly disfavor the model. These possible problems might be overcome in more elaborate models. In addition, the validity of these constraints in the present context is not strictly established. Evolution of fluctuations in the scalar field and their impact to clustering of matter is studied in detail and more model-independently. Small scale limit is derived for the perturbations and their stability is addressed. A divergence is found and discussed. The general equations for scalar perturbations are also presented and solved numerically, confirming that the Gauss-Bonnet coupling can be compatible with the observed spectrum of cosmic microwave background radiation as well as the matter power spectrum inferred from large scale surveys.

Tomi Koivisto; David F. Mota

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

336

Conditioning the gamma spectrometer for activity measurement at very high background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in determining the fuel element burnup in a future reactor is studied. The HPGe detector is exposed by a Co60 source with varying irradiation rate from 10 kcps to 150 kcps to simulate the input counting rate in real reactor environment. A Cs137 and a Eu152 source are positioned at given distances to generate certain event rate in the detector with the former being proposed as a labeling nuclide to measure the burnup of fuel element. It is shown that both the energy resolution slightly increasing with the irradiation rate and the passthrough rate at high irradiation level match the requirement of the real application. The influence of the background is studied in different parameter sets used in the particularly developed procedure of the background subtraction. It is demonstrated that with the typical input irradiation rate and Cs137 intensity relevant to deep burnup situation, the precision of the Cs137 counting rate in the current experiment is consistently below 2.8%, indicating a promising feasibility of utilizing an HPGe detector in the burnup measurement in future bed-like reactor.

Weihua Yan; Liguo Zhang; Zhao Zhang; Zhigang Xiao

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

337

LISA Measurement of Gravitational Wave Background Anisotropy: Hexadecapole Moment via a Correlation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss spatial fluctuations in the gravitational wave background arising from unresolved Galactic binary sources, such as close white dwarf binaries, due to the fact the galactic binary source distribution is anisotropic. We introduce a correlation analysis of the two data streams of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to extract spherical harmonic coefficients, in an independent manner, of the hexadecapole moment ($l=4$) related to the projected two-dimensional density distribution of the binary source population. The proposed technique complements and improves over previous suggestions in the literature to measure the gravitational wave background anisotropy based on the time modulation of data as LISA orbits around the Sun. Such techniques, however, are restricted only to certain combinations of spherical harmonic coefficients of the galaxy with no ability to separate them individually. With LISA, $m=2,3$ and 4 coefficients of the hexadecapole ($l=4$) can be measured with signal-to-noise ratios at the level of 10 and above in a certain coordinate system. In addition to the hexadecapole coefficients, when combined with the time modulation analysis, the correlation study can also be used, in principle, to measure quadrupole coefficients of the binary distribution.

Naoki Seto; Asantha Cooray

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

An array of low-background $^3$He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been built in order to make a unique measurement of the total active flux of solar neutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the third phase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 and November 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve the neutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of 36 strings of proportional counters filled with a mixture of $^3$He and CF$_4$ gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteron neutral current reaction in the D$_2$O, and four strings filled with a mixture of $^4$He and CF$_4$ gas for background measurements. The proportional counter diameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCD array is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional counters ever produced. This article describes the design, construction, deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses the electronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signatures and backgrounds.

J. F. Amsbaugh; J. M. Anaya; J. Banar; T. J. Bowles; M. C. Browne; T. V. Bullard; T. H. Burritt; G. A. Cox-Mobrand; X. Dai; H. Deng; M. Di Marco; P. J. Doe; M. R. Dragowsky; C. A. Duba; F. A. Duncan; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; E. -I. Esch; H. Fergani; J. A. Formaggio; M. M. Fowler; J. E. Franklin; P. Geissbhler; J. V. Germani; A. Goldschmidt; E. Guillian; A. L. Hallin; G. Harper; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; K. M. Heeger; J. Heise; A. Hime; M. A. Howe; M. Huang; L. L. Kormos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. C. Loach; S. Majerus; J. Manor; S. McGee; K. K. S. Miknaitis; G. G. Miller; B. Morissette; A. Myers; N. S. Oblath; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. W. Ollerhead; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; P. Skensved; A. R. Smith; M. W. E. Smith; T. D. Steiger; L. C. Stonehill; P. M. Thornewell; N. Tolich; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel; B. L. Wall; H. Wan Chan Tseung; J. Wendland; N. West; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. F. Wilkerson; J. M. Wouters

2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

Central symmetry and antisymmetry of the microwave background inhomogeneities on Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a visual and numeric analysis of the deviation of the microwave background temperature on WMAP maps. We proved that the microwave background inhomogeneities possess the property of the central symmetry resulting from the two kinds of central symmetry of the opposite signs. After the computer modeling we have established the relation between the coefficient of the central symmetry and the values of the symmetrical and antisymmetrical components of the deviation of the temperature. The obtained distribution of the symmetry coefficient on the map of the celestial sphere in Mollweide projection testifies on a contribution of both kinds of central symmetry which is approximately equal on the average in absolute magnitude but opposite by sign and where one kind of the central symmetry prevails on some sections of the celestial sphere and another kind - on the others. The average resulting value of the symmetry coefficient on the sections with angular measures less than 15-200 varies within the range from -50% to +50% with some prevalence of the antisymmetry - the average coefficient of the central symmetry for the whole celestial sphere is -4 +/- 1%. (antisymmetry 4%). Small scale structure of the distribution indicates that it is the result of the combined action of the mechanisms of the central symmetry and central antisymmetry, close to 100%.

Iurii Kudriavtcev; Dmitry A. Semenov

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Proca equation in the Randall-Sundrum II background and unparticles  

SciTech Connect

Recently Grinstein, Intriligator and Rothstein (GIR) found a number of important effects in the context of unparticle physics. They showed that coupling CFT vector operators to Standard Model (SM) currents necessarily leads, in a weakly coupled CFT, to contact interactions between the SM currents. These contact interactions are physically important, since in exclusive scattering of SM initial states to SM final states they are found to dominate over the pure and novel CFT contribution. Such interactions are also necessary to resolve certain divergences that appear in the two-point function at integer scaling dimension. We show that all of these features can be obtained when the SM currents are coupled to a massive vector field living in a five-dimensional warped background of the Randall-Sundrum 2 (RS2) scenario, which by the AdS/CFT duality must exhibit certain properties of the CFT. Within the RS2 model we also examine and contrast in detail the scalar and vector position-space correlators at intermediate and large distances. These issues are also considered in the Lykken-Randall model in which the Standard Model fields are assumed to be confined to a tensionless brane in the AdS background geometry. Our results can be seen as a generalization of those results of GIR that do not follow from symmetries to large N, strongly coupled CFTs.

Friedland, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giannotti, Maurizio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graesser, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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341

A sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A Sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background has been developed for use in environmental restoration activities on the Hanford Site. Sitewide background more accurately represents the range of background compositions that exist in soil and groundwater at the over 140 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 operable units, and provides a more consistent, credible, integrated, and efficient basis for identifying and evaluating contamination in these media than using unit-specific backgrounds.

Hoover, J.D.; Ruck, F.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); LeGore, T. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, K.M. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.  

SciTech Connect

The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND2010-0714.

Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

SEARCH F O R LINEAR POLARIZATION O F THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEARCH F SEARCH F O R LINEAR POLARIZATION O F THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION P h i l M. Lubin and George F. Smoot Space Sciences L a b o r a t o r y and Lawrence Berkeley L a b o r a t o r y U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a Berkeley, C a l i f o r n i a 94720 Received ABSTRACT W e p r e s e n t p r e l i m i n a r y measurements of t h e l i n e a r p o l a r i z a t i o n of t h e cosmic microwave background ( 3 ° K blackbody) r a d i a t i o n . These ground-based measurements a r e made a t 9 mm wavelength. W e f i n d no e v i d e n c e f o r l i n e a r p o l a r i z a t i o n , and s e t a n upper l i m i t f o r a p o l a r i z e d component of 0.8 m°K with a 95% confidence l e v e l . T h i s i m p l i e s t h a t t h e p r e s e n t rate of e x p a n s i o n of t h e Universe i s i s o t r o p i c t o one p a r t i n 1 0 , assuming no r e - i o n i z a t i o n of t h e p r i m o r d i a l plasma a f t e r recombination. 6 The observed cosmic microwave background r

344

AES NewEnergy, Inc. Order No. EA-248 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On July 13, 2001, AES NewEnergy, Inc. (AES NewEnergy) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. AES NewEnergy, a Delaware corporation and wholly- owned subsidiary of the AES Corporation, a public utility holding company, is a power marketer that does not own or control any electric generation or transmission facilities nor does it have any franchised service territory in the United States. AES NewEnergy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and

345

Anadarko's Proposed Acquisition of Kerr-McGee and Western Gas Resources, June 23, 2006, Background  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Aspects of Anadarko's Acquisition of Kerr-McGee Aspects of Anadarko's Acquisition of Kerr-McGee Corp. and Western Gas Resources Background On June 23, 2006, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported that Anadarko Petroleum Corp had agreed to acquire Kerr-McGee Corp. and Western Gas Resources Inc. for $21.1 billion of cash (see "Anadarko to Buy Kerr-McGee, Western Gas for $21.1 Billion" (June 23, 2006)). Anadarko also will assume $2.2 billion of debt from the two companies. Anadarko will pay $16.4 billion ($70.50 per share) and assume $1.6 billion of debt to acquire Kerr-McGee and pay $4.7 billion ($61 per share) and assume $600 million of debt to acquire Western Gas. Additional information is available on Anadarko's web site. According to the WSJ, Anadarko's president and chief executive officer Jim Hacket noted that the

346

Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/107 3/107 Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans Implementing Sustainability: The Institutional-Behavioral Dimension Elizabeth L. Malone Tom Sanquist Amy K. Wolfe Rick Diamond Christopher Payne Jerry Dion January 2011 (Updated June 2013) Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road

347

PSEG Energy Resources & Trade, LLC Order No. EA-250 I. BACKGROUND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PSEG Energy Resources & Trade, LLC PSEG Energy Resources & Trade, LLC Order No. EA-250 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On September 14, 2001, PSEG Energy Resources & Trade, LLC (PSEG ER&T) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. The power to be exported by PSEG ER&T will be surplus to the needs of PSEG ER&T's native load and may be supplied by PSEG ER&T-owned generation or purchased from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States. The energy to be exported would be

348

Induced vacuum current and magnetic field in the background of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum polarization effects in the cosmic string background are considered. We find that a current is induced in the vacuum of the quantized massive scalar field and that the current circulates around the string which is generalized to a $(d-2)$-brane in locally flat $(d+1)$-dimensional space-time. As a consequence of the Maxwell equation, a magnetic field strength is also induced in the vacuum and is directed along the cosmic string. The dependence of the current and the field strength on the string flux and tension is comprehensively analyzed. Both the current and the field strength are holomorphic functions of the space dimension, decreasing exponentially with the distance from the string. In the case of $d=3$ we show that, due to the vacuum polarization, the cosmic string is enclosed in a tube of the magnetic flux lines if the mass of the quantized field is less than the inverse of the transverse size of the string core.

Yu. A. Sitenko; N. D. Vlasii

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

SU(2) Yang-Mills Theory in Savvidy Background at Finite Temperature and Chemical Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The one-loop effective energy density of a pure SU(2) Yang-Mills theory in the Savvidy background, at finite temperature and chemical potential is examined with emphasis on the unstable modes. After identifying the stable and unstable modes, the stable modes are treated in the quadratic approximation. For the unstable modes, the full expansion including the cubic and the quartic terms in the fluctuations is used. The functional integrals for the unstable modes are evaluated and added to the results for the stable modes. The resulting energy density is found to be {\\it{real}}, coinciding with the real part of the energy density in the quadratic approximation of earlier study. There is now {\\it{no imaginary part.}} Numerical results are presented for the variation of the energy density with temperature for various choices of the chemical potential.

R. Parthasarathy; Alok Kumar

2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

A rotating cylinder in an asymptotically locally anti-de Sitter background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A family of exact solutions is presented which represents a rigidly rotating cylinder of dust in a background with a negative cosmological constant. The interior of the infinite cylinder is described by the Godel solution. An exact solution for the exterior solution is found which depends both on the rotation of the interior and on its radius. For values of these parameters less than a certain limit, the exterior solution is shown to be locally isomorphic to the Linet-Tian solution. For values larger than another limit, it is shown that the exterior solution extends into a region which contains closed timelike curves. At large distances from the source, the space-time is shown to be asymptotic locally to anti-de Sitter space.

J. B. Griffiths; N. O. Santos

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

Estimation of Equivalent Sea Level Cosmic Ray Exposure for Low Background Experiment  

SciTech Connect

While scientists at CERN and other particle accelerators around the world explore the boundaries of high energy physics, the Majorana project investigates the other end of the spectrum with its extremely sensitive, low background, low energy detector. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to detect neutrinoless double beta decay (0???), a rare theoretical process in which two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons, without the emission of the two antineutrinos that are a product of a normal double beta decay. This process is only possible if and therefore a detection would prove the neutrino is a Majorana particle, meaning that it is its own antiparticle [Aaselth et al. 2004] . The existence of such a decay would also disprove lepton conservation and give information about the neutrino's mass.

Greene, Austen T.; Orrell, John L.

2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

On the classical solution for the double-brane background in open string field theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Murata and Schnabl recently proposed solutions for the multiple-brane backgrounds in Witten's open bosonic string field theory. The solutions contain some singularities, and in one particular regularization, the double-brane solution reproduces the desired energy and the Ellwood invariant, which is conjectured to represent coupling to a closed string. However, it turned out that the equation of motion is slightly violated. In this paper, we propose another regularization method for the double-brane solution. The regularized solution is realized as a superposition of the wedge states with operator insertions. It respects the equation of motion both contracted with the solution itself and with the states in the Fock space. It reproduces the desired double-brane tension, while the expected Ellwood invariant is not obtained.

Masuda, Toru

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational waves by correlating n detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the optimal detection strategy for a stochastic background of gravitational waves in the case n detectors are available. In literature so far, only two cases have been considered: 2- and n-point correlators. We generalize these analysises to m-point correlators (with mn) built out of the n detector signals, obtaining the result that the optimal choice is to combine 2-point correlators. Correlating n detectors in this optimal way will improve the (suitably defined) signal-to-noise ratio with respect to the n=2 case by a factor equal to the fourth root of n(n-1)/2. Finally we give an estimation of how this could improve the sensitivity for a network of multi-mode spherical antennas.

Orestis Malaspinas; Riccardo Sturani

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

Low-background measurements of neutron emission from Ti metal in pressurized deuterium gas  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of neutron detector systems have been used at various research facilities to search for anomalous neutron emission from deuterated metals. Some of these detector systems are summarized here together with possible sources of spurious signals from electronic noise. During the past two years, we have performed experiments to measure neutron emission from pressurized D{sub 2} gas mixed with various forms of titanium metal chips and sponge. Details concerning the neutron detectors, experimental procedures, and results have been reported previously. Our recent experiments have focused on increasing the low-level neutron emission and finding a way to trigger the emission. To improve our detection sensitivity, we have increased the shielding in our counting laboratory, changed to low-background {sup 3}He tubes, and set up additional detector systems in deep underground counting stations. This report is an update on this experimental work. 7 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Menlove, H.O.; Paciotti, M.A.; Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

ISOTROPY IN THE TWO-POINT ANGULAR CORRELATION FUNCTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect

We study the directional dependence of the angular two-point correlation function in maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose two new statistics: one which measures the correlation of each point in the sky with a ring of points separated an angle {theta} away, and a second one that measures the missing angular correlation above 60 deg as a function of direction. Using these statistics, we find that most of the low power in cut-sky maps measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment comes from unusually low contributions from the directions of the lobes of the quadrupole and the octupole. These findings may aid a future explanation of why the CMB exhibits low power at large angular scales.

Zhang, Sophie, E-mail: sophz@umich.edu [Department of Physics, University of Michigan 450 Church St, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/107 3/107 Evidence-Based Background Material Underlying Guidance for Federal Agencies in Implementing Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans Implementing Sustainability: The Institutional-Behavioral Dimension Elizabeth L. Malone Tom Sanquist Amy K. Wolfe Rick Diamond Christopher Payne Jerry Dion January 2011 (Updated June 2013) Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road

357

The Starburst Contribution to the Extra-Galactic Gamma-Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic ray protons interacting with gas at the mean density of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies lose energy rapidly via inelastic collisions with ambient nuclei. The resulting pions produce secondary electrons and positrons, high-energy neutrinos, and gamma-ray photons. We estimate the cumulative gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies. We find a total integrated background above 100 MeV of F_gamma ~ 10^{-6} GeV/cm^2/s/sr and a corresponding specific intensity at GeV energies of nuI_nu ~ 10^{-7} GeV/cm^2/s/sr. Starbursts may thus account for a significant fraction of the extra-galactic $\\gamma$-ray background. We show that the FIR-radio correlation provides a strong constraint on the gamma-ray emission from starburst galaxies because pions decay into both gamma-rays and radio-emitting electron/positron pairs. We identify several nearby systems where the potential for observing gamma-ray emission is the most favorable (M82, NGC 253, and IC 342), predict their fluxes, and predict a linear FIR-gamma-ray correlation for the densest starbursts. If established, the FIR-gamma-ray correlation would provide strong evidence for the ``calorimeter'' theory of the FIR-radio correlation and would imply that cosmic rays in starburst galaxies interact with gas at approximately the mean density of the interstellar medium (ISM), thereby providing an important constraint on the physics of the ISM in starbursts.

Todd A. Thompson; Eliot Quataert; Eli Waxman

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Evolution of Swift/BAT blazars and the origin of the MeV background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use 3 years of data from the Swift/BAT survey to select a complete sample of X-ray blazars above 15 keV. This sample comprises 26 Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) and 12 BL Lac objects detected over a redshift range of 0.03 < z < 4.0. We use this sample to determine, for the first time in the 15-55 keV band, the evolution of blazars. We find that, contrary to the Seyfert-like AGNs detected by BAT, the population of blazars shows strong positive evolution. This evolution is comparable to the evolution of luminous optical QSOs and luminous X-ray selected AGNs. We also find evidence for an epoch-dependence of the evolution as determined previously for radio-quiet AGNs. We interpret both these findings as a strong link between accretion and jet activity. In our sample, the FSRQs evolve strongly, while our best-fit shows that BL Lacs might not evolve at all. The blazar population accounts for 10-20% (depending on the evolution of the BL Lacs) of the Cosmic X-ray background (CXB) in the 15-55 keV band. We find that FSRQs can explain the entire CXB emission for energies above 500 keV solving the mystery of the generation of the MeV background. The evolution of luminous FSRQs shows a peak in redshift (z{sub c} = 4.3 {+-} 0.5) which is larger than the one observed in QSOs and X-ray selected AGNs. We argue that FSRQs can be used as tracers of massive elliptical galaxies in the early Universe.

Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Costamante, L.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Sambruna, R.M.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard; Chiang, J.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rau, A.; /Caltech; Escala, A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Cerro Calan Observ.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Tueller, J.; /NASA, Goddard; Wall, J.V.; /British Columbia U.; Mushotzky, R.F.; /NASA, Goddard

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

359

CORRELATIONS IN THE (SUB)MILLIMETER BACKGROUND FROM ACT Multiplication-Sign BLAST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present measurements of the auto- and cross-frequency correlation power spectra of the cosmic (sub)millimeter background at 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m (1200, 860, and 600 GHz) from observations made with the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST); and at 1380 and 2030 {mu}m (218 and 148 GHz) from observations made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The overlapping observations cover 8.6 deg{sup 2} in an area relatively free of Galactic dust near the south ecliptic pole. The ACT bands are sensitive to radiation from the cosmic microwave background, to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from galaxy clusters, and to emission by radio and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs), while the dominant contribution to the BLAST bands is from DSFGs. We confirm and extend the BLAST analysis of clustering with an independent pipeline and also detect correlations between the ACT and BLAST maps at over 25{sigma} significance, which we interpret as a detection of the DSFGs in the ACT maps. In addition to a Poisson component in the cross-frequency power spectra, we detect a clustered signal at 4{sigma}, and using a model for the DSFG evolution and number counts, we successfully fit all of our spectra with a linear clustering model and a bias that depends only on redshift and not on scale. Finally, the data are compared to, and generally agree with, phenomenological models for the DSFG population. This study demonstrates the constraining power of the cross-frequency correlation technique to constrain models for the DSFGs. Similar analyses with more data will impose tight constraints on future models.

Hajian, Amir; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Viero, Marco P.; Bock, James J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Addison, Graeme [Department of Astrophysics, Oxford University, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Aguirre, Paula [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Appel, John William; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hincks, Adam D. [Joseph Henry Laboratories of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Das, Sudeep; Dunkley, Joanna [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hughes, John P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Halpern, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Hasselfield, Matthew [Laboratoire APC, Universite Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris (France); Hilton, Matt [Astrophysics and Cosmology Research Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); and others

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search and Background Rejection with Event Position Information  

SciTech Connect

Evidence from observational cosmology and astrophysics indicates that about one third of the universe is matter, but that the known baryonic matter only contributes to the universe at 4%. A large fraction of the universe is cold and non-baryonic matter, which has important role in the universe structure formation and its evolution. The leading candidate for the non-baryonic dark matter is Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), which naturally occurs in the supersymmetry theory in particle physics. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is searching for evidence of a WIMP interaction off an atomic nucleus in crystals of Ge and Si by measuring simultaneously the phonon energy and ionization energy of the interaction in the CDMS detectors. The WIMP interaction energy is from a few keV to tens of keV with a rate less than 0.1 events/kg/day. To reach the goal of WIMP detection, the CDMS experiment has been conducted in the Soudan mine with an active muon veto and multistage passive background shields. The CDMS detectors have a low energy threshold and background rejection capabilities based on ionization yield. However, betas from contamination and other radioactive sources produce surface interactions, which have low ionization yield, comparable to that of bulk nuclear interactions. The low-ionization surface electron recoils must be removed in the WIMP search data analysis. An emphasis of this thesis is on developing the method of the surface-interaction rejection using location information of the interactions, phonon energy distributions and phonon timing parameters. The result of the CDMS Soudan run118 92.3 live day WIMP search data analysis is presented, and represents the most sensitive search yet performed.

Wang, Gen-sheng; /Case Western Reserve U.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Gross-Pitaevskii functional with a random background potential and condensation in the single particle ground state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For discrete and continuous Gross-Pitaevskii energy functionals with a random background potential, we study the Gross-Pitaevskii ground state. We characterize a regime of interaction coupling when the Gross-Pitaevskii ground state and the ground state of the random background Hamiltonian asymptotically coincide.

Frdric Klopp; Bernd Metzger

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Characterisation and mitigation of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector during the 2011 proton-proton run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a summary of beam-induced backgrounds observed in the ATLAS detector and discusses methods to tag and remove background contaminated events in data. Trigger-rate based monitoring of beam-related backgrounds is presented. The correlations of backgrounds with machine conditions, such as residual pressure in the beam-pipe, are discussed. Results from dedicated beam-background simulations are shown, and their qualitative agreement with data is evaluated. Data taken during the passage of unpaired, i.e. non-colliding, proton bunches is used to obtain background-enriched data samples. These are used to identify characteristic features of beam-induced backgrounds, which then are exploited to develop dedicated background tagging tools. These tools, based on observables in the Pixel detector, the muon spectrometer and the calorimeters, are described in detail and their efficiencies are evaluated. Finally an example of an application of these techniques to a monojet analysis is given, which demonstrates the importance of such event cleaning techniques for some new physics searches.

ATLAS Collaboration

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

THE INTERPRETATION OF ROTATION MEASURES IN THE PRESENCE OF INHOMOGENEOUS FOREGROUND SCREENS  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the redshift evolution of the rotation measure (RM) in the Taylor et al. data set, based on NVSS radio data at 21 cm, and compare with results from our previous work based on RMs determined at lower wavelengths, e.g., 6 cm. We find that, in spite of the same analysis, Taylor et al.'s data set produces neither an increase of the RM dispersion with redshift nor the correlation of RM strength with Mg II absorption lines that we found previously. We develop a simple model to understand this discrepancy. The model assumes that the Faraday rotators, namely the QSO's host galaxy and the intervening Mg II host galaxies along the line of sight, contain partially inhomogeneous RM screens. We find that this leads to an increasing depolarization toward longer wavelengths and to wavelength-dependent RM values. In particular, due to cosmological redshift, observations at fixed wavelength of sources at different redshift are affected differently by depolarization and are sensitive to different Faraday active components. For example, at 21 cm the polarized signal is averaged out by inhomogeneous Faraday screens and the measured RM mostly reflects the Milky Way contributions for low-redshift QSOs whereas polarization is relatively unaffected for high-redshift QSOs. Similar effects are produced by intervening galaxies acting as inhomogeneous screens. Finally, we assess the performance of RM synthesis on our synthetic models and conclude that the study of magnetic fields in galaxies as a function of cosmic time will benefit considerably from the application of such a technique, provided there is sufficient instrumental bandwidth. For this purpose, high-frequency channels appear preferable but not strictly necessary.

Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J., E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: simon.lilly@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: mbernet@swin.edu.au [Physics Department, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

A MEASUREMENT OF SECONDARY COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES WITH TWO YEARS OF SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present the first three-frequency South Pole Telescope (SPT) cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra. The band powers presented here cover angular scales 2000 < l < 9400 in frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. At these frequencies and angular scales, a combination of the primary CMB anisotropy, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, radio galaxies, and cosmic infrared background (CIB) contributes to the signal. We combine Planck/HFI and SPT data at 220 GHz to constrain the amplitude and shape of the CIB power spectrum and find strong evidence for nonlinear clustering. We explore the SZ results using a variety of cosmological models for the CMB and CIB anisotropies and find them to be robust with one exception: allowing for spatial correlations between the thermal SZ effect and CIB significantly degrades the SZ constraints. Neglecting this potential correlation, we find the thermal SZ power at 150 GHz and l = 3000 to be 3.65 {+-} 0.69 {mu}K{sup 2}, and set an upper limit on the kinetic SZ power to be less than 2.8 {mu}K{sup 2} at 95% confidence. When a correlation between the thermal SZ and CIB is allowed, we constrain a linear combination of thermal and kinetic SZ power: D{sup tSZ}{sub 3000} + 0.5D{sub 3000}{sup kSZ} = 4.60 {+-} 0.63 {mu}K{sup 2}, consistent with earlier measurements. We use the measured thermal SZ power and an analytic, thermal SZ model calibrated with simulations to determine {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.016. Modeling uncertainties involving the astrophysics of the intracluster medium rather than the statistical uncertainty in the measured band powers are the dominant source of uncertainty on {sigma}{sub 8}. We also place an upper limit on the kinetic SZ power produced by patchy reionization; a companion paper uses these limits to constrain the reionization history of the universe.

Reichardt, C. L.; George, E. M.; Holzapfel, W. L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shaw, L. [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208210, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Zahn, O. [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, and Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Hoover, S. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Holder, G. P. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Halverson, N. W. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Hou, Z., E-mail: cr@bolo.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Digital Pulse-Shape Discrimination Applied to an Ultra-Low-Background Gas-Proportional Counting System: First Results  

SciTech Connect

Abstract A new ultra-low-background proportional counter (ULBPC) design was recently developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This design, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS) which provides passive and active shielding with radon exclusion, has been developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (~30 meters water-equivalent) constructed at PNNL. After these steps to mitigate dominant backgrounds (cosmic rays, external gamma-rays, radioactivity in materials), remaining background events do not exclusively arise from ionization of the proportional counter gas. Digital pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) is thus employed to further improve measurement sensitivity. In this work, a template shape is generated for each individual sample measurement of interest, a "self-calibrating" template. Differences in event topology can also cause differences in pulse shape. In this work, the temporal region analyzed for each event is refined to maximize background discrimination while avoiding unwanted sensitivity to event topology. This digital PSD method is applied to sample and background data, and initial measurement results from a biofuel methane sample are presented in the context of low-background measurements currently being developed.

Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Fuller, Erin S.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Keillor, Martin E.; Mace, Emily K.; Myers, A. W.; Overman, Cory T.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen; Warren, Glen A.; Williams, Richard M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Neutron electric polarizability from unquenched lattice QCD using the background field approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A calculational scheme for obtaining the electric polarizability of the neutron in lattice QCD with dynamical quarks is developed, using the background field approach. The scheme differs substantially from methods previously used in the quenched approximation, the physical reason being that the QCD ensemble is no longer independent of the external electromagnetic field in the dynamical quark case. One is led to compute (certain integrals over) four-point functions. Particular emphasis is also placed on the physical role of constant external gauge fields on a finite lattice; the presence of these fields complicates the extraction of polarizabilities, since it gives rise to an additional shift of the neutron mass unrelated to polarizability effects. The method is tested on a SU(3) flavor-symmetric ensemble furnished by the MILC Collaboration, corresponding to a pion mass of m_pi = 759 MeV. Disconnected diagrams are evaluated using stochastic estimation. A small negative electric polarizability of alpha =(-2.0 +/- 0.9) 10^(-4) fm^3 is found for the neutron at this rather large pion mass; this result does not seem implausible in view of the qualitative behavior of alpha as a function of m_pi suggested by Chiral Effective Theory.

Michael Engelhardt

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Statistical characterisation of bio-aerosol background in an urban environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we statistically characterise the bio-aerosol background in an urban environment. To do this we measure concentration levels of naturally occurring microbiological material in the atmosphere over a two month period. Naturally occurring bioaerosols can be considered as noise, as they mask the presence of signals coming from biological material of interest (such as an intentionally released biological agent). Analysis of this 'biobackground' was undertaken in the 1-10 um size range and a 3-9% contribution was found to be biological in origin - values which are in good agreement with other studies reported in the literature. A model based on the physics of turbulent mixing and dispersion was developed and validated against this analysis. The Gamma distribution (the basis of our model) is shown to comply with the scaling laws of the concentration moments of our data, which enables us to universally characterise both biological and non-biological material in the atmosphere. An application of this model is proposed to build a framework for the development of novel algorithms for bio-aerosol detection and rapid characterisation.

Milan Jamriska; Timothy C. DuBois; Alex Skvortsov

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures  

SciTech Connect

We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

Alarcon, Ricardo [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Balascuta, S. [Arizona State University, Glendale, AZ (United States); Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Bertozzi, William [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Boyce, James R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cowan, Ray [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Evtushenko, Pavel [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fisher, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ihloff, Ernest E. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kalantarians, Narbe [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Kelleher, Aidan Michael [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Krossler, W. J. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Legg, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Long, Elena [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Milner, Richard [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Neil, George R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Ou, Longwu [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Schmookler, Barack Abraham [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Tschalar, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Williams, Gwyn P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Shukui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

webIRB Application Procedures Recommended Consent Form Language References Principles and Background Guiding Principles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The term conflict of interest in research refers to situations in which financial or other personal considerations may compromise, or have the appearance of compromising, an investigators professional judgment in conducting or reporting research. A conflict of interest depends on the situation, and not on the actions or character of an individual investigator. It is important that researchers involved in the conduct of human research do not have or appear to have a conflict of interest, including a financial interest, related to any of the studies in which they participate. The welfare and safety of the research participant is paramount. The fact that an investigator has or appears to have a conflict of interest in research does not preclude conduct of that research, but the interest must be disclosed and the conflict managed in a way that ensures that the welfare of subjects and the integrity of the data are not compromised by that interest. Background The increase in financial relationships between research institutions, investigators and research funders has led to calls for greater disclosure to human subjects of these relationships. Congress, 1 government agencies, 2 courts of law, 3 and professional associations 4 have all taken the position that, in order for research subjects to be able to give a consent that is fully informed, they should be

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Angular Signatures of Dark Matter in the Diffuse Gamma Ray Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark matter annihilating in our Galaxy's halo and elsewhere in the universe is expected to generate a diffuse flux of gamma rays, potentially observable with next generation satellite-based experiments, such as GLAST. In this article, we study the signatures of dark matter in the angular distribution of this radiation, in particular the deterministic ones. Pertaining to the extragalactic contribution, we discuss the effect of the motion of the solar system with respect to the cosmological rest frame, and anisotropies due to the structure of our local universe. For the gamma ray flux from dark matter in our own Galactic halo, we discuss the effects of the offset position of the solar system, the Compton-Getting effect, the asphericity of the Milky Way halo, and the signatures of nearby substructure. We explore the prospects for the detection of these features by the GLAST satellite and find that, if ~10% or more of the diffuse gamma ray background observed by EGRET is the result of dark matter annihilations, then GLAST should be sensitive to anisotropies at the sub-percent level. Such precision would be sufficient to detect many, if not all, of the signatures discussed in this paper.

Dan Hooper; Pasquale D. Serpico

2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

371

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (load in conjunction with the use of a cold front end keeps systematic instrumental corrections small. Atmospheric and window emission are minimized by flying the instrument at 24 km altitude. A large outer ground screen and smaller inner screen shield the instrument from stray radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

Background-free quasi-steady-state photoinduced absorption spectroscopy by dual optical modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple and inexpensive means to measure background-free photoinduced absorption spectra of highly luminescent materials by implementing a dual optical modulation scheme. In our instrument, we modulate a continuous-wave laser, which excites the material of interest resonantly, at a frequency $f_{pu} = 170$\\,Hz with a mechanical chopper. We measure the fractional change of transmission of the sample with a tuneable monochromatic probe source modulated at a frequency $f_{pr} = 139$\\,Hz, and with a digital lockin amplifier at a reference frequency $f_{ref} = f_{pu} + f_{pr} = 309$\\,Hz. We generate the reference sinusoidal wave for the lockin amplifier using a simple home-built electronic circuit that converts the trigger TTL pulsetrains from the two chopper controllers to sine waves and then generates their sum-frequency wave. This scheme allows measurement of the fractional change of transmittance of the sample induced by the pump laser at a frequency $f_{pu} + f_{pr}$ without parasitic signal at a ...

Kallel, Houssem; Paquin, Francis; Rinfret, Robert; Stingelin-Stutzmann, Natalie; Silva, Carlos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD ANALYSIS OF SYSTEMATIC ERRORS IN INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the impact of instrumental systematic errors in interferometric measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization power spectra. We simulate interferometric CMB observations to generate mock visibilities and estimate power spectra using the statistically optimal maximum likelihood technique. We define a quadratic error measure to determine allowable levels of systematic error that does not induce power spectrum errors beyond a given tolerance. As an example, in this study we focus on differential pointing errors. The effects of other systematics can be simulated by this pipeline in a straightforward manner. We find that, in order to accurately recover the underlying B-modes for r = 0.01 at 28 < l < 384, Gaussian-distributed pointing errors must be controlled to 0. Degree-Sign 7 root mean square for an interferometer with an antenna configuration similar to QUBIC, in agreement with analytical estimates. Only the statistical uncertainty for 28 < l < 88 would be changed at {approx}10% level. With the same instrumental configuration, we find that the pointing errors would slightly bias the 2{sigma} upper limit of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r by {approx}10%. We also show that the impact of pointing errors on the TB and EB measurements is negligibly small.

Zhang Le; Timbie, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S. [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Sutter, Paul M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D. [Department of Physics, 1110 W Green Street, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bunn, Emory F., E-mail: lzhang263@wisc.edu [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A high spatial resolution analysis of the MAXIMA-1 cosmicmicrowave background anisotropy data  

SciTech Connect

We extend the analysis of the MAXIMA-1 cosmic microwave background data to smaller angular scales. MAXIMA, a bolometric balloon-borne experiment, mapped a 124 deg(2) region of the sky with 10 minutes resolution at frequencies of 150, 240, and 410 GHz during its first flight. The original analysis, which covered the multipole range 36 less than or equal to l less than or equal to 785 using a 100 deg(2) map, is extended to l = 1235 using a subset of the data from three 150 GHz photometers in the fully cross-linked central 60 deg(2) of the map. The main improvement over the original analysis is the use of 3 minutes square pixels in the calculation of the map. The new analysis is consistent with the original for l<785. For l>785, where inflationary models predict a third acoustic peak, the new analysis shows power with an amplitude of 56 +/- 7 muK at l similar or equal to 850 in excess to the average power of 42 +/- 3 muK in the range 441

Lee, A.T.; Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri,A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira P.G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V.V.; Jaffe,A.H.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Netterfield, C.B.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2001-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Frequentist estimation of cosmological parameters from theMAXIMA-1 cosmic microwave background anisotropy data  

SciTech Connect

We use a frequentist statistical approach to set confidence intervals on the values of cosmological parameters using the MAXIMA-1 and COBE measurements of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. We define a Deltachi (2) statistic, simulate the measurements of MAXIMA-1 and COBE, determine the probability distribution of the statistic, and use it and the data to set confidence intervals on several cosmological parameters. We compare the frequentist confidence intervals with Bayesian credible regions. The frequentist and Bayesian approaches give best estimates for the parameters that agree within 15 per cent, and confidence interval widths that agree to within 30 per cent. The results also suggest that a frequentist analysis gives slightly broader confidence intervals than a Bayesian analysis. The frequentist analysis gives values of Omega = 0.89(-0.19)(+0.26), Omega(B) h(2) =0.026(-0.011)(+0.020) and n = 1.02(-0.10)(+0.31), and the Bayesian analysis gives values of Omega = 0.98(-0.19)(+0.14) Omega(B) h(2) =0.029(-0.010)(+0.015), and n = 1.18(-0.23)(+0.10), all at the 95 per cent confidence level.

Abroe, M.E.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.; Bunn, E.F.; Hanany, S.; Ferreira, P.G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lee, A.T.; Olive, K.A.; Rabii, B.; Richards,P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Stompor, R.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

MAXIMA: an experiment to measure temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the MAXIMA experiment, a balloon-borne measurement designed to map temperature anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from l=80 to l=800. The experiment consists of a 1.3 m diameter off-axis Gregorian telescope and a receiver with a 16 element array of bolometers cooled to 100 mK. The frequency bands are centered at 150, 240, and 410 GHz. The 10{sup {prime}} FWHM beam sizes are well matched to the scale of acoustic peaks expected in the angular power spectrum of the CMB. The first flight of the experiment in its full configuration was launched in August 1998. A 122 deg{sup 2} map of the sky was made near the Draco constellation during the 7 hour flight in a region of extremely low galactic dust contamination. This map covers 0.3{percent} of the sky and has 3200 independent beamsize pixels. We describe the MAXIMA instrument and its performance during the recent flight. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Lee, A.T.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.; Jaffe, A.H.; Oh, S.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, 301 LeConte Hall, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lee, A.T.; Jaffe, A.H.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ade, P.; Hristov, V.; Lange, A.E.; Pascale, E. [Queen Mary and Westfield College, London (United Kingdom); Balbi, A.; Borrill, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bock, J.; Crill, B.P.; Smoot, G.F. [Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bock, J.; Del Castillo, H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Boscaleri, A. [IROE-CNR, Firenze (Italy); De Bernardis, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Ferreira, P. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Ganga, K. [IPAC, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Hanany, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Mauskopf, P. [University of Massachusetts, Amhurst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Netterfield, C.B. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Ruhl, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

J. Marvin Herndon

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

Historical Background on Assessment the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, six years after selecting the Delaware Basin as a potential disposal area, Congress authorized the US Department of Energy to build the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, as a research and development facility for the safe management, storage, and disposal of waste contaminated with transuranic radioisotopes. In 1998, 19 years after authorization and 25 years after site selection, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certified that the WIPP disposal system complied with its regulations. The EPA's decision was primarily based on the results from a performance assessment conducted in 1996. This performance assessment was the culmination of four preliminary performance assessments conducted between 1989 and 1992. This report provides a historical setting and context for how the performance of the deep geologic repository at the WIPP was analyzed. Also included is background on political forces acting on the project. For example, the federal requirement to provide environmental impact statements and negotiated agreements with the State of New Mexico influenced the type of scientific areas that were investigated and the engineering analysis prior to 1989 for the WIPP.

Rechard, R.P.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

EPA Clean Energy-Environment Technical Forum Renewable Energy Certificates: Background & Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) are transferable commodities that represent the environmental and other non-power attributes of renewable energy. RECs are used to demonstrate compliance with state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) which are designed to increase development and production of energy from renewable resources by imposing mandated targets for retail sales of renewable generation. RECS are also used in the voluntary green power market which allows individual purchasers to voluntarily purchase a REC and then claim an environmental benefit associated with that purchase. This background paper describes the importance of RECs and how state RPS policies and tracking systems influence REC availability, cost of compliance and price differences in REC markets from state to state. Resources for additional information about these topics are also provided. I. What is a REC? Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) represent the environmental and other non-power attributes of renewable electricity. RECs are measured in megawatt-hours (MWh) and are created at the point of generation, as the electricity is introduced into the electricity grid. RECs are numbered, paper certificates that represent each MWh of renewable energy sold and provide

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

Mobrand, Lars E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

HOT AND COLD SPOT COUNTS AS PROBES OF NON-GAUSSIANITY IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND  

SciTech Connect

We introduce the numbers of hot and cold spots, n{sub h} and n{sub c} , of excursion sets of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropy maps as statistical observables that can discriminate different non-Gaussian models. We numerically compute them from simulations of non-Gaussian CMB temperature fluctuation maps. The first kind of non-Gaussian model we study is the local type primordial non-Gaussianity. The second kind of model has some specific form of the probability distribution function from which the temperature fluctuation value at each pixel is drawn, obtained using HEALPIX. We find the characteristic non-Gaussian deviation shapes of n{sub h} and n{sub c} , which is distinct for each of the models under consideration. We further demonstrate that n{sub h} and n{sub c} carry additional information compared to the genus, which is just their linear combination, making them valuable additions to the Minkowski Functionals in constraining non-Gaussianity.

Chingangbam, Pravabati [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala II Block, Bangalore 560034 (India); Park, Changbom [Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Yogendran, K. P. [Indian Institute for Science Education and Research, Mohali (India); Van de Weygaert, Rien, E-mail: prava@iiap.res.in, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr, E-mail: pattag@gmail.com, E-mail: weygaert@astro.rug.nl [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9747 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

What can be learned from the lensed cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization power spectrum?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of weak gravitational lensing on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies and polarization will provide access to cosmological information that cannot be obtained from the primary anisotropies alone. We compare the information content of the lensed B-mode polarization power spectrum, properly accounting for the non-Gaussian correlations between the power on different scales, with that of the unlensed CMB fields and the lensing potential. The latter represent the products of an (idealised) optimal analysis that exploits the lens-induced non-Gaussianity to reconstruct the fields. Compressing the non-Gaussian lensed CMB into power spectra is wasteful and leaves a tight degeneracy between the equation of state of dark energy and neutrino mass that is much stronger than in the more optimal analysis. Despite this, a power spectrum analysis will be a useful first step in analysing future B-mode polarization data. For this reason, we also consider how to extract accurate parameter constraints from the lensed B-mode power spectrum. We show with simulations that for cosmic-variance-limited measurements of the lensed B-mode power, including the non-Gaussian correlations in existing likelihood approximations gives biased parameter results. We develop a more refined likelihood approximation that performs significantly better. This new approximation should also be of more general interest in the wider context of parameter estimation from Gaussian CMB data.

Sarah Smith; Anthony Challinor; Graca Rocha

2005-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

383

Angular Correlations of the X-Ray Background and Clustering of Extragalactic X-Ray Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The information content of the autocorrelation function (ACF) of intensity fluctuations of the X-ray background (XRB) is analyzed. The tight upper limits set by ROSAT deep survey data on the ACF at arcmin scales imply strong constraints on clustering properties of X-ray sources at cosmological distances and on their contribution to the soft XRB. If quasars have a clustering radius r_0=12-20 Mpc (H_0=50), and their two point correlation function, is constant in comoving coordinates as indicated by optical data, they cannot make up more 40-50% of the soft XRB (the maximum contribution may reach 80% in the case of stable clustering, epsilon=0). Active Star-forming (ASF) galaxies clustered like normal galaxies, with r_0=10-12 Mpc can yield up to 20% or up to 40% of the soft XRB for epsilon=-1.2 or epsilon=0, respectively. The ACF on degree scales essentially reflects the clustering properties of local sources and is proportional to their volume emissivity. The upper limits on scales of a few degrees imply that hard X-ray selected AGNs have r_06 deg, if real, may be due to AGNs with r_0=20 Mpc; the contribution from clusters of galaxies with r_0~50 Mpc is a factor 2 lower.

L. Danese; L. Toffolatti; A. Franceschini; J. M. Martin-Mirones; G. De Zotti

1993-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hierarchical Bayesian Detection Algorithm for Early-Universe Relics in the Cosmic Microwave Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of theoretically well-motivated additions to the standard cosmological model predict weak signatures in the form of spatially localized sources embedded in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. We present a hierarchical Bayesian statistical formalism and a complete data analysis pipeline for testing such scenarios. We derive an accurate approximation to the full posterior probability distribution over the parameters defining any theory that predicts sources embedded in the CMB, and perform an extensive set of tests in order to establish its validity. The approximation is implemented using a modular algorithm, designed to avoid a posteriori selection effects, which combines a candidate-detection stage with a full Bayesian model-selection and parameter-estimation analysis. We apply this pipeline to theories that predict cosmic textures and bubble collisions, extending previous analyses by using: (1) adaptive-resolution techniques, allowing us to probe features of arbitrary size, and (2) optimal filters, which provide the best possible sensitivity for detecting candidate signatures. We conclude that the WMAP 7-year data do not favor the addition of either cosmic textures or bubble collisions to the standard cosmological model, and place robust constraints on the predicted number of such sources. The expected numbers of bubble collisions and cosmic textures on the CMB sky within our detection thresholds are constrained to be fewer than 4.0 and 5.2 at 95% confidence, respectively.

Stephen M. Feeney; Matthew C. Johnson; Jason D. McEwen; Daniel J. Mortlock; Hiranya V. Peiris

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

BAYESIAN NOISE ESTIMATION FOR NON-IDEAL COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND EXPERIMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a Bayesian framework for estimating the time-domain noise covariance of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations, typically parameterized in terms of a 1/f frequency profile. This framework is based on the Gibbs sampling algorithm, which allows for exact marginalization over nuisance parameters through conditional probability distributions. In this paper, we implement support for gaps in the data streams and marginalization over fixed time-domain templates, and also outline how to marginalize over confusion from CMB fluctuations, which may be important for high signal-to-noise experiments. As a by-product of the method, we obtain proper constrained realizations, which themselves can be useful for map making. To validate the algorithm, we demonstrate that the reconstructed noise parameters and corresponding uncertainties are unbiased using simulated data. The CPU time required to process a single data stream of 100,000 samples with 1000 samples removed by gaps is 3 s if only the maximum posterior parameters are required, and 21 s if one also wants to obtain the corresponding uncertainties by Gibbs sampling.

Wehus, I. K. [Theoretical Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Naess, S. K.; Eriksen, H. K., E-mail: i.k.wehus@fys.uio.no, E-mail: sigurdkn@astro.uio.no, E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

LOCAL NON-GAUSSIANITY IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND THE BAYESIAN WAY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce an exact Bayesian approach to search for non-Gaussianity of local type in cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation data. Using simulated CMB temperature maps, the newly developed technique is compared against the conventional frequentist bispectrum estimator. Starting from the joint probability distribution, we obtain analytic expressions for the conditional probabilities of the primordial perturbations given the data, and for the level of non-Gaussianity, f{sub NL}, given the data and the perturbations. We propose Hamiltonian Monte Carlo sampling as a means to derive realizations of the primordial fluctuations from which we in turn sample f{sub NL}. Although computationally expensive, this approach allows us to construct exactly the full target posterior probability distribution. When compared to the frequentist estimator, applying the Bayesian method to Gaussian CMB maps provides consistent results. For the analysis of non-Gaussian maps, however, the error bars on f{sub NL} do not show excess variance within the Bayesian framework. This finding is of particular relevance in the light of upcoming high-precision CMB measurements obtained by the Planck satellite mission.

Elsner, Franz [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Wandelt, Benjamin D., E-mail: felsner@mpa-garching.mpg.d [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis, blvd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurements of Secondary Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies with the South Pole Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum measurements from the first 100 sq. deg. field observed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) at 150 and 220 GHz. On angular scales where the primary CMB anisotropy is dominant, ell ~ 50 at both frequencies. We combine the 150 and 220 GHz data to remove the majority of the point source power, and use the point source subtracted spectrum to detect Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) power at 2.6 sigma. At ell=3000, the SZ power in the subtracted bandpowers is 4.2 +/- 1.5 uK^2, which is significantly lower than the power predicted by a fiducial model using WMAP5 cosmological parameters. This discrepancy may suggest that contemporary galaxy cluster models overestimate the thermal pressure of intracluster gas. Alternatively, this result can be interpreted as evidence for lower values of sigma8. When combined with an estimate of the kinetic SZ contribution, the measured SZ amplitude shifts sigma8 from the primary CMB anisotropy derived constraint of 0.794 +/- 0.028 down t...

Lueker, M; Schaffer, K K; Zahn, O; Ade, P A R; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; George, E M; Hall, N R; Halverson, N W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Shaw, L; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Cluster contribution to the X-ray background as a cosmological probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive measurements of the X-ray background (XRB) yield a reasonably reliable characterisation of its basic properties. Having resolved most of the cosmic XRB into discrete sources, the levels and spectral shapes of its main components can be used to probe both the source populations and also alternative cosmological and large-scale structure models. Recent observations of clusters seem to provide evidence that clusters formed earlier and are more abundant than predicted in the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. This motivates interest in alternative models that predict enhanced power on cluster scales. We calculate predicted levels and spectra of the superposed emission from groups and clusters of galaxies in $\\Lambda$CDM and in two viable alternative non-Gaussian ($\\chi^2$) and early dark energy models. The predicted levels of the contribution of clusters to the XRB in the non-Gaussian models exceed the measured level at low energies and levels of the residual XRB in the 2-8 keV band; these particular models a...

Lemze, Doron; Rephaeli, Yoel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gravitational Wave Background from Neutrino-Driven Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the gravitational wave background (GWB) from a cosmological population of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among various emission mechanisms for the gravitational waves (GWs), we pay a particular attention to the vast anisotropic neutrino emissions from the accretion disk around the black hole formed after the so-called failed supernova explosions. The produced GWs by such mechanism are known as burst with memory, which could dominate over the low-frequency regime below \\sim 10Hz. To estimate their amplitudes, we derive general analytic formulae for gravitational waveform from the axisymmetric jets. Based on the formulae, we first quantify the spectrum of GWs from a single GRB. Then, summing up its cosmological population, we find that the resultant value of the density parameter becomes roughly \\Omega_{GW} \\approx 10^{-20} over the wide-band of the low-frequency region, f\\sim 10^{-4}-10^1Hz. The amplitude of GWB is sufficiently smaller than the primordial GWBs originated from an inflationary epoch and far below the detection limit.

Takashi Hiramatsu; Kei Kotake; Hideaki Kudoh; Atsushi Taruya

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Homobuffer thickness effect on the background electron carrier concentration of epitaxial ZnO thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epitaxial ZnO thin films were grown on r-plane sapphire substrates using plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. ZnO homobuffer layers grown at a lower temperature were introduced to improve the crystallinity of the top ZnO thin films. Thicker homobuffer layers lead to better crystallinity of the subsequent epitaxial ZnO thin films due to the strain relaxation effect. Residual background electron carrier concentration in these undoped ZnO thin films first decreases, then increases as the buffer layer thickness increases from {approx}1 to 30 nm, with a minimum electron concentration of {approx}1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} occurring in ZnO homobuffer of {approx}5 nm. These results demonstrate that the optimized ZnO homobuffer thickness to achieve both good ZnO crystallinity and low residual electron concentration is determined by the relative electron carrier concentration ratios and mobility ratios between the buffer and epi-ZnO layers.

Yang, Z.; Zhou, H. M.; Li, L.; Zhao, J. Z.; Liu, J. L. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Quantum Structures Laboratory, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Chen, W. V.; Yu, P. K. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Genetic Background Modulates Gene Expression Profile Induced by Skin Irradiation in Ptch1 Mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Ptch1 germ-line mutations in mice predispose to radiation-induced basal cell carcinoma of the skin, with tumor incidence modulated by the genetic background. Here, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying skin response to radiation in F1 progeny of Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice crossed with either skin tumor-susceptible (Car-S) or -resistant (Car-R) mice and X-irradiated (3 Gy) at 2 days of age or left untreated. Methods and Materials: We conducted a gene expression profile analysis in mRNA samples extracted from the skin of irradiated or control mice, using Affymetrix whole mouse genome expression array. Confirmation of the results was done using real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Analysis of the gene expression profile of normal skin of F1 mice at 4 weeks of age revealed a similar basal profile in the nonirradiated mice, but alterations in levels of 71 transcripts in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-R cross and modulation of only eight genes in irradiated Ptch1{sup neo67/+} mice of the Car-S cross. Conclusions: These results indicate that neonatal irradiation causes a persistent change in the gene expression profile of the skin. The tendency of mice genetically resistant to skin tumorigenesis to show a more complex pattern of transcriptional response to radiation than do genetically susceptible mice suggests a role for this response in genetic resistance to basal cell tumorigenesis.

Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Mancuso, Mariateresa; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna [ENEA Laboratories, Rome (Italy); Dragani, Tommaso A. [Department of Experimental Oncology and Laboratories, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: tommaso.dragani@istitutotumori.mi.it

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

Keefer, Gregory [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

393

The High Energy Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of the Dark Matter in the Galactic Halo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present constraints on the density of halo dark matter candidates within the solar circle based on the anisotropy in the high energy gamma-ray background. The known galactic components of the gamma-ray background, in particular the inverse Compton component, have been estimated more accurately. We find the spectrum of the residual emission, after subtracting the galactic component is inconsistent with emission from some of the proposed dark matter candidates. We derive upper limits of 10^8 M_sun for the mass of diffuse gas and 3*10^9 pc^(-3) for the number density of primordial black holes contributing to the gamma-ray background.

R. Chary; E. L. Wright

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integrated Molecular Analysis Indicates Undetectable Change in DNA Damage in Mice after Continuous Irradiation at ~ 400-fold Natural Background Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: In the event of a nuclear accident, people are exposed to elevated levels of continuous low dose-rate radiation. Nevertheless, most of the literature describes the biological effects of acute radiation.

Olipitz, Werner

395

SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF SX TANK FARM AT THE HANFORD SITE RESULTS OF BACKGROUND CHARACTERIZATION WITH MAGNETICS AND ELECTROMAGNETICS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the background characterization of the cribs and trenches surrounding the SX tank farm prepared by HydroGEOPHYSICS Inc, Columbia Energy & Environmental Services Inc and Washington River Protection Solutions.

MYERS DA; RUCKER D; LEVIT M; CUBBAGE B; HENDERSON C

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

396

Neural networks and separation of Cosmic Microwave Background and astrophysical signals in sky maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm is implemented as a neural network for separating signals of different origin in astrophysical sky maps. Due to its self-organizing capability, it works without prior assumptions on the signals, neither on their frequency scaling, nor on the signal maps themselves; instead, it learns directly from the input data how to separate the physical components, making use of their statistical independence. To test the capabilities of this approach, we apply the ICA algorithm on sky patches, taken from simulations and observations, at the microwave frequencies, that are going to be deeply explored in a few years on the whole sky, by the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) and by the {\\sc Planck} Surveyor Satellite. The maps are at the frequencies of the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) aboard the {\\sc Planck} satellite (30, 44, 70 and 100 GHz), and contain simulated astrophysical radio sources, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, and Galactic diffuse emissions from thermal dust and synchrotron. We show that the ICA algorithm is able to recover each signal, with precision going from 10% for the Galactic components to percent for CMB; radio sources are almost completely recovered down to a flux limit corresponding to $0.7\\sigma_{CMB}$, where $\\sigma_{CMB}$ is the rms level of CMB fluctuations. The signal recovering possesses equal quality on all the scales larger then the pixel size. In addition, we show that the frequency scalings of the input signals can be partially inferred from the ICA outputs, at the percent precision for the dominant components, radio sources and CMB.

C. Baccigalupi; L. Bedini; C. Burigana; G. De Zotti; A. Farusi; D. Maino; M. Maris; F. Perrotta; E. Salerno; L. Toffolatti; A. Tonazzini

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dark stars: Implications and constraints from cosmic reionization and extragalactic background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dark stars powered by dark matter annihilation have been proposed as the first luminous sources in the universe. These stars are believed to form in the central dark matter cusp of low-mass minihalos. Recent calculations indicate stellar masses up to \\sim1000 solar masses and/or have very long lifetimes. The UV photons from these objects could therefore contribute significantly to cosmic reionization. Here we show that such dark star models would require a somewhat artificial reionization history, based on a double-reionization phase and a late star-burst near redshift $z\\sim6$, in order to fulfill the WMAP constraint on the optical depth as well as the Gunn-Peterson constraint at $z\\sim6$. This suggests that, if dark stars were common in the early universe, then models are preferred which predict a number of UV photons similar to conventional Pop. III stars. This excludes dark stars with 100 solar masses that enter a main-sequence phase and other models that lead to a strong increase in the number of UV photons. We also derive constraints for massive as well as light dark matter candidates from the observed X-ray, gamma-ray and neutrino background, considering dark matter profiles which have been steepened during the formation of dark stars. This increases the clumping factor at high redshift and gives rise to a higher dark matter annihilation rate in the early universe. We furthermore estimate the potential contribution from the annihilation products in the remnants of dark stars, which may provide a promising path to constrain such models further, but which is currently still uncertain.

Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Robi Banerjee; Ralf S. Klessen

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker  

SciTech Connect

MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore; Stompor, Radoslaw

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cosmological implications of the MAXIMA-1 high-resolution cosmicmicrowave background anisotropy measurement  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the cosmological implications of the new constraints on the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy derived from a new high-resolution analysis of the MAXIMA-1 measurement. The power spectrum indicates excess power at lsimilar to 860 over the average level of power at 411 less than or equal to l less than or equal to 785. This excess is statistically significant at the similar to 95 percent confidence level. Its position coincides with that of the third acoustic peak, as predicted by generic inflationary models selected to fit the first acoustic peak as observed in the data. The height of the excess power agrees with the predictions of a family of inflationary models with cosmological parameters that are fixed to fit the CMB data previously provided by BOOMERANG-LDB and MAXIMA-1 experiments. Our results therefore lend support for inflationary models and more generally for the dominance of adiabatic coherent perturbations in the structure formation of the universe. At the same time, they seem to disfavor a large variety of the nonstandard (but inflation-based) models that have been proposed to improve the quality of fits to the CMB data and the consistency with other cosmological observables. Within standard inflationary models, our results combined with the COBE/Differential Microwave Radiometer data give best-fit values and 95 percent confidence limits for the baryon density, Omega (b)h(2)similar or equal to 0.033 +/- 0.013, and the total density, Omega =0.9(-0.16)(+0.18). The primordial spectrum slope (n(s)) and the optical depth to the last scattering surface (tau (c)) are found to be degenerate and to obey the relation n(s) similar or equal to (0.99 +/- 0.14) + 0.46tau (c), for tau (c) less than or equal to 0.5 (all at 95 percent confidence levels).

Stompor, R.; Abroe, M.; Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Barbosa, D.; Bock,J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany,S.; Hristov, V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lee, A.T.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

Thomas, Dan M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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401

A SEARCH FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES ON ARCMINUTE SCALES WITH BOLOCAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have surveyed two science fields totaling 1 deg.{sup 2} with Bolocam at 2.1 mm to search for secondary Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies caused by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). The fields are in the Lynx and Subaru/XMM SDS1 fields. Our survey is sensitive to angular scales with an effective angular multipole of l{sub eff} = 5700 with FWHM{sub l} = 2800 and has an angular resolution of 60 arcsec FWHM. Our data provide no evidence for anisotropy. We are able to constrain the level of total astronomical anisotropy, modeled as a flat-band power in C{sub l}, with most frequent 68%, 90%, and 95% CL upper limits of 590, 760, and 830 {mu}K {sup 2} {sub CMB}. We statistically subtract the known contribution from primary CMB anisotropy, including cosmic variance, to obtain constraints on the SZE anisotropy contribution. Now including flux calibration uncertainty, our most frequent 68%, 90%, and 95% CL upper limits on a flat-band power in C{sub l} are 690, 960, and 1000 {mu}K {sup 2} {sub CMB}. When we instead employ the analytical spectrum suggested by Komatsu and Seljack in 2002, and account for the non-Gaussianity of the SZE anisotropy signal, we obtain upper limits on the average amplitude of their spectrum weighted by our transfer function of 790, 1060, and 1080 {mu}K {sup 2} {sub CMB}. We obtain a 90% CL upper limit on {sigma}{sub 8}, which normalizes the power spectrum of density fluctuations, of 1.57. These are the first constraints on anisotropy and {sigma}{sub 8} from survey data at these angular scales at frequencies near 150 GHz.

Sayers, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Rossinot, P.; Edgington, S. F.; Lange, A. E. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 59-33, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ade, P. A. R.; Haig, D.; Mauskopf, P. D. [Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, P.O. Box 913, Cardiff CF24 3YB, Wales (United Kingdom); Aguirre, J. E.; Glenn, J.; Laurent, G. T. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bock, J. J.; Goldin, A.; Nguyen, H. T. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)], E-mail: jack@caltech.edu

2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background from Non-Uniform Reionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the signal in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization anisotropy resulting from patchy reionization. It is well known that the primordial polarization of the CMB is very sensitive to the details of reionization. Combining a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, in which the optical depth to the reionization epoch is in the range 0.014 to 0.048, with a high resolution N-body simulation we find that reionization generates a peak with amplitude 0.05~0.15 \\mu K at large angular scales. The position of this peak reveals the size of the horizon at reionization, whilst its amplitude is a measure of the optical depth to reionization. On small scales, ionized patches prior to full reionization create a second order polarization signal due to the coupling of the free electron density fluctuation with the quadrupole moment of the temperature anisotropy. Careful study reveals that the coupling generates the same power spectra for electric and magnetic modes, whose amplitudes of polarization anisotropies from this process are predicted to be ~10nK. The amplitude depends strongly on the total baryon density $\\Omega_b$ and on the spatial correlations of the free electron density in the ionized regions, and weakly on the fraction of ionizing photons able to escape their source galaxy, $f_{esc}$. The first- and second-order signals are therefore sensitive to the details of how the reionization occurred. Detection of these signals will place important constraints on the reionization history of the Universe.

Guo-Chin Liu; Naoshi Sugiyama; Andrew J. Benson; C. G. Lacey; Adi Nusser

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

Background and Scattered Light Subtraction in the High-Resolution Echelle Modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simple, effective approach for estimating the on-order backgrounds of spectra taken with the highest-resolution modes of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scheme for determining the on-order background spectrum uses polynomial fits to the inter-order scattered light visible in the two-dimensional STIS MAMA images. We present a suite of high-resolution STIS spectra to demonstrate that our background subtraction routine produces the correct overall zero point, as judged by the small residual flux levels in the centers of strongly-saturated interstellar absorption lines. Although there are multiple sources of background light in STIS echelle mode data, this simple approach works very well for wavelengths longward of Lyman-alpha. At shorter wavelengths, the smaller order separation and generally lower signal-to-noise ratios of the data can reduce the effectiveness of our background estimation procedure. Slight artifacts in the background-subtracted spectrum can be seen in some cases, particularly at wavelengths light. We discuss the limitations of high-resolution STIS data in light of the uncertainties associated with our background subtraction procedure. We compare our background-subtracted STIS spectra with GHRS Ech-A observations of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B and GHRS first-order G160M observations of the early-type star HD 218915. We find no significant differences between the GHRS data and the STIS data reduced with our method in either case.

J. Christopher Howk; Kenneth R. Sembach

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Extending the Sensitivity to the Detection of WIMP Dark Matter with an Improved Understanding of the Limiting Neutron Backgrounds  

SciTech Connect

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses position-sensitive Germanium and Silicon crystals in the direct detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) believed to constitute most of the dark matter in the Universe. WIMP interactions with matter being rare, identifying and eliminating known backgrounds is critical for detection. Event-by-event discrimination by the detectors rejects the predominant gamma and beta backgrounds while Monte Carlo simulations help estimate, and subtract, the contribution from the neutrons. This thesis describes the effort to understand neutron backgrounds as seen in the two stages of the CDMS search for WIMPs. The first stage of the experiment was at a shallow site at the Stanford Underground Facility where the limiting background came from high-energy neutrons produced by cosmic-ray muon interactions in the rock surrounding the cavern. Simulations of this background helped inform the analysis of data from an experimental run at this site and served as input for the background reduction techniques necessary to set new exclusion limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross-section, excluding new parameter space for WIMPs of masses 8-20 GeV/c{sup 2}. This thesis considers the simulation methods used as well as how various event populations in the data served as checks on the simulations to allow them to be used in the interpretation of the WIMP-search data. The studies also confirmed the presence of a limiting neutron background at the shallow site, necessitating the move to the 713-meter deep Soudan Underground Facility. Similar computer-based studies helped quantify the neutron background seen at the deeper site and informed the analysis of the data emerging from the first physics run of the experiment at Soudan. In conjunction with the WIMP-search and calibration data, the simulations confirmed that increased depth considerably reduced the neutron backgrounds seen, greatly improving the sensitivity to WIMP detection. The data run set an upper limit of 4 x 10{sup -43} on the WIMP-nucleon cross section for a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c{sup 2} . Upper limits to the rate of background neutrons have also been determined.

Kamat, Sharmila; /Case Western Reserve U.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 David C. Kirschner Beaver, Utah Beaver Natural Gas Fueling Station Installation of LNGCNG fueling station in Beaver, Utah. Located along Interstate-15 on a previously...

406

Analytic calculations of the spectra of ultra high energy cosmic ray nuclei. II. The general case of background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the problem of ultra high energy nuclei propagation in extragalactic background radiations. The present paper is the continuation of the accompanying paper I where we have presented three new analytic methods to calculate the fluxes and spectra of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) nuclei, both primary and secondary, and secondary protons. The computation scheme in this paper is based on the analytic solution of coupled kinetic equations, which takes into account the continuous energy losses due to the expansion of the universe and pair-production, together with photo-disintegration of the nuclei. This method includes in the most natural way the production of secondary nuclei in the process of photo-disintegration of the primary nuclei during their propagation through extragalactic background radiations. In paper I, in order to present the suggested analytical schemes of calculations, we have considered only the case of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, in the present paper we gene...

Aloisio, R; Grigorieva, S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet--Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endr\\Hoczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzlez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska; D. Kozak; O. Kranz; V. Kringel; S. Krishnamurthy; B. Krishnan; A. Krlak; G. Kuehn; R. Kumar; P. Kwee; P. K. Lam

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

408

Upper limits on a stochastic gravitational-wave background using LIGO and Virgo interferometers at 600-1000 Hz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stochastic background of gravitational waves is expected to arise from a superposition of many incoherent sources of gravitational waves, of either cosmological or astrophysical origin. This background is a target for the current generation of ground-based detectors. In this article we present the first joint search for a stochastic background using data from the LIGO and Virgo interferometers. In a frequency band of 600-1000 Hz, we obtained a 95% upper limit on the amplitude of $\\Omega_{\\rm GW}(f) = \\Omega_3 (f/900 \\mathrm{Hz})^3$, of $\\Omega_3 < 0.33$, assuming a value of the Hubble parameter of $h_{100}=0.72$. These new limits are a factor of seven better than the previous best in this frequency band.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet--Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavagli, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Daz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endr?czi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gspr, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L ; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzlez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krlak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Blazar Duty-Cycle at gamma-ray Frequecies: Constraints from Extragalactic Background Radiation and Prospects for AGILE and GLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic gamma-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST gamma-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

Pittori, Carlotta; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Giommi, Paolo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

On the variation of the Astronomical Unit and the corrections to planetary motion on an expanding locally anisotropic background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work are computed analytical solutions for orbital motion on a background described by an Expanding Locally Anisotropic (ELA) metric ansatz. This metric interpolates between the Schwarzschild metric near the central mass and the Robertson-Walker metric describing the expanding cosmological background far from the central mass allowing for a fine-tuneable covariant parameterization of gravitational interactions corrections in between these two asymptotic limits. Assuming a non-varying gravitational constant, 'dG/dt=0', it is discussed the variation of the Astronomical Unit (AU) obtained from numerical analysis of the Solar System dynamics, being shown that the corrections to the orbital periods on the Solar System due to the decrease of the Sun's mass by radiation emission plus the General Relativity corrections due to the ELA metric background with respect to Schwarzschild backgrounds can be mapped to the reported yearly increase of the AU through the corrections to Kepler's third law. Based on the value of the heuristic fit to the parameter 'dAU/dt' corresponding to the more recent ephemerides of the Solar System are derived bounds for the value of a constant parameter 'alpha_0' for the ELA metric as well as the maximal corrections to orbital precession and orbital radius variation within this framework. Hence it is shown that employing the ELA metric as a functional covariant parameterization to model gravitational interactions corrections within the Solar system allows to avoid the need for a varying AU and/or varying gravitational constant G.

P. Castelo Ferreira

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

An optimal text/background color combination of LED information boards for visibility improvement based on psychological measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, conspicuity and readability of the text on light-emitting diode (LED) information boards were evaluated by psychological experiments, and the influences of color combinations of text / background, luminance, and shadow were evaluated quantitatively. ... Keywords: LED, Scheffe's paired comparison, color combination, visibility

Aya Shiraiwa; Eriko Aiba; Takayuki Shimotomai; Hiroya Inome; Noriko Nagata

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Analytical and Numerical Studies of the Complex Interaction of a Fast Ion Beam Pulse with a Background Plasma  

SciTech Connect

Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, high energy physics, etc. Comprehensive analytical, numerical, and experimental studies are underway to investigate the complex interaction of a fast ion beam with a background plasma. The positively charged ion beam attracts plasma electrons, and as a result the plasma electrons have a tendency to neutralize the beam charge and current. A suite of particle-in-cell codes has been developed to study the propagation of an ion beam pulse through the background plasma. For quasi-steady-state propagation of the ion beam pulse, an analytical theory has been developed using the assumption of long charge bunches and conservation of generalized vorticity. The analytical results agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The visualization of the data obtained in the numerical simulations shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry into and ex it from the plasma.

Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g. 37 Ar ). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

**TITLE** ASP Conference Series, Vol. **VOLUME**, **PUBLICATION YEAR** **EDITORS** The autocorrelation function of the soft X-ray background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The first positive detection of the X-ray background fluctuations at small angular scales is reported. ROSAT PSPC archive pointed observations are used to measure fluctuations at scales of 0. ? 03 ?0. ? 4. The pointings have been selected from an area free from galactic contamination. At separations below ? 0. ? 1 clusters of galaxies become a substantial source of the background fluctuations. The autocorrelation function of the fluctuations in the power law approximation has a slope of ? 1 for all the data but is substantially flatter (with slope of ? 0.7) when pointings containing bright clusters are removed. At separations 0. ? 3 ? 0. ? 4 where the ACF estimates based on the ROSAT pointings and All-Sky Survey are available, both data sets give consistent results. 1.

Andrzej M. Soltan; Michael J. Freyberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon-14 Background, Pathway, and Dose Calculation Analysis for Nuclear Power Plants: A Sourcebook for Accurate Carbon-14 Dose Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) generate carbon-14 during operation, and release it in power plant effluents. This report explores the current state of carbon and carbon-14 science and understanding to identify and recommend any enhancements to carbon-14 dose calculation methodologies.BackgroundWhile the amount of carbon-14 released by NPPs is small compared to natural and other anthropogenic sources, it is important to accurately document it, along ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

High Energy Neutrino Emission and Neutrino Background from Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Internal Shock Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy neutrino emission from GRBs is discussed. In this paper, by using the simulation kit GEANT4, we calculate proton cooling efficiency including pion-multiplicity and proton-inelasticity in photomeson production. First, we estimate the maximum energy of accelerated protons in GRBs. Using the obtained results, neutrino flux from one burst and a diffuse neutrino background are evaluated quantitatively. We also take account of cooling processes of pion and muon, which are crucial for resulting neutrino spectra. We confirm the validity of analytic approximate treatments on GRB fiducial parameter sets, but also find that the effects of multiplicity and high-inelasticity can be important on both proton cooling and resulting spectra in some cases. Finally, assuming that the GRB rate traces the star formation rate, we obtain a diffuse neutrino background spectrum from GRBs for specific parameter sets. We introduce the nonthermal baryon-loading factor, rather than assume that GRBs are main sources of UHECRs. We find that the obtained neutrino background can be comparable with the prediction of Waxman & Bahcall, although our ground in estimation is different from theirs. In this paper, we study on various parameters since there are many parameters in the model. The detection of high energy neutrinos from GRBs will be one of the strong evidences that protons are accelerated to very high energy in GRBs. Furthermore, the observations of a neutrino background has a possibility not only to test the internal shock model of GRBs but also to give us information about parameters in the model and whether GRBs are sources of UHECRs or not.

Kohta Murase; Shigehiro Nagataki

2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Developing a Methodology for Characterizing the Effects of Building Materials Natural Radiation Background on a Radiation Portal Monitoring System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trafficking of radioactive material, particularly special nuclear material (SNM), has long been a worldwide concern. To interdict this material the US government has installed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) around the globe. Building materials surrounding an RPM can greatly effect the detectors background radiation levels due to Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM). In some cases this effect is so great that the initial RPM setup had to be rebuilt. This thesis develops a methodology for quick and efficient determination of the specific activity and composition of building materials surrounding a RPM to predict background levels, therefore determining the minimum detectable quantity (MDQ) of material. This methodology builds on previous work by Ryan et al by generating material and source cards for a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) deck, based on an experimental RPM setup to predict the overall gamma background at a site. Gamma spectra were acquired from samples of building materials and analyzed to determine the specific activity of the samples. A code was developed to estimate the elemental composition of building materials using the gamma transmission of the samples. These results were compared to previous Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) on the same samples. It was determined that densitometry provided an elemental approximation within 5% of that found through NAA. Using the specific activity and material composition, an MCNP deck was used to predict the gamma background levels in the detectors of a typical RPM. These results were compared against actual measurements at the RPM site, and shown to be within 10% of each other.

Fitzmaurice, Matthew Blake 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Signal and background in NLO QCD for the search of the intermediate mass Higgs boson at the SSC  

SciTech Connect

The signal and background for the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the intermediate mass range 80 GeV < m{sub H} < 2M{sub Z} is studied based on calculations of the cross sections in next-to-leading order QCD perturbation theory for the production of the Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion and for the hadronic two-photon production. The method of Monte-Carlo integration allows the application of realistic cuts (p{sub T}, rapidity, photon isolation) to the cross section. Results are given for the K-factors of the signal and the background. It turns out that the NLO corrections improve the situation for a Higgs boson mass in the range of 80--120 GeV. Furthermore, the influence of a cut on the transverse momentum of the additional jet produced in the processes gg {yields} Hg, gq {yields} Hq, q{bar q} {yields} Hg is compared to a similar cut for the background.

Bailey, B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 2.2 and 3.5 microns Using DIRBE Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare data from the Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite to the the Wainscoat et al. (1992) model of the infrared sky. The model is first compared with broadband K (2.2 microns) star counts. Its success at K gives credence to its physical approach which is extrapolated to the L band (3.5 microns). We have analyzed the histograms of the pixel by pixel intensities in the 2.2 and 3.5 micron maps from DIRBE after subtracting the zodiacal light. The shape of these histograms agrees quite well with the histogram shape predicted using the Wainscoat et al. model of the infrared sky, but the predicted histograms must be displaced by a constant intensity in order to match the data. This shift is the cosmic infrared background, which is 16.9+/-4.4 kJy/sr or 23.1+/-5.9 nW/m^2/sr at 2.2 microns, and 14.4+/-3.7 kJy/sr or 12.4+/-3.2 nW/m^2/sr at 3.5 microns.

E. L. Wright; E. D. Reese

1999-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Background - Revenue Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revenue Collection Revenue Collection The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) collects Federal fuel taxes from large oil companies or large oil distribution firms with storage facilities prior to distribution of the fuels to customers. The Federal fuel taxes are imposed when the fuel is first removed from bulk storage and sold. Although these taxes are "passed on" to the individual purchaser, data at the individual purchaser level are simply not available. Additional Federal heavy vehicle non-fuel-based fees include (1) the retail sales excise tax on tractors and trailers, (2) the tax on heavy vehicle tire sales, and (3) the heavy vehicle-use tax. Truck registration was once used as a proxy for truck taxes, but was rejected because it did not accurately reflect on-highway usage in a particular State. In fact, the State where the heavy vehicle and/or tires are purchased is not necessarily the State in which these purchases will be used.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

BRC-CBEFF Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... version of CBEFF. Three parts of the multi-part CBEFF international standard have been published as ISO/IEC standards: ...

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Introdction Background: HMC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications, NNSA applications, and applications that have earned allocations on the largest NSF platforms

423

Background on Strategy Map  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... all of our key processes and the amount of time, energy, and resources ... is to copies), eventually leading to Baldrige becoming a household name. ...

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

SATE 2010 Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... categories (true quality); More detailed guidelines for analysis. Still, much can be improved 14. Thanks. Romain Gaucher, Ram Sugasi; Aurelien ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

CHAPTER 2 -- BACKGROUND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... But weighing and measuring devices are also themselves commodities, just like laundry detergent or heating oil, and are usually marketed across ...

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

426

Background - State Data Reporting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Data Reporting State-reported motor fuel data is a critical component of the process that distributes HTF monies to the States. Currently, motor-fuel-based apportionment...

427

Dark Background Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

make more exotic technologies less likely to become competitive - Coal-to-liquids - Oil shale 112012 6 Fracking Operations Driving Increased Output of Natural Gas -5 0 5 10 15...

428

NEHRP - Background & History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... four primary program agencies, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB ...

429

Background Information for Teachers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

students. What is Particle Physics? Some Particle Properties The Need for Large Accelerators The Present Theory of Fundamental Particles and Forces Web Maintainer:...

430

SKI Perspective Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessments of the source term for Swedish nuclear power reactors are based on calculations made by means of the severe accident analysis code MAAP. This code was developed for the US nuclear industry. MELCOR is another code for severe accident analysis, developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Both MAAP and MELCOR are integrated codes that simulate the whole course of events in a severe accident from the initiating event to the source term, i. e. radioactive releases to the environment. In Sweden, MELCOR has mostly been employed in some International Standard Problems (ISPs). In consequence of plans to increase the power in Oskarshamn 3 there is demand for a MELCOR model that can be used for independent analyses of specific limiting transients and accidents. Objective The objective was to obtain an executable and complete input model for the Oskarshamn 3 that meets standard requirements for MELCOR 1.8.5. The input should work in steady-state calculations as well as in tentative accident cases. The intention was also to carry out calculations with the MELCOR model of certain accident sequences for comparison with results from earlier MAAP4 calculations. This work will be reported separately. Results An input model has been prepared for the Oskarshamn 3 rector. Demonstrations calculations, at current nominal operating conditions in Oskarshamn 3 for 3300 MW thermal power, were performed for three cases: (1) initial, steady-state conditions, (2) total loss of AC power and (3) large steam line LOCA. The results are presented in the report.

Lars Nilsson; Lars Nilsson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

USGv6: Background  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This document suggests that product testing services are likely needed to ensure the confidence and to protect the investment of early IPv6 adopters ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Background and General Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.C. Fowler, Value Analysis in Materials Selection and Design, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

433

Slide Template (Light Background)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... technologies for energy and chemical production from biodegradable ... organic degradation, salt removal, and energy production (ONR, NSF) ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Background - Historical Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Historical Perspective Historical Perspective The Highway Trust Fund (HTF) was established in 1956 (Public Law 84-627) to ensure a dependable source of Federal funding to support highway programs. Prior to 1956, motor fuel and vehicle taxes went to the General Fund; although highway funding was provided from the General Fund, there was no relationship between fuel tax receipts and highway funding. Since 1956, legislation has periodically extended taxation of motor fuels and the HTF. The Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21) extended the HTF through September 30, 2005. The HTF currently contains two accounts: the Highway Account and the Mass Transit Account; this document only concerns funds in the Highway Account. The income and outlays for transportation have increased steadily over time. The closing balance of funds in the Highway Account of the HTF remained at around $10 billion from 1983 through 1995. In 2000, the closing balance in the Highway Account was over $22.5 billion. It is necessary to maintain a balance of funds in the HTF to be able to meet unpaid commitments. This balance is not surplus funds because the HTF functions as a reimbursable program and must maintain funds for reimbursing obligations. The closing balance (income - outlays = closing balance) is shown in the following chart for 1957 through 2000 (the latest available data).

435

Evaluation of radioactive background rejection in 76Ge neutrino-lessdouble-beta decay experiments using a highly segmented HPGe detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly segmented coaxial HPGe detector was operated in a low background counting facility for over 1 year to experimentally evaluate possible segmentation strategies for the proposed Majorana neutrino-less double-beta decay experiment. Segmentation schemes were evaluated on their ability to reject multi-segment events while retaining single-segment events. To quantify a segmentation scheme's acceptance efficiency the percentage of peak area due to single segment events was calculated for peaks located in the energy region 911-2614 keV. Single interaction site events were represented by the double-escape peak from the 2614 keV decay in {sup 208}Tl located at 1592 keV. In spite of its prototypical nature, the detector performed well under realistic operating conditions and required only minimal human interaction. Though the energy resolution for events with interactions in multiple segments was impacted by inter-segment cross-talk, the implementation of a cross-talk correlation matrix restored acceptable resolution. Additionally, simulations utilizing the MaGe simulation package were performed and found to be in good agreement with experimental observations verifying the external nature of the background radiation.

Chan, Yuen-Dat; Campbell, D.B.; Vetter, K.; Henning, R.; Lesko, K.; Chan, Y.D.; Poon, A.W.P.; Perry, M.; Hurley, D.; Smith, A.R.

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

436

PROTOTOUCH a system for prototyping ubiquitous computing environments mediated by touch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computers as we know them are fading into the background. However, interaction modalities developed for "foreground" computer systems are beginning to seep into the day-to-day interactions that people have with each other ...

Cranor, David (John David)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hydrogen lines in the infrared region and spectral background for the thomson scattering diagnostics of the iter divertor plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations are made of the plasma spectral background, which is important for the Thomson scattering diagnostics in the ITER divertor. Theoretical grounds have been elaborated for computing the hydrogen spectral line shapes in the infrared spectral region for a divertor plasma in ITER. The shape of the P-7 Paschen line (transition n = 7 {yields} n = 3) located near the laser scattering signal has been calculated for various lines of sight in the ITER divertor. Contributions from different mechanisms of broadening the P-7 line have been examined. The spectral intensities of bremsstrahlung and photorecombination continuum have been calculated. All calculations use data on the spatial distribution of temperatures and densities of all species of plasma particles computed with the SOLPS4.3 code for basic operation regimes of the ITER divertor.

Lisitsa, V. S. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Tokamak Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Mukhin, E. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Kadomtsev, M. B.; Kukushkin, A. B. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Tokamak Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kukushkin, A. S. [ITER Organization, Cadarache (France); Kurskiev, G. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Levashova, M. G. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute, Tokamak Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Tolstyakov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Rigorous luminosity function determination in presence of a background: theory and application to two intermediate redshift clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a rigorous derivation of the luminosity function (LF) in presence of a background. Our approach is free from the logical contradictions of assigning negative values to positively defined quantities and avoid the use of incorrect estimates for the 68 % confidence interval (error bar). It accounts for Poisson fluctuations ignored in previous approaches and does not requires binning of the data. The method is extensible to more complex situations, does not require the existence of an environment--independent LF, and clarifies issues common to field LF derivations. We apply the method to two clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift (z~0.3) with among the deepest and widest K_s observations ever taken. Finally, we point out short-comings of flip--flopping magnitudes.

S. Andreon; G. Punzi; A. Grado

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

Interactions and Implications of a Collector Well with a River in an Unconfined Aquifer with Regional Background Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ranney radial collector wells consist of an array of horizontal lateral wells arranged radially around and connected to the base of a vertical well. They offer numerous advantages over traditional vertical wells with application in both the petroleum industry and hydrologic sciences. This study improved the understanding of the interaction of collector wells and the aquifers/reservoirs they tap by numerically modeling flux exchanges between a collector well and a river in an unconfined aquifer with regional background flow. Modeling demonstrated that flux along each horizontal lateral increased with distance from the vertical well stem following a third order polynomial function. Ultimately these models demonstrated that in the collector well/aquifer/river system, the pumping rate of the collector well was the dominant factor in controlling flux between the river and aquifer under various conditions. This study can be used to project the maximum allowable pumping rate without causing an initially gaining river to become a losing river.

Dugat, William D., IV

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "foreground background beaver" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.