National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fore cast ing

  1. Kitty Inglis Jane Harvell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Kitty Inglis Librarian Jane Harvell Head of Library Content Delivery & Digital Strategy (ActingFT, 2PT) Eleanor Craig Digital Content Librarian G7 Library Assistant Systems G3 Library Assistants G) Sally Faith Head of Library Planning & Administration Joanna Ball Head of Library Academic Services

  2. Routine EH& ing and labo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    for fication or m atory decom ing of a large contaminati from capita ordinary eme d to, acts of uality analyse sal cost for r ion producin iners unsuita ylinders with k sensitive ch ury oxides ­ es and ashes n cost unlabeled or s EH&S pers e time osal that resu odel, renova spill clean-u ion, sabotag al

  3. Cryptography: the cast Cryptography: the cast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Gregory R.

    Cryptography: the cast #12;Cryptography: the cast Alice. . . #12;Cryptography: the cast Alice. . . c John Tenniel 1865 #12;Cryptography: the cast Alice. . . c John Tenniel 1865 wishes to send

  4. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfotenhauer, John M.; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  5. Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  6. Casting methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

    2012-12-18

    A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

  7. Plain Speaking: The Voices of William Inge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Philip M.

    2011-04-15

    from Latin America, Asia, and Europe as well as from different parts of the country, including the East Coast. Even so, I had no trouble casting the play. A handsome and muscular senior of Columbian ancestry was perfect as Hal, the handsome... perfectly; she never wore a dress to school, and despite being seventeen, she still looked as if she as on the verge of adolescence. Even casting the adult roles was easy; the girl auditioning for Mrs. Potts wrote on her casting card that she “loved...

  8. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  9. Cast for Mr. Shiffley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    A commercial foundry has been established which makes extensive use of fluid beds in the production of heat treated alloy steel castings. The castings are cooled immediately after solidification by fluidizing the mold sand in which they were cast...

  10. Theoryand Applications Perta in ing to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Part 3 Theoryand Applications Perta in ing to Photochemical Processes Chapters 1-4 treated thermal-state potentlal energy surfaces that play cruclal roles In rate-cletermlnlng processes because the slaw rate mostphotochemlcal processes. Thepurpose ot thlsrevlew Is to tocus attentlon on those aspects ot partlcular exclted

  11. Vortical flow control on a conical fore body cross section using an array of pulsed dc actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    investigated, separately and then combined on flow control. It is found that joule heating results in highVortical flow control on a conical fore body cross section using an array of pulsed dc actuators 2006; accepted 23 February 2007; published online 1 May 2007 Flow control on a conical fore body cross

  12. Bioinspired Design : : Magnetic Freeze Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Michael Martin

    2014-01-01

    30 CHAPTER 3: FREEZE CASTING: A94 CHAPTER 5: MAGNETIC FREEZE CASTING INSPIRED BY98 5.2.1. Magnetic freeze casting

  13. Ing Arvid Nesheim | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt.Infinifuel Biodiesel JumpInfotilityIng Arvid

  14. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  15. Drop Traffic in Microfluidic Ladder Networks with Fore-Aft Structural Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeevan Maddala; William S. Wang; Siva A. Vanapalli; Raghunathan Rengaswamy

    2012-01-27

    We investigate the dynamics of pairs of drops in microfluidic ladder networks with slanted bypasses, which break the fore-aft structural symmetry. Our analytical results indicate that unlike symmetric ladder networks, structural asymmetry introduced by a single slanted bypass can be used to modulate the relative drop spacing, enabling them to contract, synchronize, expand, or even flip at the ladder exit. Our experiments confirm all these behaviors predicted by theory. Numerical analysis further shows that while ladder networks containing several identical bypasses are limited to nearly linear transformation of input delay between drops, mixed combination of bypasses can cause significant non-linear transformation enabling coding and decoding of input delays.

  16. Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page 1 #12;Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page 2 #12;Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page 3 #12;Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page 4 #12;Hickey, W8206, all casts Hickey, W8206, all casts, page

  17. Approved by CAST Council CAST Learning Technology Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    Approved by CAST Council 12/3/04 CAST Learning Technology Advisory Committee Provost John Presley and security matters. Other probable functions that may be the purview of a CAST Technology Committee would be to advise the Dean on long term planning for technology; periodically review and suggest revisions to CAST

  18. Metal Casting Project Fact Sheet - Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-12-01

    Factors affecting casting dimension and tools to reduce their impact are being identified in this project.

  19. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  20. Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

    Volume Ray Casting Neslisah Torosdagli #12;Overview · Light Transfer Optical Models · Math behind Direct Volume Ray Casting · Demonstration · Transfer Functions · Details of our Application · References #12;What is Volume Ray Casting? · Volume Ray Casting is construction of 3D volume using stack of 2D

  1. Variations of air content in Dasuopu ice core from AD 1570e1927 and implications fore climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Variations of air content in Dasuopu ice core from AD 1570e1927 and implications fore climate June 2010 a b s t r a c t An ice core air content record that was recovered from the refrozen-recrystallization ice formation zone in the Dasuopu Glacier was investigated in this work, which showed that the air

  2. Method of casting aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

  3. Method of casting aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, J.F.

    1993-09-07

    The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

  4. Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Schaeffer, Jon Conrad (Greenville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT)

    2002-01-01

    Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

  5. The Gendering of Film and Television Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Erin

    2011-01-01

    by Erin Hill contents Why did casting, which in its presentbecame interested in casting, a female- dominated professionindustry, after observing the casting process carried out at

  6. Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 1 #12;Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 2 #12;Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 3 #12;Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 4 #12;Hickey, C8206_all casts Hickey, C8206_all casts, page 5 #12

  7. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  8. LACEwING: Lessons from a New Moving Group Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riedel, Adric R

    2015-01-01

    With all the new discoveries being made about nearby young stars, the ability to find new nearby young stars is as important as ever, and membership identification codes will continue to perform a vital role in scientific research. In the process of creating a new moving group membership identification code - LocAting Constituent mEmbers In Nearby Groups (LACEwING) - we have discovered a few pointers relevant to astronomers trying to use codes like LACEwING to locate young stars.

  9. STEM-ing the Tide | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION JSTEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide September 29,

  10. InventIngFuture Virginia Tech Research CenterArlington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and provides seed capital for new university initiatives. #12;buIldInglocatIon and Virginia Tech Research. The new Virginia Tech Research Center will drive greater ingenuity and innovation for both ArlingtonInventIngFuture the Virginia Tech Research Center­Arlington Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity

  11. Investigador Departamento Nazario Ramrez, PhD Ing. Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Ingeniería Agrícola Nazario Ramírez, PhD Ing. Industrial Ciencias Marinas Ciencias Marinas Por segundo año. Morell, PhD Correlate data from electronic databases to ocean measurements Pieter Van der Meer Durante el: Hurricane wind profile model Eric Harmsen, PhD Química Aurelio Mercado Aidalú Joubert, PhD Proyecto: Física

  12. Successful application of promis-ing new technologies is predicated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    34 Successful application of promis- ing new technologies is predicated on understanding Fisheries Service, NOAA. Abstract--New technologies can be riddled with unforeseen sources of error and controlling sources of errors. The need to identify sources of error with the development of new fisheries

  13. Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5 Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5 Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5, page 1 CTD003 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5 Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5, page 2 CTD003 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5 Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5, page 3 CTD003 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5 Hickey, TT136, casts 3-5, page 4 CTD003 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 3

  14. Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5 Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5 Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5, page 1 CTD002 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5 Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5, page 2 CTD002 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5 Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5, page 3 CTD002 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5 Hickey, TT162, Casts 2-5, page 4 CTD002 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 2

  15. Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10 Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10 Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10, page 1 CTD006 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10 Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10, page 2 CTD006 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10 Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10, page 3 CTD006 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10 Hickey, TT136, casts 6-10, page 4 CTD006 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts

  16. Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD006 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7, page 1 #12;CTD006 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7, page 2 #12;CTD006 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7, page 3 #12;CTD006 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7 Hickey, TT162, casts 6-7, page 4 #12;CTD006 Hickey, TT162, casts 6

  17. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  18. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  19. LOST FOAM CASTING OF MAGNESIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval

    2007-01-01

    The lost foam casting process has been successfully used for making aluminum and cast iron thin walled castings of complex geometries. Little work has been carried out on cast magnesium alloys using the lost foam process. The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings. The plate castings were designed to investigate the mold filling characteristics of magnesium and aluminum alloys using an infrared camera. The pate castings were then characterized for porosity distribution. The window castings were made to test the castability of the alloys under lost foam conditions. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  20. Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-10

    A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

  1. Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76 Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76 Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76, page 1 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76 Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76, page 2 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76 Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76, page 3 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76 Hickey, TT136, casts 56-76, page 4 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT136

  2. Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47 Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47 Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47, page 1 CTD038 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47 Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47, page 2 CTD039 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47 Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47, page 3 CTD039 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47 Hickey, TT162, Casts 38-47, page 4 CTD040 #12;Hickey, TT162

  3. Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72 Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72 Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72, page 1 CTD063 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72 Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72, page 2 CTD063 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72 Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72, page 3 CTD063 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72 Hickey, TT162, Casts 63-72, page 4 CTD064 #12;Hickey, TT162

  4. Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49 Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49 Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49, page 1 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49 Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49, page 2 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49 Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49, page 3 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49 Hickey, TT162, Casts 48-49, page 4 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT162

  5. Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99 Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99 Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99, page 1 CTD098 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99 Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99, page 2 CTD098 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99 Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99, page 3 CTD098 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99 Hickey, TT136, casts 98-99, page 4 CTD098 #12;Hickey, TT136

  6. Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82 Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82 Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82, page 1 CTD073 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82 Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82, page 2 CTD073 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82 Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82, page 3 CTD073 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82 Hickey, TT162, Casts 73-82, page 4 CTD074 #12;Hickey, TT162

  7. Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51 Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51 Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51, page 1 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51 Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51, page 2 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51 Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51, page 3 CTD048 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 48, 49, 51 Hickey, TT136, casts

  8. Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD041 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43, page 1 #12;CTD041 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43, page 2 #12;CTD041 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43, page 3 #12;CTD041 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43 Hickey, TT136, casts 41-43, page 4 #12;CTD041

  9. Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36 Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36 Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36, page 1 CTD027 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36 Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36, page 2 CTD027 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36 Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36, page 3 CTD027 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36 Hickey, TT136, casts 27-36, page 4 CTD027 #12;Hickey, TT136

  10. Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92 Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92 Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92, page 1 CTD088 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92 Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92, page 2 CTD088 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92 Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92, page 3 CTD088 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92 Hickey, TT162, Casts 88-92, page 4 CTD088 #12;Hickey, TT162

  11. Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46 Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46 Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46, page 1 CTD044 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46 Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46, page 2 CTD044 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46 Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46, page 3 CTD044 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46 Hickey, TT136, casts 44-46, page 4 CTD044 #12;Hickey, TT136

  12. Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32 Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32 Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32, page 1 CTD026 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32 Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32, page 2 CTD026 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32 Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32, page 3 CTD027 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32 Hickey, W8201, casts 26-32, page 4 CTD027 #12;Hickey, W8201

  13. Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24 Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24 Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24, page 1 CTD017 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24 Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24, page 2 CTD017 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24 Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24, page 3 CTD018 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24 Hickey, TT162, Casts 17-24, page 4 CTD018 #12;Hickey, TT162

  14. Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87 Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87 Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87, page 1 CTD083 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87 Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87, page 2 CTD083 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87 Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87, page 3 CTD083 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87 Hickey, TT162, Casts 83-87, page 4 CTD083 #12;Hickey, TT162

  15. Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90 Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90 Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90, page 1 CTD077 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90 Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90, page 2 CTD077 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90 Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90, page 3 CTD077 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90 Hickey, TT136, casts 77-90, page 4 CTD077 #12;Hickey, TT136

  16. Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62 Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62 Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62, page 1 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62 Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62, page 2 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62 Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62, page 3 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62 Hickey, TT162, Casts 56-62, page 4 CTD056 #12;Hickey, TT162

  17. Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97 Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97 Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97, page 1 CTD096 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97 Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97, page 2 CTD096 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97 Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97, page 3 CTD096 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97 Hickey, TT136, casts 96-97, page 4 CTD096 #12;Hickey, TT136

  18. Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26 Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26 Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26, page 1 CTD021 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26 Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26, page 2 CTD021 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26 Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26, page 3 CTD021 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26 Hickey, TT136, casts 21-26, page 4 CTD021 #12;Hickey, TT136

  19. Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD037 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40, page 1 #12;CTD037 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40, page 2 #12;CTD037 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40, page 3 #12;CTD037 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40 Hickey, TT136, casts 37-40, page 4 #12;CTD037

  20. Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18 Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18 Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18, page 1 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18 Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18, page 2 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18 Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18, page 3 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18 Hickey, W8201, casts 11-18, page 4 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8201

  1. Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47 Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47 Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47, page 1 CTD046 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47 Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47, page 2 CTD046 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47 Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47, page 3 CTD046 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47 Hickey, TT136, casts 46-47, page 4 CTD046 #12;Hickey, TT136

  2. Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55 Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55, pager 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55 Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55, pager 1 CTD052 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55 Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55, pager 2 CTD052 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55 Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55, pager 3 CTD052 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55 Hickey, TT136, casts 52-55, pager 4 CTD052 #12;Hickey, TT

  3. Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95 Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95 Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95, page 1 CTD091 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95 Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95, page 2 CTD091 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95 Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95, page 3 CTD091 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95 Hickey, TT136, casts 91-95, page 4 CTD091 #12;Hickey, TT136

  4. Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD001 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10, page 1 #12;CTD001 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10, page 2 #12;CTD002 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10, page 3 #12;CTD002 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10 Hickey, W8201, Casts 1-10, page 4 #12;CTD003 Hickey, W8201

  5. Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20 Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20 Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20, page 1 CTD011 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20 Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20, page 2 CTD011 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20 Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20, page 3 CTD012 #12;Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20 Hickey, TT136, casts 11-20, page 4 CTD013 #12;Hickey, TT136

  6. Die Casting Copper Motor Rotors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Though it conducts electricity less efficiently than copper, aluminum is the industry’s preferred fabrication material in electric induction motor rotors. Traditional tool steel casting molds...

  7. ITP Metal Casting: Metalcasting Industry Technology Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Castings are essential building blocks of U. S. industry. More than 90% of all mnaufactured, durable good and 100% of all manufacturing machinery contain castings.

  8. Hickey -TT174, casts 1 to cast 11 Cruise cast lat (dd.mm.m) lon(dd.mm.m) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM) Total Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey -TT174, casts 1 to cast 11 Cruise cast lat (dd.mm.m) lon(dd.mm.m) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM;Hickey -TT174, casts 1 to cast 11 Cruise cast lat (dd.mm.m) lon(dd.mm.m) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM) Total -TT174, casts 1 to cast 11 Cruise cast lat (dd.mm.m) lon(dd.mm.m) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM) Total Scan

  9. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); O'Malley, Ronald J. (Miamisburg, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) includes a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14), a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22) and devices (29) for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces (44) of the casting rolls with a powder flux material (56). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550.degree. C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll.

  10. Strip casting with fluxing agent applied to casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; O`Malley, R.J.; Sussman, R.C.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster for producing a continuous strip includes a tundish for containing a melt, a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls and devices for electrostatically coating the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls with a powder flux material. The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouting basin for receiving the melt through a teeming tube thereby establishing a meniscus between the rolls for forming the strip. The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line to a sealing chamber. A preferred flux is boron oxide having a melting point of about 550 C. The flux coating enhances wetting of the steel melt to the casting roll and dissolves any metal oxide formed on the roll. 3 figs.

  11. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S. (Plum, PA); Baker, Donald F. (Hempfield, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip.

  12. Strip casting apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  13. Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136,Casts 1-2, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136,Casts 1-2, page 1 CTD001 #12;Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136,Casts 1-2, page 2 CTD001 #12;Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136,Casts 1-2, page 3 CTD001 #12;Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136,Casts 1-2, page 4 CTD001 #12;Hickey -TT136 casts 1-2 Hickey -TT136

  14. Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide Version B January 27, 2003 IM-1002 Novex® Pre-Cast Gel Electrophoresis Guide General information and protocols for using Novex® pre-cast gels www.invitrogen.com tech.....................................................................................................................1 Novex® Pre-Cast Gels

  15. RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , shrinkage porosity in the casting. Despite the power and promise of these developments in casting processRELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION Richard Hardin1 , K.K. Choi1 , and Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting Process Design, Optimization, Reliability-Based Design Optimization

  16. Reliability based casting process design optimisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , which is typically defined as an absence of, or low level of, shrinkage porosity in the casting. DespiteReliability based casting process design optimisation R. A. Hardin, K. K. Choi, N. J. Gaul and C and physical uncertainties in the casting process. In the present research, casting simulation is integrated

  17. Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The research will develop the gravity and/or low-pressure permanent-mold casting processes with sand or permanent-mold cores for aluminum and magnesium based alloys.

  18. ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond ITP Metal Casting: A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry: 2002 and Beyond mcvision.pdf More Documents &...

  19. Casting an Ecclesiastical Prince: Portrait Medals of Pope Julius II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishburne, James Eynon

    2014-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Casting an Ecclesiastical Prince:OF THE DISSERTATION Casting an Ecclesiastical Prince:Bramante. 16 In addition to casting medals, he also crafted

  20. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  1. CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22 Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22 Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22, page 1 #12;CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22 Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22, page 2 #12;CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22 Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22, page 3 #12;CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22 Hickey, W8201_casts 19-22, page 4 #12;CTD019Hickey, W8201_casts 19

  2. CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25 Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25 Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25, page 1 #12;CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25 Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25, page 2 #12;CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25 Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25, page 3 #12;CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25 Hickey, W8201_casts 23-25, page 4 #12;CTD023Hickey, W8201_casts 23

  3. CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23 Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23 Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23, page 1 #12;CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23 Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23, page 2 #12;CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23 Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23, page 3 #12;CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23 Hickey, W8101_casts 21-23, page 4 #12;CTD021Hickey, W8101_casts 21

  4. CAST results and Axion review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Geralis; for the CAST collaboration

    2009-05-26

    We present results from the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) and the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), together with a brief review on prospects on Axion searches with a variety of experimental techniques. CAST has explored masses up to 0.64 eV setting the most stringent limit on the axion-photon coupling, apart for the micro-eV region where ADMX is the most competitive experiment. CAST is aiming at surpassing the 1eV WMAP upper limit and possibly revisiting the operation in vacuum with extra sensitive X-ray detectors, while ADMX, using improved extra sensitive SQUID amplifiers will explore the micro-eV mass range.

  5. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  6. The Misunderstood Social Activist: A Reexamination of the Plays of William Inge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Robert

    2013-05-03

    2 The Misunderstood Social Activist: A Reexamination of the Plays of William Inge By Robert Woods © 2013 Robert Woods ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 3 On December 5... the central relationship of the play, between Bo, Inge's by-then-typical brawny, unintellectual male stud, and Cherie, the young woman who has gotten herself into difficulties by giving in to her sexual desires. It is that relationship which Inge uses...

  7. 2005 May JOM 29 Casting DefectsOverview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    2005 May · JOM 29 Casting DefectsOverview Casting designs are generally based factors of safety, which leadtoincreasedcomponentweightsand inefficient use of materials. In castings in castings and determine their effect on performance. INTRODUCTION Designers are responsible for the per

  8. Improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Casting is an energy-intensive manufacturing process within the metal casting and aluminum industries, requiring natural gas to melt aluminum and electricity to run equipment. The higher-than...

  9. Casting NETs provides bait for autoantibody-mediated arthritis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lew, Brian Raymond

    2011-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Casting NETs provides bait forvii ABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Casting NETs provides bait for

  10. July/August 20056 Casting aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    July/August 20056 Bob Rapp Casting aluminum Lay people unfamiliar with metallurgical processing to cast Al commercially. Perhaps I can interest the reader with a summary of this important process. I refer to casting large Al shapes suitable for rolling, forging, pressing, extruding, or drawing to make

  11. Master thesis Supercooled Simultaneous Composite Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    I Master thesis Supercooled Simultaneous Composite Casting for Microstructure Refinement of AlloySimultaneousCompositeCastingforMicrostructureRefinementofAlloy2008Kim,YongKi #12;3 SupercooledSimultaneousCompositeCasting for Microstructure Refinement of Alloy #12;4 Supercooled Simultaneous Composite Casting for Microstructure Refinement of Alloy by Kim

  12. Simulation of Dimensional Changes in Steel Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    casting due to thermal effects (temperature differences) and volume changes (e.g., shrinkage, sand are the primary reasons for dimensional changes during casting. In the case such shrinkage is free or unrestrained of the sand and the solidifying steel. Such hindered shrinkage of restrained casting features is usually less

  13. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  14. Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995 Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995 Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995, page 1 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995 Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995, page 2 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995 Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995, page 3 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995 Hickey, W8009C, casts 992-995, page 4 #12;Hickey, W8009C

  15. "Dark Web: Exploring and Min-ing the Dark Side of the Web"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelsen, Claus

    Title: "Dark Web: Exploring and Min- ing the Dark Side of the Web" Speaker: Director, Prof will review the emerging research in Terrorism Informatics based on a web mining perspective. Recent progress in the internationally re- nowned Dark Web project will be reviewed, including: deep/dark web spider- ing (web sites

  16. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  17. Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9, page 1 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9, page 2 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9, page 3 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9, page 4 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 1-9 Hickey, W8009C, casts

  18. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  19. Franois Barthelat, Ph.D, Ing. Department of Mechanical Engineering Phone: (514) 3986318

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    1 François Barthelat, Ph.D, Ing. Department of Mechanical Engineering Phone: (514 APPOINTMENTS Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering, McGill University (2012present) Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering, McGill University (20062012) Associate Member, Biomedical Engineering

  20. ISIS polarimetry for ING support astronomers Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ISIS polarimetry for ING support astronomers Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes Pablo Rodr 0.1 Document history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 ISIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Setting up ISIS for spectropolarimetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1

  1. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric M. [John Deere -- Moline Tech Center; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL; Schmidlin, Joshua E [ORNL; Dutler, S. A. [MAGMA Foundry Technologies, Inc.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast components. This enables incorporation of the residual stresses at the design phase along with external loads for accurate predictions of fatigue and fracture performance of the cast components.

  2. Casting an Object with a Core Hee-Kap Ahn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Siu-Wing

    Casting an Object with a Core Hee-Kap Ahn Sang Won Bae Siu-Wing Cheng Kyung-Yong Chwa Abstract This paper addresses geometric problems that concern manufacturing an object using a cast with a core. In casting, molten material is poured into the cavity of the cast and allowed to solidify. The cast has two

  3. Fachgebiet Leistungselektronik und Elektrische Antriebstechnik Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. Bcker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Pos.1 Pos.2 iC C R iR u(t) Zum Zeitpunkt t = 0 werde der Schalter S von Position 1 in Position 2 Elektrische Antriebstechnik Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. Böcker Pos.2 12T1T t0T 13T Schalter- stellung Pos.1 12T1T t0T 13 und Elektrische Antriebstechnik Prof. Dr.-Ing. J. Böcker Aufgabe 4: RL-Reihenschaltung S U0 Pos.1 Pos

  4. Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6 Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6 Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6, page 1 CTD001 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6 Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6, page 2 CTD001 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6 Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6, page 3 CTD001 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6 Hickey, W8010A casts 1-6, page 4 CTD001 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 1

  5. CAST RESEARCH COMMITTEE Membership: 7 appointed faculty and the CAST Associate Dean for Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branoff, Theodore J.

    CAST RESEARCH COMMITTEE Membership: 7 appointed faculty and the CAST Associate Dean for Research and experience researcher. The Associate Dean for Research chairs the Committee and serves an ex officio member board to the Associate Dean for Research in the evaluation and formation of CAST policies related

  6. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to four time s the distance of a non-pressurized riser, and can increase casting yield by decreasing the required number of risers. All case studies for this projects were completed and compiled into an SFSA Technical Report that is submitted part of this Final Report

  7. ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal casting Industry profile.pdf More Documents &...

  8. Energy use in selected metal casting facilities - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eppich, Robert E.

    2004-05-01

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metal casting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casting.

  9. Edinburgh College of Art : cast collection and architecture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoica, Ruxandra-Iulia; Stewart, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The Edinburgh Cast Collection comprises 265 plaster casts of Antique, Renaissance, and Gothic statues, bas reliefs, and architectural passages held at the Edinburgh College of Art and the University of Edinburgh. The plaster casts at the Edinburgh...

  10. Hickey -TT174, casts 21, line 18 to cast 31, line 24 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM) Total Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey -TT174, casts 21, line 18 to cast 31, line 24 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date;Hickey -TT174, casts 21, line 18 to cast 31, line 24 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date;Hickey -TT174, casts 21, line 18 to cast 31, line 24 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date

  11. ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

  12. ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations castingops.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  13. Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    metal only where you need it; minimal yield loss * Die casting no rolling or welding * Die casting scalable to mass production * Compatible with complex geometric...

  14. Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  15. Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-11-01

    The project will further reduce porosity and fold defects in lost foam casting to improve production efficiency, mechanical properties, and marketability of castings.

  16. AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with B206 Alloy 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  17. THE CHOICE OF THE PROPER REFRACTORY FOR THE CASTING OF HIGH MELTING ELECTROPOSITIVE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2008-01-01

    for the Casting of High Melting Electropositive Metals Leothe Casting of High Melting Electropositive Metals" (Report

  18. Special Focus on High-Confidence Software Technologies SCIENCE CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yun

    , China; 3School of Software and Electrical Engineering, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC of high-level middleware services for different comput- ing paradigms such as cluster, grid, and cloud intensive e-science applications such as weather fore- cast earthquake modeling, and astrophysics [4

  19. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 23332340, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/2333/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    : 23 April 2008 ­ Published: 5 May 2008 Abstract. An integrated sand and dust storm (SDS) forecast- ing in the real time operational fore- casts in East Asia through a DAS. During its application. Correspondence to: S. L. Gong (sunling.gong@ec.gc.ca) 1 Introduction Sand and dust storms (SDS) have caused

  20. Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31 Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31 Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31, page 1 CTD028 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31 Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31, page 2 CTD028 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31 Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31, page 3 CTD028 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31 Hickey, W8010A casts 28-31, page 4 CTD028 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  1. Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20 Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20 Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20, page 1 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20 Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20, page 2 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20 Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20, page 3 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20 Hickey, W8010A casts 11-20, page 4 CTD011 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  2. Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128 Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128 Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128, page 1 #12;Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128 Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128, page 2 #12;Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128 Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128, page 3 #12;Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128 Hickey, W8206_ctd_casts 67-128, page 4 #12;Hickey

  3. Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51 Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51 Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51, page 1 CTD041 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51 Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51, page 2 CTD041 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51 Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51, page 3 CTD042 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51 Hickey, W8010A casts 41-51, page 4 CTD042 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  4. Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34 Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34 Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34, page 1 CTD032 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34 Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34, page 2 CTD032 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34 Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34, page 3 CTD032 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34 Hickey, W8010A casts 32-34, page 4 CTD032 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  5. Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27 Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27 Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27, page 1 CTD021 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27 Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27, page 2 CTD021 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27 Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27, page 3 CTD021 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27 Hickey, W8010A casts 21-27, page 4 CTD022 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  6. Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10 Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10 Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10, page 1 CTD007 #12;Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10 Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10, page 2 CTD007 #12;Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10 Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10, page 3 CTD007 #12;Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10 Hickey, W8010A, Casts 7-10, page 4 CTD007 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  7. Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40 Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40 Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40, page 1 CTD035 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40 Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40, page 2 CTD035 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40 Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40, page 3 CTD035 #12;Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40 Hickey, W8010A casts 35-40, page 4 CTD035 #12;Hickey, W8010A

  8. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  9. A review of "“The Temple” mit einer deutschen Versübersetzung." by Inge Leimberg ed. George Herbert 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bill Engel

    2002-01-01

    Herbert. ?The Temple? mit einer deutschen Vers?bersetzung. Ed. Inge Leimberg. M?nster, New York, Munich, Berlin: Waxmann Verlag, 2002. xx + 473 pp. 39,00 EURO. Review by BILL ENGEL (NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE). Seventeenth-century scholars will be delighted... and instructed by Inge Leimberg?s facing-page translation of the 1633 Cambridge edition of The Temple. The notes alone will amply reward any reader of German (403-44). Not every poem is glossed, however, for Leimberg has carefully selected what is in need...

  10. A Place of His Own: Inge's "The Tiny Closet" as Outside Sexual and Political Orders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Brian; Hernandez, Teresa

    2013-05-03

    mainstream society. Homosexuality, which is merely implied by the tenant’s hat making, makes Mr. Newbold an outcast and a “creature” (Inge 64) outside of social acceptance. As Mrs. Crosby screams “Hats! Hats! Hats! With flowers on them” with disbelief, Mrs... “big four” full-length plays (Come Back, Little Sheba; Picnic; Bus Stop; and The Dark at the Top of the Stairs) were beginning to establish his greatness as a playwright. Inge famously developed one of his one-acts, People in the Wind, into the full...

  11. The CAST experiment: status and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. J. Iguaz

    2011-10-10

    The status of the solar axion search with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) will be discussed. Results from the first part of CAST phase II where the magnet bores were filled with 4He gas at variable pressure in order to scan axion masses up to 0.4 eV will be presented. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g CAST phase II. Expectations for sensibilities will be given. Near future perspectives as well as more long term options for a new helioscope experiment will be evoked.

  12. Subcritical Measurements Multiple HEU Metal Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL] [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Experiments with the standard annular highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal castings at Y-12 were performed in which up to 5 castings ({approx}90kg) were assembled in a tightly packed array with minimal spacing between castings. The fission chain multiplication process was initiated by a time tagged {sup 253}Cf spontaneously fissioning neutron source or time and directionally tagged neutrons from a small portable DT neutron generator and the prompt neutron time behavior measured with plastic scintillation detectors sensitive the fast neutron (>1 MeV) and gamma ray without distinction. These experiments were performed to provide data to benchmark methods for the calculation of the prompt neutron time behavior. Previous measurements with a single casting have been reported. This paper presents the experimental results for multiple castings. The prompt time decay was obtained by time coincidence correlation measurements between the detectors and the time tagged neutron source emission (equivalent to randomly pulsed neutron measurements) and between pairs of plastic scintillation detectors (equivalent to a 2-detector Rossi-alpha measurement). These standard HEU storage castings at the Y-12 plant had 5.000-in-OD, 3.500-in-ID, masses between 17,636 and 17,996 g, impurity content of 992 ppm, density of 18.75 g/cm{sup 3} and average enrichment of 93.16 wt % {sup 235}U. The castings were in tight fitting 025-in.-thick, 8.0-in-high stainless steel (SS-304) cylindrical cans for contamination control which were 8.0 in high. One can had an inside diameter of 3.0 in so that the Cf source could be located on the axes of this casting. Four 1 x 1 x 6 in plastic scintillators with the long dimension perpendicular to axes of the castings and adjacent to the outer surface of the casting cans were used. The detectors were enclosed in 1/4.-in.-thick lead shields on four 1 x 6 surfaces and on the 1 x 1 surface. The small surface of the lead shield was adjacent to the steel table. The photograph of the assembly of 5 casting with the detectors is given in Figure 1. The DT generator can be seen in the back with the time tagged neutrons aligned symmetrically around a line drawn from the generator through target spot and the center of the casting in the annular can seen in the foreground.

  13. Clamshell Casting Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie Wuhrer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smid, Michiel

    Clamshell Casting Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie Wuhrer School of Computer}@scs.carleton.ca Abstract A popular manufacturing technique is clamshell casting, where liquid is poured into a cast and the cast is removed by a rotation once the liquid has hardened. We consider the case where the object

  14. Casting with Skewed Ejection Direction Hee-Kap Ahn1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Siu-Wing

    Casting with Skewed Ejection Direction Hee-Kap Ahn1 Siu-Wing Cheng2 Otfried Cheong3 Abstract Casting is a manufacturing process in which liquid is poured into a cast (mould) that has a cavity with the shape of the object to be manufactured. The liquid then hardens, after which the cast is removed. We

  15. Deformation during casting of steel: model and material C. Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Deformation during casting of steel: model and material properties C. Monroe C. Beckermann Dimensional differences between a final casting and its design are casting distortions. Distortion is created by the deformation occurring throughout solidification and further cooling during the casting process. Accurate

  16. COMPARISON OF FATIGUE BEHAVIOR FOR CENTRIFUGALLY CAST AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    COMPARISON OF FATIGUE BEHAVIOR FOR CENTRIFUGALLY CAST AND KEEL BLOCK CAST STEEL J.J. Gradman1 , R The objective of this research was to determine if location through the wall thickness of centrifugal castings affects fatigue properties and to compare fatigue and monotonic tensile properties of centrifugal castings

  17. Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rotation and Land Preparation easures 1. Farm Ponds 2. Water Harvesting Measures 1. Checkdam/Reservoir 2Water Quality Protection and Management Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Herwig Lehmann University of Hannover Use & Land Cover TopographyTopography Semi arid/Sub- humid Climatic Watershed Quantitative Water

  18. Prof. Ing. Alessandro A.Golkar, PhD Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Architecture for Large-Scale Infrastructures; Space Systems, Small Satellite Technology. OTHER CURRENTProf. Ing. Alessandro A.Golkar, PhD Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology 100 Novaya Ulitsa and Technology (Skoltech) in Moscow, Russian Federation, a private university opened in collaboration with MIT

  19. CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS**, Dr. VASILIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS, antoniadis@dpem.tuc.gr Abstract: Twist drills are geometrically complex tools, which are used in industry and experimental approaches for drilling simulation. The present paper is based on the ground that the increasing

  20. Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr.Ing. Joachim Bcker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Ing. J. Böcker Power Electronics Trial Exam: (Summer Term 2014) Page 3 of 5 Task 2: Buck-Boost converter (25 Points) Figure 2 shows a buck-boost converter. The switches S1 and D1 are assumed to be ideal in continuous conduction mode. Fig.2 : Buck-Boost converter 2.1 Write down the differential equations

  1. Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr. Ing. Joachim Bcker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    Converter (25 Points) Figure 1 shows a boost converter. The input voltage to the converter is U1 = 8 V Figure 1: Boost converter Note: For questions 1.1 to 1.5, RC can be considered zero. Estimate Drives Prof. Dr. Ing. J. Böcker Power Electronics Final Examination SS 2014 Page 2 of 6 Task 1: Boost

  2. Fachgebiet Leistungselektronik und Elektrische Antriebstechnik Prof. Dr.Ing. Joachim Bcker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    .01.2014 Test Examination: Mechatronics and Electrical Drives Page 1 of 8 Test Examination: Mechatronics.01.2014 Test Examination: Mechatronics and Electrical Drives Page 2 of 8 Exercise 1: Basic Magnetics (20 Points Elektrische Antriebstechnik Prof. Dr.­Ing. J. Böcker 08.01.2014 Test Examination: Mechatronics and Electrical

  3. Department of Power Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr.Ing. Joachim Bcker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    .09.2014 Mechatronics und Electrical Drives SS 2014 Page 1 of 6 Mechatronics and Electrical Drives 03.09.2014 Surname Drives Prof. Dr.­Ing. J. Böcker 03.09.2014 Mechatronics und Electrical Drives SS 2014 Page 2 of 6.09.2014 Mechatronics und Electrical Drives SS 2014 Page 3 of 6 Aufgabe 2: Reluctance motor (18 Points) The profiles

  4. Climate change is not "a problem" wait-ing for "a solution". It is an environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulme, Mike

    41 Climate change is not "a problem" wait- ing for "a solution". It is an environ- mental, cultural humanity's place on Earth. My new book, Why We Disagree About Climate Change, dissects this idea of climate about it. It also develops a different way of approaching the idea of climate change and of working

  5. NTNU Dr. ing. Thesis 2001:43 Ivar J. Halvorsen Minimum Energy Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    was followed in more detail. My background is from the department of Engineering Cybernetics, NTNU, where I- neer to have a basic understanding of the process behaviour. In process design, chemical engineers Engineering Norwegian University of Science and Technology N-7491 Trondheim, Norway Dr. ing. Thesis 2001

  6. Roll Casting of Aluminum Alloy Clad Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, R.; Tsuge, H. [Graduate School of Osaka Institute of Technology (Japan); Haga, T. [Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya Asahiku Osaka city 535-8585 (Japan); Watari, H. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda Midoriku Yokohama city 226-8502 (Japan); Kumai, S. [Gunma University, 1-5-1 tenjin cho Kiryu city 376-8515 (Japan)

    2011-01-17

    Casting of aluminum alloy three layers of clad strip was tried using the two sets of twin roll casters, and effects of the casting parameters on the cladding conditions were investigated. One twin roll caster was mounted on the other twin roll caster. Base strip was 8079 aluminum alloy and overlay strips were 6022 aluminum alloy. Effects of roll-load of upper and lower casters and melt temperature of the lower caster were investigated. When the roll-load of the upper and lower caster was large enough, the overlay strip could be solidified and be connected. The overlay strip could be connected when the melt of the overlay strip cast by the lower caster was low enough. Sound three layers of clad strip could be cast by proper conditions.

  7. Advanced lost foam from casting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C. E.; Littleton, H. E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B. A.; Sheldon, D. S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects Task 4: Pattern Gating Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas in the period of October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers.

  8. H-Series Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cast H-Series austenitic steels are used extensively in several industries for a broad range of high-temperature applications. The H-Series stainless steels have evolved over many years of complex...

  9. Arc Casting Intermetallic Alloy (Materials Preparation Center)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Arc casting of intermetallic (La-Ni-Sn) AB5 alloy used for metal hydride hydrogen storage. Upon solidification the Sn is partially rejected and increases in concentration in the remaining liquid. Upon completing solidification there is a great deal of internal stress in the ingot. As the ingot cools further the stress is relieved. This material was cast at the Ames Laboratorys Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  10. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, J G; Calvet, D; Castel, J F; Christensen, F E; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Decker, T; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Giomataris, I; Hill, R M; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jakobsen, A C; Jourde, D; Mirallas, H; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Ruz, J; Tomás, A; Vafeiadis, T; Vogel, J K

    2015-01-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as ...

  11. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Garza; S. Aune; D. Calvet; J. F. Castel; F. E. Christensen; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; T. Decker; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galán; J. A. García; I. Giomataris; R. M. Hill; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; A. C. Jakobsen; D. Jourde; H. Mirallas; I. Ortega; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; J. Ruz; A. Tomás; T. Vafeiadis; J. K. Vogel

    2015-03-17

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10$^{-6}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10$^{-7}$ counts/keV/cm$^2$/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  12. Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-01-14

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  13. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G. (Gettysburg, PA)

    2011-11-01

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

  14. Advanced Pattern Material for Investment Casting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Douglas Neece Neil Chaudhry

    2006-02-08

    Cleveland Tool and Machine (CTM) of Cleveland, Ohio in conjunction with Harrington Product Development Center (HPDC) of Cincinnati, Ohio have developed an advanced, dimensionally accurate, temperature-stable, energy-efficient and cost-effective material and process to manufacture patterns for the investment casting industry. In the proposed technology, FOPAT (aFOam PATtern material) has been developed which is especially compatible with the investment casting process and offers the following advantages: increased dimensional accuracy; increased temperature stability; lower cost per pattern; less energy consumption per pattern; decreased cost of pattern making equipment; decreased tooling cost; increased casting yield. The present method for investment casting is "the lost wax" process, which is exactly that, the use of wax as a pattern material, which is then melted out or "lost" from the ceramic shell. The molten metal is then poured into the ceramic shell to produce a metal casting. This process goes back thousands of years and while there have been improvements in the wax and processing technology, the material is basically the same, wax. The proposed technology is based upon an established industrial process of "Reaction Injection Molding" (RIM) where two components react when mixed and then "molded" to form a part. The proposed technology has been modified and improved with the needs of investment casting in mind. A proprietary mix of components has been formulated which react and expand to form a foam-like product. The result is an investment casting pattern with smooth surface finish and excellent dimensional predictability along with the other key benefits listed above.

  15. Casting out nines is a method for checking the accuracy of arithmetic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roames, Renee S

    2015-08-19

    Math 13700. Casting out Nines. Assignment #34. Casting out nines is a method for checking the accuracy of arithmetic. You can cast out nines by adding the ...

  16. The CAST Manual John Yen*, Thomas R. Ioerger^, Michael S. Miller^, Shuang Sun*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CAST Manual John Yen*, Thomas R. Ioerger^, Michael S. Miller^, Shuang Sun*, Kaivan Kamali................................................................................................................. 4 3. About CAST ........................................................................................................... 6 3.3. CAST architecture

  17. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to deliver to industry a computer program in which all three systems are coupled for determining the dimensions of the wax pattern, the shell mold, and casting in a sequential but coupled manner.

  18. Analysis and Comparison between War Driving and War Walk-ing in Metropolitan WiFi Radio Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Analysis and Comparison between War Driving and War Walk- ing in Metropolitan WiFi Radio Maps Arvin, Hsinchu County, 310, Taiwan arvin@itri.org.tw ABSTRACT War-driving is currently the most widely adopted cost for war driv- ing is smaller than that of war walking, its positional accu- racy is also lower

  19. REVISTA INTERNACIONAL METODOS NUMERICOS EN INGENIERIA Rev. Int. Met. Numer. Ing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Hector

    REVISTA INTERNACIONAL M´ETODOS NUM´ERICOS EN INGENIER´IA Rev. Int. M´et. Num´er. Ing. Un nuevo´ericos en Ingenier´ia, GMNI Departamento de M´etodos Matem´aticos y de Representaci´on E.T.S. de Ingenieros aplicaciones pr´acticas de ingenier´ia el transporte se produce conjuntamente por convecci´on y por difusi

  20. The X-ray Telescope of CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kuster; H. Bräuninger; S. Cébrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. Rodríguez; L. Strüder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

    2007-05-10

    The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

  1. The CAST experiment: status and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esther Ferrer Ribas; for the CAST Collaboration

    2009-12-21

    The status of the solar axion search with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) will be discussed. Results from the first part of CAST phase II where the magnet bores were filled with \\hefour gas at variable pressure in order to scan \\ma up to 0.4 eV will be presented. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of $\\gag \\lesssim 2.17 \\times10^{-10}$GeV$^{-1}$ at 95% CL for \\ma$CAST phase II. Expectations for sensibilities will be given. Near future perspectives as well as more long term options for a new helioscope experiment will be evoked.

  2. Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Thomas N. (3987 Murray Highlands Cir., Murrysville, PA 15668-1747); Viswanathan, Srinath (1104 Albermarle La., Knoxville, TN 37923)

    2002-09-17

    A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

  3. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-11-05

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  4. Search for solar chameleons and relic axions with CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantatore, G; Zioutas, K

    2015-01-01

    New CAST research proposal covering the period 2015-2018 detailing motivations and novel techniques to search for solar Chameleons and new searches for relic Axions with the CAST dipole magnet

  5. The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

    2007-01-01

    Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

  6. APPROXIMATION OF A TWOPHASE CONTINUOUS CASTING STEFAN PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPROXIMATION OF A TWO­PHASE CONTINUOUS CASTING STEFAN PROBLEM Zhiming Chen \\Lambda Lishang Jiang y Abstract. The continuous casting Stefan problem is a mathematical model describing the solidification with convection of a material being cast continuously with a prescribed velocity. We propose a practical piecewise

  7. Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic Francisco Ganacim, Luiz Henrique, Brazil Abstract--We present a GPU-based beam-casting method for rendering implicit surfaces in real time. INTRODUCTION Rendering surfaces with ray casting is perhaps the clearest example of a potentially

  8. Simultaneous Cast Shadows, Illumination and Geometry Inference Using Hypergraphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samaras, Dimitris

    Simultaneous Cast Shadows, Illumination and Geometry Inference Using Hypergraphs Alexandros Abstract--The cast shadows in an image provide important information about illumination and geometry environment, a set of geometry parameters, and an estimate of the cast shadows in the scene given a single

  9. CAST STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2014 Student Success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    CAST STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-2014 Student Success Academic Affairs Objectives Support the initiative to require advising in the first year. CAST Objectives Outcome Measurements Lead Person(s) Target 1a). Meet/exceed the current 1st- and 2nd-year retention rate for our college CAST 1st- and 2nd-year retention rates (done

  10. Converge-Cast with MIMO , Xinbing Wang3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    Converge-Cast with MIMO Luoyi Fu1 , Yi Qin2 , Xinbing Wang3 , Xue Liu4 1,2,3 Depart. of Electronic, called converge-cast, where each of the n nodes in the network act as a destination with k ran- domly two many-to-one cooperative schemes under converge-cast for both static and mobile ad hoc networks

  11. Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Modelling of reoxidation inclusion formation in steel sand casting A. J. Melendez, K. D. Carlson pouring, as well as their final locations on the surface of steel sand castings. Inclusions originate. The inclusion model is implemented in a general-purpose casting simulation code. The model is validated

  12. Morphological castes in a vertebrate M. J. O'Riain*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    Morphological castes in a vertebrate M. J. O'Riain* , J. U. M. Jarvis , R. Alexander§ , R of reproduction in females. This is the only known example of morphological castes in a vertebrate and is distinct breeding vertebrates. The evolution of castes in a mammal and insects represents a striking example

  13. Macei Alagoas -Brazil Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Maceió ­ Alagoas - Brazil Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic Francisco Ganacim Luiz Henrique de Figueiredo Diego Nehab #12;8/27/11 2Beam casting implicit surfaces on the GPU with interval arithmetic 2 Barth: Related work Introduction #12;8/27/11 3Beam casting implicit

  14. Genetic Evidence on the Origins of Indian Caste Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bamshad, Michael; Kivisild, Toomas; Watkins, W. Scott; Dixon, Mary E.; Ricker, Chris E.; Rao, Baskara B.; Naidu, J. Mastan; Prasad, B. V. Ravi; Reddy, P. Govinda; Rasanayagam, Arani; Papiha, Surinder S.; Villems, Richard; Redd, Alan J.; Hammer, Michael F.; Nguyen, Son V.; Carroll, Marion L.; Batzer, Mark A.; Jorde, Lynn B.

    2001-11-01

    have established the Hindu caste system and placed themselves primarily in castes of higher rank. To explore the impact of West Eurasians on contemporary Indian caste populations, we compared mtDNA (400 bp of hypervariable region 1 and 14 restriction...

  15. Application of New Feeding Rules To Risering of Steel Castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    and predicted shrinkage porosity in the castings to the expected level of porosity based on the new feeding1 Application of New Feeding Rules To Risering of Steel Castings Doug Smith , Tony Faivre , Shouzhu Engineering , ABC-NACO TECHNOLOGIES, Lombard, IL1 Project Engineer - Casting Simulation, ABC-NACO TECHNOLOGIES

  16. MODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , or even larger shrinkage cavities found in inadequately fed cast sections. Microporosity can cause leaksMODELING OF POROSITY FORMATION AND FEEDING FLOW IN STEEL CASTING Kent D. Carlson, Zhiping Lin pressure, feeding flow, and porosity formation and growth in steel castings during solidification

  17. INTEGRATED DESIGN OF STEEL CASTINGS FOR SERVICE PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Bellet TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2006 #12;Casting Simulation (Shrinkage PredictionINTEGRATED DESIGN OF STEEL CASTINGS FOR SERVICE PERFORMANCE Richard. A. Hardin1 , Richard K. Huff2, USA 2 Caterpillar Inc., Champaign, IL 61820, USA Keywords: steel casting, porosity, fatigue life

  18. Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings Richard Hardin and Christoph are summarized. Hardin, R., and Beckermann, C., "Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings An overview of the objectives and progress made by the "Integrated Design of Steel Castings for Service

  19. Feeding and Risering of High Alloy Steel Castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Feeding and Risering of High Alloy Steel Castings Kent D. Carlson, Shouzhu Ou and Christoph radiographically sound castings at 2 pct sensitivity. By comparing results between plate casting trials known as the Niyama criterion and ASTM shrinkage x-ray level. This relationship was then used

  20. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  1. Roll Casting of Al-25%Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haga, Toshio [Osaka Institute of Technology, Omiya Asahiku Osaka city 535-8585 (Japan); Harada, Hideto [Graduate School of Osaka Institute of Technology, Omiya Asahiku Osaka city 535-8585 (Japan); Watari, Hisaki [Gunma University, Kiryu city, 376-8515 (Japan)

    2011-05-04

    Strip casting of Al-25%Si strip was tried using an unequal diameter twin roll caster. The diameter of the lower roll (large roll) was 1000 mm and the diameter of the upper roll (small roll) was 250 mm. Roll material was mild steel. The sound strip could be cast at the speeds ranging from 8 m/min to 12 m/min. The strip did not stick to the roll without the parting material. The primary Si, which existed at centre area of the thickness direction, was larger than that which existed at other area. The size of the primary Si was smaller than 0.2 mm. Eutectic Si was smaller 5 {mu}m. The as-cast strip was ranging from 2 mm to 3 mm thick and its width was 100 mm. The as-cast strip could be hot rolled down to 1 mm. The hot rolled strip was cold rolled. The primary Si became smaller and the pore occurred around the primary Si after the rolling.

  2. Mini-PROTEAN Multi-Casting Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    Mini-PROTEAN® 3 Multi-Casting Chamber Instruction Manual Catalog Number 165-4110 For Technical components should be cleaned with a suitable laboratory detergent (Bio-Rad's Cleaning Concentrate, catalog number 161-0772), rinsed thoroughly with distilled water, and dried before use. Section 2 Loading

  3. The Essence of American Drama: The Short Plays of William Inge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Howard R.

    2012-04-01

    to the World” (441) Lenny and George in Of Mice and Men; Alice Hindman in Sherwood Anderson’s “Adventure” (Winesburg, Ohio); The Lone Ranger and Tonto (?), and many others. One of those other pairs is Ben and the Old Man (the professor, again.... 5. SEXUAL LIBERATION: 1960-2010 It’s hard to know what kinds of plays William Inge might have written and how they would have been received, had he emerged in the 1960’s, not 1950’s. If he had experienced the permissiveness atmosphere of the 1960...

  4. Jozo Dujmovi was born in Dubrovnik, Croatia. He received the Dipl. Ing. degree in electronic and telecommunication engineering and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dujmovic, Jozo J.

    Jozo Dujmovi was born in Dubrovnik, Croatia. He received the Dipl. Ing. degree in electronic on Software and Performance (WOSP 2004). #12;Jozo Dujmovi (M'92-SM'97) was born in Dubrovnik, Croatia. He

  5. Histone H3K4me3 Binding Is Required for the DNA Repair and Apoptotic Activities of ING1 Tumor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    of growth 1 (ING1) is implicated in oncogenesis, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Mutations within the ING11) is a member of the recently discovered family of tumor suppressors implicated in oncogenesis

  6. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  7. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  8. Solar axion search with the CAST experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrán; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bräuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galán; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gómez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzón; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

    2008-10-10

    The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

  9. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinlage, Greg A. (West Lafayette, IN); Trumble, Kevin P. (West Lafayette, IN); Bowman, Keith J. (West Lafayette, IN)

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  10. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  11. Thin sheet casting with electromagnetic pressurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walk, Steven R. (Winterport, ME); Slepian, R. Michael (Pittsburgh, PA); Nathenson, Richard D. (Pittsburgh, PA); Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus, method and system for the casting of thin strips or strips of metal upon a moving chill block that includes an electromagnet located so that molten metal poured from a reservoir onto the chill block passes into the magnetic field produced by the electromagnet. The electromagnet produces a force on the molten metal on said chill block in the direction toward said chill block in order to enhance thermal contact between the molten metal and the chill block.

  12. Comparison of Lost Foam Casting of AM60B Alloy and A356 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Qingyou [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Sklad, Philip S [ORNL; Currie, Kenneth [Tennessee Technological University; Vondra, Fred [Tennessee Technological University; Abdelrahman, Mohamed [Tennessee Technological University; Walford, Graham [Walford Technologies; Nolan, Dennis J [Foseco-Morval; Nedkova, Teodora [Kaiser Aluminum

    2007-01-01

    The article describes the research activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Tennessee Technological University on lost foam casting of magnesium alloys. The work was focused on castings of simple geometries such as plate castings and window castings in order to compare the difference in castability between magnesium alloys and aluminum alloy using the lost foam casting process. Significant differences between lost foam aluminum casting and lost foam magnesium casting have been observed.

  13. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  14. Centrifugal Casting Features/Metallurgical Characterization of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chirita, G.; Soares, D.; Cruz, D.; Silva, F. S. [Mechanical Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Minho University (Portugal); Stefanescu, I. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Dunarea de Jos University Galati (Romania)

    2008-02-15

    This paper deals with the study of centrifugal effects on aluminium castings under high G values. Most of the studies in this domain (FGMs obtained by centrifugal casting) deal with functionally graded composites reinforced with a solid phase such as silicon particles or others. However, in this study it will be shown that unreinforced aluminium alloys may be significantly influenced by the centrifugal effect and that functionally graded castings are also obtained. It has been observed that the centrifugal effect may increase in some alloys, depending on the relative position in the castings, the rupture strength by approx. 50%, and rupture strain by about 300%, as compared to the gravity casting technique. The Young's modulus may also increase by about 20%. It has also been reported that in vertical centrifugal castings there are mainly three aspects that affect the components thus obtained, namely: fluid dynamics; vibration (inherent to the system); and centrifugal force. These features have a different effect on the castings depending on the aluminium alloy. In this paper, an analysis of the most important effects of the centrifugal casting process on metallurgical features is conducted. A solidification characterization at several points along the mould will be made in order to have an accurate idea of both the fluid dynamics inside the mould during the casting and the solidification behavior in different parts of the component. These two analyses will be related to the metallurgical properties (phase distribution; SDAS; eutectic silicon content and shape, pores density and shape) along the component and mainly along the direction of the centrifugal pressure. A comparison between castings obtained by both centrifugal casting technique and gravity casting technique is made for reference (gravity casting)

  15. Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A, page 1 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A, page 2 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A, page 3 #12;Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A Hickey, W8009C, casts 10-14,14A, page 4 #12

  16. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

  17. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  18. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  19. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  20. ITP Metal Casting: Energy Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities - 2003 ITP Metal Casting: Energy Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities - 2003 energyuseinselectedmetalcasting52804.pdf More Documents &...

  1. ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices ? High Alloy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AL Atlas Casting & Technology Tacoma, WA Southern Alloy Corp. Sylacauga, AL Stainless Foundry & Eng. Milwaukee, WI Wollaston Alloys Braintree, MA A Strong Energy Portfolio for a...

  2. AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    alloy to cast as it is sensitive to cooling rate and is susceptible to hot tearing. Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Heat Treatment Evaluate new, quicker, alternative...

  3. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet Citation Details In-Document Search Title: AISDOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip...

  4. Microstructural Modification of a Cast Iron by Magnetic Field Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Ludtka, Gerard Michael [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The current study deals with the microstructural modification of a nodular cast iron during solidification under the influence of high magnetic fields (up to 18 tesla).

  5. Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals-Cast Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2013-016 CX-008995: Categorical Exclusion...

  6. ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 3. Automotive Metals - Cast Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Phase Transformation...

  7. SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilovic, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    set_sleep_mode(SLEEP_MODE_PWR_DOWN); //enter Power-down Mode4 #define SEL2_PB0 8 #define SEL1_PD7 7 #define PWR_CTRL_PINPD5 #define PWR_CTRL_SD_CARD 6 //SmartCast bitFields for

  8. Method and apparatus for strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); Powell, John C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH); Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH)

    1991-01-01

    Casting nozzles will provide improved flow conditions with the parameters controlled according to the present invention. The gap relationships between the nozzle slot and exit orifice must be controlled in combination with converging exit passageway to provide a smooth flow without shearing and turbulence in the stream. The nozzle lips are also rounded to improve flow and increase refractory life of the lips of the nozzle. The tundish walls are tapered to provide improve flow for supplying the melt to the nozzle. The nozzle is located about 45.degree. below top dead center for optimum conditions.

  9. Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2012-03-31

    This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

  10. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon-Jun Kim

    2004-12-19

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

  11. Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst, E-mail: rousseau@uri.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 92 Upper College Rd., Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370?MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490?MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94–1.2?GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

  12. A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM. Engrg. (to appear) Abstract. the continuous casting problem is a convection­dominated nonlinearly, continuous casting, method of characteristics, convec­ tion dominated diffusion, degenerate parabolic

  13. THE CHOICE OF THE PROPER REFRACTORY FOR THE CASTING OF HIGH MELTING ELECTROPOSITIVE METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2008-01-01

    Hefractory for the Casting of High Melting Electropositiveof the Proper Hefractor'""y" for the Casting of High Meltingof one mole percent o If the casting is done quickly so that

  14. A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    A CHARACTERISTIC GALERKIN METHOD WITH ADAPTIVE ERROR CONTROL FOR THE CONTINUOUS CASTING PROBLEM casting problem is a convection­dominated nonlinearly degenerate diffusion problem. It is discretized adaptive method. Keywords. a posteriori error estimates, continuous casting, method of characteristics

  15. SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    : Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed within commercial casting simulation software to predict shrinkage porosity and hot tears changes are introduced to mitigate the shrinkage and hot tear problems in these castings. The comparisons

  16. Occlusal Harmony of Hand Articulated Digitally Mastered Definitive Casts Mounted in Maximal Intercuspal Position 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bone, Sven Erik

    2015-04-24

    ) casts acquired with this system has not been evaluated. In this study, 20 scans were acquired of a simulated patient producing 10 pairs digitally mastered (DM) definitive casts. The occlusal differences between DM casts and SP were evaluated...

  17. Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page1 #12;Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page2 #12;Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page3 #12;Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page4 #12;Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30 Hickey-W8305A,casts21-30,page5 #12;Hickey

  18. Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page1 #12;Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page2 #12;Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page3 #12;Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page4 #12;Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39 Hickey-W8305A_casts31-39,page5 #12;Hickey

  19. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  20. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  1. Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology - Phase V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanliang Sun; Harry E. Littleton; Charles E. Bates

    2004-04-29

    Previous research, conducted under DOE Contracts DE-FC07-89ID12869, DE-FC07-93ID12230 and DE-FC07-95ID113358 made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional developments were needed to improve the process and make it more functional in industrial environments. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--Computational Model for the Process and Data Base to Support the Model; Task 2--Casting Dimensional Accuracy; Task 3--Pattern Production; Task 4--Improved Pattern Materials; Task 5--Coating Control; Task 6--In-Plant Case Studies; Task 7--Energy and the Environmental Data; and Task 8--Technology Transfer. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of October 1, 1999 through September 30, 2004. The results obtained in each task and subtask are summarized in this Executive Summary and details are provided in subsequent sections of the report.

  2. Energy Saving Melting andRevert Reduction Technology (E0SMARRT): Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimension for Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Cannell; Dr. Mark Samonds; Adi Sholapurwalla; Sam Scott

    2008-11-21

    The investment casting process is an expendable mold process where wax patterns of the part and rigging are molded, assembled, shelled and melted to produce a ceramic mold matching the shape of the component to be cast. Investment casting is an important manufacturing method for critical parts because of the ability to maintain dimensional shape and tolerances. However, these tolerances can be easily exceeded if the molding components do not maintain their individual shapes well. In the investment casting process there are several opportunities for the final casting shape to not maintain the intended size and shape, such as shrinkage of the wax in the injection tool, the modification of the shape during shell heating, and with the thermal shrink and distortion in the casting process. Studies have been completed to look at the casting and shell distortions through the process in earlier phases of this project. Dr. Adrian Sabau at Oak Ridge National Labs performed characterizations and validations of 17-4 PH stainless steel in primarily fused silica shell systems with good agreement between analysis results and experimental data. Further tasks provided material property measurements of wax and methodology for employing a viscoelastic definition of wax materials into software. The final set of tasks involved the implementation of the findings into the commercial casting analysis software ProCAST, owned and maintained by ESI Group. This included: o the transfer of the wax material property data from its raw form into separate temperature-dependent thermophysical and mechanical property datasets o adding this wax material property data into an easily viewable and modifiable user interface within the pre-processing application of the ProCAST suite, namely PreCAST o and validating the data and viscoelastic wax model with respect to experimental results

  3. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

  4. Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets Kent D. Carlson these groupings to other casting simulation results, because such grouping neglects property variation effects. The effects of four property variations are studied here: (1) solidification shrinkage; (2) liquidus

  5. Ivey ING Leadership Centre, Toronto, February 19-21, 2013 1 CIFAR-OBI Neuroscience Accelerator workshop: Autism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    workshop: Autism Ivey ING Leadership Centre, Toronto, February 19-21, 2013 OnFebruary19-21,2013,CIFAR-longbraindisorder. SESSION I: AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER ­ OVERVIEW Session Chair: Sir Michael Rutter, King's College London: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is currently reported to occur in roughly 1% of the human population

  6. AC 2011-732: INTEGRATING NASA SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: US-ING AN INNOVATIVE SOFTWARE CURRICULUM DELIVERY TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AC 2011-732: INTEGRATING NASA SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING: US- ING AN INNOVATIVE SOFTWARE CURRICULUM DELIVERY TOOL TO CREATE A NASA-BASED CURRICULUM Morgan M Hynes, Tufts University Elsa Head, Tufts;Integrating NASA Science and Engineering: Using an Innovative Software Curriculum Delivery Tool to Create

  7. AC 2011-2087: FIRST YEAR ENGINEERING STUDENTS ARE STRIK-INGLY IMPOVERISHED IN THEIR SELF-CONCEPT AS PROFESSIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilford, William

    AC 2011-2087: FIRST YEAR ENGINEERING STUDENTS ARE STRIK- INGLY IMPOVERISHED IN THEIR SELF-CONCEPT for education. Brian A Nosek, University of Virginia c American Society for Engineering Education, 2011 #12;First year engineering students are strikingly impoverished in their self-concept as professional

  8. The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain-ing and curious happening in astrology.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain- ing and curious happening recordings of lunar and solar eclipses. 2 #12;The Dresden Codex was for the Mayans a way to predict eclipses likely that Martin Meinshausen proposed that this data was related to the timing of series of solar

  9. Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat-ing parameters from a diesel engine during transient op-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    ABSTRACT Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat- ing parameters from a diesel engine and are the subject of future research. INTRODUCTION Soot emissions from diesel engines are well known to have gov- erning the emission of particles from diesel engines are becoming ever more stringent. The soot

  10. he application of rapid prototyping (RP) in fabricat-ing nonassembly robotic systems with inserts is pre-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    T he application of rapid prototyping (RP) in fabricat- ing nonassembly robotic systems with inserts is pre- sented in this article. The development of robotic systems that have all necessary of which are essential steps toward the future goal of automated (robotized) robot design and manufacturing

  11. Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat-ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat- ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) where many seismic surveys have been acquired and will continue to be acquired. To apply seismic technology to gas-hydrate studies in the gulf in an optimal manner

  12. lthough most people have a common understand-ing of what the Internet is, the expression Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lthough most people have a common understand- ing of what the Internet is, the expression Future Internet has different meanings depending essen- tially on the expectations about the future connec- tivity of the Internet, are com- plementary, each highlighting different aspects of the expect- ed future network

  13. Salary savings scheme 2011 (ING BANK) 11-10-2010 Personnel and Organization Department 1/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Salary savings scheme 2011 (ING BANK) 11-10-2010 Personnel and Organization Department 1!! The undersigned hereby declares not to participate in a "course-of-life" arrangement or a salary savings scheme-year and you can only participate in a salary savings scheme via one employer Alteration as of (enter date

  14. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, John C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification.

  15. Method and apparatus for planar drag strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J.C.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-11-12

    The present invention is directed to an improved process and apparatus for strip casting. The combination of a planar flow casting nozzle positioned back from the top dead center position with an attached nozzle extension, provides an increased level of casting control and quality. The nozzle extension provides a means of containing the molten pool above the rotating substrate to increase the control of molten metal at the edges of the strip and increase the range of coating thicknesses which may be produced. The level of molten metal in the containment means is regulated to be above the level of melt supplying the casting nozzle which produces a condition of planar drag flow with the casting substrate prior to solidification. 5 figures.

  16. Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

    2005-04-01

    Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

  17. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  18. The Influence of Casting Conditions on the Microstructure of As-Cast U-10Mo Alloys: Characterization of the Casting Process Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-12-13

    Sections of eight plate castings of uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) were sent from Y-12 to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for microstructural characterization. This report summarizes the results from this study.

  19. Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing geometric multicrystalline cast silicon and geometric multicrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2015-02-10

    Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of geometrically ordered multi-crystalline silicon may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm is provided.

  20. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  1. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  2. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-04-01

    Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations. For 17-4PH stainless steel parts, the alloy shrinkage factors were over-predicted, as compared with experimental data. Additional R&D focus was placed on obtaining material property data for filled waxes, waxes that are common in the industry. For the first time in the investment casting industry, the thermo-mechanical properties of unfilled and filled waxes were measured. Test specimens of three waxes were injected at commercial foundries. Rheometry measurement of filled waxes was conducted at ORNL. The analysis of the rheometry data to obtain viscoelastic properties was not completed due to the reduction in the budget of the project (approximately 50% funds were received).

  3. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  4. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1996-12-24

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water. 3 figs.

  5. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  6. Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-102, 201-202 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-202, page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    CTD052 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-102, 201-202 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-202, page 1 #12;CTD052 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-102, 201-202 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-202, page 2 #12;CTD052 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-102, 201-202 Hickey, W8010A casts 52-55,101-202, page 3 #12;CTD053

  9. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it must remain open until the casting is solidified and pressure is maintained on the solidifying casting. Fanned gates, particularly on the smaller section castings avoid jetting effects at the ingate end. The fan type ingate helps accomplish a rapid fill without high velocities. The molten metal has to fill the cavity before localized solidification occurs. This is best accomplished with a larger ingate to attain rapid filling without excessive velocity or jetting that occurs at high metal velocities. Straight gates are prone to case jetting of the metal stream even a low velocities. Fanned gates allow use of higher fill velocity without excessive jetting. A higher metal pressure provides a more complete fill of the die including improved compensation for solidification shrinkage. With the proper filling pattern, ingates, overflows and die temperature for a given die, very good tensile properties can be attained in squeeze casting. In general, the smaller squeeze castings require higher die temperatures. Computer models using the UES Procast and MagmaSoft finite element software can, after suitable adjustments, predict the flow pattern in the die cavity.

  10. Rotational Clamshell Casting In Three Dimensions Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie Wuhrer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Rotational Clamshell Casting In Three Dimensions Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie, swuhrer}@scs.carleton.ca Abstract A popular manufacturing technique is clamshell casting, where liquid is poured into a cast and the cast is removed once the liquid has hardened. We consider the case where

  11. FLATNESS BASED OPEN LOOP CONTROL FOR THE TWIN ROLL STRIP CASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier, François

    FLATNESS BASED OPEN LOOP CONTROL FOR THE TWIN ROLL STRIP CASTING PROCESS Ch. Fleck #,1 Th. Paulus, Steinbachstr. 54, D­52074 Aachen, Germany Abstract: Strip casting technology is the most recent innovative steel casting technology that integrates casting and rolling into a single production step. The strip

  12. Rotational Clamshell Casting In Two Dimensions Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie Wuhrer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pat

    Rotational Clamshell Casting In Two Dimensions Prosenjit Bose, Pat Morin, Michiel Smid, Stefanie, swuhrer}@scs.carleton.ca Abstract A popular manufacturing technique is clamshell casting, where liquid is poured into a cast and the cast is removed once the liquid has hardened. We consider the case where

  13. CAMLE: A Caste-Centric Agent-Oriented Modeling Language and Environment Lijun Shan Hong Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    CAMLE: A Caste-Centric Agent-Oriented Modeling Language and Environment Lijun Shan Hong Zhu specification language SLABS. It is caste-centric because the notion of caste plays the central role in its methodology. Caste is the classifier of agents in our language. It allows multiple and dynamic classifications

  14. FLATNESS BASED OPEN LOOP CONTROL FOR THE TWIN ROLL STRIP CASTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier, François

    FLATNESS BASED OPEN LOOP CONTROL FOR THE TWIN ROLL STRIP CASTING PROCESS Ch. Fleck ,1 Th. Paulus ,2, D-52074 Aachen, Germany Abstract: Strip casting technology is the most recent innovative steel casting technology that integrates casting and rolling into a single production step. The strip thickness

  15. Casting a Polyhedron with Directional Uncertainty Hee-kap Ahn Otfried Cheong Rene van Oostrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Casting a Polyhedron with Directional Uncertainty£ Hee-kap Ahn££ Otfried Cheong££ Ren´e van Oostrum££ Abstract Casting is a manufacturing process in which molten material is poured into a cast (mould), which with imperfect control of the casting machinery. In this paper, we consider directional uncertainty: given a 3

  16. Round Robin Study to Assess Variations in Casting Simulation Niyama Criterion Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    that is a common output of casting simulation software packages, is frequently used to predict shrinkage porosity criterion values from a casting simulation may be used not only to provide guidance in designing shrinkage variable in casting simulation software packages to predict shrinkage porosity defects in steel castings

  17. Development of New Feeding-Distance Rules Using Casting Simulation: Part I. Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    measured shrinkage porosity levels in steel castings to predictions from casting simulations, in order meaningful set of experimental data for top-risered cast steel sections having various ASTM shrinkage X if there was no evidence of shrinkage detected bywithout having to actually produce the casting. In addition, radiography

  18. Rayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings and Ingots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    steel sand castings. By comparing the predictions with observations made in the actual castingsRayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings and Ingots M. TORABI RAD the formation of A-segregates in steel castings and ingots. The criterion is calibrated using available

  19. Rayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings M. Torabi Rad1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in a casting simulation code and used to predict A-segregates in three different shaped steel sand castings1 Rayleigh Number Criterion for Formation of A-Segregates in Steel Castings and Ingots M. Torabi the formation of A-segregates in steel castings and ingots. The criterion is calibrated using available

  20. Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.; Peker, A.

    1998-08-25

    A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast. 8 figs.

  1. Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Xianghong (Laguna Niguel, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Aliso Viejo, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast.

  2. Methodology for Fine Art formulation applied to investment casting moulds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Ahmad Rashdi Yan

    This research concerns the development of a methodology for formulation in Fine Art, Design and Craft practice. The methodology is applied to the choosing of formulations for bronze and glass investments casting moulds ...

  3. Process and apparatus for casting multiple silicon wafer articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nanis, Leonard (Palo Alto, CA)

    1992-05-05

    Method and apparatus of casting silicon produced by the reaction between SiF.sub.4 and an alkaline earth metal into thin wafer-shaped articles suitable for solar cell fabrication.

  4. Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Matthew S

    2013-01-01

    Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

  5. Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Near-Term Automotive Applications General Motors LLC - Warren, MI An integrated super-vacuum die casting process uses a new magnesium alloy to potentially achieve a 50% energy...

  6. In Search Of Axions: The CAST Experiment George K. Fanourakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    , Greece Abstract. The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment uses a decommissioned LHC test magnet-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany, 6 Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas Energias

  7. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  8. Search for low Energy solar Axions with CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Cantatore; for the CAST Collaboration; :; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrán; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Bräuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. Cebrián; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galán; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gómez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzón; D. Miller; A. Morales; {deceased}; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

    2008-09-29

    We have started the development of a detector system, sensitive to single photons in the eV energy range, to be suitably coupled to one of the CAST magnet ports. This system should open to CAST a window on possible detection of low energy Axion Like Particles emitted by the sun. Preliminary tests have involved a cooled photomultiplier tube coupled to the CAST magnet via a Galileian telescope and a switched 40 m long optical fiber. This system has reached the limit background level of the detector alone in ideal conditions, and two solar tracking runs have been performed with it at CAST. Such a measurement has never been done before with an axion helioscope. We will present results from these runs and briefly discuss future detector developments.

  9. Titanium Matrix Composite Tooling Material for Aluminum Die Castings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In aluminum die-casting, molten aluminum is forced under high pressure into a die cavity. First a "shot" of molten aluminum is ladled into a shot sleeve and the shot of molten aluminum is forced by...

  10. Marry for What? Caste and Mate Selection in Modern India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Abhijit

    This paper analyzes how preferences for a noneconomic characteristic (e.g., caste) can affect equilibrium patterns of matching, and empirically evaluates this in the context of middle-class Indian arranged marriages. We ...

  11. An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

    2006-12-31

    An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

  12. Advanced lost foam casting technology. 1995 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Askeland, D.; Griffin, J.; Miller, B.A.; Sheldon, D.S.

    1996-05-01

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on five areas listed as follows: Task 1: Precision Pattern Production; Task 2: Pattern Coating Consistency; Task 3: Sand Fill and Compaction Effects; Task 4: Pattern Gating; and Task 5: Mechanical Properties of Castings. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all five areas. Twenty-eight (28) companies jointly participate in the project. These companies represent a variety of disciplines, including pattern designers, pattern producers, coating manufacturers, plant design companies, compaction equipment manufacturers, casting producers, and casting buyers. This report summarizes the work done in the past two years and the conclusions drawn from the work.

  13. ITP Metal Casting: Energy Use in Selected Metalcasting Facilities- 2003

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report represents an energy benchmark for various metalcasting processes. It describes process flows and energy use by fuel type and processes for selected casting operations. It also provides recommendations for improving energy efficiency in casti

  14. Manufacturers Saving with Lost Foam Metal Casting | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Metal casting was identified as one of the top 10 energy users in manufacturing. The technology represents a 20- to 25-percent reduction in production costs and uses 7 percent...

  15. Methods for manufacturing geometric multi-crystalline cast materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2013-11-26

    Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semi-conductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a geometrically ordered multi-crystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm.

  16. Methods for manufacturing monocrystalline or near-monocrystalline cast materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G

    2014-04-29

    Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a monocrystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm.

  17. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Jung, H. B.; Wang, Guohui

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  18. Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

    1988-01-01

    A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

  19. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J.; Franklin, Elizabeth; Prickett, Zane T.; Artau, Alexander

    2004-08-03

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  20. Cast-to-shape electrokinetic trapping medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Franklin, Elizabeth (Rolla, MO); Prickett, Zane T. (Golden, CO); Artau, Alexander (Pleasanton, CA)

    2006-05-30

    A three-dimensional microporous polymer network material, or monolith, cast-to-shape in a microchannel. The polymer monolith, produced by a phase separation process, is capable of trapping and retaining charged protein species from a mixture of charged and uncharged species under the influence of an applied electric field. The retained charged protein species are released from the porous polymer monolith by a pressure driven flow in the substantial absence of the electric field. The pressure driven flow is independent of direction and thus neither means to reverse fluid flow nor a multi-directional flow field is required, a single flow through the porous polymer monolith can be employed, in contrast to prior art systems. The monolithic polymer material produced by the invention can function as a chromatographic medium. Moreover, by virtue of its ability to retain charged protein species and quantitatively release the retained species the porous polymer monolith can serve as a means for concentrating charged protein species from, for example, a dilute solution.

  1. Determination of Bulk Dimensional Variation in Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. James F. Cuttino Dr. Edward P. Morse

    2005-04-14

    The purpose of this work is to improve the efficiency of green sand foundries so that they may continue to compete as the most cost-effective method of fabrication while meeting tightening constraints on near-net shape manufacturing. In order to achieve this objective, the study is divided into two major components. The first component concentrated on identifying which processes control surface finish on the castings and which provide potential reductions in variations. The second component identified metrological methods that effectively discern between the geometry of bulk material versus surface finish in order to more accurately determine the quality of a part. The research resulted in the determination of an empirical relationship relating pouring parameters to dimensional variation, with an R2 value of greater than 0.79. A significant difference in variations obtained from vertical vs. horizontal molding machines was also noticed. When analyzed separately, however, the resulting empirical relationships for horizontal and vertical machines had reduced R2 values, probably due to the reduced data sets. Significant parameters when considering vertical and horizontal molding machines together included surface roughness, pattern type, iron type, pouring rate, copper content, amount of Western Bentonite, and permeability.

  2. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2013-03-27

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

  3. Casting evaluation of U-Zr alloy system fuel slug for SFR prepared by injection casting method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock

    2013-07-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U-Pu-Zr alloys for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) have conventionally been fabricated by a vacuum injection casting method. Recently, management of minor actinides (MA) became an important issue because direct disposal of the long-lived MA can be a long-term burden for a tentative repository up to several hundreds of thousand years. In order to recycle transuranic elements (TRU) retained in spent nuclear fuel, remote fabrication capability in a shielded hot cell should be prepared. Moreover, generation of long-lived radioactive wastes and loss of volatile species should be minimized during the recycled fuel fabrication step. In order to prevent the evaporation of volatile elements such as Am, alternative fabrication methods of metal fuel slugs have been studied applying gravity casting, and improved injection casting in KAERI, including melting under inert atmosphere. And then, metal fuel slugs were examined with casting soundness, density, chemical analysis, particle size distribution and microstructural characteristics. Based on these results there is a high level of confidence that Am losses will also be effectively controlled by application of a modest amount of overpressure. A surrogate fuel slug was generally soundly cast by improved injection casting method, melted fuel material under inert atmosphere.

  4. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  5. Yield improvement and defect reduction in steel casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Carlson

    2004-03-16

    This research project investigated yield improvement and defect reduction techniques in steel casting. Research and technology development was performed in the following three specific areas: (1) Feeding rules for high alloy steel castings; (2) Unconventional yield improvement and defect reduction techniques--(a) Riser pressurization; and (b) Filling with a tilting mold; and (3) Modeling of reoxidation inclusions during filling of steel castings. During the preparation of the proposal for this project, these areas were identified by the High Alloy Committee and Carbon and Low Alloy Committee of the Steel Founders' Society of America (SFSA) as having the highest research priority to the steel foundry industry. The research in each of the areas involved a combination of foundry experiments, modeling and simulation. Numerous SFSA member steel foundries participated in the project through casting trials and meetings. The technology resulting from this project will result in decreased scrap and rework, casting yield improvement, and higher quality steel castings produced with less iteration. This will result in considerable business benefits to steel foundries, primarily due to reduced energy and labor costs, increased capacity and productivity, reduced lead-time, and wider use and application of steel castings. As estimated using energy data provided by the DOE, the technology produced as a result of this project will result in an energy savings of 2.6 x 10{sup 12} BTU/year. This excludes the savings that were anticipated from the mold tilting research. In addition to the energy savings, and corresponding financial savings this implies, there are substantial environmental benefits as well. The results from each of the research areas listed above are summarized.

  6. Comparing matched polymer:Fullerene solar cells made by solution-sequential processing and traditional blend casting: Nanoscale structure and device performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    and Traditional Blend Casting: Nanoscale Structure andby traditional blend casting (BC), where the components aresuch networks is the blend-casting (BC) method, wherein the

  7. Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mangels, John A. (Flat Rock, MI); Dickie, Ray A. (Birmingham, MI)

    1985-01-01

    The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

  8. Simulation and Experiment on Direct Continuous Casting Process of Lead Frame Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Process of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, 100088 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Direct Continuous Casting (D.C.C) is an important method in casting lead frame copper alloy. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the D.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1413 Kapprox1413 K, the casting speed is between 8 m/happrox10 m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 4.2 m/sapprox4.6 m/s. And the depth of liquid-solid boundary is measured in different casting temperature and casting speed by experiments. The results show the actual measurements have a little deviation with the numerical simulation. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the actual experiments.

  9. Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Pardo, B.T.

    1996-09-01

    The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.

  10. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  11. Effect of flask vibration time on casting integrity, Surface Penetration and Coating Inclusion in lost foam casting of Al-Si Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karimian, Majid [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Idris, M. H. [Dept. of Manufacturing and Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Johor Bauru (Malaysia); Ourdjini, A.; Muthu, Kali [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Khomeinishahr branch, Islamic Azad University-(Khomeinishahr- Isfahan) (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The paper presents the result of an experimental investigation conducted on medium aluminum silicon alloy casting- LM6, using no-vacuum assisted lost foam casting process. The study is directed for establishing the relationship between the flask vibrations times developed for molded sample on the casting integrity, surface penetration and coating inclusion defects of the casting. Four different flask vibration times namely 180, 120, 90 and 60 sec. were investigated. The casting integrity was investigated in terms of fulfilling in all portions and edges. The surface penetration was measured using optical microscope whilst image analyzer was used to quantify the percentage of coating inclusion in the casting. The results show that vibration time has significant influence on the fulfilling as well as the internal integrity of the lost foam casting. It was found that the lower vibration time produced comparatively sound casing.

  12. Hickey -TT175, casts 220, line 222-229,231-232 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date/Time (MMDDYYHHMM) Total Scans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Barbara

    Hickey -TT175, casts 220, line 222- 229,231-232 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date,220 #12;Hickey -TT175, casts 220, line 222- 229,231-232 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date #12;Hickey -TT175, casts 220, line 222- 229,231-232 Cruise cast lat(dd.mm.mm) lon(dd.mm.mm) Date

  13. A comparison of the marginal adaptation of cathode-arc vapor-deposited titanium and cast base metal copings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jean C; Lai, Li-Chung; Sheets, Cherilyn G; Earthman, James; Newcomb, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Marginal fit of gold inlay castings. J Prosthet Dent 1966;filling and porosity in castings of titanium. Dent Matera b Wu et al alloy types, casting procedures, por- celain

  14. Life with the alien: role casting and face-saving techniques in family conversation with young children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatigante, Marilena; Fasulo, Alessandra; Pontecorvo, Clotilde

    1998-01-01

    Life with the aUen: role casting and face-saving techniquespresence has tlie main of casting the current interactionchildren as addressees, casting them as side partici- pants,

  15. A comparison of the marginal adaptation of cathode-arc vapor-deposited titanium and cast base metal copings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jean C; Lai, Li-Chung; Sheets, Cherilyn G; Earthman, James; Newcomb, Robert

    2011-01-01

    invest- ment, and casting of metal alloys are potentialusing ti- tanium and base metal castings was that they havenique-sensitive method of casting this base metal alloy. The

  16. Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.

  17. Method and apparatus for casting conductive and semiconductive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for casting conductive and semiconduce materials. The apparatus includes a plurality of conductive members arranged to define a container-like area having a desired cross-sectional shape. A portion or all of the conductive or semiconductive material which is to be cast is introduced into the container-like area. A means is provided for inducing the flow of an electrical current in each of the conductive members, which currents act collectively to induce a current flow in the material. The induced current flow through the conductive members is in a direction substantially opposite to the induced current flow in the material so that the material is repelled from the conductive members during the casting process.

  18. CASTING DEFECT MODELING IN AN INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL MATERIALS ENGINEERING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    To accelerate the introduction of new cast alloys, the simultaneous modeling and simulation of multiphysical phenomena needs to be considered in the design and optimization of mechanical properties of cast components. The required models related to casting defects, such as microporosity and hot tears, are reviewed. Three aluminum alloys are considered A356, 356 and 319. The data on calculated solidification shrinkage is presented and its effects on microporosity levels discussed. Examples are given for predicting microporosity defects and microstructure distribution for a plate casting. Models to predict fatigue life and yield stress are briefly highlighted here for the sake of completion and to illustrate how the length scales of the microstructure features as well as porosity defects are taken into account for modeling the mechanical properties. Thus, the data on casting defects, including microstructure features, is crucial for evaluating the final performance-related properties of the component. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work was performed under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Nemak Inc., and Chrysler Co. for the project "High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines. The author would also like to thank Amit Shyam for reviewing the paper and Andres Rodriguez of Nemak Inc. Research sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office, as part of the Propulsion Materials Program under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle, LLC. Part of this research was conducted through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program, which is sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program.

  19. Tape-cast sensors and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-08-18

    A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

  20. Remote ballot casting with Captchas Stefan Popoveniuc, Poorvi L. Vora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vora, Poorvi

    to Internet voting is the possibility of an attacker writ- ing a computer virus that spreads to enough Ensuring that a computer is virus free is virtually impossible. The constant battle between the anti-virus industry and programmers that write malware is well known. Computer viruses can go undetected, because

  1. Flexible casting of modular self-aligning microfluidic assembly blocks Sean M. Langelier,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Nils G.

    Flexible casting of modular self-aligning microfluidic assembly blocks Sean M. Langelier,a Eric and extraction of MABs using flexible casting trays, (2) use of pre-coated substrates for simultaneous assembly

  2. Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

    2008-01-01

    The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

  3. Evaluation of residual stress gradients in ductile cast iron using critical refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfluger, Ron Atlan

    1995-01-01

    Critically refracted longitudinal (LCR) waves have been investigated as a possible technique for the evaluation of the residual stress gradients present in ductile iron castings. Residual stresses are likely to develop in ductile cast iron during...

  4. A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry - 2002 and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-05-01

    Chief executive officers and presidents from the foundry, die casting, and foundry supply industries developed the A Vision for the U.S. Metal Casting Industry - 2002 and Beyond document.

  5. CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components...

  6. Simulating a double casting technique using level set method Qiang Du a,*, Dianzhong Li a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Pingwen

    Simulating a double casting technique using level set method Qiang Du a,*, Dianzhong Li a , Yiyi Li. It is used here for the ®rst time to track the interface evolution during the process of casting a second in real double casting processes. Ó 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Level set

  7. CASTE AND REPRODUCTION IN ANTS: NOT ALL MATE^ EGG-LAYERS ARE "QUEENS9'*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    CASTE AND REPRODUCTION IN ANTS: NOT ALL MATE^ EGG-LAYERS ARE "QUEENS9'* School of Biological, various bees (Bombus, Apis, Meliponini) and vespine wasps. Queen and worker castes differ phenotypically activities respectively. Reproductive role partitioning in highly-eusocial species is specified by caste

  8. Development of a Hot Tear Indicator for Use in Casting Simulation C. Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Development of a Hot Tear Indicator for Use in Casting Simulation C. Monroe C. Beckermann for initiation sites for hot tears in the casting, not a full tear prediction. By evaluating this quantity. Using a simulation study of hot tear castings developed in SFSA literature, conclusions are drawn about

  9. Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during Casting of Steel: Comparison with Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during Casting of Steel: Comparison with Experiments C City, IA 52242 Abstract Hot tears are defects that occur during solidification of a casting that is subjected to mechanical restraints. Several key factors are known to aggravate the hot tearing of cast steel

  10. Converge-Cast with MIMO Luoyi Fu, Yi Qin, Xinbing Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    Converge-Cast with MIMO Luoyi Fu, Yi Qin, Xinbing Wang Dept. of Electronic Engineering Shanghai investigates throughput and delay based on a newly predominant traffic pattern, called converge-cast, where schemes under converge-cast for both static and mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs), respectively. In a static

  11. To appear in the 1998 Symposium on Volume Visualization Adaptive Perspective Ray Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Baoquan

    To appear in the 1998 Symposium on Volume Visualization Adaptive Perspective Ray Casting Kevin Abstract We present a method to accuratelyand e cientlyperform per- spective volumetric ray casting ectiveness by contrasting its antialiasing quality and timing with other perspective ray casting meth- ods

  12. Bigger Helpers in the Ant Cataglyphis bombycina: Increased Worker Polymorphism or Novel Soldier Caste?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    Caste? Mathieu Molet1,2 *, Vincent Maicher1,2 , Christian Peeters1,2 1 Laboratoire Ecologie & Evolution, the repeated evolution of novel castes in ants may have been facilitated by the existence of alternative queen and worker castes and their respective developmental programs. Material and Methods: Cataglyphis bombycina

  13. Streaming Model Based Volume Ray Casting Implementation for Cell Broadband Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JaJa, Joseph F.

    Streaming Model Based Volume Ray Casting Implementation for Cell Broadband Engine Jusub Kim grows. While a number of volumetric rendering techniques have been widely used, ray casting has been, the use of ray casting has been limited to datasets that are very small because of its high demands

  14. The Current State of Casting Yield: Results from the 1997 Steel Founders'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    The Current State of Casting Yield: Results from the 1997 Steel Founders' Society of America Casting Yield Survey Richard A. Hardin - Research Engineer Christoph Beckermann - Professor Solidification The results of a casting yield survey of steel foundries taken in the first quarter of 1997 are presented

  15. To appear in the 1998 Symposium on Volume Visualization Adaptive Perspective Ray Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Baoquan

    To appear in the 1998 Symposium on Volume Visualization Adaptive Perspective Ray Casting Kevin volumetric ray casting of uniform regular datasets, called Exponential­Region (ER) Perspective. Unlike casting meth­ ods. CR Categories: I.3.3 [Computer Graphics]: Pic­ ture/Image Generation

  16. Efficient Receipt-Free Ballot Casting Resistant to Covert Channels Ben Adida C. Andrew Neff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Efficient Receipt-Free Ballot Casting Resistant to Covert Channels Ben Adida C. Andrew Neff Abstract We present an efficient, covert-channel-resistant, receipt-free ballot casting scheme that can elections of yore: cast ballots are available for all to see on a public bulletin board, and the tabulation

  17. Prediction of burn-on and mould penetration in steel casting using simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of burn-on and mould penetration in steel casting using simulation B. E. Brooks1 , C. Beckermann*1 and V. L. Richards2 Burn-on and penetration defects in steel casting are principally caused burn-on and penetration defect locations as part of a standard casting simulation. The method relies

  18. Reproductive Caste Performs Intranidal Tasks Instead of Workers in the Ant Mystrium oberthueri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danchin, Etienne

    Reproductive Caste Performs Intranidal Tasks Instead of Workers in the Ant Mystrium oberthueri different tasks. In ants, the wingless worker caste performs non-reproductive activities and sometimes rogeri from Madagascar is a specialist predator on large centipedes, and the worker caste is highly

  19. ROBERTO DE BEAUCLAIR SEIXAS VISUALIZAC ~AO VOLUM ETRICA COM RAY-CASTING NUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    ROBERTO DE BEAUCLAIR SEIXAS VISUALIZAC ~AO VOLUM ETRICA COM RAY-CASTING NUM AMBIENTE DISTRIBU IDO Beauclair Seixas Visualizac~ao Volum etrica com Ray-Casting num Ambiente Distribu do Tese apresentada ao^encia durante a fase de testes. #12;Resumo Ray-Casting e uma t ecnica muito usada em visualizac~ao volum etrica

  20. A Role Casting Method Based on Emotions in a Story Generation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thawonmas, Ruck

    A Role Casting Method Based on Emotions in a Story Generation System Ruck Thawonmas1 , Masanao point out a problem in the role casting method of a story generation system called OPIATE and then propose a solution to this problem. The existing casting method does not take into account the emotions

  1. Caste ratios affect the reproductive output of social trematode T. KAMIYA & R. POULIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    Caste ratios affect the reproductive output of social trematode colonies T. KAMIYA & R. POULIN Department of Zoology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand Keywords: caste ratio; optimal ratio theory phenotypic diversification in social organisms often leads to formation of physical castes which

  2. A Recursive Taylor Method for Ray-Casting Algebraic Huahao Shoua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    A Recursive Taylor Method for Ray-Casting Algebraic Surfaces Huahao Shoua , Wenhao Songb , Jie a recursive Taylor method for ray-casting algebraic surfaces. The performance of this approach is compared with four other candidate approaches to ray- casting: using interval arithmetic on the power form, using

  3. A Simple Cast-as-Intended E-Voting Protocol by Using Secure Smart Cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A Simple Cast-as-Intended E-Voting Protocol by Using Secure Smart Cards March 12, 2012 Helger Lipmaa Institute of Computer Science, University of Tartu, Estonia Abstract. We propose a simple cast, is significantly more secure (in the sense of "cast-as-intended") and convenient to use than the e-voting protocol

  4. Simulation of Convection and Macrosegregation in Steel Casting C. Beckermann* and M. C. Schneider**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of Convection and Macrosegregation in Steel Casting C. Beckermann* and M. C. Schneider.C., "Simulation of Convection and Macrosegregation in Steel Casting," in Proceedings of the 50th SFSA Technical and the mushy zone. This is particularly true in heavy steel castings which have very large cross sections

  5. Measurement and Prediction of Stresses during Casting of a Steel Bar , C. Monroe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    to cores and the mold are present, the casting is said to contract freely. For such free thermal. The unrestrained casting is allowed to contract freely with no restraints. Thermal simulations are performed the mold cavity and the casting are of great concern to all steel foundries. When no restraints due

  6. FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    FATIGUE OF 8630 CAST STEEL IN THE PRESENCE OF SHRINKAGE POROSITY K.M. Sigl1 , R.A. Hardin2 , R of shrinkage porosity on the mechanical performance of the cast steel. Axial fatigue tests were conducted under.I., and Beckermann, C., "Fatigue of 8630 Cast Steel in the Presence of Shrinkage Porosity," in Proceedings of the 57

  7. MCWASP, Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes XI TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    at the bottom of the casting due to shrinkage driven fluid flow leads to a non-uniform solute distributionMCWASP, Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes XI TMS (The Minerals, Aluminum alloys, Cast surfaces, Mold topography, Inverse segregation, Imperfect contact, Air-gaps, Solid

  8. Effect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    shrinkage porosity on deformation, damage, and fracture of cast steel under tensile testing. Steel plates containing shrinkage porosity are cast in sand molds, machined into test coupons, and tensile testedEffect of Porosity on Deformation, Damage, and Fracture of Cast Steel R.A. HARDIN and C. BECKERMANN

  9. Prediction of Riser Carbon Macrosegregation due to Shrinkage Flow in Steel Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Prediction of Riser Carbon Macrosegregation due to Shrinkage Flow in Steel Casting Kent D Carbon Macrosegregation due to Shrinkage Flow in Steel Casting," in Proceedings of the 64th SFSA macrosegregation in and below risers due to feeding flow in steel castings. The model uses feeding flow velocities

  10. Effect of mould expansion on pattern allowances in sand casting of steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    properties of the sand and the solidifying steel. Such hindered shrinkage of restrained casting featuresEffect of mould expansion on pattern allowances in sand casting of steel F. Peters1 , R. Voigt2 , S. Z. Ou3 and C. Beckermann*3 For steel castings produced in sand moulds, the expansion of the sand

  11. Bioinspired composites from freeze casting with clathrate hydrates Steven E. Naleway a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    Bioinspired Freeze casting Ceramic matrix composite Mechanical behavior a b s t r a c t Freeze casting mimic the nature of biological materials, these composites have consisted of ceramic and poly- mericBioinspired composites from freeze casting with clathrate hydrates Steven E. Naleway a

  12. Probing eV-scale axions with CAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrán; S. Borghi; G. Bourlis; F. S. Boydag; H. Bräuninger; J. M. Carmona; S. Cebrián; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; P. Friedrich; J. Franz; J. Galán; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gómez; R. Hartmann; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; K. Königsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; G. Lutz; G. Luzón; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; K. van Bibber; J. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

    2009-01-09

    We have searched for solar axions or other pseudoscalar particles that couple to two photons by using the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) setup. Whereas we previously have reported results from CAST with evacuated magnet bores (Phase I), setting limits on lower mass axions, here we report results from CAST where the magnet bores were filled with \\hefour gas (Phase II) of variable pressure. The introduction of gas generated a refractive photon mass $m_\\gamma$, thereby achieving the maximum possible conversion rate for those axion masses \\ma that match $m_\\gamma$. With 160 different pressure settings we have scanned \\ma up to about 0.4 eV, taking approximately 2 h of data for each setting. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun, we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of $\\gag\\lesssim 2.17\\times 10^{-10} {\\rm GeV}^{-1}$ at 95% CL for $\\ma \\lesssim 0.4$ eV, the exact result depending on the pressure setting. The excluded parameter range covers realistic axion models with a Peccei-Quinn scale in the neighborhood of $f_{\\rm a}\\sim10^{7}$ GeV. Currently in the second part of CAST Phase II, we are searching for axions with masses up to about 1.2 eV using \\hethree as a buffer gas.

  13. 2005 May JOM 35 Casting DefectsOverview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    2005 May · JOM 35 Casting DefectsOverview Superplastic forming (SPF) is intro- duced must fill the entire mold cavity and at the same time be cooled fast enough to avoidcrystallization.Thismakescasting of complex geometries (i.e., parts with thin sections and large aspect ratios) a challenging undertaking

  14. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  15. EFFECT OF POROSITY ON MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF 8630 CAST STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    of steel castings. Likewise there are no guidelines relating non-destructive testing or non- destructive radiographs of 8630 steel fatigue test specimens taken prior to fatigue testing. The measurement procedure well with the fatigue test specimens' measured elastic modulus. Converting the elastic modulus

  16. Geometric and Computational Aspects of Gravity Casting \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Godfried T.

    2A7 Abstract In the manufacturing industry, finding an orientation for a mold that eliminates surface defects and insures a complete fill after the termination of the gravity casting process Introduction `Mold orientation during fill is a cut­and­try process to find the most favorable position.' [13

  17. Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in the production of steel castings. Removing inclusions and refilling the defect areas with the weld metal account in steel with oxygen during pouring of the (deoxidized) steel from the ladle into the mold. Oxy- gen may come from the surrounding atmosphere, refracto- ries, slag, or the sand mold.[3] The atmosphere

  18. Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    the risers, and the ability of inclusions to adhere to mold walls. Recommendations for future research castings is due to the removal of inclusions and the repair of the resulting defect areas with weld metal comes into contact with oxygen during mold filling, make up a substantial portion of the inclusions

  19. Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    larger inclusions entering the mold cavity from the ladle, and they can also be born on the metal free of the resulting defect areas with weld metal. Inclusions that remain in the casting adversely affect machining inclusions, which form when deoxidized steel comes into contact with oxygen during mold filling, make up

  20. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weirich, Stephanie

    distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functionsTermination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion Aaron Stump Computer type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced

  1. The Athlit ra: Classical and Hellenistic bronze casting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oron, Asaf

    2001-01-01

    existing rams in size and is one of the largest bronzes to have survived intact from the ancient Mediterranean world. Initial metallographic and metallurgical analyses of the ram, made shortly after its recovery, led to the conclusion that it was cast...

  2. COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COSTS MODELS IN DESIGN AND MANUFACTURING OF SAND CASTING PRODUCTS Nicolas PERRY Ass. Prof., IRCCy.Bernard@irccyn.ec-nantes.fr Abstract: In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization

  3. Modelling the dip coating process for hot metal castings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Modelling the dip coating process for hot metal castings Mark J. McGuinness #3; A.J. Roberts y #12; List of Figures 2 6 Modelling Coating Growth 17 6.1 Simple Conduction Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 6.3 Linear Temperature Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 7 Estimates of Coating

  4. Casting polymer nets to optimize noisy molecular codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    Casting polymer nets to optimize noisy molecular codes Tsvi Tlusty* Department of Physics noise may be understood from the sta- tistics of a two-dimensional network made of polymers. The noisy. The ``polymers'' are the boundaries between these regions, and their statistics define the cost and the quality

  5. Numerical Simulation of Horizontal Continuous Casting Process of C194 Copper Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Guojie; Xie Shuisheng; Cheng Lei; Cheng Zhenkang [State Key Laboratory for Fabrication and Processing of Nonferrous Metals, Beijing General Research Institute for Non-ferrous Metals, China, 100088 (China)

    2007-05-17

    Horizontal Continuous Casting (H.C.C) is an important method to cast C194 copper ingot. In this paper, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the casting process in order to optimize the H.C.C technical parameters, such as the casting temperature, casting speed and cooling intensity. According to the numerical results, the reasonable parameters are that the casting temperature is between 1383K{approx}1463K, the casting speed is between 7.2m/h{approx}10.8m/h and the speed of cooling water is between 3.6m/s{approx}4.6m/s. The results of numerical simulation provide the significant reference to the subsequent experiments.

  6. Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot-cast multicrystalline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402­407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot-cast silicon (mc-Si) ingot casting for cost-effective solar cell wafer production. Highly sensitive to coat the inside of mc-Si ingot-casting crucibles, as well as the as-grown cast mc-Si material

  7. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which demonstrated the importance of proper heat treat cycles for Homogenization, and Solutionizing parameters selection and implementation. 3) Step blocks casting of Nimonic 263: Carried out casting solidification simulation analysis, NDT inspection methods evaluation, detailed test matrix for Chemical, Tensile, LCF, stress rupture, CVN impact, hardness and J1C Fracture toughness section sensitivity data and were reported. 4) Centrifugal Casting of Haynes 282, weighing 1400 lbs. with hybrid mold (half Graphite and half Chromite sand) mold assembly was cast using compressor casing production tooling. This test provided Mold cooling rates influence on centrifugally cast microstructure and mechanical properties. Graphite mold section out performs sand mold across all temperatures for 0.2% YS; %Elongation, %RA, UTS at 1400°F. Both Stress-LMP and conditional Fracture toughness plots data were in the scatter band of the wrought alloy. 5) Fundamental Studies on Cooling rates and SDAS test program. Evaluated the influence of 6 mold materials Silica, Chromite, Alumina, Silica with Indirect Chills, Zircon and Graphite on casting solidification cooling rates. Actual Casting cooling rates through Liquidus to Solidus phase transition were measured with 3 different locations based thermocouples placed in each mold. Compared with solidification simulation cooling rates and measurement of SDAS, microstructure features were reported. The test results provided engineered casting potential methods, applicable for heavy section Haynes 282 castings for optimal properties, with foundry process methods and tools. 6) Large casting of Haynes 282 Drawings and Engineering FEM models and supplemental requirements with applicable specifications were provided to suppliers for the steam turbine proto type feature valve casing casting. Molding, melting and casting pouring completed per approved Manufacturing Process Plan during 2014 Q4. The partial valve casing was successfully cast after casting methods were validated with solidification simulation analysis and the casting met NDT inspection and a

  8. Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.] [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.

    2013-10-31

    A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

  9. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  10. The X-ray Telescope of the CAST Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Kotthaus; H. Braeuninger; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; D. Kang; M. Kuster; G. Lutz; L. Strueder

    2005-11-14

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for solar axions employing a 9 Tesla superconducting dipole magnet equipped with 3 independent detection systems for X-rays from axion-photon conversions inside the 10 m long magnetic field. Results of the first 6 months of data taking in 2003 imply a 95 % CL upper limit on the axion-photon coupling constant of 1.16x10(-10) GeV(-1) for axion masses CAST is a X-ray telescope consisting of a Wolter I type mirror system and a fully depleted pn-CCD as focal plane detector. Exploiting the full potential of background suppression by focussing X-rays emerging from the magnet bore, the axion sensitivity obtained with telescope data taken in 2004, for the first time in a controlled laboratory experiment, will supersede axion constraints derived from stellar energy loss arguments.

  11. Material development in the SI sub 3 N sub 4 system using glass encapsulated Hip'ing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP'ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

  12. Modeling the Mechanical Performance of Die Casting Dies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Allen Miller

    2004-02-27

    The following report covers work performed at Ohio State on modeling the mechanical performance of dies. The focus of the project was development and particularly verification of finite element techniques used to model and predict displacements and stresses in die casting dies. The work entails a major case study performed with and industrial partner on a production die and laboratory experiments performed at Ohio State.

  13. Axion helioscopes update: the status of CAST and IAXO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Dafni; F. J. Iguaz; on behalf of the CAST; IAXO collaborations

    2015-01-07

    Almost 35 years since their suggestion as a good solution to the strong CP-problem, axions remain one of the few viable candidates for the Dark Matter, although still eluding detection. Most of the methods for their detection are based on their coupling to photons, one of the most sensitive ones being the helioscope technique. We report on the current status of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope and the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II, where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV, are presented. Currently, CAST is expecting to improve its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 after the upgrade of the X-ray detectors and with the implementation of a second X-ray optic. At the same time, it is exploring other possibilities at the low energy physics frontier. On the other hand IAXO, the fourth generation axion helioscope, aims to improve CAST's performance in terms of axion-photon coupling by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude. The details of the project building a dedicated magnet, optics and X-ray detectors are given.

  14. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

    1997-01-01

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  15. CAST microbulk micromegas in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tomás; S. Aune; T. Dafni; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galán; J. A. García; A. Gardikiotis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; H. Gómez; J. G. Garza; D. C. Herrera; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; G. Luzón; T. Papaevangelou; A. Rodríguez; J. Ruz; L. Seguí; T. Vafeiadis; S. C. Yildiz

    2012-08-28

    During the last taking data campaigns of the CAST experiment, the micromegas detectors have achieved background levels of $\\approx 5 \\times 10^{-6}$keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ between 2 and 9 keV. This performance has been possible thanks to the introduction of the microbulk technology, the implementation of a shielding and the development of discrimination algorithms. It has motivated new studies towards a deeper understanding of CAST detectors background. One of the working lines includes the construction of a replica of the set-up used in CAST by micromegas detectors and its installation in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. Thanks to the comparison between the performance of the detectors underground and at surface, shielding upgrades, etc, different contributions to the detectors background have been evaluated. In particular, an upper limit $< 2 \\times 10^{-7}$keV$^{-1}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ for the intrinsic background of the detector has been obtained. This work means a first evaluation of the potential of the newest micromegas technology in an underground laboratory, the most suitable environment for Rare Event Searches.

  16. In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

    1997-07-29

    A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

  17. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

  18. Searching for alternative solutions of an indeterminate reason-ing task is an important and necessary step in order to draw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Searching for alternative solutions of an indeterminate reason- ing task is an important mental representations and processes of the search for alternatives in spatial reasoning, an experiment. The results showed that searching for alternative solutions can be best explained as a revision process

  19. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  20. Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High...

  1. ITP Metal Casting: Theoretical/Best Practice Energy Use in Metalcastin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TheoreticalBest Practice Energy Use in Metalcasting Operations ITP Metal Casting: TheoreticalBest Practice Energy Use in Metalcasting Operations doebestpractice052804.pdf More...

  2. Software Analytical Instrument for Assessment of the Process of Casting Slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franek, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, The School of Business Administration in Karvina, Univerzitni nam. 1934, Karvina (Czech Republic); Kavicka, Frantisek; Stetina, Josef [Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic); Masarik, Milos [EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel, a.s. (Czech Republic)

    2010-06-15

    The paper describes the original proposal of ways of solution and function of the program equipment for assessment of the process of casting slabs. The program system LITIOS was developed and implemented in EVRAZ Vitkovice Steel Ostrava on the equipment of continuous casting of steel (further only ECC). This program system works on the data warehouse of technological parameters of casting and quality parameters of slabs. It enables an ECC technologist to analyze the course of casting melt and with using statistics methods to set the influence of single technological parameters on the duality of final slabs. The system also enables long term monitoring and optimization of the production.

  3. Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Metal Casting Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-09-01

    This detailed report benchmarks the energy and environmental characteristics of the key technologies used in the major processes of the metal casting industry.

  4. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Final technical report, September 29, 1993--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.; Giese, S.R.; Lane, A.M.

    1996-01-31

    This is the final report covering work performed on research into methods of attaining clean ferrous castings. In this program methods were developed to minimize the formation of inclusions in steel castings by using a variety of techniques which decreased the tendency for inclusions to form during melting, casting and solidification. In a second project, a reaction chamber was built to remove inclusions from molten steel using electromagnetic force. Finally, a thorough investigation of the causes of sand penetration defects in iron castings was completed, and a program developed which predicts the probability of penetration formation and indicates methods for avoiding it.

  5. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

  6. Milling of Sand Blocks to Make Casting Moulds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.; Rodriguez, A.; Lamikiz, A.; Penafiel, F. J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Basque Country, ETSII, c/Alameda de Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2011-01-17

    In this paper a full procedure to make moulds in sand for direct casting of metallic parts is presented. The technology aims at unique pieces or art pieces, where only one prototype or components is required, but lead times are much reduced. The key of the procedure is to achieve enough tool life when milling with carbide tools, avoiding the risk of sand destruction or damage.The use of inverse techniques is a common input due to the industrial sectors where the direct milling is interesting. Two examples of moulds are presented, evaluating times and costs. A special study of tool wear is also presented.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  8. Cast-stone sectors for lining bends in pipework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chechulin, V.A.; Novikov, A.I.; Karpov, V.M.; Sotnik, A.A.; Sedyshev, B.L.

    1987-03-01

    The authors disclose an efficient method for lining the bends of pipelines used to deliver coal dust to the burners of coal-fired power plants or to transport coal slurries in mining and preparation enterprises. The method consists of melting a wear-resistant silicate compound and casting it in the form of rings whose increased width on the outboard side accounts for the angle of the bend when the rings are installed consecutively inside the pipe. Enhanced service life estimations and cost benefit analyses are given for pipe bends thus lined in both of the above applications.

  9. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Nicolas; Bernard, Alain

    2010-01-01

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  10. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Perry; Magali Mauchand; Alain Bernard

    2010-11-26

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  11. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V. [KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, Belgaum -590 008, Karnataka (India); Parappagoudar, M. B. [Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Durg (C.G)-491001 (India)

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  12. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasoyinu, Yemi

    2014-03-31

    Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

  13. eNgINeerINg g r A d U A T e P r O g r A M S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    IIT ArMOUr COllege Of eNgINeerINg g r A d U A T e P r O g r A M S Educating a nEw gEnEration of EnginEErs #12;A TrAdiTion of ExcEllEncE Armour College of Engineering was founded in 1893 as Armour Institute, dedicated to preparing students from all backgrounds for careers as engineers in a rapidly

  14. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Von L. Richards

    2011-09-30

    This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

  15. S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Management Nov. 30, 2002 Prof. Jeff Tian, SMU #12;S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 2 Software Quality: Why: customer view of quality Probability: statistical modeling Time/input/environment: OP · OP: OperationalS/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance -- Meeting New Challenges Jeff Tian

  16. Characterization of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloy permanent mold castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bichler, L. [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada); Ravindran, C., E-mail: rravindr@ryerson.ca [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard St. E., Toronto, M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Casting premium-quality magnesium alloy components for aerospace and automotive applications poses unique challenges. Magnesium alloys are known to freeze rapidly prior to filling a casting cavity, resulting in misruns and cold shuts. In addition, melt oxidation, solute segregation and turbulent metal flow during casting contribute to the formation of fold defects. In this research, formation of fold defects in AZ91D and AE42 magnesium alloys cast via the permanent mold casting process was investigated. Computer simulations of the casting process predicted the development of a turbulent metal flow in a critical casting region with abrupt geometrical transitions. SEM and light optical microscopy examinations revealed the presence of folds in this region for both alloys. However, each alloy exhibited a unique mechanism responsible for fold formation. In the AZ91D alloy, melt oxidation and velocity gradients in the critical casting region prevented fusion of merging metal front streams. In the AE42 alloy, limited solubility of rare-earth intermetallic compounds in the {alpha}-Mg phase resulted in segregation of Al{sub 2}RE particles at the leading edge of a metal front and created microstructural inhomogeneity across the fold.

  17. Development of a new casting method to fabricate U–Zr alloy containing minor actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hoon Song; Hyung Tae Kim; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee; R. S. Fielding

    2014-01-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U–Zr alloys for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) have conventionally been fabricated using an injection casting method. However, casting alloys containing volatile radioactive constituents, such as Am, are problematic in a conventional injection casting method. As an alternative fabrication method, low pressure gravity casting has been developed. Casting soundness, microstructural characteristics, alloying composition, density, and fuel losses were evaluated for the following as-cast fuel slugs: U–10 wt% Zr, U–10 wt% Zr–5 wt% RE, and U–10 wt% Zr–5 wt% RE–5 wt% Mn. The U and Zr contents were uniform throughout the matrix, and impurities such as oxyen, carbon, and nitrogen satisfied the specification of total impurities less than 2,000 ppm. The appearance of the fuel slugs was generally sound, and the internal integrity was shown to be satisfactory based on gamma-ray radiography. In a volatile surrogate casting test, the U–Zr–RE–Mn fuel slug showed that nearly all of the manganese was retained when casting was done under an inert atmosphere.

  18. Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties R.A. Hardin.A., and Beckermann, C., "Simulation of the Mechanical Performance of Cast Steel with Porosity: Static Properties1 and C. Beckermann2 1 Research Engineer, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Dept. The University

  19. EFFECT OF POROSITY ON DEFORMATION, DAMAGE, AND FRACTURE OF CAST STEEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    EFFECT OF POROSITY ON DEFORMATION, DAMAGE, AND FRACTURE OF CAST STEEL Richard Hardin1 , Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting, Porosity, Tensile Properties, Damage, Fracture Abstract A combined experimental and computational study is performed to investigate the effect of internal shrinkage porosity

  20. Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN A simulation methodology for predicting the fatigue life of cast steel components with shrinkage porosity is developed and validated through comparison with previously performed measure- ments

  1. ANALYSIS OF ASTM X-RAY SHRINKAGE RATING FOR STEEL CASTINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 ANALYSIS OF ASTM X-RAY SHRINKAGE RATING FOR STEEL CASTINGS Kent Carlson1 , Shouzhu Ou1 , Richard-ray shrinkage rating system for radiographs of steel castings. The first study evaluated the reliability and repeatability of x-ray shrinkage ratings through a statistical study of x-rays that were each rated seven

  2. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MINWALL HJ

    2011-04-08

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  3. Grain refinement of cast niobium via equal channel angular extrusion/annealing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Don O.

    2007-04-25

    decreases from the as-cast material to the worked/recrystallized material while the 0.2% yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increase from the as-cast material to the worked/recrystallized material. Long sub-grains are created in the as...

  4. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  5. Clean ferrous casting technology research. Annual report, September 29, 1994--September 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, J.; Bates, C.E.; Piwonka, T.S.

    1995-10-31

    This annual report covers work performed in the second year of research on Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. Significant progress was made in establishing pouring practices which avoid re-oxidation of steel during pouring; application of revised pouring practices have led to reduced inclusion levels in commercially poured steel castings.

  6. A review and update of advancements in clean cast steel technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, M.; Monroe, R.W.; Griffin, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Steel Founders' Society of America Quality Assurance Task Force identified oxide macroinclusions as a universal problem experienced by users of steel castings. SFSA along with the Department of Commerce and the Department of Energy have sponsored research directed at reducing the occurrence of macroinclusions in steel castings. The Clean Cast Steel Technology program has investigated melting practice, pouring practice, gating practice, ladle treatment, and special devices such as filtration and analog simulation of mold pouring and filling. In-plant trials have demonstrated a dramatic improvement in casting quality with submerged pouring of steel castings. Research is currently underway in optimizing foundry melting practice to reduce macroinclusions. A 30--50% reduction in macroinclusion occurrence has been observed in production castings at the foundries participating in the trials. Analog simulation and in-plant trials of pouring practices have demonstrated that poor gating practice can increase air entrainment and oxide inclusions. Ladle treatments such as calcium wire injection has been demonstrated in plant trials to significantly reduce oxide defects in steel castings. Experiments have been conducted at participating foundries to examine the benefits of filtration on casting quality. Filtration has been shown to reduce rework and scrap by 70% in some cases.

  7. PeerCast: Churn-Resilient End System Multicast on Heterogeneous Overlay Networks Jianjun Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    P) network are confronted with high churn rates (Saroiu et al., 2002) with nodes enteringTitle: PeerCast: Churn-Resilient End System Multicast on Heterogeneous Overlay Networks Authors-7404 Phone: (706) 542-2737 Fax: (706) 542-2966 Email: laks@cs.uga.edu 1 #12;PeerCast: Churn-Resilient End

  8. Casting Engineer Process Research AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless and electrical steels, has an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    AK Steel Casting Engineer ­ Process Research AK Steel, a leading producer of carbon, stainless, will act in support of primary and secondary steelmaking as well as casting operations for carbon

  9. National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Development of an automated ultrasonic inspection cell for detecting subsurface discontinuities in cast gray iron. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burningham, J.S.

    1995-08-01

    This inspection cell consisted of an ultrasonic flaw detector, transducer, robot, immersion tank, computer, and software. Normal beam pulse-echo ultrasonic nondestructive testing, using the developed automated cell, was performed on 17 bosses on each rough casting. Ultrasonic transducer selection, initial inspection criteria, and ultrasonic flow detector (UFD) setup parameters were developed for the gray iron castings used in this study. The software were developed for control of the robot and UFD in real time. The software performed two main tasks: emulating the manual operation of the UFD, and evaluating the ultrasonic signatures for detecting subsurface discontinuities. A random lot of 105 castings were tested; the 100 castings that passed were returned to the manufacturer for machining into finished parts and then inspection. The other 5 castings had one boss each with ultrasonic signatures consistent with subsurface discontinuities. The cell was successful in quantifying the ultrasonic echo signatures for the existence of signature characteristics consistent with Go/NoGo criteria developed from simulated defects. Manual inspection showed that no defects in the areas inspected by the automated cell avoided detection in the 100 castings machined into finished parts. Of the 5 bosses found to have subsurface discontinuities, two were verified by manual inspection. The cell correctly classified 1782 of the 1785 bosses (99.832%) inspected.

  10. Solar Axion search with Micromegas detectors in the CAST Experiment with $^{3}$He as buffer gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Axions are well motivated particles proposed in an extension of the SM as a solution to the strong CP problem. Also, there is the category of Axion-Like Particles (ALPs) which appear in extensions of the SM and share the same phenomenology of the axion. Axions and ALPs are candidates to solve the Dark Matter problem. CAST, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope is looking for solar axions since 2003. CAST exploit the helioscope technique using a decommissioned LHC dipole magnet in which solar axions could be reconverted into photons. Three of the four detectors operating at CAST are of the Micromegas type. The analysis of the data of the three Micromegas detectors during the 2011 data taking campaign at CAST is presented in this thesis, obtaining a limit on the coupling constant of g$_{a \\gamma}$ CAST Micromegas detectors exploit different strategies developed for the reduction of the background level. Moreov...

  11. Microporosity is one of the major defects encountered in castings and is caused by two concomitant mechanisms: solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. It reduces mechanical properties of the cast part like fatigue life.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    mechanisms: solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. It reduces mechanical properties of the cast part·Microporosity is one of the major defects encountered in castings and is caused by two concomitant for multigas systems in multi-component alloys. Modeling of Casting, Welding and Adv. Solidif. Proc. XI, volume

  12. Translating Water Spray Cooling of a Steel Bar Sand Casting Thomas J. Williams, Daniel Galles, and Christoph Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Translating Water Spray Cooling of a Steel Bar Sand Casting Thomas J. Williams, Daniel Galles, IA 52242 Abstract Ablation casting is a recently introduced process in which the sand mold is ablated, i.e., washed away, from the casting during solidification. The method uses a water-soluble binder

  13. The Role of Castes in Formal Specification of MAS School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, Oxford Brookes University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    The Role of Castes in Formal Specification of MAS Hong Zhu School of Computing and Mathematical of classes, castes introduced in the formal specification language SLAB provide a language facility that provides modularity in the formal specification of multiagent systems. A caste represents a set of agents

  14. Ray Casting Algebraic Surfaces using the Frustum Form Martin Reimers1 and Johan Seland1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsen, Kenneth Hvistendahl

    Ray Casting Algebraic Surfaces using the Frustum Form Martin Reimers1 and Johan Seland1,2 1Centre to appear in Computer Graphics Forum Abstract We propose an algorithm for interactive ray-casting, such as biology, physics and mathematics. Ray casting is a standard approach for visualizing a 3D surface on a 2D

  15. Otimizao do Algoritmo de Ray Casting para Visualizao de Tomografias ROBERTO DE BEAUCLAIR SEIXAS1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    Otimização do Algoritmo de Ray Casting para Visualização de Tomografias ROBERTO DE BEAUCLAIR SEIXAS, Brasil WURQ#OQFFEU Abstract. Ray Casting is a useful volume visualization technique that has a high computational cost. This work proposes some optimization procedures of the Ray Casting algorithm, originally

  16. Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Sand Casting K.D. Carlson, A.J. Melendez and C. Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    1 Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Sand Casting K.D. Carlson, A.J. Melendez, as well as their final locations on the surface of steel sand castings. Inclusions originate on the melt. The inclusion model is implemented in a general-purpose casting simulation code. The model is validated

  17. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 JULY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3357 Rapid casting of patterned vascular networks for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Christopher S.

    LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 1 JULY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT3357 Rapid casting of patterned vascular casting approach allows independent control of network geometry, endothelialization and extravascular be fabricated by creating a rigid 3D lattice of filaments, casting the lattice into 1Department

  18. ''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

    2001-12-14

    This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

  19. Reducing Leaks in Cast Pump and Valve Bodies using Solidification Simulation Raymond Monroe, Steel Founders' Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    shrinkage. This provides a way to assess casting quality prior to production at sensitivity levels the liquid and so the shrinkage associated with this transition must be managed through clever casting designReducing Leaks in Cast Pump and Valve Bodies using Solidification Simulation Raymond Monroe, Steel

  20. Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points were analyzed for rheological properties and density. Both the rheological properties (plastic viscosity and yield strength) and density were consistent with previous and later SCPF runs.

  1. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  2. Thermal casting process for the preparation of membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caneba, G.T.M.; Soong, D.S.

    1985-07-10

    Disclosed is a method for providing anisotropic polymer membrane from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

  3. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.

    1987-10-28

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a model within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. 8 figs.

  4. Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stump, Aaron; Weirich, Stephanie; 10.4204/EPTCS.43.6

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a type-and-effect system called Teqt, which distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functions, for a lambda calculus with general recursion and equality types. The central idea is to include a primitive type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced from possibly diverging to total, using a proof of Terminates t. We call such coercions termination casts, and show how to implement terminating recursion using them. For the meta-theory of the system, we describe a translation from Teqt to a logical theory of termination for general recursive, simply typed functions. Every typing judgment of Teqt is translated to a theorem expressing the appropriate termination property of the computational part of the Teqt term.

  5. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were obtained with unreinforced 356 aluminum casting. Good strength can be obtained with a sound die casting without any defects produced by squeeze casting. The use of higher pressure to produce the squeeze casting has been shown to increase the strength of a hemispherical dome casting. This dome shape casting has been produced both with and without reinforcement and tested to determine its pressure resistance under internal pressure of water. Only a slight improvement in strength could be determined because of water leaks at the seal between hemispherical dome and its flat supporting side. However, when the ability of the casting was tested under the compressive force of a plunger, the strengthening effect of wire mesh or sheet was evident. Higher loads to failure were obtained because of the reinforcement of the stainless steel wire and punched sheet. Rather than a sudden failure occurring, the reinforcement of the stainless steel wire or the punched hard stainless steel sheet held the material together and prevented any loss of the fractured casting to the surroundings. Unalloyed steel did not have the required strength or mechanical properties to increase the properties of the casting.

  6. Anisotropic constitutive model and FE simulation of the sintering process of slip cast traditional porcelain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarbandi, B.; Besson, J.; Boussuge, M.; Ryckelynck, D. [Centre des Materiaux / Mines ParisTech / CNRS UMR 7633 / BP 87, 91003 Evry (France)

    2010-06-15

    Slip cast ceramic components undergo both sintering shrinkage and creep deformation caused by gravity during the firing cycle. In addition sintering may be anisotropic due to the development of preferential directions during slip casting. Both phenomena induce complex deformations of parts which make the design of casting molds difficult. To help solving this problem, anisotropic constitutive equations are proposed to represent the behavior of the ceramic compacts during sintering. The model parameters are identified using tests allowing to characterize both sintering and creep. The model was implemented in a finite element software and used to simulate the deformation of a traditional ceramic object during sintering.

  7. Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 28, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanescu, D.M.; Lane, A.M.; Giese, S.R.; Pattabhi, R.; El-Kaddah, N.H.; Griffin, J.; Bates, C.E.; Piwonka, T.S.

    1994-10-01

    This annual report covers work performed in the first year of research on Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. During this year the causes of penetration of cast iron in sand molds were defined and a program which predicts the occurrence of penetration was written and verified in commercial foundries. Calculations were made to size a reaction chamber to remove inclusions from liquid steel using electromagnetic force and the chamber was built. Finally, significant progress was made in establishing pouring practices which avoid re-oxidation of steel during pouring application of revised pouring practices have led to reduced inclusion levels in commercially poured steel castings.

  8. Understanding how processing additives tune nanoscale morphology of high efficiency organic photovoltaic blends: From casting solution to spun-cast thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Ming [ORNL; Keum, Jong Kahk [ORNL; Kumar, Rajeev [ORNL; Chen, Jihua [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL; Chen, Wei [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Jianhui, Hou [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Institute of Chemistry; Do, Changwoo [ORNL; Littrell, Ken [ORNL; Sanjib, Das [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Geohegan, David B [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Xiao, Kai [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Adding a small amount of a processing additive to the casting solution of organic blends has been demonstrated to be an effective method for achieving improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). However, an understanding of the nano-structural evolution occurring in the transformation from casting solution to thin photoactive films is still lacking. In this report, we investigate the effects of the processing additive diiodooctane (DIO) on the morphology of OPV blend of PBDTTT-C-T and fullerene derivative, PC71BM in a casting solution and in spun-cast thin films by using neutron/x-ray scattering, neutron reflectometry and other characterization techniques. The results reveal that DIO has no effect on the solution structures of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM. In the spun-cast films, however, DIO is found to promote significantly the molecular ordering of PBDTTT-C-T and PC71BM, and phase segregation, resulting in the improved PCE. Thermodynamic analysis based on Flory-Huggins theory provides a rationale for the effects of DIO on different characteristics of phase segregation as a solvent and due to evaporationg during the film formation. Such information may enable improved rational design of ternary blends to more consistently achieve improved PCE for OPVs.

  9. MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

    2012-05-02

    The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers���������������¢�������������������������������� reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into ���������������¢��������������������������������nuts���������������¢������������������������������� that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

  10. Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbeek, Ross

    2010-01-25

    Ross Overbeek of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes gives a presentation on "Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  11. Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Folker [ANL] [ANL

    2010-01-26

    Folker Meyer from Argonne National Lab gives a presentation on "Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  12. Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    Interfacial thermal conductance in spun-cast polymer films and polymer brushes Mark D. Losego inorganic materials and anharmonic polymers have potentially intriguing thermal transport behavior. The low thermal conductivity of amorphous polymers limits significant interfacial effects to polymer film

  13. Simulation of Stresses during Casting of Binary Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , C. BECKERMANN, Z. ZHEN, and N. HORT A viscoplastic stress model is used to predict contraction, an attempt has been made to numerically simulate the deformations and stresses during permanent mold casting

  14. Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Jae-taek

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained ...

  15. Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Overbeek, Ross

    2011-06-08

    Ross Overbeek of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes gives a presentation on "Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  16. Occlusal Contacts of Milled Polyurethane Casts Mounted in a Proprietary and Semi-adjustable Articulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Sarah Parker

    2015-04-07

    relationship. This information is transferred to a milling machine that carves casts from a solid polyurethane block using a subtractive process. The completed arches can be ‘snapmounted’ in a proprietary articulator for restoration fabrication at a lab...

  17. Industrial Assessments in the Cast Metals Industry: Common Problems and Opportunities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, M. R.; Barnish, T. J.; Kasten, D.

    1998-01-01

    to be considered include the melting area where the potential for inductive heating, waste heat recovery, preheating of metal charges, and optimization of combustion efficiency will be discussed. The casting area provides many opportunities including mold design...

  18. SIMULATION OF STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    are often prone to hot tearing defects. Hot tears form during solidification due to tensile strains been made to numerically simulate the deformations and stresses during permanent mold casting of an AZ

  19. Computational modeling of structure of metal matrix composite in centrifugal casting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagorski, Roman [Department of Electrotechnology, Faculty of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Krasinskiego 8, 40-019, Katowice (Poland)

    2007-04-07

    The structure of alumina matrix composite reinforced with crystalline particles obtained during centrifugal casting process are studied. Several parameters of cast process like pouring temperature, temperature, rotating speed and size of casting mould which influent on structure of composite are examined. Segregation of crystalline particles depended on other factors such as: the gradient of density of the liquid matrix and reinforcement, thermal processes connected with solidifying of the cast, processes leading to changes in physical and structural properties of liquid composite are also investigated. All simulation are carried out by CFD program Fluent. Numerical simulations are performed using the FLUENT two-phase free surface (air and matrix) unsteady flow model (volume of fluid model - VOF) and discrete phase model (DPM)

  20. Interfacial shear strength of cast and directionally solidified NiAl-sapphire fiber composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.N.; Asthana, R. . Chemical Engineering Dept.); Noebe, R.D. . Intermetallics Branch)

    1993-09-01

    The feasibility of fabricating intermetallic NiAl-sapphire fiber composites by casting and zone directional solidification has been examined. The fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths measured using a fiber push-out technique in both cast and directionally solidified composites are greater than the strengths reported for composites fabricated by powder cloth process using organic binders. Microscopic examination of fibers extracted from cast, directionally solidified (DS), and thermally cycled composites, and the high values of interfacial shear strengths suggest that the fiber-matrix interface does not degrade due to casting and directional solidification. Sapphire fibers do not pin grain boundaries during directional solidification, suggesting that this technique can be used to fabricate sapphire fiber reinforced NiAl composites with single crystal matrices.

  1. Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Meyer, Folker [ANL

    2011-06-08

    Folker Meyer from Argonne National Lab gives a presentation on "Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  2. Microstructural breakdown and scale-up effects in equal channel angular extrusion of cast copper 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadri, Shabibahmed Jehangir

    2006-10-30

    Channel Angular Extrusion of Cast Copper. (August 2005) Shabibahmed Jehangir Kadri, B.S., Gujarat University (India) Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. K. Theodore Hartwig The primary objectives of this study were: (1) to verify the effectiveness...

  3. Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuyucak, Selcuk; Li, Delin

    2013-12-31

    Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using the lip pouring method. It was observed again that gating designs greatly influenced the melt filling velocity and the number of inclusion defects. The radial choked gating showed improvements in casting cleanliness and yield over the other gatings, even though no mold filters were used in the gating system.

  4. Morphological characterization of ? phase in poly-(vinylidenefluoride) film prepared by spin cast method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehtani, Hitesh Kumar, E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com; Kumar, Rishi, E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com; Raina, K. K., E-mail: kkraina@gmail.com [School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala-147004 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Poly-(Vinylidene fluoride) PVDF film was prepared by spin casting method to control the pore size of the matrix. The morphological spherulitic structure was confirmed Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) after gold sputtering and the presence of ? phase was ensured in spin cast PVDF film by the FTIR spectroscopy. The ? phase is very important in the application because it improve the properties like piezoelectricity by modifying PVDF crystallinity.

  5. Improving the Efficiency of Die Casting Machine Hydraulic Systems with the Retrofit of Adjustable Frequency Drives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambs, L.; Kosanovic, D.; Edberg, C.

    1999-01-01

    this period, the injection plunger is maintaining pressure on the metal in the mold during its solidification. This compensates for shrinkage as the part solidifies. Flow requirements are low while pressure requirements are high. The duration... represents a connected electrical load of over 315 MW. DIE CASTING PROCESS The basic die casting process is very similar to the injection molding process used for fonning plastic parts. Two hardened steel mold or die halves are moved together and a...

  6. Grid Integration Studies: Data Requirements, Greening the Grid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rates) for grid integration model development and calibration. * Collect and archive sub-hourly data where possible. * Monitor and incorporate best practices in fore- casting...

  7. Pulsed Neutron Measurments With A DT Neutron Generator for an Annular HEU Uranium Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, John T [ORNL; Archer, Daniel E [ORNL; Wright, Michael C [ORNL; Mullens, James Allen [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    Measurements were performed with a single annular, stainless-steel-canned casting of uranium (93.17 wt% 235U) metal ( ~18 kg) to provide data to verify calculational methods for criticality safety. The measurements used a small portable DT generator with an embedded alpha detector to time and directionally tag the neutrons from the generator. The center of the time and directional tagged neutron beam was perpendicular to the axis of the casting. The radiation detectors were 1x1x6 in plastic scintillators encased in 0.635-cm-thick lead shields that were sensitive to neutrons above 1 MeV in energy. The detector lead shields were adjacent to the casting and the target spot of the generator was about 3.8 cm from the casting at the vertical center. The time distribution of the fission induced radiation was measured with respect to the source event by a fast (1GHz) processor. The measurements described in this paper also include time correlation measurements with a time tagged spontaneously fissioning 252Cf neutron source, both on the axis and on the surface of the casting. Measurements with both types of sources are compared. Measurements with the DT generator closely coupled with the HEU provide no more additional information than those with the Cf source closely coupled with the HEU and are complicated by the time and directionally tagged neutrons from the generator scattering between the walls and floor of the measurements room and the casting while still above detection thresholds.

  8. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  9. Fastcast: Integration and application of rapid prototyping and computational simulation to investment casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Atwood, C.L.

    1996-09-01

    The emergence of several rapid prototyping and manufacturing (RP and M) technologies is having a dramatic impact on investment casting. While the most successful of the rapid prototyping technologies are almost a decade old, relatively recent process advances in their application have produced some remarkable success in utilizing their products as patterns for investment castings. Sandia National Laboratories has been developed highly coupled experimental and computational capabilities to examine the investment casting process with the intention of reducing the amount of time required to manufacture castings, and to increase the quality of the finished product. This presentation will begin with process aspects of RP and M pattern production and handling, shell fabrication, burnout, and casting. The emphasis will be on how the use of Stereolithography (SL) or Selective Laser Sintered (SLS) patterns differs from more traditional wax pattern processes. Aspects of computational simulation to couple design, thermal analysis, and mold filling will be discussed. Integration of these topics is probably the greatest challenge to the use of concurrent engineering principles with investment casting. Sandia has conducted several experiments aimed at calibrating computer codes and providing data for input into these simulations. Studies involving materials as diverse as stainless steel and gold have been conducted to determine liquid metal behavior in molds via real time radiography. The application of these experiments to predictive simulations will be described.

  10. Low-head feeding system for thin section castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, Sabah S. (Allegheny County, PA); Kleeb, Thomas R. (Allegheny County, PA); Lewis, Thomas W. (Allegheny County, PA); McDermott, John F. (Allegheny County, PA); Ozgu, Mustafa R. (Northhampton County, PA); Padfield, Ralph C. (Lehigh County, PA); Rego, Donovan N. (Lehigh County, PA); Vassilicos, Achilles (Allegheny County, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A feed system is provided for conveying molten metal to a thin section caster having mold surfaces moving exclusively in the direction of casting. The feed system has a passage of circular cross section adjacent to one end thereof for receiving molten metal and a rectangular cross section at the delivery end thereof adjacent to the caster. The feed system is designed for supplying molten metal to the caster at low pressure for "closed-pool" type caster operation. The point of highest elevation in the metal flow passage of the feed system is on the upper surface of a transition portion where the cross section changes from circular to rectangular adjacent to the nozzle. The level or height of the high point above the centerline of the nozzle exit is selected so as to be less than the pressure of the metal measured in inches at the nozzle exit. This feature enables the maintenance of positive pressure in the metal within the feed system so that ingress of air into the metal is prevented.

  11. Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

  12. New solar axion search in CAST with $^4$He filling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; H. Bräuninger; J. Bremer; V. Burwitz; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; E. Da Riva; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; A. Dermenev; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galán; J. A. García; A. Gardikiotis; J. G. Garza; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; E. Georgiopoulou; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; M. Gómez Marzoa; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; M. Karuza; M. Kavuk; M. Kr?mar; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; G. Luzón; S. Neff; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; I. Ortega; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt A. Rodríguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; I. Shilon; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Tomás; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

    2015-06-11

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for $a\\to\\gamma$ conversion in the 9 T magnetic field of a refurbished LHC test magnet that can be directed toward the Sun. Two parallel magnet bores can be filled with helium of adjustable pressure to match the X-ray refractive mass $m_\\gamma$ to the axion search mass $m_a$. After the vacuum phase (2003--2004), which is optimal for $m_a\\lesssim0.02$ eV, we used $^4$He in 2005--2007 to cover the mass range of 0.02--0.39 eV and $^3$He in 2009--2011 to scan from 0.39--1.17 eV. After improving the detectors and shielding, we returned to $^4$He in 2012 to investigate a narrow $m_a$ range around 0.2 eV ("candidate setting" of our earlier search) and 0.39--0.42 eV, the upper axion mass range reachable with $^4$He, to "cross the axion line" for the KSVZ model. We have improved the limit on the axion-photon coupling to $g_{a\\gamma}< 1.47\\times10^{-10} {\\rm GeV}^{-1}$ (95% C.L.), depending on the pressure settings. Since 2013, we have returned to vacuum and aim for a significant increase in sensitivity.

  13. Results on axion physics from the CAST Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eleftheriadis, Christos A; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Beltran, B; Bräuninger, H; Carmona, J; Cebrián, S; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Di Lella, L; Englhauser, J; Fanourakis, G K; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Geralis, T; Giomataris, Ioanis; Gninenko, S; Gomez, H; Hasinoff, M; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, D H H; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakovcic, K; Kang, D; Königsmann, K C; Kotthaus, R; Krcmar, M; Kousouris, K; Kuster, M; Laki, B; Lasseur, C; Liolios, A; Ljubicic, cA; Lutz, G; Luzón, G; Miller, D; Morales, A; Morales, J; Nordt, A; Ortiz, A; Papaevangelou, T; Placci, A; Raffelt, G; Riege1, H; Rodríguez, A; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Semertzidis, Y K; Serpico, Pasquale Dario; Stewart, L; Villar, J; Vogel, J; Walckiers, L; Zioutas, K

    2007-01-01

    Axions are expected to be produced in the sun via the Primakoff process. They may be detected through the inverse process in the laboratory, under the influence of a strong magnetic field, giving rise to X-rays of energies in the range of a few keV. Such an Axion detector is the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), collecting data since 2003. Results have been published, pushing the axion-photon coupling g$_{a\\gamma}$ below the 10$^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ limit at 95% CL, for axion masses less than 0.02 eV. This limit is nearly an order of magnitude lower than previous experimental limits and surpassed for the first time limits set from astrophysical arguments based on the energy-loss concept. The experiment is currently exploring axion masses in the range of 0.02 eV $< m_a <$ 1.1 eV. In the next run, currently under preparation, the axion mass explored will be extended up to the limit of 1.1 eV, testing for the first time the region of theoretical axion models with the axion helioscope method.

  14. Results on axion physics from the CAST Experiment at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christos Eleftheriadis

    2007-06-05

    Axions are expected to be produced in the sun via the Primakoff process. They may be detected through the inverse process in the laboratory, under the influence of a strong magnetic field, giving rise to X-rays of energies in the range of a few keV. Such an Axion detector is the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), collecting data since 2003. Results have been published, pushing the axion-photon coupling g$_{a\\gamma}$ below the 10$^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ limit at 95% CL, for axion masses less than 0.02 eV. This limit is nearly an order of magnitude lower than previous experimental limits and surpassed for the first time limits set from astrophysical arguments based on the energy-loss concept. The experiment is currently exploring axion masses in the range of 0.02 eV $< m_a <$ 1.1 eV. In the next run, currently under preparation, the axion mass explored will be extended up to the limit of 1.1 eV, testing for the first time the region of theoretical axion models with the axion helioscope method.

  15. The search for solar axions in the CAST experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donghwa Kang

    2006-05-15

    The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment at CERN searches for solar axions with energies in the keV range. It is possible that axions are produced in the core of the sun by the interaction of thermal photons with virtual photons of strong electromagnetic fields. In this experiment, the solar axions can be reconverted to photons in the transversal field of a 9 Tesla superconducting magnet. At both ends of the 10m-long dipole magnet three different X-ray detectors were installed, which are sensitive in the interesting photon energy range. Preliminary results from the analysis of the 2004 data are presented: g$_{a\\gamma}<0.9\\times10^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ at 95% C.L. for axion masses m$_{a} <$ 0.02 eV. At the end of 2005, data started to be taken with a buffer gas in the magnet pipes in order to extend the sensitivity to axion masses up to 0.8 eV.

  16. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  17. Energy and Technolgy Assessment of Zinc and Magnesium Casting Plants, Technical Report Close-out, August 25,2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twin City Die Castings Company; Tom Heider; North American Die Castings Association

    2006-08-25

    Twin City Die Castings Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota, Twin City Die Castings Company was awarded project No. DE-FG36-05GO15097 to perform plant wide assessments of ten (10) die casting facilities that produce zinc and magnesium alloy castings in order to determine improvements and potential cost savings in energy use. Mr. Heider filled the role of team leader for the project and utilized the North American Die Casting Association (NADCA) to conduct audits at team participant plants so as to hold findings specific to each plant proprietary. The intended benefits of the project were to improve energy use through higher operational and process efficiency for the plants assessed. An improvement in energy efficiency of 5 – 15% was targeted. The primary objectives of the project was to: 1) Expand an energy and technology tool developed by the NADCA under a previous DOE project titled, “Energy and Technology Assessment for Die Casting Plants” for assessing aluminum die casting plants to be more specifically applicable to zinc and magnesium die casting facilities. 2) Conduct ten (10) assessments of zinc and magnesium die casting plants, within eight (8) companies, utilizing the assessment tool to identify, evaluate and recommend opportunities to enhance energy efficiency, minimize waste, and improve productivity. 3) Transfer the assessment tool to the die casting industry at large.

  18. Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

    2011-07-22

    Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting���¢��������s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125�������°C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU���¢��������s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

  19. Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results show that criticality is achievable with freeze-cast fuel pins despite the significant amount of inert fuel matrix. Freeze casting is a promising method to achieve very precise fuel placement within fuel pins. (authors)

  20. Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J. (ANL)

    2006-08-15

    Approximately 68% of the aluminum produced in the United States is first cast into ingots prior to further processing into sheet, plate, extrusions, or foil. The direct chill (DC) semi-continuous casting process has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of ingots due largely to its robust nature and relative simplicity. Though the basic process of DC casting is in principle straightforward, the interaction of process parameters with heat extraction, microstructural evolution, and development of solidification stresses is too complex to analyze by intuition or practical experience. One issue in DC casting is the formation of stress cracks [1-15]. In particular, the move toward larger ingot cross-sections, the use of higher casting speeds, and an ever-increasing array of mold technologies have increased industry efficiencies but have made it more difficult to predict the occurrence of stress crack defects. The Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap [16] has recognized the challenges inherent in the DC casting process and the control of stress cracks and selected the development of 'fundamental information on solidification of alloys to predict microstructure, surface properties, and stresses and strains' as a high-priority research need, and the 'lack of understanding of mechanisms of cracking as a function of alloy' and 'insufficient understanding of the aluminum solidification process', which is 'difficult to model', as technology barriers in aluminum casting processes. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks from the current level of 5% to 2%. Decreasing stress crack incidence is important for improving product quality and consistency as well as for saving resources and energy, since considerable amounts of cast metal could be saved by eliminating ingot cracking, by reducing the scalping thickness of the ingot before rolling, and by eliminating butt sawing. Full-scale industrial implementation of the results of the proposed research would lead to energy savings in excess of 6 trillion Btu by the year 2020. The research undertaken in this project aimed to achieve this objective by a collaboration of industry, university, and national laboratory personnel through Secat, Inc., a consortium of aluminum companies. During the four-year project, the industrial partners and the research team met in 16 quarterly meetings to discuss research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot production. The project focused on the development of a fundamental understanding of ingot cracking and detailed models of thermal conditions, solidification, microstructural evolution, and stress development during the initial transient in DC castings of the aluminum alloys 3004 and 5182. The microstructure of the DC casting ingots was systematically characterized. Carefully designed experiments were carried out at the national laboratory and university facilities as well as at the industrial locations using the industrial production facilities. The advanced computational capabilities of the national laboratories were used for thermodynamic and kinetic simulations of phase transformation, heat transfer and fluid flow, solidification, and stress-strain evolution during DC casting. The achievements of the project are the following: (1) Identified the nature of crack formation during DC casting; (2) Developed a novel method for determining the mechanical properties of an alloy at the nonequilibrium mushy zone of the alloy; (3) Measured heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) between the solidifying ingot and the cooling water jet; (4) Determined the material constitutive model at high temperatures; and (5) Developed computational capabilities for the simulation of cracking formation in DC casting ingot. The models and the database de

  1. The effect of residuals on the presence of intergranular surface cracks on continuously cast billets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijngaarden, M.J.U.T. van; Visagie, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    During 1991, Iscor Vereeniging experienced a dramatic increase in the rejection rate of specialty steel bars rolled from continuously cast billets due to the presence of seams on the bars. The seams originated from tearing of the billets during the first 2 passes in the roughing mill during hot rolling. The defective billets were found to contain fine intergranular cracks on the surface. Such cracks have been described in the literature and have been attributed to the presence of high levels of residuals resulting in the well-known phenomenon of surface hot shortness which results from the enrichment of residuals at the grain boundaries after preferential oxidation of iron during scaling of the steel. The present investigation revealed that the effect of residuals on intergranular surface cracking is a complex interaction between steel composition and casting conditions such as casting speed, intensity of secondary cooling, section size, and mold type. This paper quantifies the effect of residuals on the intergranular surface cracking of continuously cast billets and quantitatively relates the incidence of these cracks to parameters which can be controlled during steelmaking and continuous casting.

  2. Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

    2004-06-01

    The casting apparatus (50) includes a holding vessel (10) for containing a supply of molten metal (12) and a casting mold (52) located above the holding vessel (10) and having a casting cavity (54). A molten metal injector (14) extends into the holding vessel (10) and is at least partially immersed in the molten metal (12) in the holding vessel (10). The molten metal injector (14) is in fluid communication with the casting cavity (54). The molten metal injector (14) has an injector body (16) defining an inlet opening (24) for receiving molten metal into the injector body (16). A gas pressurization source (38) is in fluid communication with the injector body (16) for cyclically pressurizing the injector body (16) and inducing molten metal to flow from the injector body (16) to the casting cavity (54). An inlet valve (42) is located in the inlet opening (24) in the injector body (16) for filling molten metal into the injector body (16). The inlet valve (42) is configured to prevent outflow of molten metal from the injector body (16) during pressurization and permit inflow of molten metal into the injector body (16) after pressurization. The inlet valve (42) has an inlet valve actuator (44) located above the surface of the supply of molten metal (12) and is operatively connected to the inlet valve (42) for operating the inlet valve (42) between open and closed positions.

  3. Prompt Neutron Time Decay in Single HEU and DU Metal Annular Storage Castings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, Kirsten E [ORNL] [ORNL; McConchie, Seth M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mihalczo, John T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Previous measurements of highly enriched uranium (HEU) storage castings performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at the Y-12 National Security Complex showed a prompt neutron time decay that is not exponential. These measurements showed that multiple time constants originating from multiplication, time-of-flight, scattering in the assembly and room return could be associated with this prompt neutron decay. In this work, the contribution not associated with neutron multiplication was investigated via measurements with a depleted uranium (DU) casting. The measurements at ORNL used an annular (5.0-in OD, 3.5-in ID, 6.0-in H) DU casting with a time-tagged 252Cf source, centered vertically on the axis, and four closely coupled 1 1 6-in.-long plastic scintillators with -in.- thick lead shielding adjacent to the outer surface of the casting. This setup was identical to the configuration used in the previously performed measurements with HEU castings at Y-12. The time correlation between fission events and detections in the plastic scintillators was measured, as well as the time distribution of coincidences between multiple detectors within a 512-ns time window. The measurement results were then compared to MCNP-PoliMi calculations and the previous HEU measurements. Time constants from decay fits to the HEU and DU data were compared to characterize the contributions resulting from multiplication, time-of-flight, and scattering.

  4. Determination of effective axion masses in the helium-3 buffer of CAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruz, J

    2011-11-18

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a ground based experiment located in Geneva (Switzerland) searching for axions coming from the Sun. Axions, hypothetical particles that not only could solve the strong CP problem but also be one of the favored candidates for dark matter, can be produced in the core of the Sun via the Primakoff effect. They can be reconverted into X-ray photons on Earth in the presence of strong electromagnetic fields. In order to look for axions, CAST points a decommissioned LHC prototype dipole magnet with different X-ray detectors installed in both ends of the magnet towards the Sun. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV/c{sup 2}. During the second phase, CAST extends its mass sensitivity by tuning the electron density present in the magnetic field region. Injecting precise amounts of helium gas has enabled CAST to look for axion masses up to 1.2 eV/c{sup 2}. This paper studies the determination of the effective axion masses scanned at CAST during its second phase. The use of a helium gas buffer at temperatures of 1.8 K has required a detailed knowledge of the gas density distribution. Complete sets of computational fluid dynamic simulations validated with experimental data have been crucial to obtain accurate results.

  5. Computer modeling of electromagnetic edge containment in twin-roll casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, F.C.; Turner, L.R.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H.; Blazek, K.E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents modeling studies of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) analysis in twin-roll casting. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Inland Steel Company have worked together to develop a 3-D computer model that can predict eddy currents, fluid flows, and liquid metal containment for an electromagnetic (EM) edge containment device. This mathematical model can greatly shorten casting research on the use of EM fields for liquid metal containment and control. It can also optimize the existing casting processes and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in EM edge dams designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve Maxwell`s equations, Ohm`s law, Navier-Stokes equations, and transport equations of turbulence flow in a casting process that uses EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy-current distribution and electromagnetic forces in complex geometry. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free-surfaces and dynamic rollers. The computed 3-D magnetic fields and induced eddy currents in ELEKTRA are used as input to flow-field computations in CaPS-EM. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from both static and dynamic tests.

  6. Measurement of concrete E-modulus evolution since casting: A novel method based on ambient vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azenha, Miguel, E-mail: miguel.azenha@civil.uminho.p [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); ISISE - Institute for Sustainability and Innovation in Structural Engineering, Universidade do Minho, Escola de Engenharia, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Magalhaes, Filipe [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Faria, Rui [LABEST - Laboratory for the Concrete Technology and Structural Behaviour, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Cunha, Alvaro [VIBEST - Laboratory of Vibrations and Structural Monitoring, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-07-15

    The use of ambient vibration tests to characterize the evolution of E-modulus of concrete right after casting is investigated in this paper. A new methodology is proposed, which starts by casting a concrete cylindrical beam inside a hollow acrylic formwork. This beam is then placed horizontally, simply supported at both extremities, and vertical accelerations resulting from ambient vibration are measured at mid-span. Processing these mid-span acceleration time series using power spectral density functions allows a continuous identification of the first flexural frequency of vibration of the composite beam, which in turn is correlated with the evolutive E-modulus of concrete since casting. Together with experiments conducted with the proposed methodology, a complementary validation campaign for concrete E-modulus determination was undertaken by static loading tests performed on the composite beam, as well as by standard compressive tests of concrete cylinders of the same batch loaded at different ages.

  7. Evaluation of a Heat Flux Sensor for Spray Cooling for the Die Casting Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Wu, Zhuoxi

    2007-02-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. In this paper, a new technique for measuring the heat flux during lubricant application is evaluated. Data from experiments conducted using water spray are first presented. Water spray experiments were conducted for different initial plate temperatures. Measurements were conducted for the application of two different lubricants, of dilution ratios of 1/15 and 1/50 of lubricant in water. The measurement uncertainties were documented. The results show that the surface temperature decreases initially very fast. Numerical simulation results confirmed that the abrupt temperature drop is not an artifact but illustrates the thermal shock experienced by the dies during the initial stages of lubricant application. The lubricant experiments show that the sensor can be successfully used for testing die lubricants with typical dilution ratios encountered in the die casting process.

  8. Method and apparatus for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ciszek, T.F.

    1984-08-13

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials. The apparatus includes a plurality of conductive members arranged to define a container-like area having a desired cross-sectional shape. A portion or all of the conductive or semi-conductive material which is to be cast is introduced into the container-like area. A means is provided for inducing the flow of an electrical current in each of the conductive members, which currents act collectively to induce a current flow in the material. The induced current flow through the conductive members is in a direction substantially opposite to the induced current flow in the material so that the material is repelled from the conductive members during the casting process.

  9. Engineering-Scale Development of Injection Casting Technology for Metal Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogata, Takanari; Tsukada, Takeshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory 2-11-1 Iwado-Kita, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Engineering-scale injection casting tests were conducted in order to demonstrate the applicability of injection casting technology to the commercialized fast reactor fuel cycle. The uranium-zirconium alloy slugs produced in the tests were examined with reference to the practical slug specifications: average diameter tolerance {+-} 0.05 mm, local diameter tolerance {+-} 0.1 mm, density range 15.3 to 16.1 g/cm{sup 3}, zirconium content range 10 {+-} 1 wt% and total impurity (C, N, O, Si) <2000 ppm, which were provisionally determined. Most of the slugs satisfied these specifications, except for zirconium content. The impurity level was sufficiently low even though the residual and scrapped alloys were repeatedly recycled. The weight ratio of injected metal to charged metal was sufficiently high for a high process throughput. The injection casting technology will be applicable to the commercialized fuel cycle when the issue of zirconium content variation is resolved. (authors)

  10. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

  11. ing delivery of shipment. For

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    satisfactory food is available and in which no monophage could sur- UfO: ~NETT G. GALEF, JR. AND MATTHEW BECK

  12. Microstructure Based Modeling of ? Phase Influence on Mechanical Response of Cast AM Series Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Erin I.; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin; Deda, Erin; Allison, John; Li, Mei; Forsmark, Joy; Zindel, Jacob; Godlewski, Larry

    2014-09-30

    Magnesium alloys have become popular alternatives to aluminums and steels for the purpose of vehicle light-weighting. However, Mg alloys are hindered from wider application due to limited ductility as well as poor creep and corrosion performance. Understanding the impact of microstructural features on bulk response is key to improving Mg alloys for more widespread use and for moving towards truly predicting modeling capabilities. This study focuses on modeling the intrinsic features, particularly volume fraction and morphology of beta phase present, of cast Mg alloy microstructure and quantifying their impact on bulk performance. Computational results are compared to experimental measurements of cast plates of Mg alloy with varying aluminum content.

  13. The Impact of Ceramic Shell Strength on Hot Tearing during Investment Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norouzi, Saeid [MAPNA GROUP Co (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhangi, Hassan [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    The effect of ceramic shell strength on hot tearing susceptibility during solidification was inspected practicing investment casting of the cobalt-base superalloy samples with the same casting conditions, but different ceramic shell systems. Results showed that the lower the ceramic shell strength upon using polymer additives, the lower the hindered contraction rate, and the lower the hindered contraction rate, the smaller the hot tearing tendency. Optical microscopy and electron microscopy scanning revealed that the hot tear propagated along the last solidified interdendritic phase, and that the hot tear surface had two major modes: (1) the ductile region in the outer layer; and (2) the inner region of liquid embrittlement.

  14. Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Schenectady, NY)

    2004-09-07

    A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

  15. Recent constraints on axion-photon and axion-electron coupling with the CAST experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruz, J.; Vogel, J. K.; Pivovaroff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a helioscope looking for axions arising from the solar core plasma and arriving to Earth. The experiment, located in Geneva (Switzerland) is able to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset. Four x-ray detectors mounted on both ends of the magnet wait for photons from axion-to-photon conversion due to the Primakoff effect. Up to date, with the completion of Phases I and II, CAST has been looking for axions that could be produced in the Sun by both, hadronic and non-hadronic mechanisms.

  16. Recent constraints on axion-photon and axion-electron coupling with the CAST experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruz, J.; Vogel, J. K.; Pivovaroff, M. J.

    2015-03-24

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a helioscope looking for axions arising from the solar core plasma and arriving to Earth. The experiment, located in Geneva (Switzerland) is able to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset. Four x-ray detectors mounted on both ends of the magnet wait for photons from axion-to-photon conversion due to the Primakoff effect. Up to date, with the completion of Phases I and II, CAST has been looking for axions that could be produced in the Sun by both, hadronic and non-hadronic mechanisms.

  17. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-11-01

    Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. One of the major radionuclides that Cast Stone has the potential to immobilize is technetium (Tc). The mechanism for immobilization is through the reduction of the highly mobile Tc(VII) species to the less mobile Tc(IV) species by the blast furnace slag (BFS) used in the Cast Stone formulation. Technetium immobilization through this method would be beneficial because Tc is one of the most difficult contaminants to address at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site due to its complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes (vitrification, steam reformation, etc.), and high mobility in subsurface environments. In fact, the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS) identifies technetium-99 (99Tc) as one of the radioactive tank waste components contributing the most to the environmental impact associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site. The TC&WM EIS, along with an earlier supplemental waste-form risk assessment, used a diffusion-limited release model to estimate the release of different contaminants from the WTP process waste forms. In both of these predictive modeling exercises, where effective diffusivities based on grout performance data available at the time, groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well exceeded the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for 99Tc. (900 pCi/L). Recent relatively short-term (63 day) leach tests conducted on both LAW and secondary waste Cast Stone monoliths indicated that 99Tc diffusivities were at or near diffusivities where the groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well would exceed the allowable maximum permissible 99Tc concentrations. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of Tc in the Cast Stone waste form. One method to improve the performance of the Cast Stone waste form is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc inside Cast Stone.

  18. A review of "The Ashgate Research Companion to Giorgio Vasari" edited by David Cast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelta, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    in this field can hardly afford not to have a copy of Cartari at hand. While not all of his discussions will prove immediately useful, all should be immensely entertaining to readers even moderately interested in the broader mythical tradition. David Cast, ed..., published by the Giunti, in 1568. Despite some regrettable unevenness in style and tone—one wishes that David Cast had held his contributors to the same rigorous editorial standard of his own meticulous introduction—there are some true gems...

  19. Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

    2010-06-30

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

  20. In: R. Herbin & D. Kroner (Eds) Finite Volumes for Complex Applications III (Third International Symposium on Finite Volumes for Complex Applications , Porquerolles, France), p. 487-494, Hermes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christakis, Nikolaos

    of the boundaries to the flow. The emptying / filling of hoppers with particulate materials and liquid metal casting component in the numerical modelling of a number of processes. Fore example (1) Casting [4], the process

  1. Study of hot tearing of A206 aluminum alloy using Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esfahani, M.R. Nasr [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niroumand, B., E-mail: behzn@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The hot tearing susceptibility of A206 aluminum alloy was investigated using Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting method and the effect of the casting temperature on hot tearing was studied. The Instrumented Constrained T-shaped Casting apparatus enabled real-time measurements of the contraction load developed in the casting and the temperature variations during solidification as a function of time. Critical temperatures and points during solidification of the castings were extracted from these data. The contraction load developed at the coalescence point of the castings was identified as a comparative criterion for predicting the hot tearing susceptibility of the alloys which could be utilized even when no visual tearing had occurred. The results showed that hot tearing susceptibility increased with the casting temperature. This was associated with reduced cooling rate, increased solute segregation and more localized hot spot formation at the T-junction area. Increase in the casting temperature also increased the grain size which may in turn have affected the initiation of the hot tears. The visual observations were further validated with radiographic tests.

  2. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  3. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  4. Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates and spacers are flush with bottom. Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    120 Casting 12 BioRad Mini SDS PAGE Gels 1. Assemble multicasting chamber. Make sure ALL plates, disassemble casting chamber. Carefully separate gels. Rinse with ddH2O. Remove excess polyacrylamide. Place

  5. 1 O God thou hast cast us out and | scattered us a | broad : thou hast also been displeased O | turn thee unto | us a | gain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Psalm 60 1 O God thou hast cast us out and | scattered · us a | broad : thou hast also been-pot over Edom will I | cast out · my | shoe : Phi | lis · tia | be thou | glad of me. 9 Who will lead me | into · the strong | city : who will | bring me | into | Edom? 10 Hast not thou | cast us out · O | God : wilt

  6. Fatigue of 8630 cast steel in the presence of K. M. Sigl{, R. A. Hardin, R. I. Stephens and C. Beckermann*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    Fatigue of 8630 cast steel in the presence of porosity K. M. Sigl{, R. A. Hardin, R. I. Stephens- to macroscopic levels were cast from 8630 steel. Monotonic and fatigue properties were obtained to determine the effect of porosity on the mechanical performance of the cast steel. Axial fatigue tests were conducted

  7. Vectors Cast New Darkness, and New Light, on a Classic Related Rates Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulling, Stephen

    Vectors Cast New Darkness, and New Light, on a Classic Related this question [2, Sec. 2.8, Example 4]: A car is traveling west at 50 miles per hour and a truck the car is 0.3 miles and the truck 0.4 miles from the intersection of the roads?

  8. Vectors Cast New Darkness, and New Light, on a Classic Related Rates Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulling, Stephen

    Vectors Cast New Darkness, and New Light, on a Classic Related Rates Problem S. A. Fulling Texas A]: A car is traveling west at 50 miles per hour and a truck is traveling north at 60 miles per hour. At what rate are the vehicles approaching each other when the car is 0.3 miles and the truck 0.4 miles

  9. CAST Status Report to the SPSC for the 118th Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karuza, Marin

    2015-01-01

    A status report for the CAST experiment in the year 2015 is presented. It includes the current status of the experiment concerning the detection of solar axions as well as the status of the proposed activities concerning relic axions and chameleons as a candidate particles invented to solve the mystery of the dark energy.

  10. CloudCast: Cloud Computing for Short-term Mobile Weather Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shenoy, Prashant

    of Massachusetts Amherst Abstract--Since today's weather forecasts only cover large regions every few hours algorithm for generating accurate short-term weather forecasts. We study CloudCast's design space, which One useful application is mobile weather forecasting, which provides hour-to-hour forecasts

  11. Distortion of a Steel Cylinder Casting with a Core D. Galles and C. Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    contraction to introduce stresses and distortions. Therefore, deformation models of both the steel and mold process; the measurements show that thermal expansions (of both the outer mold and core) have an immediate are predicted in the core and casting; the results suggest 1) the thermal expansion coefficient of the mold

  12. Development of New Feeding-Distance Rules Using Casting Simulation: Part II. The New Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    , sand mold materials, and pouring superheats. In comparison with previously published rules, the present, where the casting meets the mold, and the remaining 2 T (adjacent to the riser) is made sound, thus exceeded and shrinkage forms, it occurs in the intermediate saving time, material resources

  13. Significant Energy and Material Reductions in the Continuous Casting of Certain Copper Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielson, W. D.

    1994-01-01

    exclusively by fuel gas or oil, and are only 20% energy efficient. The proposed system will be 98% energy efficient and eliminate corrosive, polluting waste gases which cause porosity problems due to the entrapment of waste combustion gases in the casting...

  14. Casting Project Version 4 September 16, 2011 1 GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    assume the labor (L) and overhead (B) rates are $75/hour and 75% respectively. 3. The cost of capital.0892 per kW-h. So, you do NOT need to specify a furnace or include its capital cost in your calculation. 11, etc., is 90 mm of thickness per minute. You may ignore the capital cost of the #12;Casting Project

  15. An elasto-plastic damage model cast in a co-rotational kinematic framework for large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masud, Arif

    An elasto-plastic damage model cast in a co-rotational kinematic framework for large deformation an elasto-plastic damage model that is based on irreversible thermodynamics and internal state variable that is defined in terms of an internal damage variable of energy, along with a set of rate-independent elasto-plastic

  16. Connection of modular steel beam precast slab units with cast-in-place closure pour slabs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Natalie Camille

    2005-02-17

    -field formwork and lengthy traffic closures. The Texas Department of Transportation proposes a new method of constructing jointless bridges using prefabricated girder-and-deck units connected on-site with cast-in-place closure pours. This new system will expedite...

  17. Evolution-cast: Temporal Evolution in Wireless Social Networks and Its Impact on Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    1 Evolution-cast: Temporal Evolution in Wireless Social Networks and Its Impact on Capacity Luoyi, the corresponding capacity is significantly impacted by both social relations and network evolution. In particular with each other through social relations but employ transmission via wireless communications. The network

  18. Hydrocarbon Signatures of Egg Maternity, Caste Membership and Reproductive Status in the Common Wasp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenseleers, Tom

    Hydrocarbon Signatures of Egg Maternity, Caste Membership and Reproductive Status in the Common-laid and worker-laid eggs has never been investigated. Our aim, therefore, was to investigate if hydrocarbons on the surface of newly-laid eggs, and that there are pronounced quantitative differences in the hydrocarbon

  19. Micrograph evidence of meniscus solidification and sub-surface microstructure evolution in continuous-cast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    a Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West with the vertical oscillation of the water-cooled copper mold, which significantly alters the local heat transfer the mold moves down- ward faster than the casting speed. Oscillation also pumps molten flux into the gap

  20. PERFORMANCE RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH-EARLY STRENGTH CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE (Tollway)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PERFORMANCE RELATED SPECIAL PROVISION FOR HIGH-EARLY STRENGTH CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE (Tollway under Restrained Shrinkage REQUIREMENTS Contractor shall provide a concrete mix design according ¾-inch graded material. Length Change Measured shrinkage shall not be greater than 0.05 percent after 28

  1. PREDICTION OF BURN-ON AND MOLD PENETRATION IN STEEL CASTING USING SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in the mold are above the critical temperature, burn-on and penetration defects can be predicted. The method1 PREDICTION OF BURN-ON AND MOLD PENETRATION IN STEEL CASTING USING SIMULATION Brandon E. Brooks1 Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA Abstract Burn-on and penetration defects

  2. Measurement and Simulation of Distortion of a Steel Bracket Casting D. Galles and C. Beckermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    are strongly correlated to the thermal expansion of the core, additional research of the mold properties create interactions at the mold- metal interface and generate stresses. These stresses induce mechanical-solid mushy zone3 . Distortions and defects compromise the quality of the casting and may require costly, time

  3. PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS Brandon Elliott Brooks1 and Christoph the commercial heat treatment distortion simulation software DANTE. The parts were machined and then measured-measured and compared to pre-heat treatment values. The CF8M experiments show that the gap in the C-Ring closes due

  4. Reproduction and caste ratios under stress in trematode colonies with a division of labour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, Robert

    Reproduction and caste ratios under stress in trematode colonies with a division of labour MELANIE of labour within colonies, with 2 distinct redial morphs: small rediae (non-reproducing) and large rediae responses to environmental pressures in trematodes with a division of labour. Key words: host diet

  5. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL OF IODINE RICH CAUSTIC WASTE DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    2005-07-14

    CH2M HILL is working to develop, design, and construct low-activity waste (LAW) treatment and imcholization systems to supplement the LAW capacity provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. CH2M HILL is investigating use of cast stone technology for treatment and immobilization of caustic solutions containing high concentrations of radioactive Iodine-129.

  6. Compressed Air System Retrofitting Project Improves Productivity at a Foundry (Cast Masters, Bowling Green, OH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-06-01

    This case study highlights International Truck and Engine Corporation's optimization project on the compressed air system that serves its foundry, Indianapolis Casting Corporation. Due to the project's implementation, the system's efficiency was greatly improved, allowing the foundry to operate with less compressor capacity, which resulted in reduced energy consumption, significant maintenance savings, and more reliable production.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF PRECIPITATION IN ALUMINUM CASTING A356.2 ALLOY USING NONDESTRUCTIVE MICROSTRUCTURE ELECTRONIC PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiattisaksri, P.; Gibbs, P. J.; Koenig, K.; Pfeif, E. A.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D. L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado (United States); Lasseigne, A. N. [Generation 2 Materials Technology LLC, Firestone, Colorado (United States); Mendez, P. F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-02-22

    Application of nondestructive electronic property measurements to assess the strengthening of Mg{sub 2}Si precipitates in aluminum A356.2 casting has been demonstrated. The results indicated the evolution of precipitation phase through over aging with increased cooling time or thickness of the cast part. The classical optimum precipitation behavior has been characterized and verified with thermal analysis, thermoelectric power, low frequency impedance, and micro hardness measurements. A proposed practice to use nondestructive electronic property measurement tools to assess aluminum casting for acceptable mechanical properties after mold shake out is presented.

  8. Probing the eV-Mass Range for Solar Axions with CAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J K; Pivovaroff, M J; Soufli, R; van Bibber, K; CAST, C

    2010-11-11

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions which could be produced in the core of the Sun via the so-called Primakoff effect. Not only would these hypothetical particles solve the strong CP problem, but they are also one of the favored candidates for dark matter. In order to look for axions originating from the Sun, CAST uses a decommissioned LHC prototype magnet. In its 10 m long magnetic field region of 9 Tesla, axions could be reconverted into X-ray photons. Different X-ray detectors are installed on both ends of the magnet, which is mounted on a structure built to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset for a total of about 3 hours per day. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnetic field region yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV. In order to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to a wider mass range, the CAST experiment continues its search for axions with helium in the magnet bores. In this way it is possible to restore coherence of conversion for larger masses. Changing the pressure of the helium gas enables the experiment to scan different axion masses in the range of up to about 1.2 eV. Especially at high pressures, a precise knowledge of the gas density distribution is crucial to obtain accurate results. In the first part of this second phase of CAST, {sup 4}He was used and the axion mass region was extended up to 0.39 eV, a part of phase space favored by axion models. In CAST's ongoing {sup 3}He phase the studied mass range is now being extended further. In this contribution the final results of CAST's {sup 4}He phase will be presented and the current status of the {sup 3}He run will be given. This includes latest results as well as prospects of future axion experiments.

  9. Converge-Cast: On the Capacity and Delay Xinbing Wang1,2, Luoyi Fu1, Xiaohua Tian1, Yuanzhe Bei1, Qiuyu Peng1, Xiaoying Gan1, Hui Yu1, Jing Liu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    1 Converge-Cast: On the Capacity and Delay Tradeoffs Xinbing Wang1,2, Luoyi Fu1, Xiaohua Tian1 define an ad hoc network where multiple sources transmit packets to one destination as Converge-Cast) for both strategies. Index Terms--ConvergeCast, Capacity, Delay 1 INTRODUCTION Converge-cast network

  10. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope�������® and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope�������® were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs @ -40�������°C (-40�������°F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundri

  11. Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs {at} -40 C (-40 F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundries is adequate to produce a product free from intermetallic phases.

  12. A comparison of the marginal adaptation of cathode-arc vapor-deposited titanium and cast base metal copings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jean C; Lai, Li-Chung; Sheets, Cherilyn G; Earthman, James; Newcomb, Robert

    2011-01-01

    without use of the lost wax method. 22 The cathode-arcusing the conventional lost wax casting technique and con-The die was dipped into a wax pot (Hotty; Renfert GmbH,

  13. Low Activation Joining of SiC/SiC Composites for Fusion Applications: Tape Casting TiC+Si Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Shin, Yongsoon; Luscher, Walter G.; Mansurov, Jirgal; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2014-03-03

    This work discusses the latest developments in TiC + Si displacement reaction joining at PNNL based on new work to produce tape-cast powders for improved SiC-joints.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ICME Guided Development of Advanced Cast Aluminum Alloys For Automotive Engine Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ford at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ICME guided development of advanced cast...

  15. Microstructure and residual stress evaluation of ductile cast iron using the critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave propagation technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Robert Jeffrey

    1993-01-01

    Residual stress and microstructure evaluation of ductile cast iron using a nondestructive method (Critically Refracted Longitudinal Ultrasonic Wave Technique) was approached. Residual stresses, both good and bad graphite nodules, and different...

  16. Application of emulsifiers in the manufacture of cast boosters and related products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joginadham, C.; Shankar, P.S.; Gupta, A.N.

    1996-12-01

    Cast boosters made with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and trinitro toluene (TNT) give high velocities of detonation and are sensitive to initiation even under high pressures. However, the manufacture of the same involves heating of TNT to its melting temperature and mixing of dry PETN in it. In the present work, wet PETN, TNT and water soluble nitrate salts were used for the manufacture of the boosters. The nitrate salt solution formed with the excess water available in wet PETN was emulsified with the aid of emulsifiers. The velocities of detonation of boosters with various percentages of water were determined. The data of explosive characters of these boosters were compared with normal pentolite cast boosters.

  17. Method and apparatus for improved melt flow during continuous strip casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Schneider, Ken C. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-11-12

    The continuous casting of metal strip using the melt overflow process is improved by controlling the weir conditions in the nozzle to provide a more uniform flow of molten metal across the width of the nozzle and reducing the tendency for freezing of metal along the interface with refractory surfaces. A weir design having a sloped rear wall and tapered sidewalls and critical gap controls beneath the weir has resulted in the drastic reduction in edge tearing and a significant improvement in strip uniformity. The floor of the container vessel is preferably sloped and the gap between the nozzle and the rotating substrate is critically controlled. The resulting flow patterns observed with the improved casting process have reduced thermal gradients in the bath, contained surface slag and eliminated undesirable solidification near the discharge area by increasing the flow rates at those points.

  18. Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.

  19. Patterns of gravity induced aggregate migration during casting of fluid concretes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangenberg, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Roussel, N., E-mail: Nicolas.roussel@lcpc.fr [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees (LCPC) (France); Hattel, J.H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark); Sarmiento, E.V.; Zirgulis, G. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway)] [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Geiker, M.R. [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway) [Department of Structural Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) (Norway); Department of Civil Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (DTU) (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, aggregate migration patterns during fluid concrete castings are studied through experiments, dimensionless approach and numerical modeling. The experimental results obtained on two beams show that gravity induced migration is primarily affecting the coarsest aggregates resulting in a decrease of coarse aggregates volume fraction with the horizontal distance from the pouring point and in a puzzling vertical multi-layer structure. The origin of this multi layer structure is discussed and analyzed with the help of numerical simulations of free surface flow. Our results suggest that it finds its origin in the non Newtonian nature of fresh concrete and that increasing casting rate shall decrease the magnitude of gravity induced particle migration.

  20. Computer modeling of electromagnetic fields and fluid flows for edge containment in continuous casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, F.C.; Hull, J.R.; Wang, Y.H.; Blazek, K.E.

    1996-02-01

    A computer model was developed to predict eddy currents and fluid flows in molten steel. The model was verified by comparing predictions with experimental results of liquid-metal containment and fluid flow in electromagnetic (EM) edge dams (EMDs) designed at Inland Steel for twin-roll casting. The model can optimize the EMD design so it is suitable for application, and minimize expensive, time-consuming full-scale testing. Numerical simulation was performed by coupling a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element EM code (ELEKTRA) and a 3-D finite-difference fluids code (CaPS-EM) to solve heat transfer, fluid flow, and turbulence transport in a casting process that involves EM fields. ELEKTRA is able to predict the eddy- current distribution and the electromagnetic forces in complex geometries. CaPS-EM is capable of modeling fluid flows with free surfaces. Results of the numerical simulation compared well with measurements obtained from a static test.