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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Chameleon foreCAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark energy models, such as the chameleon, where the acceleration of the expansion of the universe results from the dynamics of a scalar field coupled to matter, suffer from the potential existence of a fifth force. Three known mechanisms have been proposed to restore General Relativity in the solar system and the laboratory, which are the symmetron/Damour-Polyakov effect, the Vainshtein property and the chameleon screening. Here, we propose to probe the existence of chameleons in the laboratory, considering their particle physics consequences. We envisage the resonant and non-resonant production of chameleons in the sun and their back-conversion into X-ray photons in a solar helioscope pipe such as the one used by CAST. A detection of these X-rays would indicate the existence of chameleons. We focus on a template model for the solar magnetic field: a constant magnetic field in a narrow shell surrounding the tachocline. The X-ray photons in a helioscope pipe obtained from back-conversion of the chameleons created inside the sun have a spectrum which is peaked in the sub-keV region, just below the actual sensitivity range of the present axion helioscopes. Nevertheless they are detectable by present day magnetic helioscopes like CAST and Sumico, which were built originally for solar axions. We also propose a chameleon-through-a-wall experiment whereby X-ray photons from a synchroton radiation source could be converted into chameleons inside a dipole magnet, then pass a wall which is opaque to X-rays before being back-converted into X-ray photons in a second magnet downstream. We show that this could provide a direct signature for the existence of chameleon particles.

Philippe Brax; Axel Lindner; Konstantin Zioutas

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ryan Sun Chee Fore | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ryan Sun Chee Fore About Us Ryan Sun Chee Fore - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Riding the Clean Energy Wave: New Projects Aim to Improve Water Power...

3

PREV'AIR, a platform for air quality monitoring and fore-, Menut, L.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREV'AIR, a platform for air quality monitoring and fore- casting Honor├ę C.1 , Menut, L.2, France 4 ADEME, Paris, France 5 CNRM Meteo-France, Toulouse, France 1 Introduction Since 2003, the PREV'AIR system has been delivering an information about air quality, dedicated to any people or organisation

Menut, Laurent

4

WA_04_009_ROCKWELL_SCIENTIFIC_CO_Wailve_of_Domestic_And_Fore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WA1995019DONNELLYCORPORATIONWaiverofDomesticandFore.pdf WA1995018OPTICALCOATINGLABORATORYINCWaiverofDomesti.pdf WA00030ASEAMERICASRequesttoAssign...

5

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic fractur ing--also called hy drofracking or frack ing--is a process where large volumes) is an aquatic invasive spe cies listed on the USDA's federal noxious weeds list (http:// www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health

Goodman, Robert M.

6

Modeling results for the ITER cryogenic fore pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cryogenic fore pump (CFP) is designed for ITER to collect and compress hydrogen isotopes during the regeneration process of torus cryopumps. Different from common cryopumps, the ITER-CFP works in the viscous flow regime. As a result, both adsorption boundary conditions and transport phenomena contribute unique features to the pump performance. In this report, the physical mechanisms of cryopumping are studied, especially the diffusion-adsorption process and these are coupled with standard equations of species, momentum and energy balance, as well as the equation of state. Numerical models are developed, which include highly coupled non-linear conservation equations of species, momentum and energy and equation of state. Thermal and kinetic properties are treated as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition. To solve such a set of equations, a novel numerical technique, identified as the Group-Member numerical technique is proposed. It is presented here a 1D numerical model. The results include comparison with the experimental data of pure hydrogen flow and a prediction for hydrogen flow with trace helium. An advanced 2D model and detailed explanation of the Group-Member technique are to be presented in following papers.

Zhang, D. S.; Miller, F. K.; Pfotenhauer, J. M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Casting methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A casting device includes a covered crucible having a top opening and a bottom orifice, a lid covering the top opening, a stopper rod sealing the bottom orifice, and a reusable mold having at least one chamber, a top end of the chamber being open to and positioned below the bottom orifice and a vacuum tap into the chamber being below the top end of the chamber. A casting method includes charging a crucible with a solid material and covering the crucible, heating the crucible, melting the material, evacuating a chamber of a mold to less than 1 atm absolute through a vacuum tap into the chamber, draining the melted material into the evacuated chamber, solidifying the material in the chamber, and removing the solidified material from the chamber without damaging the chamber.

Marsden, Kenneth C.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Grover, Blair K.; Fielding, Randall S.; Wolfensberger, Billy W.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

Curriculum Vitae Prof. Ing. Vincenzo Tucci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum Vitae Prof. Ing. Vincenzo Tucci;Vincenzo Tucci Curriculum Vitae Pagina 2 di 15 Vincenzo Tucci Professore Ordinario di Elettrotecnica;Vincenzo Tucci Curriculum Vitae Pagina 3 di 15 II. ATTIVIT├? SCIENTIFICA Il prof. Tucci ├Ę responsabile del

Costagliola, Gennaro

9

Casting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

Moving Toward SuSTainable ForeSTry: S t r a t e g i e s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moving Toward SuSTainable ForeSTry: S t r a t e g i e s For Forest Landowners PubLication 420-144 #12;#12;Moving Toward SuSTainable ForeSTry: strategies For Forest Landowners Virginia Cooperative Extension College of Natural Resources -- Department of Forestry Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State

Liskiewicz, Maciej

11

Ing Arvid Nesheim | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429IndianaProfessional JumpInfoSpiIng Arvid Nesheim

12

Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

13

Drop Traffic in Microfluidic Ladder Networks with Fore-Aft Structural Asymmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the dynamics of pairs of drops in microfluidic ladder networks with slanted bypasses, which break the fore-aft structural symmetry. Our analytical results indicate that unlike symmetric ladder networks, structural asymmetry introduced by a single slanted bypass can be used to modulate the relative drop spacing, enabling them to contract, synchronize, expand, or even flip at the ladder exit. Our experiments confirm all these behaviors predicted by theory. Numerical analysis further shows that while ladder networks containing several identical bypasses are limited to nearly linear transformation of input delay between drops, mixed combination of bypasses can cause significant non-linear transformation enabling coding and decoding of input delays.

Jeevan Maddala; William S. Wang; Siva A. Vanapalli; Raghunathan Rengaswamy

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

Clean Metal Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

The increase in use of isostatic processing for aluminum alloy castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The castings industry originally perceived isostatic processing as a means of reducing scrap rates. Prior to the development of HIP`ing no other non-destructive technique was available which let to improved economics. However in recent years the emphasis has changed towards the exploitation of improved properties as design engineers realize that cast parts which have been HIP`d can develop capabilities similar to those of forged components. This paper presents experimental data regarding compaction during HIP and CIP processes, applied to various aluminum castings alloys which are used extensively in the Romanian automotive industry.

Geaman, V. [Univ. Transylvania of Brasov (Romania)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Method of casting aerogels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm.sup.3 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of alcogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent.

Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Method of casting aerogels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention describes a method for making monolithic castings of transparent silica aerogel with densities in the range from 0.001 g/cm[sup 3] to 0.6 g/cm[sup 3]. Various shapes of aerogels are cast in flexible polymer molds which facilitate removal and eliminate irregular surfaces. Mold dimensions are preselected to account for shrinkage of aerogel which occurs during the drying step of supercritical extraction of solvent. 2 figures.

Poco, J.F.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Salvaged castings and methods of salvaging castings with defective cast cooling bumps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Castings for gas turbine parts exposed on one side to a high-temperature fluid medium have cast-in bumps on an opposite cooling surface side to enhance heat transfer. Areas on the cooling surface having defectively cast bumps, i.e., missing or partially formed bumps during casting, are coated with a braze alloy and cooling enhancement material to salvage the part.

Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Schaeffer, Jon Conrad (Greenville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

After the 1950's: Looking Back at William Inge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that there is an Aaron Copeland quality to Ingeĺs plays ľ a lyrical (45) sadness (with overtones of ôMoonglowö?). Without fanfare or hyperbole, typical of his style as a man and playwright (he dressed and spoke plainly), William Inge had told me something sad, wise... at the center of his plays.] And of equal, if not greater importance, Rubin has no place to go. He is a ôharnessö salesman (229) in the age of the automobile. ôRaised on a ranch,ö he is a son of the West. A son of pioneers, he is ôa stranger in the very land...

Wolf, Howard R.

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

20

Simulation of Dimensional Changes in Steel Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Dimensional Changes in Steel Casting Shouzhu (Hans) Ou and Christoph Beckermann Pattern allowances in casting of steel are predicted using the casting simulation software MAGMASOFT to predict dimensional changes occurring during solidification and cooling of a steel casting

Beckermann, Christoph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fort Inge and the Texas frontier, 1849-1869  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) May 1991 ABSTRACT Fort Inge and the Texas Frontier, 1849-1869. (May 1991) Thomas Tyree Smith B. S. in Ed. , Southwest Texas State University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joseph G. Dawson III Now an obscure site near Uvalde, Fort Inge was once...'s Report on the Eighth Nilitary Department, " Cartographic Division, DR 148, RG 77, NA. 12 NOTES 1. Frederick Law Olmsted, A Journey Through Texas: Or A Saddle- Trip On the Southwestern Frontier (New York: Dix, Edwards 6 Co. , 1857; rpr. , Austin...

Smith, Thomas Tyree

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Discussion of "Development and Verification of an Analytical Solution for Fore-casting Nonlinear Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, July/August 2006, Vol. 11, No presents an interesting method to forecast nonlinear kinematic flood waves (Serrano, 2006). As a first to the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE). The range of time lags for which this analytical solution is applicable being

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

23

Cast dielectric composite linear accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A linear accelerator having cast dielectric composite layers integrally formed with conductor electrodes in a solventless fabrication process, with the cast dielectric composite preferably having a nanoparticle filler in an organic polymer such as a thermosetting resin. By incorporating this cast dielectric composite the dielectric constant of critical insulating layers of the transmission lines of the accelerator are increased while simultaneously maintaining high dielectric strengths for the accelerator.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Sampayan, Stephen (Manteca, CA); Slenes, Kirk (Albuquerque, NM); Stoller, H. M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

H C26 Performance Analysis of Optica1 Interconnection Systems Inch-ing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Optica1 Interconnection Systems Inch- ing T ransmitter T emperature Dependence .├Ę ┬» ├? , ├? ├? ├Č

Choi, Woo-Young

25

978-1-4244-5113-5/09/$25.00 c 2009 IEEE OppCast: Opportunistic Broadcast of Warning Messages in VANETs with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- hop broadcast protocol is particularly difficult to design in VANETs with unreliable links. Schemes the opportunistic broadcast protocol (OppCast) that aims at minimizing the number of transmissions while achieving the propagation latency. An opportunistic forwarding protocol is designed accord- ingly as a MAC-layer broadcast

California at Davis, University of

26

Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project (AMD 304)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

block, bore and journal strategies 2.2 Fasteners, gaskets, sealing 2.3 Coolant and corrosion 2.4 FEA design, integration and analysis 2.5 Component casting and casting analysis...

28

Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Process development of thin strip steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Field measurements of lateral earth pressures on a pre-cast panel retaining wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE August 1973 Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON A PRE-CAST PANEL RETAINING WALL A Thesis by DAVID MONROE PRESCOTT Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chai man o Co ttee~ ember ead of Departm... in Appendix I. (The style and format of this thesis follows that used by the Journal of the Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division, Procee ings, of t e American Society of Civil Engineers result of some large scale earth pressure tests at Massachusetts...

Prescott, David Monroe

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Power Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim Bcker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehiclesElectric vehicles RailCab Power Electronics Switched-mode power supplies High efficiency Drives and Electric Vehicles Power Electronics and Electrical Drives 5 Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim B├ÂckerPower Electronics and Electrical Drives Prof. Dr.-Ing. Joachim B├Âcker Research Topics Mechatronic

Hellebrand, Sybille

32

"Dark Web: Exploring and Min-ing the Dark Side of the Web"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the internationally re- nowned Dark Web project will be reviewed, including: deep/dark web spider- ing (web sitesTitle: "Dark Web: Exploring and Min- ing the Dark Side of the Web" Speaker: Director, Prof will review the emerging research in Terrorism Informatics based on a web mining perspective. Recent progress

Michelsen, Claus

33

Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

SmartCast - Novel Textile Sensors for Embedded Pressure Sensing of Orthopedic Casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Kaiser, Chair An orthopedic plaster or fiberglass cast is1 - Introduction 1.1 Background A plaster or fiberglass castunderstand how well a plaster or fiberglass cast fits over

Danilovic, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A review of "ôThe Templeö mit einer deutschen VersŘbersetzung." by Inge Leimberg ed. George Herbert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS 189 George Herbert. ?The Temple? mit einer deutschen Vers?bersetzung. Ed. Inge Leimberg. M?nster, New York, Munich, Berlin: Waxmann Verlag, 2002. xx + 473 pp. 39,00 EURO. Review by BILL ENGEL (NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE). Seventeenth...

Bill Engel

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELIABILITY-BASED CASTING PROCESS DESIGN OPTIMIZATION Richard Hardin1 , K.K. Choi1 , and Christoph 52242-1527 Keywords: Casting Process Design, Optimization, Reliability-Based Design Optimization purpose reliability-based design optimization (RBDO) software tool previously developed at the University

Beckermann, Christoph

37

ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program ITP Metal Casting: Corrosion Testing Practices - High Alloy Corrosion Program lehighfs.pdf More Documents...

38

Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

39

ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and Opportunities for the Metal Casting Industry ITP Metal Casting: Advanced Melting Technologies: Energy Saving Concepts and...

40

ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations ITP Steel: Hydrogen and Nitrogen Control in Ladle and Casting Operations castingops.pdf More Documents & Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a...

42

Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Maryland. merit08mccarty6.pdf More Documents & Publications Ultra Large Castings For Lightweight Vehicle Structures Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project (AMD 304)...

43

Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Die Casting Process ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin- Wall Magnesium Applications Enabling Production of Lightweight...

44

Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, ôProduction and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Formsö to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

45

Thermal transport properties of grey cast irons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of grey cast iron have been measured as a function of graphite flake morphology, chemical composition, and position in a finished brake rotor. Cast iron samples used for this investigation were cut from ``step block`` castings designed to produce iron with different graphite flake morphologies resulting from different cooling rates. Samples were also machined from prototype alloys and from production brake rotors representing a variation in foundry practice. Thermal diffusivity was measured at room and elevated temperatures via the flash technique. Heat capacity of selected samples was measured with differential scanning calorimetry, and these results were used to calculate the thermal conductivity. Microstructure of the various cast iron samples was quantified by standard metallography and image analysis, and the chemical compositions were determined by optical emission spectroscopy.

Hecht, R.L. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Ford Research Lab.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Porter, W.D.; Wang, Hsin [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

This tutorial describes stroke-based render-ing (SBR), an automatic approach to cre-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This tutorial describes stroke-based render- ing (SBR), an automatic approach to cre- ating nonphotorealistic imagery by placing discrete elements such as paint strokes or stipples. Researchers have proposed strokes are placed in a manner that match- estheoriginalphotograph,andthen rendered to have the appearance

Toronto, University of

47

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build-ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build- ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and safe movement. How- ever, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance of transportation facilities, and through the travel behaviors they encourage

Storici, Francesca

48

Fraunhofer FOKUSCompetence Center NGNI Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil Thomas Magedanz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fraunhofer FOKUSCompetence Center NGNI Overview ├?berblick 1 Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil Thomas Magedanz Berlin, Germany Internet: www.av.tu-berlin.de Email: tm@cs.tu-berlin.de #12;Fraunhofer FOKUSCompetence and IT is fueling the innovation in Service Delivery Platforms and underlying networking infrastructures ┬Ě IP

Wichmann, Felix

49

CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS**, Dr. VASILIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD BASED DRILLING USING CONVENTIONAL TWIST DRILLS PANAGIOTIS KYRATSIS*, Dr. Ing. NIKOLAOS BILALIS, antoniadis@dpem.tuc.gr Abstract: Twist drills are geometrically complex tools, which are used in industry and experimental approaches for drilling simulation. The present paper is based on the ground that the increasing

Aristomenis, Antoniadis

50

Climate change is not "a problem" wait-ing for "a solution". It is an environ-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

41 Climate change is not "a problem" wait- ing for "a solution". It is an environ- mental, cultural humanity's place on Earth. My new book, Why We Disagree About Climate Change, dissects this idea of climate about it. It also develops a different way of approaching the idea of climate change and of working

Hulme, Mike

51

BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR POTATOES seec ing Potato Voriet-es  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR POTATOES seec ing Potato Voriet-es for Mic -gon 45¢ Richard Chase bal to a high quality potato crop for commer- inche in rows 34 inches apart. Based on a soil test cial outlet. Extensive potato Ibs K20/A. variety performance trials are conducted each year Harvests were made

Douches, David S.

52

1D AND 3D SYSTEMS IN MACHINE AUTOMATION Dr.-Ing. Werner Stempfhuber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1D AND 3D SYSTEMS IN MACHINE AUTOMATION Dr.-Ing. Werner Stempfhuber Leica Geosystems AG Heerbrugg with "stringless technology". Today there is a large range of potential markets for new machine automation, mining and agricultural industries. The use of machine automation in these applications will alter

53

UC DAVIS College of engIneerIng 2012 13 Annual report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and industry, and included speakers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, General Motors, CarnegieUC DAVIS College of engIneerIng 2012 ş13 Annual report #12;College of engineering, UC Davis a relations College of engineering, UC Davis 1 Shields Avenue, Kemper Hall 1027 Davis, CA 95616 530

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

54

he history of technology is a rich and fascinat-ing subject, combining engineering with eco-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he history of technology is a rich and fascinat- ing subject, combining engineering with eco, Portuguese ships explored the un- charted coast of Africa, a daring exploit. It was a full 70 years before da- volved a compass for determining direction and a means for timing an object floating by the ship

Oriolo, Giuseppe

55

Power and sample size calculations for designing rare variant sequenc-ing association studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the statistical power of SKAT. Required sample size can be computed easily by inverting the power functionPower and sample size calculations for designing rare variant sequenc- ing association studies pow- erful than the collapsing based burden tests under many circumstances [4]. To design new sequence

Lin, Xihong

56

Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sens-ing for Cognitive Radio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dimension Estimation-based Spectrum Sens- ing for Cognitive Radio Bassem Zayen and Aawatif Hayar. Introduction The discrepancy between current-day spectrum allocation and spectrum use sug- gests that radio mean that radios could find and adapt to any immediate local spectrum availability. A new class

Gesbert, David

57

Shock chlorination is a method of disinfect-ing a water well. It is recommended when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

period. Most water treatment equipment (such as water heaters, softeners and pressure tanks) should alsoShock chlorination is a method of disinfect- ing a water well. It is recommended when a water is the source of bacteria, the system will be contaminated again every time water is pumped into the plumbing

58

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.

Jensen, D. [University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States). Dept. of Industrial Technology] [comp.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Methods and apparatuses for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

Stoddard, Nathan G. (Gettysburg, PA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Methods and apparatus for manufacturing monocrystalline cast silicon and monocrystalline cast silicon bodies for photovoltaics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatuses are provided for casting silicon for photovoltaic cells and other applications. With such methods and apparatuses, a cast body of monocrystalline silicon may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm is provided.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The automotive industry is seeking to replace current car parts made of aluminum and iron castings with thin wall (down to 2 mm) iron castings to reduce the cost and weight of automobiles. The mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings are affected strongly by the thickness of the castings. The thinner castings cool at a faster rate, and microstructural features that form during solidification, and subsequently, transform in the solid state, are strongly dependent on a geometrical parameter related to the ratio of surface area-to-volume of the casting. As this ratio becomes larger, castings cool faster. As a result, the nodule count on the observation plane of the specimens increases dramatically (>2000 nodules/mm2 in most specimens), i.e. as the thickness of castings decreases. Also, the matrix of the thin walled ductile iron castings becomes more ferritic as the ratio of surface area-to-volume decreases.

Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet Corp., Lynchburg, VA)

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The X-ray Telescope of CAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cern Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is in operation and taking data since 2003. The main objective of the CAST experiment is to search for a hypothetical pseudoscalar boson, the axion, which might be produced in the core of the sun. The basic physics process CAST is based on is the time inverted Primakoff effect, by which an axion can be converted into a detectable photon in an external electromagnetic field. The resulting X-ray photons are expected to be thermally distributed between 1 and 7 keV. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a pn-CCD detector combined with a Wolter I type X-ray mirror system. With the X-ray telescope of CAST a background reduction of more than 2 orders off magnitude is achieved, such that for the first time the axion photon coupling constant g_agg can be probed beyond the best astrophysical constraints g_agg < 1 x 10^-10 GeV^-1.

M. Kuster; H. Brńuninger; S. CÚbrian; M. Davenport; C. Elefteriadis; J. Englhauser; H. Fischer; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; F. H. Heinsius; D. H. H. Hoffmann; G. Hoffmeister; J. N. Joux; D. Kang; K. K÷nigsmann; R. Kotthaus; T. Papaevangelou; C. Lasseur; A. Lippitsch; G. Lutz; J. Morales; A. RodrÝguez; L. StrŘder; J. Vogel; K. Zioutas

2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

Meyer, Thomas N. (3987 Murray Highlands Cir., Murrysville, PA 15668-1747); Viswanathan, Srinath (1104 Albermarle La., Knoxville, TN 37923)

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fluxing agent for metal cast joining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Athlit ra: Classical and Hellenistic bronze casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Classical and Hellenistic bronze casting technology. Through the use of advanced analytical techniques and careful visual examination, the current study re-evaluates the technology employed in casting the Athlit ram. Newly gathered data, complemented...

Oron, Asaf

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The industrial ecology of the iron casting industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal casting is an energy and materials intensive manufacturing process, which is an important U.S. industry. This study analyzes iron casting, in particular, for possible improvements that will result in greater efficiencies ...

Jones, Alissa J. (Alissa Jean)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

aqueous tape casting: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K; Zioutas, Konstantin; 10.1103PhysRevLett.94.121301 2005-01-01 397 The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST): status and prospects Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The CAST...

68

REVISTA INTERNACIONAL METODOS NUMERICOS EN INGENIERIA Rev. Int. Met. Numer. Ing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVISTA INTERNACIONAL M┬┤ETODOS NUM┬┤ERICOS EN INGENIER┬┤IA Rev. Int. M┬┤et. Num┬┤er. Ing. Un nuevo de Galerkin discontinuo H. G┬┤omez, I. Colominas* , F. Navarrina, M. Casteleiro Grupo de M┬┤etodos Num┬┤ericos enfoque para el tratamiento de los t┬┤erminos difusivos de la ecuaci┬┤on de convecci┬┤on-difusi┬┤on en el m┬┤etodo

Gomez, Hector

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - a356 solidification cast Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 10 Capabilities and Integration Potential of Current Casting Design Software Summary: and engineering information, simulation of the casting process...

70

Electron beam melting and casting of zirconium and titanium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of electron beam melting (EBM) and casting Zirconium and Titanium alloys are discussed. The data on different schedules used for EBM of this metals as well as equipment for crucible melting and special equipment for casting are described. The results of production of Zirconium and Titanium alloy mold castings for various purposes are presented.

Arzhakova, V.M.; Popov, E.I. [A.A. Bochvar All Union Scientific and Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubrovski, V.A.; Frolov, V.I. [PO ChMZ, Glazov (Russian Federation); Ladohin, S.V.; Levitsky, N.I.; Chernyavsky, V.B. [Scientific and Research Institute of Casting, Kiev (Ukraine)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation During Filling of Steel Castings Kent D. Carlson cycle of inclusions during the filling of steel castings. There are two ways that inclusions can the final location and characteristics of reoxidation inclusions in steel castings. Carlson, K

Beckermann, Christoph

72

Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Shrinkage on Service Performance of Steel Castings Richard Hardin and Christoph An overview of the objectives and progress made by the "Integrated Design of Steel Castings for Service service performance of steel castings with porosity are reviewed. Structural performance predictions

Beckermann, Christoph

73

Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Reoxidation Inclusion Formation in Steel Casting Antonio J. Melendez, Kent D. Carlson the formation of reoxidation inclusions in carbon and low-alloy steel castings. A model is developed are conducted using radiographs of cast steel weld plates. The limit of resolution in the radiographs is about 1

Beckermann, Christoph

74

Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST) Karan Singh #12;Conceptual. ┬Ě What makes automotive design unique. ┬Ě Existing modeling trends. ┬Ě A proposed workflow for conceptual automotive design. #12;Conceptual design desirables ┬Ě Abstraction from underlying surface math. ┬Ě Invite

Toronto, University of

75

Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Fig. 2, the gas fuel (such as propane C3H8) and oxygen leaving the torch combust into a high of the heat is transported away through radiation and advection with the combustion gas and the rest- 1 - Continuous Casting Consortium Report to POSCO Modeling Steel Slab Heat Transfer During

Thomas, Brian G.

77

Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST (CERN Axion Solar Telescope) experiment is searching for solar axions by their conversion into photons inside the magnet pipe of an LHC dipole. The analysis of the data recorded during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnet pipes has resulted in the most restrictive experimental limit on the coupling constant of axions to photons. In the second phase, CAST is operating with a buffer gas inside the magnet pipes in order to extent the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. We will present the first results on the $^{4}{\\rm He}$ data taking as well as the system upgrades that have been operated in the last year in order to adapt the experiment for the $^{3}{\\rm He}$ data taking. Expected sensitivities on the coupling constant of axions to photons will be given for the recent $^{3}{\\rm He}$ run just started in March 2008.

CAST Collaboration; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrßn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Brńuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galßn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gˇmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. K÷nigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzˇn; D. Miller; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. RodrÝguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J5D. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

79

Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

Nathaniel Steven Lee Phillips

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Process for slip casting textured tubular structures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

Steinlage, Greg A. (West Lafayette, IN); Trumble, Kevin P. (West Lafayette, IN); Bowman, Keith J. (West Lafayette, IN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

Doru M. Stefanescu

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Feasibility of Casting Sculpture in Kirksite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

given to the various zinc die-casting alloys. Kirksite consists of 91 percent zinc, 4 percent aluminum, 4 percent copper, and 1 percent magnesium. It is a bluish- white metal commonly used commercially by the automobile industry in the production... of zinc extant is an idol found in a prehistoric Dacian settle- ment in Transylvania. This idol was alloyed with lead and had a I physical makeup resembling zinkstuhl, a modern zinc alloy. The ancients probably were unacquainted with zinc; however...

Fox, Lewis Howard

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

CAST: An Inspiring Axion Helioscope ala Sikivie  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAST is a data taking axion helioscope using a recycled LHC test magnet, CERN's detector technology and cryogenics expertise. An imaging X-ray telescope improves substantially the detection sensitivity and axion-ID. Massive axion-like particles of the Kaluza-Klein type were first introduced to explain the paradox of the hot corona, which is even hotter at locations overlying magnetic spots. This is suggesting that the CAST detection principle might be at work there, but being somehow modified and performing better. Remarkably, the density profile of the Sun allows for resonance crossing (m{sub axion}c{sup 2{approx_equal}}h{omega}{sub plasma}), which axion helioscopes are aiming to reach. The restless Sun favours this occasionally even further. Then, such processes can give rise to a chimera of converted axions or the like, making the Sun appear, within known physics, as mysterious and unpredictable as it is. CAST axion limits were used to conclude also for the hidden sector paraphotons. This is then suggestive for novel helioscopes for exotica like paraphotons, chameleons, etc. Pierre Sikivie's pioneering idea was to use a magnetic field as a catalyst to transform particles from the dark sector to ours, and vice versa.

Zioutas, K.; Anastassopoulos, V. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Tsagri, M. [University of Patras, Patras (Greece); CERN, 1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Semertzidis, Y. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Papaevangelou, T. [IRFU, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method and mold for casting thin metal objects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Virtual Aluminum Castings An Industrial Application of Integrated...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Virtual Aluminum Castings An Industrial Application of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Home Author: J. Allison, M. Li, C. Wolverton, X. Su Year: 2006 Abstract: The...

91

AMD 405: Improved Automotive Suspension Components Cast with...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to cast as it is sensitive to cooling rate and is susceptible to hot tearing. Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Heat Treatment Evaluate new, quicker, alternative methods for...

92

Development of Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Die Casting Process for Large Thin-Wall Magnesium Applications Enabling Production of Lightweight Magnesium Parts for Near-Term Automotive Applications, April 2013...

93

Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures ?AMD...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for reduced investment cost in tooling and dies - Demonstrate improved energy absorption. USAMP AMD 406 Ultra Large Castings for Lightweight Vehicle Structures...

94

Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as {sigma} and {chi} can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase ({sigma} + {chi}) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, {sigma} was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and {chi} by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

Yoon-Jun Kim

2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

Electromagnetic continuous casting project: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work on development of an electromagnetic casting process for steel, which was carried out at Argonne National Laboratory between January 1985 and December 1987. This effort was concerned principally with analysis and design work on magnet technology, liquid metal feed system, coolant system, and sensors and process controllers. Experimentation primarily involved (1) electromagnetic studies to determine the conditions and controlling parameters for stable levitation and (2) feed-system studies to establish important parameters that control and influence fluid flow from the liquid metal source to the caster. 73 refs., 91 figs., 11 tabs.

Battles, J.E.; Rote, D.M.; Misra, B.; Praeg, W.F.; Hull, J.R.; Turner, L.R.; Shah, V.L.; Lari, R.J.; Gopalsami, N.; Wiencek, T.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Spall behavior of cast iron with varying microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spall strength of cast iron with varying microstructures has been investigated using plate impact at moderate speed. Stress history measurements were made with manganin stress gauges embedded between the back face of the specimen and a low impedance polycarbonate backing. Five separate cast irons were tested. Four of these consisted of gray cast iron with graphite in flake form, with three classified as Type VII A2 and the fourth containing a bimodal distribution of Types VII A4 and VII D8. The fifth casting consisted of ductile cast iron with graphite in nodular form, classified as Type I, size class 5. The spall strength for the Type VII A2 gray cast irons varied between 40 and 370?MPa, and that of the additional gray cast iron, between 410 and 490?MPa. The spall strength of the ductile cast iron fell within the range of 0.94ľ1.2?GPa. It is shown that the spall strength is linked to the damage level at the spall plane, where an increased level of tensile stress is required to generate higher levels of damage. Post mortem analysis was performed on the recovered samples, revealing the graphite phase to be the primary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons, where crack nucleation is directly correlated to the debonding of graphite from the metal matrix. The average length of graphite found within a casting is linked to the material's strength, where strength increases as a function of decreasing length. The morphology and mean free path of graphite precipitates further govern the subsequent coalescence of initiated cracks to form a complete fracture plane. In cases where graphite spacing is large, increased energy level is required to complete the fracture process. A secondary factor governing the spall fracture of cast irons has also been linked to the microstructure of the metal matrix, with pearlite yielding higher spall strengths than free ferrite.

Plume, Gifford; Rousseau, Carl-Ernst, E-mail: rousseau@uri.edu [Mechanical Engineering, University of Rhode Island, 92 Upper College Rd., Kingston, Rhode Island 02881 (United States)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Material accountancy for metallic fuel pin casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. The pin casting operation, although only one of several operations in FCF, was the first to be on-line. As such, it has served to demonstrate the material accountancy system in many of its facets. This paper details, for the operation of the pin casting process with depleted uranium, the interaction between the mass tracking system (MTG) and some of the ancillary computer codes which generate pertinent information for operations and material accountancy. It is necessary to distinguish between two types of material balance calculations -- closeout for operations and material accountancy for safeguards. The two have much in common, for example, the mass tracking system database and the calculation of an inventory difference, but, in general, are not congruent with regard to balance period and balance spatial domain. Moreover, the objective, assessment, and reporting requirements of the calculated inventory difference are very different in the two cases.

Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.; Beitel, J.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification for Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The science of heat treatment has been well studied and is the basis from which existing specifications and practices for the heat treatment of steel castings have been developed. Although these existing specifications address the general needs of steel castings to be heat-treated, they do not take into account the variability in the parameters that govern the processes. The need for a heat treatment qualification procedure that accounts for this variability during heat treatment is an important step toward heat treatment quality assurance. The variability in temperatures within a heat treatment furnace is one such variable that a foundry has to contend with in its day-to-day activity. Though specifications indicate the temperatures at which a particular heat treatment has to be conducted, heat treatment specifications do not adequately account for all aspects of heat treatment quality assurance. The heat treatment qualification procedure will comprise of a robust set of rules and guidelines that ensure that foundries will still be able to operate within the set of constraints imposed on them by non-deterministic elements within the processes.

Professor Robert C. Voigt

2003-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Automatic 3D modeling of palatal plaster casts Marco Andreetto  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic 3D modeling of palatal plaster casts Marco Andreetto Dept. of Information Engineer-form surfaces of anatomi- cal interest. 1. Introduction Plaster models derived from palate's impressions. A data-base with the 3D models of the plaster casts, which could be called a "virtual gypsotheque", can

Abu-Mostafa, Yaser S.

103

Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings.?

Schwam, David [Case Western Reserve University] [Case Western Reserve University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel Liang Wang and Christoph ABSTRACT A model is developed to calculate the composition of reoxidation inclusions in steel casting. It is assumed that oxygen is continually absorbed by the steel during pouring. The software package Thermo

Beckermann, Christoph

105

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of Reoxidation Inclusion Composition in Casting of Steel LIANG WANG and CHRISTOPH pouring of steel castings. The software package Thermo-Calc is used to obtain the inclusion phase fractions and compositions as a function of the temperature and oxygen content of the steel. Oxygen

Beckermann, Christoph

106

Grain Refinement of Permanent Mold Cast Copper Base Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Grain refinement is a well established process for many cast and wrought alloys. The mechanical properties of various alloys could be enhanced by reducing the grain size. Refinement is also known to improve casting characteristics such as fluidity and hot tearing. Grain refinement of copper-base alloys is not widely used, especially in sand casting process. However, in permanent mold casting of copper alloys it is now common to use grain refinement to counteract the problem of severe hot tearing which also improves the pressure tightness of plumbing components. The mechanism of grain refinement in copper-base alloys is not well understood. The issues to be studied include the effect of minor alloy additions on the microstructure, their interaction with the grain refiner, effect of cooling rate, and loss of grain refinement (fading). In this investigation, efforts were made to explore and understand grain refinement of copper alloys, especially in permanent mold casting conditions.

M.Sadayappan; J.P.Thomson; M.Elboujdaini; G.Ping Gu; M. Sahoo

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum shape casting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

knuckles... to the cast iron and cast ... Source: Fatemi, Ali - Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo Collection: Materials...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysicists cast doubt Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C... , Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco...

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy dental castings Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C... , Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco......

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum die casting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

porosity (e.g., die cast specimens) must be excluded. Some studies have been... , Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A ......

111

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Solar Cells: Spin-Cast Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Dynamical Investigation Print Wednesday,...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum casting technology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alloys Commercial, aluminum die-cast alloys... operation and failure. Constant load creep tests were conducted on aluminum die-casting alloys: B-390... experimental data for...

113

The Influence of Casting Conditions on the Microstructure of As-Cast U-10Mo Alloys: Characterization of the Casting Process Baseline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sections of eight plate castings of uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo) were sent from Y-12 to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for microstructural characterization. This report summarizes the results from this study.

Nyberg, Eric A.; Joshi, Vineet V.; Lavender, Curt A.; Paxton, Dean M.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

208 | Intermodal transportatIon: movIng FreIght In a global economy 7.1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

208 | Intermodal transportatIon: movIng FreIght In a global economy #12;7 7.1 Introduction Air become an indispensible part of the world's global economy, holding an important niche in the transport al mutawaly | 209ę 2010 EnoTransportation Foundation.www.enotrans.com Reprinted from IntermodalTransportation:MovingFreightinaGlobalEconomy

Keskinocak, Pinar

115

he application of rapid prototyping (RP) in fabricat-ing nonassembly robotic systems with inserts is pre-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T he application of rapid prototyping (RP) in fabricat- ing nonassembly robotic systems for the rapid and automatic design and fabrication of robotic sys- tems a reality is to study the application with inserts is pre- sented in this article. The development of robotic systems that have all necessary

Mavroidis, Constantinos

116

Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat-ing parameters from a diesel engine during transient op-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Measurements of the soot emissions and engine operat- ing parameters from a diesel engine and are the subject of future research. INTRODUCTION Soot emissions from diesel engines are well known to have gov- erning the emission of particles from diesel engines are becoming ever more stringent. The soot

Daraio, Chiara

117

The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain-ing and curious happening in astrology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar eclipse is indeed a momentous, or at least visually entertain- ing and curious happening recordings of lunar and solar eclipses. 2 #12;The Dresden Codex was for the Mayans a way to predict eclipses likely that Martin Meinshausen proposed that this data was related to the timing of series of solar

Little, John B.

118

ribology is the science and technology of contact-ing solid surfaces in relative motion, including the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

┬╗ friction and lubrication under extreme conditions, such as high-temperature or nonequilibrium, includ- ing, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films. Friction between contacting

Guo, Yi

119

Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat-ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat- ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly to be acquired. To apply seismic technology to gas-hydrate studies in the gulf in an optimal manner, it is essential to understand the seismic target that has to be analyzed. What is gas hydrate? Gas hydrate

Texas at Austin, University of

120

Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

Williams, R.S.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efforts during Phase III focused mainly on the shell-alloy systems. A high melting point alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel, was considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. Shell molds made of fused-silica and alumino-silicates were considered. A literature review was conducted on thermophysical and thermomechanical properties alumino-silicates. Material property data, which were not available from material suppliers, was obtained. For all the properties of 17-4PH stainless steel, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. Thus, some material properties were evaluated using ProCAST, based on CompuTherm database. A comparison between the predicted material property data and measured property data was made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted only over several temperature ranges. No experimental data for plastic modulus were found. Thus, several assumptions were made and ProCAST recommendations were followed in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted during heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution on heating and cooling. Numerical simulations were performed using ProCAST for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts in fused silica molds using the thermal expansion obtained on heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained on cooling. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The shell mold was considered to be a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations. For 17-4PH stainless steel parts, the alloy shrinkage factors were over-predicted, as compared with experimental data. Additional R&D focus was placed on obtaining material property data for filled waxes, waxes that are common in the industry. For the first time in the investment casting industry, the thermo-mechanical properties of unfilled and filled waxes were measured. Test specimens of three waxes were injected at commercial foundries. Rheometry measurement of filled waxes was conducted at ORNL. The analysis of the rheometry data to obtain viscoelastic properties was not completed due to the reduction in the budget of the project (approximately 50% funds were received).

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanfordĺs (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Young

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Nuclear-waste encapsulation by metal-matrix casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several encapsulation casting processes are described that were developed or used at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to embed simulated high-level wastes of two different forms (glass marbles and ceramic pellets) in metal matrices. Preliminary evaluations of these casting processes and the products are presented. Demonstrations have shown that 5- to 10-mm-dia glass marbles can be encapsulated on an engineering scale with lead or lead alloys by gravity or vacuum processes. Marbles approx. 12 mm in dia were successfully encapsulated in a lead alloy on a production scale. Also, 4- to 9-mm-dia ceramic pellets in containers of various sizes were completely penetrated and the individual pellets encased with aluminum-12 wt % silicon alloy by vacuum processes. Indications are that of the casting processes tested, aluminum 12 wt % silicon alloy vacuum-cast around ceramic pellets had the highest degree of infiltration or coverage of pellet surfaces.

Nelson, R.G.; Nesbitt, J.F.; Slate, S.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

Humbert, Matthew S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An Energy Savings Model for the Heat Treatment of Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated system of software, databases, and design rules have been developed, verified, and to be marketed to enable quantitative prediction and optimization of the heat treatment of aluminum castings to increase quality, increase productivity, reduce heat treatment cycle times and reduce energy consumption. The software predicts the thermal cycle in critical locations of individual components in a furnace, the evolution of microstructure, and the attainment of properties in heat treatable aluminum alloy castings. The model takes into account the prior casting process and the specific composition of the component. The heat treatment simulation modules can be used in conjunction with software packages for simulation of the casting process. The system is built upon a quantitative understanding of the kinetics of microstructure evolution in complex multicomponent alloys, on a quantitative understanding of the interdependence of microstructure and properties, on validated kinetic and thermodynamic databases, and validated quantitative models.

Y. Rong; R. Sisson; J. Morral; H. Brody

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

In Search Of Axions: The CAST Experiment George K. Fanourakis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Greece Abstract. The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment uses a decommissioned LHC test magnet-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching, Germany, 6 Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas Energias

Hudson, Hugh

129

alloy die casting: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush; Stephen P. Midson 5 Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Recent...

130

additional die casting: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into contact... Ambs, L.; Kosanovic, D.; Edberg, C. 5 Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Recent...

131

aluminium die casting: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

into contact... Ambs, L.; Kosanovic, D.; Edberg, C. 8 Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Recent...

132

alloy die castings: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush; Stephen P. Midson 5 Prediction of Thermal Fatigue in Tooling for Die-casting Copper via Finite Element Analysis CiteSeer Summary: Abstract. Recent...

133

Search for low Energy solar Axions with CAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have started the development of a detector system, sensitive to single photons in the eV energy range, to be suitably coupled to one of the CAST magnet ports. This system should open to CAST a window on possible detection of low energy Axion Like Particles emitted by the sun. Preliminary tests have involved a cooled photomultiplier tube coupled to the CAST magnet via a Galileian telescope and a switched 40 m long optical fiber. This system has reached the limit background level of the detector alone in ideal conditions, and two solar tracking runs have been performed with it at CAST. Such a measurement has never been done before with an axion helioscope. We will present results from these runs and briefly discuss future detector developments.

Giovanni Cantatore; for the CAST Collaboration; :; E. Arik; S. Aune; D. Autiero; K. Barth; A. Belov; B. Beltrßn; S. Borghi; F. S. Boydag; H. Brńuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. Cebrißn; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; L. Di Lella; O. B. Dogan; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; H. Fischer; J. Franz; J. Galßn; E. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gˇmez; M. Hasinoff; F. H. Heinsius; I. Hikmet; D. H. H. Hoffmann; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; D. Kang; T. Karageorgopoulou; M. Karuza; K. K÷nigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; K. Kousouris; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; C. Lasseur; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzˇn; D. Miller; A. Morales; {deceased}; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; A. Ortiz; T. Papaevangelou; M. Pivovaroff; A. Placci; G. Raiteri; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. RodrÝguez; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; Y. Semertzidis; P. Serpico; S. K. Solanki; R. Soufli; L. Stewart; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; J. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

Microstructure of thin-wall ductile iron castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Step plate castings with section thicknesses of 1.5 mm to 6 mm and individual (single) castings with section thicknesses of 2 mm to 6 mm were produced using a ductile iron chemistry. Microstructures of these thin wall ductal iron castings were characterized quantitatively using an image analyzer. Matrix structure (amount of pearlite, ferrite, and massive carbides) and graphite structure (volume fraction, nodule size, nodule content, and nodularity) were investigated as a function of section thickness. Pearlite content, nodule count, and nodularity increased with decreasing section thickness, whereas the nodule size decreased. Nodule content exceeded 2000 nodules per mm{sup 2} at the thinnest sections. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate the effect of casting parameters on the microstructure.

Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Process and apparatus for casting multiple silicon wafer articles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus of casting silicon produced by the reaction between SiF.sub.4 and an alkaline earth metal into thin wafer-shaped articles suitable for solar cell fabrication.

Nanis, Leonard (Palo Alto, CA)

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Marry for What? Caste and Mate Selection in Modern India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper analyzes how preferences for a noneconomic characteristic (e.g., caste) can affect equilibrium patterns of matching, and empirically evaluates this in the context of middle-class Indian arranged marriages. We ...

Banerjee, Abhijit

137

Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast. 8 figs.

Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.; Peker, A.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method of casting articles of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A casting charge of a bulk-solidifying amorphous alloy is cast into a mold from a temperature greater than its crystallized melting temperature, and permitted to solidify to form an article. The oxygen content of the casting charge is limited to an operable level, as excessively high oxygen contents produce premature crystallization during the casting operation. During melting, the casting charge is preferably heated to a temperature above a threshold temperature to eliminate heterogeneous crystallization nucleation sites within the casting charge. The casting charge may be cast from above the threshold temperature, or it may be cooled to the casting temperature of more than the crystallized melting point but not more than the threshold temperature, optionally held at this temperature for a period of time, and thereafter cast.

Lin, Xianghong (Laguna Niguel, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Aliso Viejo, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Microstructures and properties of aluminum die casting alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides descriptions of the microstructure of different aluminum die casting alloys and to relate the various microstructures to the alloy chemistry. It relates the microstructures of the alloys to their main engineering properties such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, fatigue life, impact resistance, wear resistance, hardness, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity. Finally, it serves as a reference source for aluminum die casting alloys.

M. M. Makhlouf; D. Apelian; L. Wang

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Procedure for flaw detection in cast stainless steel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of ultrasonic flaw detection in cast stainless steel components incorporating the steps of determining the nature of the microstructure of the cast stainless steel at the site of the flaw detection measurements by ultrasonic elements independent of the component thickness at the site; choosing from a plurality of flaw detection techniques, one such technique appropriate to the nature of the microstructure as determined and detecting flaws by use of the chosen technique.

Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Methods for manufacturing monocrystalline or near-monocrystalline cast materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a monocrystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free of, or substantially free of, radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 35 cm.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Methods for manufacturing geometric multi-crystalline cast materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semi-conductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a geometrically ordered multi-crystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

143

EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg26 en million Americans suffer from osteoporosis, a gradual weakening of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg26 T en million Americans suffer from osteoporosis Laboratory, is try- ing to figure out how to prevent and treat osteoporosis from both engineering analysis of osteoporosis. Guo and his team also plan to use their knowledge to better understand osteoporosis and bone loss

Hone, James

144

Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energyĺs (DOEĺs) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: Ľ Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. Ľ Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. Ľ Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. Ľ Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. Ľ Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Yield improvement and defect reduction in steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project investigated yield improvement and defect reduction techniques in steel casting. Research and technology development was performed in the following three specific areas: (1) Feeding rules for high alloy steel castings; (2) Unconventional yield improvement and defect reduction techniques--(a) Riser pressurization; and (b) Filling with a tilting mold; and (3) Modeling of reoxidation inclusions during filling of steel castings. During the preparation of the proposal for this project, these areas were identified by the High Alloy Committee and Carbon and Low Alloy Committee of the Steel Founders' Society of America (SFSA) as having the highest research priority to the steel foundry industry. The research in each of the areas involved a combination of foundry experiments, modeling and simulation. Numerous SFSA member steel foundries participated in the project through casting trials and meetings. The technology resulting from this project will result in decreased scrap and rework, casting yield improvement, and higher quality steel castings produced with less iteration. This will result in considerable business benefits to steel foundries, primarily due to reduced energy and labor costs, increased capacity and productivity, reduced lead-time, and wider use and application of steel castings. As estimated using energy data provided by the DOE, the technology produced as a result of this project will result in an energy savings of 2.6 x 10{sup 12} BTU/year. This excludes the savings that were anticipated from the mold tilting research. In addition to the energy savings, and corresponding financial savings this implies, there are substantial environmental benefits as well. The results from each of the research areas listed above are summarized.

Kent Carlson

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone ľ a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Method of reducing the green density of a slip cast article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The method disclosed in this specification is one of reducing the green density of an article cast in a slip casting operation. The article is cast from a casting slip containing silicon metal particles, yttrium containing particles, and a small amount of a fluoride salt which is effective to suppress flocculation of the silicon metal particles by y.sup.+3 ions derived from the yttrium containing particles. The method is characterized by the following step. A small amount of compound which produces a cation which will partly flocculate the particles of silicon metal is added to the casting slip. The small amount of this compound is added so that when the casting slip is slip cast into a casting mold, the partly flocculated particles of silicon will interrupt an otherwise orderly packing of the particles of silicon and particles of yttrium. In this manner, the green density of the slip cast article is reduced and the article may be more easily nitrided.

Mangels, John A. (Flat Rock, MI); Dickie, Ray A. (Birmingham, MI)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tape-cast sensors and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

149

Electron beam casting technology in the former Soviet Union  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report the results of the investigation of metals and alloys melting and casting in the EB skull installations in the former USSR are given. The technological equipment used for these purposes is described. The long term prospects for the technological and engineering developments for multicomponent alloy melting and casting, including those containing volatile elements are shown. The significant technological advantages of the electro-magnetic stirring used in the course of the EB melting are demonstrated. The important advantage of the technology described is the efficient processing of metals and alloys metals.

Ladokhin, S.V. [Inst. of Foundry Problems, Kiev (Ukraine)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Use of duplex stainless steel castings in control valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels have enjoyed rapidly increasing popularity in recent years. For numerous reasons the availability of these alloys in the cast form has lagged behind the availability of the wrought form. Commercial demand for control valves in these alloys has driven development of needed information to move into production. A systematic approach was used to develop specifications, suppliers and weld procedures. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), sulfide stress cracking (SSC) and hardness results are also presented for several alloys including; CD3MN (UNS J92205), CD4MCu (UNS J93370) and CD7MCuN (cast UNS S32550).

Gossett, J.L. [Fisher Controls International, Inc., Marshalltown, IA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Plaster Casts at Berkeley. Collections of the Hearst Museum of Anthropology & Department of Classics at UC Berkeley. An Exhibition of Rare Plaster Casts of Ancient Greek and Roman Sculpture. 2nd edition 2005, pp. vi + 76 + ii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Britain: An Oxford Story of Plaster Casts from the Antique (sculptor Lysistratos took plaster impressions not only fromPlaster Casts at Berkeley COLLECTIONS OF THE HEARST MUSEUM

Miller, Stephen G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Significant Energy and Material Reductions in the Continuous Casting of Certain Copper Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project addresses the continuous casting of barstock in certain copper alloys. A superheated reservoir of molten alloy is maintained in a continuously heated holding furnace (tundish) during casting. These tundishes are currently heated...

Nielson, W. D.

154

CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components...

155

CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

engine * Cast stainless upgrade for SiMo cast-iron diesel engine exhaust components turbo-housing exhaust manifold C-15, 14.6L HD On- Highway Diesel Engine Materials Need: High...

156

Construction and Preliminary HVS Tests of Pre-Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cast Concrete Pavement Slabs with HVS Testing. ö TechnicalCast Concrete Pavement Slabs with HVS Testing Signatures: E.subgrade. FWD testing on the centers of the concrete slabs

Kohler, Erwin R.; du Plessis, Louw; Theyse, Hechter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL STRESS MEASUREMENT IN DUCTILE CAST IRON USING CRITICALLY REFRACTED LONGITUDINAL (Lcm) WAVE TECHNIQUE A Thesis by SRINIVASULU NAIDU CHUNDU.... In an attempt to study the effect of heat-treatment on the acoustoelastic behavior of ductile cast iron, four continuously cast ductile iron bars were investigated. While one bar was retained as-cast, the other three bars were subjected to heat...

Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Current State of Casting Yield: Results from the 1997 Steel Founders'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Chicago, IL, 1997. #12;lNTRODUCTlON It is commonly believed that the average metal yield in the steel casting industry is approximately 50 to 55 percent. A primary goal of conducting the casting yield survey additional costs in remelting scrapped steel (estimated to account for 7% of the total casting cost

Beckermann, Christoph

159

Distortion of a Steel Cylinder Casting with a Core D. Galles and C. Beckermann  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distortion of a Steel Cylinder Casting with a Core D. Galles and C. Beckermann Mechanical, are studied through a series of in situ casting trials in which a low-carbon steel cylinder with a core to thermal contractions of the steel. 1. Introduction The final dimensions of a steel casting are commonly

Beckermann, Christoph

160

Statistical analysis of the mechanical properties of thin walled ductile iron castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ductile iron castings have long been used in the automotive market. Ductile iron is inexpensive to produce and has desirable fracture resistance and mechanical properties. However, the weight of ductile iron is driving an effort to reduce wall thickness in order to increase fuel economy. Traditionally, cast iron has been cast into thick, bulky shapes. Reducing the section size of cast iron can be done, but pushes foundry practice into new areas. A consortium of foundries, foundry suppliers, and automotive manufacturers has been pursuing the use of thin walled ductile cast iron. This paper investigates the mechanical behavior of three experimental heats of thin-wall castings in order to evaluate property trends and limits. Castings as thin as 1.7 mm (0.07 in) have been successfully cast. The study was designed to investigate the effects of thickness and different casting heats on the dependent variables of ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation-to-failure, reduction in area, and hardness. The ultimate tensile strength of the castings is found to increase as the casting thickness decreases. Conversely, the elongation-to-failure is found to decrease as the casting thickness decreases. Heat-to-heat differences were found, but they were usually within the scatter of the data.

Schrems, Karol K.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Druschitz, A.P. (Intermet)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION OF POROSITY AND HOT TEARS IN A SQUEEZE CAST MAGNESIUM CONTROL ARM K.D. Carlson1 , C: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Shrinkage Porosity, Hot Tears, Modeling Abstract Simulations are performed and hot tears in squeeze casting of magnesium alloys. Introduction Both shrinkage porosity and hot tears

Beckermann, Christoph

162

Numerical Study of Steady Turbulent Flow through Bifurcated Nozzles in Continuous Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The effects of nozzle design and casting process operating variables on the jet characteristics exitingNumerical Study of Steady Turbulent Flow through Bifurcated Nozzles in Continuous Casting FADY M. NAJJAR, BRIAN G. THOMAS, and DONALD E. HERSHEY Bifurcated nozzles are used in continuous casting

Thomas, Brian G.

163

Edinburgh Research Explorer The Dalmarnock Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edinburgh Research Explorer The Dalmarnock Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure Citation Fire Tests on a Cast Insitu Concrete Structure'. in Proceedings of the international Workshop Fire THE DALMARNOCK FIRE TESTS ON A CAST INSITU CONCRETE STRUCTURE Susan Deeny PhD Student University of Edinburgh, UK

Millar, Andrew J.

164

Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Termination Casts: A Flexible Approach to Termination with General Recursion Aaron Stump Computer distinguishes terminating terms and total functions from possibly diverging terms and partial functions type-form "Terminates t", expressing that term t is terminating; and then allow terms t to be coerced

Weirich, Stephanie

165

The Dyslexia Foundation is Sponsoring a Web-Cast Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Dyslexia Foundation is Sponsoring a Web-Cast Conference The Dyslexia Foundation 4 Narragansett St./PO Box P-22 South Dartmouth, MA 02748 TheDyslexiaFoundation@gmail.com TheDyslexiaFoundation.org Reading/Literacy, Dyslexia and the Brain In Celebration of the 25th Anniversary of The Dyslexia Research

166

DIVISON 03 CONCRETE 03300 CAST-IN-PLACE CONCRETE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-IN-PLACE CONCRETE A. Design Considerations 1. Testing and inspection will be required for cast-in-place concrete of the Building Code. All testing and inspection of concrete work will be contracted for and paid for directly by the University, regardless of building class. The A/E must specify all testing and inspection of concrete work

167

Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 ░C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 ░C).

G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Percutaneous Treatment of Biliary Cast Syndrome After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Comparison of Mechanical Versus Hydraulic Rheolytic Cast Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Biliary cast syndrome (BCS) is the presence of casts within the intrahepatic or extrahepatic biliary system after orthotopic liver transplantation. Our work compares two percutaneous methods for BCS treatment: the mechanical cast-extraction technique (MCE) versus the hydraulic cast-extraction (HCE) technique using a rheolytic system. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 patients were included in the study. Six patients were referred for HCE, and 18 patients were treated with MCE. A statistically significant larger number of sessions was required in the MCE group (21.0, range 11 to 72 sessions) (p = 0.033). Results: Median therapy duration was shorter in the HCE group at 2.4 months (range 2 to 5) compared with 6.7 months (range 3 to 39) in the MCE group (p < 0.001). Both patient acceptance was better and costs for total therapy were 40% less in the HCE group. No significant differences where found concerning clinical and biochemical improvement or graft and patient survival. Conclusion: The use of the hydraulic rheolytic system decreased total therapy time, thereby decreasing the induced inflammation time of the biliary tree. A significant benefit of HCE has been observed in our patients when we compare our results with those of MCE.

Lopez-Benitez, R., E-mail: ruben.lopez@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Wielpuetz, M. O., E-mail: mark.wielpuetz@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Bryant, M. G. H., E-mail: bryant.mark@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Ganten, Tom, E-mail: Tom.ganten@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Department of Internal Medicine (Germany); Richter, G. M., E-mail: g.richter@klinikum-stuttgart.de [Katharinenhospital, Klinikum Stuttgart (Germany); Flach, N., E-mail: flach.nicole@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Hallscheidt, P. J., E-mail: peter.hallscheidt@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of Thin Section Zinc Die Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new high fluidity zinc high pressure die casting alloy, termed the HF alloy, was developed during laboratory trials and proven in industrial production. The HF alloy permits castings to be achieved with section thicknesses of 0.3 mm or less. Technology transfer activities were conducted to develop usage of the HF high fluidity alloy. These included production of a brochure and a one-hour webinar on the HF alloy. The brochure was then sent to 1,184 product designers in the Interzinc database. There was excellent reception to this mailing, and from this initial contact 5 technology transfer seminars were conducted for 81 participants from 30 companies across a wide range of business sectors. Many of the successful applications to date involve high quality surface finishes. Design and manufacturing assistance was given for development of selected applications.

Goodwin, Frank [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.] [International Lead Zinc Research Org., Inc.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sensitivity of Steel Casting Simulation Results to Alloy Property Datasets Kent D. Carlson dataset; Ni-based alloys N3M, CW6MC and CW12MW can be represented by the benchmark CW12MW dataset; and Ni-based alloys M30C and M35-1 can be represented by the benchmark M35-1 dataset. While these alloy groupings

Beckermann, Christoph

171

3D Rendering and Ray Casting Michael Kazhdan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Rendering and Ray Casting Michael Kazhdan (600.357 / 600.457) HB Ch. 13.7, 14.6 FvDFH 15.5, 15.10 #12;Rendering ┬Ě Generate an image from geometric primitives Rendering Geometric Primitives (3D) Raster Image (2D) #12;3D Rendering Example What issues must be addressed by a 3D rendering system? #12;Overview

Kazhdan, Michael

172

Heritability of anthropometric phenotypes in caste populations of Visakhapatnam, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ANTHROPOMETRIC PHENOTYPES, ANDHRA CASTES, VARI- ANCE COMPONENTS 326 / arya et al. Duggirala and Crawford 1994). Anthropometric phenotypes are influenced by ge- netic and environmental factors, in turn exhibiting continuous phenotypic distri- butions (Falconer... demonstrated that the variation in anthropometric traits such as height and weight is under the effects of both genet- ic and environmental factors (Susanne 1977; Byard et al. 1984, 1985a, 1985b; Devor et al. 1986a, 1986b, Sharma and Susanne 1991). India...

Arya, Rector; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Puppala, Sobah; Modem, Saileela; Busi, Bhaskara R.; Crawford, Michael H.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Axion helioscopes update: the status of CAST and IAXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost 35 years since their suggestion as a good solution to the strong CP-problem, axions remain one of the few viable candidates for the Dark Matter, although still eluding detection. Most of the methods for their detection are based on their coupling to photons, one of the most sensitive ones being the helioscope technique. We report on the current status of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope and the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II, where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV, are presented. Currently, CAST is expecting to improve its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 after the upgrade of the X-ray detectors and with the implementation of a second X-ray optic. At the same time, it is exploring other possibilities at the low energy physics frontier. On the other hand IAXO, the fourth generation axion helioscope, aims to improve CAST's perf...

Dafni, T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Axion helioscopes update: the status of CAST and IAXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Almost 35 years since their suggestion as a good solution to the strong CP-problem, axions remain one of the few viable candidates for the Dark Matter, although still eluding detection. Most of the methods for their detection are based on their coupling to photons, one of the most sensitive ones being the helioscope technique. We report on the current status of the CERN Axion Solar Telescope and the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). Recent results from the second part of CAST phase II, where the magnet bores were filled with 3He gas at variable pressure achieving sensibilities on the axion mass up to 1.2 eV, are presented. Currently, CAST is expecting to improve its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV/c^2 after the upgrade of the X-ray detectors and with the implementation of a second X-ray optic. At the same time, it is exploring other possibilities at the low energy physics frontier. On the other hand IAXO, the fourth generation axion helioscope, aims to improve CAST's performance in terms of axion-photon coupling by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude. The details of the project building a dedicated magnet, optics and X-ray detectors are given.

T. Dafni; F. J. Iguaz; on behalf of the CAST; IAXO collaborations

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Commercialization effort in support of electroslag-casting technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an effort to revive interest in the electroslag casting (ESC) of components in the United States. The ESC process is an extension of a well established electroslag-remelting (ESR) process. Both processes use the electrode of a material that is continuously melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mold. For simple shapes, the mold can be movable, allowing the continuous casting of long lengths. In an effort to revive US industries` interest in ESC, the following approaches were taken: (1) US industries with prior experience in ESC or currently operating an ESR unit were contacted, followed up with telephone conversation, and/or sent copies of prior published reports on the topic, and, in some cases, personal visits were made; (2) with two companies, a potential interest in ESC was worked out by initially conducting ESR; and (3) to further strengthen the industrial interest, the newly developed iron-aluminide alloy, FA-129, was chosen as the material of choice for this study. The two industrial companies that worked with ORNL were Special Metals Corporation (New Hartford, New York) and Precision Rolled Products, Inc. (PRP) [Florham Park, New Jersey]. Even with its advantages, a survey of the industry indicated that ESC technology has a very limited chance of advancement in the United States. However, the processing of rounds and slabs by the ESR process is a well established commercial technology and will continue to expand. 16 figs, 3 tabs, 12 refs.

Sikka, V.K.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, R.S.; Campbell, S.L.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

In-situ conditioning of a strip casting roll  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A strip caster (10) for producing a continuous strip (24) has a tundish (12) for containing a melt (14) and a pair of horizontally disposed water cooled casting rolls (22). The casting rolls are juxtaposed relative to one another for forming a pouring basin (18) for receiving the melt through a teeming tube (16) thereby establishing a meniscus (20) between the rolls for forming a strip (24). The melt is protected from the outside air by a non-oxidizing gas passed through a supply line (28) to a sealing chamber (26). Devices (29) for conditioning the outer peripheral chill surfaces of the casting rolls includes grit blasting nozzles (30A, 30B, 30C, 30D), a collection trough (32) for gathering the grit, a line (34) for recycling the grit to a bag house (36), a feeder (38) and a pressurized distributor (40) for delivering the grit to the nozzles. The conditioning nozzles remove dirt, metal oxides and surface imperfections providing a clean surface readily wetted by the melt.

Williams, Robert S. (Fairfield, OH); Campbell, Steven L. (Middletown, OH)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-SelectionŚCast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Material development in the SI sub 3 N sub 4 system using glass encapsulated Hip'ing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP'ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dr. Ing. /PhD / Dr.techn. Students supervised by Signe Kjelstrup 1. Torleif Holt, Transport and equilibrium properties of a cation exchange membrane (1983)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, (1996) 6. Magnar Ott├Şy, Mass and heat transfer in ion-exchange membranes (1996) 7. Belinda Flem, Peltier in the Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (2007) 17. Isabella Inzoli, Coupled transports of heat and massDr. Ing. /PhD / Dr.techn. Students supervised by Signe Kjelstrup 1. Torleif Holt, Transport

Kjelstrup, Signe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg22 eople suffering from brain diseases and conditions ranging from traumatic brain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEALTH EXCELLENTIA CoLumbIA ENgINEErINg22 P eople suffering from brain diseases and conditions ranging from traumatic brain injury to brain cancer to progressive brain disorders could be helped if therapeu- tic drugs could be easily delivered to the affected areas. The blood-brain barrier (BBB

Hone, James

182

Die casting research. Annual progress report, June 29, 1994--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr carbide and other CVD coatings were evaluated for improving wear resistance of Al and Zn die casting dies; die cavity instrumentation was also studied.

Brevick, J.; Mobley, C.; Shivpuri, R.; Goodwin, F.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy-graphite castings technical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science 8 Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during Casting of Steel: Comparison with Experiments Summary: Simulation of Hot Tearing and Distortion during...

184

Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

for Ductile and Brittle Failure Design Criteria for Ductile Cast Iron Spent-Fuel Shipping Containers This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

185

Feasibility of cold rolling titanium strip cast by the plasma melt overflow process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new fabrication method tailored specifically for titanium alloys and intermetallics combined direct strip casting and cold rolling to produce foil products by completely eliminating hot working steps. Titanium strips 0.4-mm- to 0.7-mm-thick and 100-mm-wide were cast by the plasma melt overflow process. The cast strips were cold rolled to 0.15-mm-thick, fully dense foils. The effect of thermal and mechanical treatments on the microstructure of the cast strip was investigated. The cold rolled foils were characterized by measurement of average surface roughness, chemical composition, gas content and tensile properties.

Gaspar, T.A. [Ribbon Technology Corp., Columbus, OH (United States); Sukonnik, I.M. [Texas Instruments, Attleboro, MA (United States); Bird, R.K.; Brewer, W.D. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Low-Cost Magnesium Sheet Production using the Twin Roll Casting...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

using the Twin Roll Casting Process and Asymmetric Rolling 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

187

Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration, new technologies enabling energy efficiencies and environment-friendly improvements are slow to develop, and have trouble obtaining a broad application. The CMC team was able to effectively and efficiently transfer the results of DOE's metalcasting R&D projects to industry by utilizing and delivering the numerous communication vehicles identified in the proposal. The three metalcasting technical associations achieved significant technology transition results under this program. In addition to reaching over 23,000 people per year through Modern Casting and 28,000 through Engineered Casting Solutions, AFS had 84 national publications and reached over 1,200 people annually through Cast Metals Institute (CMI) education courses. NADCA's education department reached over 1,000 people each year through their courses, in addition to reaching over 6,000 people annually through Die Casting Engineer, and publishing 58 papers. The SFSA also published 99 research papers and reached over 1,000 people annually through their member newsletters. In addition to these communication vehicles, the CMC team conducted numerous technical committee meetings, project reviews, and onsite visits. All of these efforts to distribute the latest metalcasting technologies contributed to the successful deployment of DOE's R&D projects into industry. The DOE/CMC partnership demonstrated significant success in the identification and review of relevant and easy-to-implement metalcasting energy-saving processes and technologies so that the results are quickly implemented and become general practice. The results achieved in this program demonstrate that sustained technology transfer efforts are a critical step in the deployment of R&D projects to industry.

Gwyn, Mike

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance for both the wrought and cast duplex alloys; (3) Castings generally have better toughness than their wrought counterparts in the temperature range of ├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?80├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░C to +20├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░C; (4) All shield metal arc (SMA) test welds in DSS castings, with recommended or over matching filler metal, indicate that welding is not a significant factor when considering DSS applications.

Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) are being specified for chloride containing environments due to their enhanced pitting and stress corrosion cracking resistance. They exhibit improved corrosion performance over the austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also offer improved strength properties and are available in various wrought and cast forms. Selected grades of duplex stainless steel castings and their welds, in comparison with their wrought counterparts, were evaluated, regarding corrosion performance and mechanical properties and weldability. Multiple heats of cast duplex stainless steel were evaluated in the as-cast, solution annealed (SA) static cast and SA centrifugal cast conditions, while their wrought counterparts were characterized in the SA condition and in the form of as-rolled plate. Welding, including extensive assessment of autogenous welds and a preliminary study of composite welds (shielded metal arc weld (SMAW)), was performed. The evaluations included critical pitting temperature (CPT) testing, intergranular corrosion (IGC) testing, ASTM A923 (Methods A, B and C), Charpy impact testing, weldability testing (ASTM A494), ferrite measurement and microstructural evaluations. In the study, the corrosion performances of DSS castings were characterized and assessed, including the wrought counterparts for comparison. The evaluation filled the pore of lack of data for cast duplex stainless steels compared to wrought materials. A database of the pitting corrosion and IGC behavior of cast and wrought materials was generated for a greater depth of understanding for the behavior of cast duplex stainless steel. In addition, improved evaluation methods for DSS castings were developed according to ASTM A923, A262, G48 and A494. The study revealed that when properly heat treated according to the specification, (1) DSS castings have equal or better pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance than their wrought counterparts; (2) Welding reduces the pitting and intergranular corrosion resistance for both the wrought and cast duplex alloys; (3) Castings generally have better toughness than their wrought counterparts in the temperature range of -80 C to +20 C; (4) All shield metal arc (SMA) test welds in DSS castings, with recommended or over matching filler metal, indicate that welding is not a significant factor when considering DSS applications.

Wen, Songqing; Lundin, Carl, W.; Batten, Greg, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Light Metals Permanent Mold Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current vehicles use mostly ferrous components for structural applications. It is possible to reduce the weight of the vehicle by substituting these parts with those made from light metals such as aluminum and magnesium. Many alloys and manufacturing processes can be used to produce these light metal components and casting is known to be most economical. One of the high integrity casting processes is permanent mold casting which is the focus of this research report. Many aluminum alloy castings used in automotive applications are produced by the sand casting process. Also, aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are the most widely used alloy systems for automotive applications. It is possible that by using high strength aluminum alloys based on an aluminum-copper (Al-Cu) system and permanent mold casting, the performance of these components can be enhanced significantly. This will also help to further reduce the weight. However, many technological obstacles need to be overcome before using these alloys in automotive applications in an economical way. There is very limited information in the open literature on gravity and low-pressure permanent mold casting of high strength aluminum alloys. This report summarizes the results and issues encountered during the casting trials of high strength aluminum alloy 206.0 (Al-Cu alloy) and moderate strength alloy 535.0 (Al-Mg alloy). Five engineering components were cast by gravity tilt-pour or low pressure permanent mold casting processes at CanmetMATERIALS (CMAT) and two production foundries. The results of the casting trials show that high integrity engineering components can be produced successfully from both alloys if specific processing parameters are used. It was shown that a combination of melt processing and mold temperature is necessary for the elimination of hot tears in both alloys.

Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Precision Casting of Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addresses improvements in metal casting processes by reducing scrap and reducing the cost of production, due to scrap reduction from investment casting and yield improvement offered by lost foam casting as compared to no-bake or green sand molding. The objectives for the investment casting portion of the subtask are to improve knowledge of fracture toughness of mold shells and the sources of strength limiting flaws and to understand the effects of wax reclamation procedures on wax properties. Applying 'clean steel' approaches to pouring technology and cleanliness in investment casting of steel are anticipated to improve incoming materials inspection procedures as they affect the microstructure and toughness of the shell. This project focused on two areas of study in the production of steel castings to reduce scrap and save energy: (1) Reducing the amount of shell cracking in investment cast steel production; (2) Investigate the potential of lost foam steel casting The basic findings regarding investment casting shell cracking were: (1) In the case of post pouring cracking, this could be related to phase changes in silica upon cooling and could be delayed by pouring arrangement strategies that maintained the shell surface at temperature for longer time. Employing this delay resulted in less adherent oxidation of castings since the casting was cooler at the time o fair exposure. (2) A model for heat transfer through water saturated shell materials under steam pressure was developed. (3) Initial modeling result of autoclave de-waxing indicated the higher pressure and temperature in the autoclave would impose a steeper temperature gradient on the wax pattern, causing some melt flow prior to bulk expansion and decreasing the stress on the green shell. Basic findings regarding lost foam casting of steel at atmospheric pressure: (1) EPS foam generally decomposes by the collapse mode in steel casting. (2) There is an accumulation of carbon pick-up at the end of the casting opposite the gate. (3) It is recommended that lost foam castings in steel be gated for a quiescent fill in an empty cavity mold to prevent foam occlusion defects from the collapse mode. The energy benefit is primarily in yield savings and lower casting weight per function due to elimination of draft and parting lines for the larger lost foam castings. For the smaller investment casting, scrap losses due to shell cracking will be reduced. Both of these effects will reduce the metal melted per good ton of castings. There will also be less machine stock required per casting which is a yield savings and a small additional energy savings in machining. Downstream savings will come from heavy truck and railroad applications. Application of these processes to heavy truck castings will lighten the heavy truck fleet by about ten pounds per truck. Using ten years to achieve full penetration of the truck fleet at linear rate this will result in a fuel savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

Dr. Von L. Richards

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Metrological analysis of a procedure for the automatic 3D modeling of dental plaster casts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metrological analysis of a procedure for the automatic 3D modeling of dental plaster casts Nicola to an automatic procedure recently proposed for the 3D modeling of dental plaster casts. This contribution derives of an automatic 3D modeling procedure recently proposed and it shows the accuracy of 3D modeling dental plaster

Abu-Mostafa, Yaser S.

194

NON-DESTRUCTIVE QUALITY EVALUATION OF THE DIE- CASTING BY LASER CONTROL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive quality demands are getting higher every year. Aluminium die-castings are especially important components in the automotive industry because of their light weight, rigidity, good corrosion resistance and heat dissipation. Since the pressure die-casting process is a very complex procedure, there must also be a number of quality controls to avoid dimensional, internal and surface defects. The dimensional and internal objective quality controls are already implemented on in-line real time production. As for the surface quality control of die-castings only subjective visual control of the worker is used. This subjective visual control of surface is substituted with objective surface quality control by the laser control system. The laser control system acquires the three-dimensional (3D) data by the principle of laser triangulation and analyses the surface defects by LACO (Laser Casting Control) analysis. 3D data representing the measured surface of the die-casting is statistically analyzed and evaluated. It is capable of detecting the most common die-casting surface defects, such as laminations, cold shuts, non-fills, stains and imprints. We found that the LACO system satisfies the requirements for detecting surface defects on diecastings. Combined with the dimensional and internal quality controls, it is a good way of obtaining a total automatic quality inspection with records of die-castings in real time production. Key words: Surface defect, Laser triangulation, Detection method, Aluminium, Die-casting. 1.

Valter Gruden; Janez Mo×ina

195

CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

MINWALL HJ

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Prediction of the Fatigue Life of Cast Steel Containing Shrinkage Porosity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of porosity becomes especially critical. An integrated design process is emerging in which a casting process] It is anticipated that such a design process will also help guide and improve casting inspection procedures INHOMOGENEITIES due to porosity are currently not considered in the design of structural components made from

Beckermann, Christoph

197

Characterization of Al-Mn particles in AZ91D investment castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manganese is currently added to Mg-Al alloys in order to improve the corrosion behavior of cast components. A part of this manganese is dissolved in the magnesium matrix and the balance is found as fine Al(Mn,Fe) particles dispersed within castings. For AZ91D specimens prepared using the plaster mould investment casting process, these particles were observed in very large quantity at the surface of castings. These particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. It was found that they consist of Al{sub 8}Mn{sub 5} phase and that their morphology and size depend on local solidification conditions. Their presence at the surface of the castings is related to low solidification rates and reduced thermal gradients at the mould/metal interface.

Lun Sin, S. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada); Dube, D. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada)], E-mail: dominique.dube@gmn.ulaval.ca; Tremblay, R. [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Laval University, Quebec, Quebec, G1K 7P4 (Canada)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a blanket contract for the supply of cast-resin dry-type power transformers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points were analyzed for rheological properties and density. Both the rheological properties (plastic viscosity and yield strength) and density were consistent with previous and later SCPF runs.

Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

eNgINeerINg g r A d U A T e P r O g r A M S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IIT ArMOUr COllege Of eNgINeerINg g r A d U A T e P r O g r A M S Educating a nEw gEnEration of EnginEErs #12;A TrAdiTion of ExcEllEncE Armour College of Engineering was founded in 1893 as Armour Institute, dedicated to preparing students from all backgrounds for careers as engineers in a rapidly

Heller, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

''Heat Transfer at the Mold-Metal Interface in Permanent Mold Casting of Aluminum Alloys'' Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting has been conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigation of squeeze casting at CMI-Tech Center (Now Hayes-Lemmerz Technical Center) and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive.

Professor R. D. Pehlke, Principal Investigator, Dr. John M. Cookson, Dr. Shouwei Hao, Dr. Prasad Krishna, Kevin T. Bilkey

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

A two-dimensional finite element thermomechanical approach to a global stress-strain analysis of steel continuous casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steel continuous casting Michel Bellet, Alban Heinrich Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Mise en Forme.bellet@ensmp.fr Synopsis This paper addresses the two-dimensional finite element simulation of steel continuous casting state (temperature, deformation, stresses) of steel all along the continuous casting machine. Both plane

Boyer, Edmond

203

First results from the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hypothetical axion-like particles with a two-photon interaction would be produced in the Sun by the Primakoff process. In a laboratory magnetic field (``axion helioscope'') they would be transformed into X-rays with energies of a few keV. Using a decommissioned LHC test magnet, CAST has been running for about 6 months during 2003. The first results from the analysis of these data are presented here. No signal above background was observed, implying an upper limit to the axion-photon coupling < 1.16 10^{-10} GeV^-1 at 95% CL for m_a <~0.02 eV. This limit is comparable to the limit from stellar energy-loss arguments and considerably more restrictive than any previous experiment in this axion mass range.

CAST Collaboration

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Thermal casting process for the preparation of membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for providing anisotropic polymer membrane from a binary polymer/solvent solution using a thermal inversion process. A homogeneous binary solution is cast onto a support and cooled in such a way as to provide a differential in cooling rate across the thickness of the resulting membrane sheet. Isotropic or anisotropic structures of selected porosities can be produced, depending on the initial concentration of polymer in the selected solvent and on the extent of the differential in cooling rate. This differential results in a corresponding gradation in pore size. The method may be modified to provide a working skin by applying a rapid, high-temperature pulse to redissolve a predetermined thickness of the membrane at one of its faces and then freezing the entire structure.

Caneba, G.T.M.; Soong, D.S.

1985-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ferrite Measurement in Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steel Castings - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to determine ferrite rapidly, accurately and directly on a finished casting, in the solution annealed condition, can enhance the acceptance, save on manufacturing costs and ultimately improve service performance of duplex stainless steel cast products. If the suitability of a non-destructive ferrite determination methodology can be demonstrated for standard industrial measurement instruments, the production of cast secondary standards for calibration of these instruments is a necessity. With these concepts in mind, a series of experiments were carried out to demonstrate, in a non-destructive manner, the proper methodology for determining ferrite content. The literature was reviewed, with regard to measurement techniques and vagaries, an industrial ferrite measurement round-robin was conducted, the effects of casting surface finish, preparation of the casting surface for accurate measurement and the evaluation of suitable means for the production of cast secondary standards for calibration were systematically investigated. The data obtained from this research program provide recommendations to ensure accurate, repeatable, and reproducible ferrite measurement and qualifies the Feritscope for field use on production castings.

Lundin, C.D.; Zhou, G.; Ruprecht, W.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MACHINING ELIMINATION THROUGH APPLICATION OF THREAD FORMING FASTENERS IN NET SHAPED CAST HOLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this work was to eliminate approximately 30% of the machining performed in typical automotive engine and transmission plants by using thread forming fasteners in as-cast holes of aluminum and magnesium cast components. The primary issues at the source of engineers├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬? reluctance to implementing thread forming fasteners in lightweight castings are: * Little proof of consistency of clamp load vs. input torque in either aluminum or magnesium castings. * No known data to understand the effect on consistency of clamp load as casting dies wear. The clamp load consistency concern is founded in the fact that a portion of the input torque used to create clamp load is also used to create threads. The torque used for thread forming may not be consistent due to variations in casting material, hole size and shape due to tooling wear and process variation (thermal and mechanical). There is little data available to understand the magnitude of this concern or to form the basis of potential solutions if the range of clamp load variation is very high (> +/- 30%). The range of variation that can be expected in as-cast hole size and shape over the full life cycle of a high pressure die casting die was established in previous work completed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, (PNNL). This established range of variation was captured in a set of 12 cast bosses by designing core pins at the size and draft angles identified in the sited previous work. The cast bosses were cut into ├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?nuts├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬Ł that could be used in the Ford Fastener Laboratory test-cell to measure clamp load when a thread forming fastener was driven into a cast nut. There were two sets of experiments run. First, a series of cast aluminum nuts were made reflecting the range of shape and size variations to be expected over the life cycle of a die casting die. Taptite thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for aluminum applications), were driven into the various cored, as-cast nuts at a constant input torque and resulting clamp loads were recorded continuously. The clamp load data was used to determine the range of clamp loads to be expected. The bolts were driven to failure. The clamp load corresponding to the target input of 18.5 Nm was recorded for each fastener. In a like fashion, a second set of experiments were run with cast magnesium nuts and ALtracs thread forming fasteners, (a widely used thread forming fastener suitable for magnesium applications). Again all clamp loads were recorded and analyzed similarly to the Taptites in aluminum cast nuts. Results from previous work performed on the same test cell for a Battelle project using standard M8 bolts into standard M8 nuts were included as a comparator for a standard bolt and nut application. The results for the thread forming fasteners in aluminum cast holes were well within industry expectations of +/- 30% for out of the box and robustness range te

Cleaver, Ryan J.; Cleaver, Todd H.; Talbott, Richard

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium cast house Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Evaluation of microstructural eects on corrosion behaviour of AZ91D magnesium Summary: of aluminium or b phase. Die-cast material with smaller grain size and ne...

208

Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Folker Meyer from Argonne National Lab gives a presentation on "Casting a Wider Net: Distributed Resources for Metagenomics" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

Meyer, Folker [ANL

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ross Overbeek of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes gives a presentation on "Casting Annotation as an Optimization Problem" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

Overbeek, Ross

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy-SMARRT): Clean Steel Casting Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inclusions in steel castings can cause rework, scrap, poor machining, and reduced casting performance, which can obviously result in excess energy consumption. Significant progress in understanding inclusion source, formation and control has been made. Inclusions can be defined as non-metallic materials such as refractory, sand, slag, or coatings, embedded in a metallic matrix. This research project has focused on the mold filling aspects to examine the effects of pouring methods and gating designs on the steel casting cleanliness through water modeling, computer modeling, and melting/casting experiments. Early in the research project, comprehensive studies of bottom-pouring water modeling and low-alloy steel casting experiments were completed. The extent of air entrainment in bottom-poured large castings was demonstrated by water modeling. Current gating systems are designed to prevent air aspiration. However, air entrainment is equally harmful and no prevention measures are in current practice. In this study, new basin designs included a basin dam, submerged nozzle, and nozzle extension. The entrained air and inclusions from the gating system were significantly reduced using the new basin method. Near the end of the project, there has been close collaboration with Wescast Industries Inc., a company manufacturing automotive exhaust components. Both computer modeling using Magma software and melting/casting experiments on thin wall turbo-housing stainless steel castings were completed in this short period of time. Six gating designs were created, including the current gating on the pattern, non-pressurized, partially pressurized, naturally pressurized, naturally pressurized without filter, and radial choke gating without filter, for Magma modeling. The melt filling velocity and temperature were determined from the modeling. Based on the simulation results, three gating designs were chosen for further melting and casting experiments on the same casting pattern using the lip pouring method. It was observed again that gating designs greatly influenced the melt filling velocity and the number of inclusion defects. The radial choked gating showed improvements in casting cleanliness and yield over the other gatings, even though no mold filters were used in the gating system.

Kuyucak, Selcuk [CanmetMATERIALS; Li, Delin [CanmetMATERIALS

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

New solar axion search in CAST with $^4$He filling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for $a\\to\\gamma$ conversion in the 9 T magnetic field of a refurbished LHC test magnet that can be directed toward the Sun. Two parallel magnet bores can be filled with helium of adjustable pressure to match the X-ray refractive mass $m_\\gamma$ to the axion search mass $m_a$. After the vacuum phase (2003--2004), which is optimal for $m_a\\lesssim0.02$ eV, we used $^4$He in 2005--2007 to cover the mass range of 0.02--0.39 eV and $^3$He in 2009--2011 to scan from 0.39--1.17 eV. After improving the detectors and shielding, we returned to $^4$He in 2012 to investigate a narrow $m_a$ range around 0.2 eV ("candidate setting" of our earlier search) and 0.39--0.42 eV, the upper axion mass range reachable with $^4$He, to "cross the axion line" for the KSVZ model. We have improved the limit on the axion-photon coupling to $g_{a\\gamma}< 1.47\\times10^{-10} {\\rm GeV}^{-1}$ (95% C.L.), depending on the pressure settings. Since 2013, we have returned to vacuum and aim for a significant increase in sensitivity.

M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; H. Brńuninger; J. Bremer; V. Burwitz; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; E. Da Riva; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; A. Dermenev; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galßn; J. A. GarcÝa; A. Gardikiotis; J. G. Garza; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; E. Georgiopoulou; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; M. Gˇmez Marzoa; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov?i?; M. Karuza; M. Kavuk; M. Kr?mar; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; G. Luzˇn; S. Neff; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; I. Ortega; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt A. RodrÝguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; I. Shilon; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Tomßs; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

212

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. The engineering properties of CASS made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that are difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of wave interactions with the microstructure. To address the inspection needs, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious effects of the coarse-grained microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam will require knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detecting flaws. The goal of improving the reliability and effectiveness of ultrasonic inspection of CASS specimens can therefore potentially be achieved by first characterizing the microstructure of the component. The characterization of CASS microstructure must be done in-situ, to enable dynamic selection and optimization of the ultrasonic inspection technique. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two consistent microstructures-equiaxed-grain material and columnar-grain material.

Anderson, Michael T.; Bond, Leonard J.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Mathews, Royce; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roberts, Kamandi C.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

In-situ Characterization of Cast Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) was commonly used in selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems for corrosion resistance and enhanced durability in service. CASS materials are generally coarse-grained and elastically anisotropic in nature, and are consequently difficult to inspect ultrasonically, largely due to detrimental effects of ultrasonic wave interactions with the coarse-grain microstructures. To address the inspection needs for these materials, new approaches that are robust to these phenomena are being developed. However, to enhance the probability of detecting flaws, knowledge of the microstructure and the corresponding acoustic properties of the material may be required. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic backscatter measurement methods for classifying the microstructure of CASS components, when making measurements from the outside surface of the pipe or component. Results to date from laboratory experiments demonstrate the potential of these measurements to classify the material type of CASS for two homogeneous microstructuresŚequiaxed-grain material or columnar-grain material. Measurements on mixed or banded microstructures also show correlation with the estimated volume-fraction of columnar grains in the material. However, several operational issues will need to be addressed prior to applying this method for in-situ characterization of CASS microstructure.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Watson, Bruce E.; Mathews, Royce; Harris, Robert V.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electromagnetic confinement for vertical casting or containing molten metal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method adapted to confine a molten metal to a region by means of an alternating electromagnetic field. As adapted for use in the present invention, the alternating electromagnetic field given by B.sub.y =(2.mu..sub.o .rho.gy).sup.1/2 (where B.sub.y is the vertical component of the magnetic field generated by the magnet at the boundary of the region; y is the distance measured downward form the top of the region, .rho. is the metal density, g is the acceleration of gravity and .mu..sub.o is the permeability of free space) induces eddy currents in the molten metal which interact with the magnetic field to retain the molten metal with a vertical boudnary. As applied to an apparatus for the continuous casting of metal sheets or rods, metal in liquid form can be continuously introduced into the region defined by the magnetic field, solidified and conveyed away from the magnetic field in solid form in a continuous process.

Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

New solar axion search in CAST with $^4$He filling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) searches for $a\\to\\gamma$ conversion in the 9 T magnetic field of a refurbished LHC test magnet that can be directed toward the Sun. Two parallel magnet bores can be filled with helium of adjustable pressure to match the X-ray refractive mass $m_\\gamma$ to the axion search mass $m_a$. After the vacuum phase (2003--2004), which is optimal for $m_a\\lesssim0.02$ eV, we used $^4$He in 2005--2007 to cover the mass range of 0.02--0.39 eV and $^3$He in 2009--2011 to scan from 0.39--1.17 eV. After improving the detectors and shielding, we returned to $^4$He in 2012 to investigate a narrow $m_a$ range around 0.2 eV ("candidate setting" of our earlier search) and 0.39--0.42 eV, the upper axion mass range reachable with $^4$He, to "cross the axion line" for the KSVZ model. We have improved the limit on the axion-photon coupling to $g_{a\\gamma}< 1.47\\times10^{-10} {\\rm GeV}^{-1}$ (95% C.L.), depending on the pressure settings. Since 2013, we have returned to vacuum and aim for a s...

Arik, M; Barth, K; Belov, A; Brauninger, H; Bremer, J; Burwitz, V; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Collar, J I; Da Riva, E; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Dermenev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Elias, N; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galan, J; Garcia, J A; Gardikiotis, A.; Garza, J G; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Georgiopoulou, E; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Marzoa, M Gomez; Hasinoff, M D; Hoffmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; K.Jakovcic; Karuza, M; Kavuk, M; Krcmar, M; Kuster, M; Lakic, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubicic, A; Luzon, G; Neff, S; Niinikoski, T; Nordt, A; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M .J; Raffelt, G; Rodriguez, A; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Shilon, I; Solanki, S K; Stewart, L; Tomas, A; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dorin, A. & Korb, K.B., "Building Virtual Ecosystems from Artificial Chemistry", in Proceed-ings of the 9th European Conference on Artificial Life, Almeida e Costa (ed.), Springer-Verlag,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 9th European Conference on Artificial Life, Almeida e Costa (ed.), Springer-Verlag, 2007 pp103Dorin, A. & Korb, K.B., "Building Virtual Ecosystems from Artificial Chemistry", in Proceed- ings

Dorin, Alan

218

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A successful four-year project on the modeling and optimization of direct chill (DC) casting to reduce ingot cracking has been completed. The project involved close collaboration among private industries, national laboratories, and universities. During the four-year project, 16 quarterly meetings brought the industrial partners and the research team together for discussion of research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot. The collaborative research resulted in several major accomplishments or findings: (1) Surface cracks were shown to be a result of hot tearing rather than cold cracks, as was thought before this project. These cracks form on the surface of a DC cast ingot just above the impingement point of the secondary cooling water jets. The cracks form along dendrite and grain boundaries, where solute and impurity elements are highly segregated. This understanding led to the development of a new technique for determining the mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zone of alloys and to thermodynamic predictions of the hot tearing propensity of DC cast ingots. (2) The apparent heat transfer coefficient (HTC) at the ingot surface in the water cooling region during DC casting was determined on the basis of temperature measurements in commercial DC casting ingots and an inverse heat transfer analysis. HTCs were calculated as a function of temperature and time, and covered the different regimes of heat transfer expected during DC casting. The calculated values were extrapolated to include the effect of water flow rate. The calculated HTCs had a peak at around 200 C, corresponding to the high heat transfer rates during nucleate boiling, and the profile was consistent with similar data published in the literature. (3) A new method, termed the reheating-cooling method (RCM), was developed and validated for measuring mechanical properties in the nonequilibrium mushy zones of alloys. The new method captures the brittle nature of aluminum alloys at temperatures close to the nonequilibrium solidus temperature, while specimens tested using the reheating method exhibit significant ductility. The RCM has been used for determining the mechanical properties of alloys at nonequilibrium mushy zone temperatures. Accurate data obtained during this project show that the metal becomes more brittle at high temperatures and high strain rates. (4) The elevated-temperature mechanical properties of the alloy were determined. Constitutive models relating the stress and strain relationship at elevated temperatures were also developed. The experimental data fit the model well. (5) An integrated 3D DC casting model has been used to simulate heat transfer, fluid flow, solidification, and thermally induced stress-strain during casting. A temperature-dependent HTC between the cooling water and the ingot surface, cooling water flow rate, and air gap were coupled in this model. An elasto-viscoplastic model based on high-temperature mechanical testing was used to calculate the stress during casting. The 3D integrated model can be used for the prediction of temperature, fluid flow, stress, and strain distribution in DC cast ingots. (6) The cracking propensity of DC cast ingots can be predicted using the 3D integrated model as well as thermodynamic models. Thus, an ingot cracking index based on the ratio of local stress to local alloy strength was established. Simulation results indicate that cracking propensity increases with increasing casting speed. The composition of the ingots also has a major effect on cracking formation. It was found that copper and zinc increase the cracking propensity of DC cast ingots. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks in DC castings from a current level of 5% down to 2%. This could lead to energy savings

Das, Subodh K.

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Simulation of Distortion and Residual Stress Development During Heat Treatment of Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat treatment and associated processing, such as quenching, are critical during high strength steel casting production. These processes must be managed closely to prevent thermal and residual stresses that may result in distortion, cracking (particularly after machining), re-work, and weld repair. The risk of casting distortion limits aggressive quenching that can be beneficial to the process and yield an improved outcome. As a result of these distortions, adjustments must be made to the casting or pattern design, or tie bars must be added. Straightening castings after heat treatments can be both time-consuming and expensive. Residual stresses may reduce a casting├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?s overall service performance, possibly resulting in catastrophic failure. Stress relieving may help, but expends additional energy in the process. Casting software is very limited in predicting distortions during heat treatment, so corrective measures most often involve a tedious trial-and-error procedure. An extensive review of existing heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling revealed that it is vital to predict the phase transformations and microstructure of the steel along with the thermal stress development during heat treatment. After reviewing the state-of-the-art in heat treatment residual stress and distortion modeling, an existing commercial code was selected because of its advanced capabilities in predicting phase transformations, the evolving microstructure and related properties along with thermal stress development during heat treatment. However, this software was developed for small parts created from forgings or machined stock, and not for steel castings. Therefore, its predictive capabilities for heat treatment of steel castings were investigated. Available experimental steel casting heat treatment data was determined to be of insufficient detail and breadth, and so new heat treatment experiments were designed and performed, casting and heat treating modified versions of the Navy-C ring (a classical test shape for heat treatment experiments) for several carbon and low alloy steels in order to generate data necessary to validate the code. The predicted distortions were in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured values. However, the final distortions in the castings were small, making it difficult to determine how accurate the predictions truly are. It is recommended that further validation of the software be performed with the aid of additional experiments with large production steel castings that experience significant heat treatment distortions. It is apparent from this research that the mechanical properties of the bonded sand used for cores and sand molds are key in producing accurate stress simulation results. Because of this, experiments were performed to determine the temperature-dependent elastic modulus of a resin-bonded sand commonly utilized in the steel casting industry. The elastic modulus was seen to vary significantly with heating and cooling rates. Also, the retained room temperature elastic modulus after heating was seen to degrade significantly when the sand was heated above 125├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░C. The elastic modulus curves developed in this work can readily be utilized in casting simulation software. Additional experiments with higher heating rates are recommended to determine the behavior of the elastic modulus in the sand close to the mold-metal interface. The commercial heat treatment residual stress and distortion code, once fully validated, is expected to result in an estimated energy savings of 2.15 trillion BTU├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?s/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology.

Christoph Beckermann; Kent Carlson

2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Use of freeze-casting in advanced burner reactor fuel design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will detail the modeling of a fast reactor with fuel pins created using a freeze-casting process. Freeze-casting is a method of creating an inert scaffold within a fuel pin. The scaffold is created using a directional solidification process and results in open porosity for emplacement of fuel, with pores ranging in size from 300 microns to 500 microns in diameter. These pores allow multiple fuel types and enrichments to be loaded into one fuel pin. Also, each pore could be filled with varying amounts of fuel to allow for the specific volume of fission gases created by that fuel type. Currently fast reactors, including advanced burner reactors (ABR's), are not economically feasible due to the high cost of operating the reactors and of reprocessing the fuel. However, if the fuel could be very precisely placed, such as within a freeze-cast scaffold, this could increase fuel performance and result in a valid design with a much lower cost per megawatt. In addition to competitive costs, freeze-cast fuel would also allow for selective breeding or burning of actinides within specific locations in fast reactors. For example, fast flux peak locations could be utilized on a minute scale to target specific actinides for transmutation. Freeze-cast fuel is extremely flexible and has great potential in a variety of applications. This paper performs initial modeling of freeze-cast fuel, with the generic fast reactor parameters for this model based on EBR-II. The core has an assumed power of 62.5 MWt. The neutronics code used was Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) transport code. Uniform pore sizes were used in increments of 100 microns. Two different freeze-cast scaffold materials were used: ceramic (MgO-ZrO{sub 2}) and steel (SS316L). Separate models were needed for each material because the freeze-cast ceramic and metal scaffolds have different structural characteristics and overall porosities. Basic criticality results were compiled for the various models. Preliminary results show that criticality is achievable with freeze-cast fuel pins despite the significant amount of inert fuel matrix. Freeze casting is a promising method to achieve very precise fuel placement within fuel pins. (authors)

Lang, A. L.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Allen, T. R. [Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. of Wisconsin Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Burger, J.; Hunger, P. M.; Wegst, U. G. K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, 8000 Cummings Hall, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Modeling and Optimization of Direct Chill Casting to Reduce Ingot Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 68% of the aluminum produced in the United States is first cast into ingots prior to further processing into sheet, plate, extrusions, or foil. The direct chill (DC) semi-continuous casting process has been the mainstay of the aluminum industry for the production of ingots due largely to its robust nature and relative simplicity. Though the basic process of DC casting is in principle straightforward, the interaction of process parameters with heat extraction, microstructural evolution, and development of solidification stresses is too complex to analyze by intuition or practical experience. One issue in DC casting is the formation of stress cracks [1-15]. In particular, the move toward larger ingot cross-sections, the use of higher casting speeds, and an ever-increasing array of mold technologies have increased industry efficiencies but have made it more difficult to predict the occurrence of stress crack defects. The Aluminum Industry Technology Roadmap [16] has recognized the challenges inherent in the DC casting process and the control of stress cracks and selected the development of 'fundamental information on solidification of alloys to predict microstructure, surface properties, and stresses and strains' as a high-priority research need, and the 'lack of understanding of mechanisms of cracking as a function of alloy' and 'insufficient understanding of the aluminum solidification process', which is 'difficult to model', as technology barriers in aluminum casting processes. The goal of this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project was to assist the aluminum industry in reducing the incidence of stress cracks from the current level of 5% to 2%. Decreasing stress crack incidence is important for improving product quality and consistency as well as for saving resources and energy, since considerable amounts of cast metal could be saved by eliminating ingot cracking, by reducing the scalping thickness of the ingot before rolling, and by eliminating butt sawing. Full-scale industrial implementation of the results of the proposed research would lead to energy savings in excess of 6 trillion Btu by the year 2020. The research undertaken in this project aimed to achieve this objective by a collaboration of industry, university, and national laboratory personnel through Secat, Inc., a consortium of aluminum companies. During the four-year project, the industrial partners and the research team met in 16 quarterly meetings to discuss research results and research direction. The industrial partners provided guidance, facilities, and experience to the research team. The research team went to two industrial plants to measure temperature distributions in commercial 60,000-lb DC casting ingot production. The project focused on the development of a fundamental understanding of ingot cracking and detailed models of thermal conditions, solidification, microstructural evolution, and stress development during the initial transient in DC castings of the aluminum alloys 3004 and 5182. The microstructure of the DC casting ingots was systematically characterized. Carefully designed experiments were carried out at the national laboratory and university facilities as well as at the industrial locations using the industrial production facilities. The advanced computational capabilities of the national laboratories were used for thermodynamic and kinetic simulations of phase transformation, heat transfer and fluid flow, solidification, and stress-strain evolution during DC casting. The achievements of the project are the following: (1) Identified the nature of crack formation during DC casting; (2) Developed a novel method for determining the mechanical properties of an alloy at the nonequilibrium mushy zone of the alloy; (3) Measured heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) between the solidifying ingot and the cooling water jet; (4) Determined the material constitutive model at high temperatures; and (5) Developed computational capabilities for the simulation of cracking formation in DC casting ingot. The models and the database de

Das, S.K.; Ningileri, S.; Long, Z.; Saito, K.; Khraisheh, M.; Hassan, M.H.; Kuwana, K.; Han, Q.; Viswanathan, S.; Sabau, A.S.; Clark, J.; Hyrn, J. (ANL)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

The effect of residuals on the presence of intergranular surface cracks on continuously cast billets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1991, Iscor Vereeniging experienced a dramatic increase in the rejection rate of specialty steel bars rolled from continuously cast billets due to the presence of seams on the bars. The seams originated from tearing of the billets during the first 2 passes in the roughing mill during hot rolling. The defective billets were found to contain fine intergranular cracks on the surface. Such cracks have been described in the literature and have been attributed to the presence of high levels of residuals resulting in the well-known phenomenon of surface hot shortness which results from the enrichment of residuals at the grain boundaries after preferential oxidation of iron during scaling of the steel. The present investigation revealed that the effect of residuals on intergranular surface cracking is a complex interaction between steel composition and casting conditions such as casting speed, intensity of secondary cooling, section size, and mold type. This paper quantifies the effect of residuals on the intergranular surface cracking of continuously cast billets and quantitatively relates the incidence of these cracks to parameters which can be controlled during steelmaking and continuous casting.

Wijngaarden, M.J.U.T. van; Visagie, G.P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Present status and future prospects of electro-magnetic casting for silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development research of Electro-Magnetic Casting (EMC) for silicon crystal manufacturing technology has been carried out for years with the purpose of providing low cost multicrystalline silicon substrate for solar cells. The EMC technology is a new concept, in which electromagnetic force is utilized to suspend molten metal without contact to crucible wall for melting and solidification of silicon material. At present, the research has been carried out for the development of casting technique with an ingot size of 22 x 22 cm{sup 2} cross section, and the furnace construction for producing a 35 x 35 cm{sup 2} cross sectioned ingot has been begun. Solar cell conversion efficiencies using EMC ingot crystals are ranging from 13--14% at the present, and the quality of EMC material reaches within that of conventional mold casting material. By the improvements of higher casting speed, higher material quality and larger ingot size at the EMC technology, it is expected that a new casting technique for lower cost ingot production will be realized. The paper describes the features of EMC technology, the silicon EMC furnace, crystalline properties of EMC ingots, electric power consumption of EMC, and cost comparison of the EMC and Czychralski pulling methods.

Kaneko, Kyojiro; Kawamura, Ritsuo; Misawa, Teruoki [Sumitomo SiTiX Corp., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan). Research and Development Center

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Determination of effective axion masses in the helium-3 buffer of CAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is a ground based experiment located in Geneva (Switzerland) searching for axions coming from the Sun. Axions, hypothetical particles that not only could solve the strong CP problem but also be one of the favored candidates for dark matter, can be produced in the core of the Sun via the Primakoff effect. They can be reconverted into X-ray photons on Earth in the presence of strong electromagnetic fields. In order to look for axions, CAST points a decommissioned LHC prototype dipole magnet with different X-ray detectors installed in both ends of the magnet towards the Sun. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV/c{sup 2}. During the second phase, CAST extends its mass sensitivity by tuning the electron density present in the magnetic field region. Injecting precise amounts of helium gas has enabled CAST to look for axion masses up to 1.2 eV/c{sup 2}. This paper studies the determination of the effective axion masses scanned at CAST during its second phase. The use of a helium gas buffer at temperatures of 1.8 K has required a detailed knowledge of the gas density distribution. Complete sets of computational fluid dynamic simulations validated with experimental data have been crucial to obtain accurate results.

Ruz, J

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

225

Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

Chopra, O.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Examination of the solidification macrostructure of spheroidal and flake graphite cast irons using DAAS and ESBD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation focuses on the study of the solidification macrostructure of sand cast flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons. The macrostructure is revealed by using a special technique developed earlier by the authors, called Direct Austempering After Solidification. The observations make use of conventional metallography and Electron Back Scattering Diffraction. The latter technique allows a more detailed observation of the morphology of the austenite grains and the microstructure of the matrix. The results of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction validate the observations made using the macrographic technique. It is verified that the solidification of both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons is dominated by the growth of large austenite dendrites that form a grain pattern similar to that usually found in most metallic alloys.

Rivera, G. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Calvillo, P.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Boeri, R. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: boeri@fi.mdp.edu.ar; Houbaert, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Sikora, J. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: jsikora@fi.mdp.edu.ar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method and apparatus for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is disclosed for casting conductive and semi-conductive materials. The apparatus includes a plurality of conductive members arranged to define a container-like area having a desired cross-sectional shape. A portion or all of the conductive or semi-conductive material which is to be cast is introduced into the container-like area. A means is provided for inducing the flow of an electrical current in each of the conductive members, which currents act collectively to induce a current flow in the material. The induced current flow through the conductive members is in a direction substantially opposite to the induced current flow in the material so that the material is repelled from the conductive members during the casting process.

Ciszek, T.F.

1984-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

228

Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 1: Industrial study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted to understand and prevent the formation of cracks in alumina-zirconia-silica (AZS) refractory blocks during solidification processing. A fundamental approach has been taken, centered on the development of a three-dimensional mathematical model to predict heat flow and stress generation in fused-cast AZS refractory blocks. In the first part of a two-part study, the voidless'' casting process has been carefully examined in an industrial setting. From a survey of the distribution, frequency of occurrence, and fracture surface morphology of cracks, an attempt was made to link the crack types found in the study to process variables. In-mold temperature data collected for a single casting throughout the normal cooling period have been used to validate the heat-flow model which is described in Part 2. The stress analysis, cause of the different cracks, and remedial action are also presented in Part 2.

Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. (Carborundum Co., Falconer, NY (United States). Monofrax-S Plant)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1Î concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5Î and 10Î of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method For Removing Volatile Components From A Gel-Cast Ceramic Article  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing substantially all of the volatile component in a green, volatile-containing ceramic article is disclosed. The method comprises freezing the ceramic article; and then subjecting the frozen article to a vacuum for a sufficient time to freeze-dry the article. Frequently, the article is heated while being freeze-dried. Use of this method efficiently reduces the propensity for any warpage of the article. The article is often formed from a ceramic slurry in a gel-casting process. A method for fabricating a ceramic core used in investment casting is also described.

Klug, Frederic Joseph (Schenectady, NY); DeCarr, Sylvia Marie (Schenectady, NY)

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

Metallurgical study of duplex stainless steel CD4Mcu Casting Material for Purex type nozzles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies presented in this document evaluate the metallurgy of Cast Grade Alloys CD4MCu and CD4MCuN (ASTM A890, Grades 1A and 1B). CD4MCu has been used as a Purex-Type nozzle casting material since the early 1960's, when it was a new and exotic material. The current metallurgical knowledge base shows addition of nitrogen to the alloy is very beneficial (CD4MCuN), and rapid cooling (water quenching) is essential to achieving the sought-after material properties.

LESHIKAR, G.A.

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cast CF8C-Plus Stainless Steel for Turbocharger Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project is to provide the critical test data needed to qualify CF8C-Plus cast stainless steel for commercial production and use for turbocharger housings with upgraded performance and durability relative to standard commercial cast irons or stainless steels. The turbocharger technologies include, but are not limited to, heavy-duty highway diesel engines, and passenger vehicle diesel and gasoline engines. This CRADA provides additional critical high-temperature mechanical properties testing and data analysis needed to quality the new CF8C-Plus steels for turbocharger housing applications.

Maziasz, P.J.; Shyam, A.; Evans, N.D.; Pattabiraman, K. (Honeywell Turbo Technologies

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of Micro Catalytic Combustor Using Ceramic Tape Casting Takashi OKAMASA, Gwang-Goo LEE, Yuji SUZUKI, and Nobuhide KASAGI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Micro Catalytic Combustor Using Ceramic Tape Casting Takashi OKAMASA, Gwang-Goo LEE@thtlab.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Abstract Micro-scale catalytic combustor fueled by butane is investigated. A cost-effective ceramic combustor is developed using high- precision tape-casting technology. Nano-porous alumina fabricated through

Kasagi, Nobuhide

236

ing delivery of shipment. For  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Food arid . Fluid Intake Edited by Edward M. Stricker Univmity oj Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania living. The same fact, that most free-living omnivores live in r~.as in which no single food provides,-contributed to relatively independent literatures, and employed r- ferent theoretical perspectives. " In a landmark series

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

237

The Power of The Dark Side: Using Cast Shadows for Visually-Guided Touching  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the cast shadow of a robot arm on a surface can be detected by a camera and used to derive a time-to-contact estimate. We achieve 3D control of a robot arm relative to an unmodelled surface by integrating shadow. Shadows can be very revealing!Robot sees target, arm, and arm's shadow Robot moves to reduce visual error

Torres-Jara, Eduardo

238

Grain refinement and texture development of cast bi90sb10 alloy via severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work was to study learn about grain refinement mechanisms and texture development in cast n-type Bi90Sb10 alloy caused by severe plastic deformation. The practical objective is to produce a fine grained and textured...

Im, Jae-taek

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

SunCast: Fine-grained Prediction of Natural Sunlight Levels for Improved Daylight Harvesting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SunCast: Fine-grained Prediction of Natural Sunlight Levels for Improved Daylight Harvesting, USA {jklu,whitehouse}@cs.virginia.edu ABSTRACT Daylight harvesting is the use of natural sunlight to reduce the need for artificial lighting in buildings. The key challenge of daylight harvesting

Whitehouse, Kamin

240

PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREDICTION OF HEAT TREATMENT DISTORTION OF CAST STEEL C-RINGS Brandon Elliott Brooks1 and Christoph extensive rework or redesign, recasting, or through additional machining steps. Predicting heat treatment. There has been extensive interest in the prediction of heat treatment distortion via computer simulation

Beckermann, Christoph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Prediction of Riser Carbon Macrosegregation due to Shrinkage Flow in Steel Casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Prediction of Riser Carbon Macrosegregation due to Shrinkage Flow in Steel Casting Kent D of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 Abstract A new simulation model is developed that predicts carbon predicted with a new advanced feeding flow model that predicts melt pressure, feeding flow and porosity

Beckermann, Christoph

242

Prediction of burn-on and mould penetration in steel casting using simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction of burn-on and mould penetration in steel casting using simulation B. E. Brooks1 , C the mould surface and entrain onto the surface of the mould. A method has been developed to predict likely, burn-on and penetration defects can be predicted. The method is validated through comparison

Beckermann, Christoph

243

Simulation of Stresses during Casting of Binary Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulation of Stresses during Casting of Binary Magnesium-Aluminum Alloys M.G. POKORNY, C.A. MONROE properties that are suitable for advanced stress modeling is even more limited for magnesium alloys. Recently of an AZ91 magnesium alloy in order to predict hot tears.[4] This study relied on crude estimates

Beckermann, Christoph

244

Reliability of Laser Welding Process for ZE41A-T5 Magnesium Alloy Sand Castings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability of Laser Welding Process for ZE41A-T5 Magnesium Alloy Sand Castings Haider Al-Kazzaz1 for magnesium alloys. The process reliability of 2-mm ZE41A-T5 butt joints welded by a 4 kW Nd:YAG laser, reproducibility, Weibull distribution 1. Introduction The applications of magnesium alloys are expanding rapidly

Medraj, Mamoun

245

16th Century Cast-Bronze Ordnance at the Museu de Angra do Heroismo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the collections of the Museu de Angra do Heroismo (Terceira Island, Azores, Portugal) are nine cast bronze guns from the 16th century. Most were raised from the seafloor between the 1960s and 1990s, but this study comprises the first in...

Hoskins, Sara Grace

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

MEASUREMENTS OF MOLTEN STEEL/FLUX INTERFACE PHENOMENA IN THIN SLAB CASTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the first in-plant measurements of meniscus flow velocities for the CSP continuous casting process ......................................................................... ......................................................................... ......................................................................... The UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA October 2002 Joseph W. Shaver, 2002 #12;ii ABSTRACT Several industrial plant (CSP) process, the trials featured mold metal level and meniscus measurements, which resulted

Thomas, Brian G.

247

Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

BALT & CAST: Middleware for Cognitive Nick Hawes, Michael Zillich and Jeremy Wyatt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

researchers are working on middleware software for robotics, e.g. MARIE [C^ot┬┤e et al., 2006]. These projectsBALT & CAST: Middleware for Cognitive Robotics Nick Hawes, Michael Zillich and Jeremy Wyatt School a toolkit for implementing architectures for intelli- gent robotic systems. This toolkit is based

Wyatt, Jeremy

249

Experimental: Gel Electrolyte The gel mixtures were designed to be cast as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental: Gel Electrolyte The gel mixtures were designed to be cast as low viscosity solution and Frederik Krebs Polymer Solar Cell Initiative, The Danish Polymer Centre, Ris├Ş National Laboratory, PO Box solar cell power extraction solving the problem of high current densities. LCs realized reach 1

250

Lifetime Modelling of Fatigue Crack Initiation from Casting Defects M. Geuffrard1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodology has been developed for defects occurring in turbine discs made from powder metallurgy nickel base results of such an investigation of the assessment of casting pores in aero-engine turbine blades procedure The material used in this investigation is AM1 Ni-based single crystal. Its composition is 7.8Cr

Boyer, Edmond

251

Effect of Porosity on the Stiffness of Cast Steel RICHARD A. HARDIN and CHRISTOPH BECKERMANN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the location, amount, and size characteristics of micro- and macroporosity, an integrated design process service perfor- mance.[2] It is anticipated that such a design process will guide and improve inspection in cast metal due to porosity or inclusions are not considered directly in part design. Instead, ad

Beckermann, Christoph

252

Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems - Revison 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330 C (535-625 F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350 C (554-633 F). The correlations for estimating the change in tensile stress, including the Ramberg/Osgood parameters for strain hardening, are also described. The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The extent or degree of thermal embrittlement at 'saturation,' i.e., the minimum impact energy that can be achieved for a material after long-term aging, is determined from the chemical composition of the steel. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of JIC are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common 'predicted lower-bound' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

253

CHORIZOS: a CHi-square cOde for parameteRized modelIng and characteriZation of phOtometry and Spectrophotometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed a CHi-square cOde for parameteRized modelIng and characteriZation of phOtometry and Spectrophotometry (CHORIZOS). CHORIZOS can use up to two intrinsic free parameters (e.g. temperature and gravity for stars; type and redshift for galaxies; or age and metallicity for stellar clusters) and two extrinsic ones (amount and type of extinction). The code uses chi-square minimization to find all models compatible with the observed data in the model N-dimensional (N=1,2,3,4) parameter space. CHORIZOS can use either correlated or uncorrelated colors as input and is especially designed to identify possible parameter degeneracies and multiple solutions. The code is written in IDL and is available to the astronomical community. Here we present the techniques used, test the code, apply it to a few well-known astronomical problems, and suggest possible applications. As a first scientific result from CHORIZOS, we confirm from photometry the need for a revised temperature-spectral type scale for OB stars previously derived from spectroscopy.

J. MaÝz-Apellßniz

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in language tutor-ing. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in cultural-related areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This list includes a sampling of volunteer opportunities and organizations working in language tutor- ing. These opportunities may be suitable for students majoring or interested in cultural://www.guts.wisc.edu/programs/fll_tutor_info.html Want to meet new people interested in your language, develop cross-cultural communication skills, have

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

255

Probing the eV-Mass Range for Solar Axions with CAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions which could be produced in the core of the Sun via the so-called Primakoff effect. Not only would these hypothetical particles solve the strong CP problem, but they are also one of the favored candidates for dark matter. In order to look for axions originating from the Sun, CAST uses a decommissioned LHC prototype magnet. In its 10 m long magnetic field region of 9 Tesla, axions could be reconverted into X-ray photons. Different X-ray detectors are installed on both ends of the magnet, which is mounted on a structure built to follow the Sun during sunrise and sunset for a total of about 3 hours per day. The analysis of the data acquired during the first phase of the experiment with vacuum in the magnetic field region yielded the most restrictive experimental upper limit on the axion-to-photon coupling constant for axion masses up to about 0.02 eV. In order to extend the sensitivity of the experiment to a wider mass range, the CAST experiment continues its search for axions with helium in the magnet bores. In this way it is possible to restore coherence of conversion for larger masses. Changing the pressure of the helium gas enables the experiment to scan different axion masses in the range of up to about 1.2 eV. Especially at high pressures, a precise knowledge of the gas density distribution is crucial to obtain accurate results. In the first part of this second phase of CAST, {sup 4}He was used and the axion mass region was extended up to 0.39 eV, a part of phase space favored by axion models. In CAST's ongoing {sup 3}He phase the studied mass range is now being extended further. In this contribution the final results of CAST's {sup 4}He phase will be presented and the current status of the {sup 3}He run will be given. This includes latest results as well as prospects of future axion experiments.

Vogel, J K; Pivovaroff, M J; Soufli, R; van Bibber, K; CAST, C

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

256

Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope{reg_sign} and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope{reg_sign} were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs {at} -40 C (-40 F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundries is adequate to produce a product free from intermetallic phases.

Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Final Report, Volume 2, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of testing cast Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) required testing to several ASTM specifications, while formulating and conducting industry round robin tests to verify and study the reproducibility of the results. ASTM E562 (Standard Test Method for Determining Volume Fraction by Systematic manual Point Count) and ASTM A923 (Standard Test Methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic/Ferritic Stainless Steels) were the specifications utilized in conducting this work. An ASTM E562 industry round robin, ASTM A923 applicability study, ASTM A923 industry round robin, and an ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases were implemented. In the ASTM E562 study, 5 samples were extracted from various cast austenitic and DSS in order to have varying amounts of ferrite. Each sample was metallographically prepared by UT and sent to each of 8 participants for volume fraction of ferrite measurements. Volume fraction of ferrite was measured using manual point count per ASTM E562. FN was measured from the Feritescope├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬« and converted to volume fraction of ferrite. Results indicate that ASTM E562 is applicable to DSS and the results have excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility. Also, volume fraction of ferrite conversions from the FN measured by the Feritescope├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬« were similar to volume fraction of ferrite measured per ASTM E562. In the ASTM A923 applicability to cast DSS study, 8 different heat treatments were performed on 3 lots of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) castings and 1 lot of 2205 wrought DSS. The heat treatments were selected to produce a wide range of cooling rates and hold times in order to study the suitability of ASTM A923 to the response of varying amounts on intermetallic phases [117]. The test parameters were identical to those used to develop ASTM A923 for wrought DSS. Charpy V-notch impact samples were extracted from the castings and wrought DSS and tested per ASTM A923 method B (Charpy impact test). Method A (sodium hydroxide etch test) was performed on one half of a fractured Charpy V-notch impact sample and Method C (ferric chloride corrosion weight loss test) was performed on another half. Test results for the three cast lots and one wrought lot indicate that ASTM A923 is relevant for detecting intermetallic phases in cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 round robin study, five laboratories conducted ASTM A923 Methods A & C on cast DSS material and the lab-to-lab reproducibility of the data was determined. Two groups of samples were sent to the participants. Group 1 samples were tested per ASTM A923 Method A, group 2 samples were tested by ASTM A923 Method C. Testing procedures for this round robin study were identical to those used in the ASTM A923 applicability study. Results from this round robin indicate that there is excellent lab-to-lab reproducibility of ASTM A923 with respect to cast DSS and that ASTM A923 could be expanded to cover both wrought and cast DSS. In the ASTM A923 study of the effectiveness of existing foundry solution annealing procedures for producing cast DSS without intermetallic phases, Ten heats of ASTM A890-4A (CD3MN) in the foundry solution annealed condition were tested per ASTM A923 Methods A, B, & C. Testing of these materials per ASTM A923 was used to determine if the foundry solution anneal procedures were adequate to completely eliminate any intermetallic phases, which may have precipitated during the casting and subsequent heat treatment processes. All heats showed no sign of intermetallic phase per Method A, passed minimum Charpy impact energy requirements per Method B (> 40 ft-lbs @ -40├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░C (-40├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬░F)), and showed negligible weight loss per Method C (< 10 mdd). These results indicate that the solution annealing procedure used by foundri

Russell, Steven, W.; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ICME Guided Development of Advanced Cast Aluminum Alloys For Automotive Engine Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Ford at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ICME guided development of advanced cast...

259

Thermal stress analysis of fused-cast AZS refractories during production; Part 2: Development of thermo-elastic stress model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mathematical models of heat flow and thermo-elastic stress, based on the finite-element method, have been developed and utilized to analyze the voidless,'' fused-cast, AZS, solidification process. The results of the mathematical analysis, in conjunction with information obtained in a comprehensive industrial study, presented in Part 1 of this paper, describe the mechanisms for the formation of the various crack types found in the fused-cast product. Thermal stresses are generated early in the solidification process by rapid cooling of the refractory surface as it contacts the initially cool mold and later in conjunction with the tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation which occurs in the zirconia component of the AZS refractory. Applying this model, castings were made using a revised mold design. Preliminary results indicate these castings to be free of objectionable transverse cracks.

Cockcroft, S.L.; Brimacombe, J.K. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Centre for Metallurgical Process Engineering); Walrod, D.G.; Myles, T.A. (Carborundum Co., Falconer, NY (United States). Monofrax-S Plant)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 comprises of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope{reg_sign}, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A study on the oxidation characteristics of cast irons containing aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal-oxidation characteristics of cast irons containing aluminum (5-15% Al) from 700 to 1000{degrees}C in air have been studied. In addition to mass-gain measurements, the morphology and composition of the oxide scales have been examined by SEM-EDX system and XRD analysis. A normal Fe-5Al-C alloy does not develop protective, adherent scales. Even the addition of misch metal and calcium silicide to such an alloy does not improve its oxidation resistance. But aluminum cast iron develops considerable oxidation resistance only when a sufficient quantity of silicon is also present in the alloy. Treatment of the alloy with misch metal and calcium silicide together assists in protective scale formation. Among the alloys investigated Fe-15Al-Si-C treated with misch metal and calcium silicide shows minimum oxidation at 1000{degrees}C.

Ghosh, S.; Prodhan, A. [National Metallurigical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India); Mohanty, O.N. [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India)] [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.

Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Elimination or Minimization of Oscillation Marks: A Path To Improved Cast Surface Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oscillation marks are the most recognizable feature of continuous casting and can be related to the subsurface defects that can be found on product rolled from continuous cast slabs. The purpose of this work was to develop strategies that can be used on industrial continuous casters to reduce oscillation mark depth and, in particular, to minimize the formation of hook type defects that are prevalent on ultra low carbon grades. The major focus of the work was on developing a technique to allow heat transfer in the meniscus region of the continuous caster to be measured and the effect of mold slag chemistry and chrystallization to be documented. A new experimental technique was developed that allowed the effect of mold flux chemistry and chrystallization on the radiation heat transfer rate to be measured dynamically.

Dr. Alan W. Cramb

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fatigue properties of die cast zinc alloys for automotive lock applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the 1970ĺs many automotive lock systems were converted from zinc die casting alloys to engineering plastics for reasons of weight and cost. Recent increases in requirements for precision and security have caused automotive and other lock designers to reconsider zinc alloy die-castings for these applications. To enable this, there is a need for mechanical property data comparable to that of the plastics materials used in these applications. In this work, rotary bending fatigue tests were performed on Alloys 3, 5, ZA-8 and AcuZinc 5 using an R.R. Moore fatigue machine. Testing was performed at 30 Hz and was stopped at 1x107 cycles. The fatigue limit results were compared to data reported in the literature for higher number of cycles and faster rotations.

Schrems, Karol K.; Dogan, Omer N.; Goodwin, F.E. (International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle, NC)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

Montgomery, L.C.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

266

Characterisation of Fourteenth-Century Bell-Casting Pit in Old Town Hall Sibiu, Romania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we have made an analytical investigation by neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence of a number of pieces found on the two hearths and the slag layer discovered at the Old Town Hall from Sibiu, Romania and some bells from the surrounding region of Sibiu. The elemental analyses suggest the fact that the hearths preserve traces of an activity of alloying of copper with tin for casting bells.

Agata Olariu; Petre Munteanu-Besliu

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 301b heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(l-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions. AFA alloy properties to date have been obtained from small laboratory scale arc-castings made at ORNL. The goal of the ORNL-CarTech CRADA was to establish the viability for producing plate, sheet and foil of the AFA alloys by conventional casting and hot working approaches as a first step towards scale up and commercialization of the AFA alloys. The AFA alloy produced under this effort will then be evaluated in related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers for gas turbine recuperator applications.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H.

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Vacuum-induction melting, refining, and casting of uranium and its alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vacuum-induction melting (VIM), refining, and casting of uranium and its alloys are discussed. Emphasis is placed on historical development, VIM equipment, crucible and mold design, furnace atmospheres, melting parameters, impurity pickup, ingot quality, and economics. The VIM procedures used to produce high-purity, high-quality sound ingots at the US Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant are discussed in detail.

Jackson, R.J.

1989-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Aging of Graphitic Cast Irons and Machinability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this task was to determine whether ductile iron and compacted graphite iron exhibit age strengthening to a statistically significant extent. Further, this effort identified the mechanism by which gray iron age strengthens and the mechanism by which age-strengthening improves the machinability of gray cast iron. These results were then used to determine whether age strengthening improves the machinability of ductile iron and compacted graphite iron alloys in order to develop a predictive model of alloy factor effects on age strengthening. The results of this work will lead to reduced section sizes, and corresponding weight and energy savings. Improved machinability will reduce scrap and enhance casting marketability. Technical Conclusions: ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó Age strengthening was demonstrated to occur in gray iron ductile iron and compacted graphite iron. ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó Machinability was demonstrated to be improved by age strengthening when free ferrite was present in the microstructure, but not in a fully pearlitic microstructure. ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó Age strengthening only occurs when there is residual nitrogen in solid solution in the Ferrite, whether the ferrite is free ferrite or the ferrite lamellae within pearlite. ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ó Age strengthening can be accelerated by Mn at about 0.5% in excess of the Mn/S balance Estimated energy savings over ten years is 13.05 trillion BTU, based primarily on yield improvement and size reduction of castings for equivalent service. Also it is estimated that the heavy truck end use of lighter castings for equivalent service requirement will result in a diesel fuel energy savings of 131 trillion BTU over ten years.

Von L. Richards

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

270

Replication of engine block cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties with lab scale 319 Al alloy billet castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, aluminum alloy gasoline engine blocks have in large part successfully replaced nodular cast iron engine blocks, resulting in improved vehicle fuel efficiency. However, because of the inadequate wear resistance properties of hypoeutectic AlľSi alloys, gray iron cylinder liners are required. These liners cause the development of large tensile residual stress along the cylinder bores and necessitate the maximization of mechanical properties in this region to prevent premature engine failure. The aim of this study was to replicate the engine cylinder bridge microstructure and mechanical properties following TSR treatment (which removes the sand binder to enable easy casting retrieval) using lab scale billet castings of the same alloy composition with varying cooling rates. Comparisons in microstructure between the engine block and the billet castings were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were assessed using tensile testing. The results suggest that the microstructure at the top and middle of the engine block cylinder bridge was successfully replicated by the billet castings. However, the microstructure at the bottom of the cylinder was not completely replicated due to variations in secondary phase morphology and distribution. The successful replication of engine block microstructure will enable the future optimization of heat treatment parameters. - Highlights: Ľ A method to replicate engine block microstructure was developed. Ľ Billet castings will allow cost effective optimization of heat treatment process. Ľ The replication of microstructure in the cylinder region was mostly successful. Ľ Porosity was more clustered in the billet castings compared to the engine block. Ľ Mechanical properties were lower in billet castings due to porosity and inclusions.

Lombardi, A., E-mail: a2lombar@ryerson.ca [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5B2K3 (Canada); D'Elia, F.; Ravindran, C. [Centre for Near-net-shape Processing of Materials, Ryerson University, 101 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5B2K3 (Canada); MacKay, R. [Nemak of Canada Corporation, 4600 G.N. Booth Drive, Windsor, Ontario N9C4G8 (Canada)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Melting Efficiency in Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addressed multiple aspects of the aluminum melting and handling in die casting operations, with the objective of increasing the energy efficiency while improving the quality of the molten metal. The efficiency of melting has always played an important role in the profitability of aluminum die casting operations. Consequently, die casters need to make careful choices in selecting and operating melting equipment and procedures. The capital cost of new melting equipment with higher efficiency can sometimes be recovered relatively fast when it replaces old melting equipment with lower efficiency. Upgrades designed to improve energy efficiency of existing equipment may be well justified. Energy efficiency is however not the only factor in optimizing melting operations. Melt losses and metal quality are also very important. Selection of melting equipment has to take into consideration the specific conditions at the die casting shop such as availability of floor space, average quantity of metal used as well as the ability to supply more metal during peaks in demand. In all these cases, it is essential to make informed decisions based on the best available data.

David Schwam

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Finite Element Modelling of the Sawing of DC Cast AA2024 Aluminium Alloy Slabs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the semi-continuous casting of large cross-section rolling sheet ingots of high-strength aluminum alloys (2xxx and 7xxx series), the control of the residual (internal) stresses generated by the non-uniform cooling becomes a necessity. These stresses must be relieved by a thermal treatment before the head and foot of the ingot can be cut. Otherwise, the saw can be caught owing to compressive stresses or cut parts may be ejected thus injuring people or damaging equipment. These high added-value ingots need to be produced in secure conditions. Moreover, a better control of the sawing procedure could allow the suppression of the thermal treatment and therefore save time and energy. By studying the stress build-up during casting and the stress relief during sawing, key parameters for the control and optimization of the processing steps, can be derived. To do so, the direct chill (DC) casting of the AA2024 alloy is modeled with ABAQUS 6.5 with special attention to the thermo-mechanical properties of the alloy. The sawing operation is then simulated by removing mesh elements so as to reproduce the progression of the saw in the ingot. Preliminary results showing the stress relief during sawing accompanied by the risk of saw blocking due to compression or initiating a crack ahead of the saw, are analyzed with an approach based on the rate of strain energy release.

Drezet, J.-M. [Computational Materials Laboratory, School of Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 12, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Ludwig, O. [Calcom-ESI SA, PSE-A, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Heinrich, B. [Alcan Aluminium Valais SA, CH3960 Sierre (Switzerland)

2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment of Computer Simulation Software and Process Data for High Pressure Die Casting of Magnesium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer software for the numerical simulation of solidification and mold filling is an effective design tool for cast structural automotive magnesium components. A review of commercial software capabilities and their validation procedures was conducted. Aside form the software assessment, the program addressed five main areas: lubricant degradation, lubricant application, gate atomization, and heat transfer at metal mold interfaces. A test stand for lubricant application was designed. A sensor was used for the direct measurement of heat fluxes during lubricant application and casting solidification in graphite molds. Spray experiments were conducted using pure deionized water and commercial die lubricants. The results show that the sensor can be used with confidence for measuring heat fluxes under conditions specific to the die lube application. The data on heat flux was presented in forms suitable for use in HPDC simulation software. Severe jet breakup and atomization phenomena are likely to occur due to high gate velocities in HPDC. As a result of gate atomization, droplet flow affects the mold filling pattern, air entrapment, skin formation, and ensuing defects. Warm water analogue dies were designed for obtaining experimental data on mold filling phenomena. Data on break-up jet length, break-up pattern, velocities, and droplet size distribution were obtained experimentally and was used to develop correlations for jet break-up phenomena specific to die casting gate configurations.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Hatfield, Edward C [ORNL; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton [ORNL; Kuwana, Kazunori [University of Kentucky; Viti, Valerio [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Hassan, Mohamed I [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Saito, Kozo [University of Kentucky

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

LOW-FREQUENCY PHASED-ARRAY METHODS FOR CRACK DETECTION IN CAST AUSTENITIC PIPING COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, are being conducted to evaluate nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, austenitic stainless steel reactor components. The work provides information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effectiveness, limitations, and reliability of advanced inspection techniques for application on safety-related components in commercial nuclear power plants. This paper describes results from recent assessments using a low-frequency phased-array methodology for detecting cracks in cast austenitic piping welds. Piping specimens that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located adjacent to welds were examined. The specimens have surface geometrical conditions and weld features that simulate portions of primary piping systems in many U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were examined to assess inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of ultrasonic (UT) responses from varied circumferential locations. The phased-array UT methods were applied from the outside surface of the specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling, and employed a modified instrument operating between 500 kHz and 1.0 MHz. Composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Results from laboratory studies for assessing crack detection and sizing effectiveness are discussed, including acoustic parameters observed in centrifugally cast piping base materials.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Synthesis and casting of a lithium-bismuth compound for an ion-replacement electrorefiner.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intermetallic compound Li{sub 3}Bi played an integral part in the demonstration of an ion replacement electrorefining method developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The Li{sub 3}Bi compound was generated in a tilt-pour casting furnace using high-purity lithium and bismuth metals as the initial charge. At first, small-scale ({approximately}20 g) experiments were conducted to determine the materials synthesis parameters. In the end, four larger-scale castings (500 g to 1250 g) were completed in a tantalum crucible. The metals were heated slowly to melt the charge, and the formation reaction proceeded vigorously above the melting point of bismuth ({approximately}270 C). For the large-scale melts, the furnace power was temporarily turned off at this point. After several minutes, the tantalum crucible stopped glowing, and the furnace power was turned on. The temperature was then increased to {approximately}1200 C to melt and homogenize the compound, and liquid Li{sub 3}Bi was cast into cold stainless steel molds. Approximately 3.7 kg of Li{sub 3}Bi was generated by this method.

McDeavitt, S. M.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nonintrusive sensing and control for intelligent processing and design of castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two technologies, laser ultrasonics (LUT) for detecting inclusions in liquid metals and x-ray stereography (XS) for detecting and locating porosity and inclusions in castings, were evaluated. LUT is a relatively new technology that has the potential to operate in the harsh environment of metal melting, without melt contamination, because of its noncontacting nature. It was shown that LUT can detect and monitor inclusions in liquid metal, but limitations exist that restrict its implementation as well as minimize the advantage gained from its noncontacting nature. In many applications it is acceptable for castings to have a limited amount of inclusions or porosity if these are not in a critical location. XS can determine the physical location of defects and, when integrated into a real-time radiographic system, is useful for quickly evaluating the quality of castings prior to adding value via finish steps. It was demonstrated that XS can achieve a location accuracy of 0.2 mm relative to a part surface and can be configured as an inexpensive add-on to existing real-time systems.

Kunerth, D.C.; Gray, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energyĺs (DOEĺs) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. The PA is needed to satisfy both Washington State IDF Permit and DOE Order requirements. Cast Stone has been selected for solidification of radioactive wastes including WTP aqueous secondary wastes treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. A similar waste form called Saltstone is used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to solidify its LAW tank wastes.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

279

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being placed into manufacture. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Important notIce aBoUt yoUr rIghts Under the followIng colUmBIa UnIversIty retIrement plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Important notIce aBoUt yoUr rIghts Under the followIng colUmBIa UnIversIty retIrement plans: ┬ĚColumbiaUniversityRetirementPlanforOfficers ┬ĚColumbiaUniversityRetirementPlanforSupportStaff ┬ĚColumbiaUniversityRetirementPlanforSupportStaffAssociation ┬ĚColumbiaUniversityVoluntaryRetirementSavingsPlan(VRSP) Human Resources Retirement Benefits

Grishok, Alla

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281

pn-CCDs in a Low-Background Environment: Detector Background of the CAST X-ray Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST experiment at CERN (European Organization of Nuclear Research) searches for axions from the sun. The axion is a pseudoscalar particle that was motivated by theory thirty years ago, with the intention to solve the strong CP problem. Together with the neutralino, the axion is one of the most promising dark matter candidates. The CAST experiment has been taking data during the last two years, setting an upper limit on the coupling of axions to photons more restrictive than from any other solar axion search in the mass range below 0.1 eV. In 2005 CAST will enter a new experimental phase extending the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. The CAST experiment strongly profits from technology developed for high energy physics and for X-ray astronomy: A superconducting prototype LHC magnet is used to convert potential axions to detectable X-rays in the 1-10 keV range via the inverse Primakoff effect. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a spin-off from space technology, a Wolter I type X-ray optics in combination with a prototype pn-CCD developed for ESA's XMM-Newton mission. As in other rare event searches, background suppression and a thorough shielding concept is essential to improve the sensitivity of the experiment to the best possible. In this context CAST offers the opportunity to study the background of pn-CCDs and its long term behavior in a terrestrial environment with possible implications for future space applications. We will present a systematic study of the detector background of the pn-CCD of CAST based on the data acquired since 2002 including preliminary results of our background simulations.

M. Kuster; S. Cebrian; A. Rodriquez; R. Kotthaus; H. Braeuninger; J. Franz; P. Friedrich; R. Hartmann; D. Kang; G. Lutz; L. Strueder

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Assessment of Crack Detection in Heavy-Walled Cast Stainless Steel Piping Welds Using Advanced Low-Frequency Ultrasonic Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing the effectiveness and reliability of novel approaches to nondestructive examination (NDE) for inspecting coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods as related to the inservice inspection of safety-related components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This report provides progress, recent developments, and results from an assessment of low frequency ultrasonic testing (UT) for detection of inside surface-breaking cracks in cast stainless steel reactor piping weldments as applied from the outside surface of the components. Vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were examined to assess the capability of low-frequency UT to adequately penetrate challenging microstructures and determine acoustic propagation limitations or conditions that may interfere with reliable flaw detection. In addition, welded specimens containing mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks were examined. The specimens were fabricated using vintage centrifugally cast and statically cast stainless steel materials, which are typical of configurations installed in PWR primary coolant circuits. Ultrasonic studies on the vintage centrifugally cast stainless steel piping segments were conducted with a 400-kHz synthetic aperture focusing technique and phased array technology applied at 500 kHz, 750 kHz, and 1.0 MHz. Flaw detection and characterization on the welded specimens was performed with the phased array method operating at the frequencies stated above. This report documents the methodologies used and provides results from laboratory studies to assess baseline material noise, crack detection, and length-sizing capability for low-frequency UT in cast stainless steel piping.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems-revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a revision of the procedure and correlations presented earlier in NUREG/CR-4513, ANL-90/42 (June 1991) for predicting the change in mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water reactors at 280-330{degrees}C (535-625{degrees}F). The correlations presented in this report are based on an expanded data base and have been optimized with mechanical-property data on cast stainless steels aged up to {approx}58,000 h at 290-350{degrees}C (554-633{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve, tensile stress, and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known material information. Mechanical properties of a specific cast stainless steel are estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. Embrittlement of cast stainless steels is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. Charpy-impact energy as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which are also determined from the chemical composition. The initial impact energy of the unaged steel is required for these estimations. Initial tensile flow stress is needed for estimating the flow stress of the aged material. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained by correlating room-temperature Charpy-impact energy with fracture toughness parameters. The values of J{sub IC} are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. A common {open_quotes}predicted lower-bound{close_quotes} J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, range of ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented.

Chopra, O.K

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Results and perspectives of the solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status of the solar axion search with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) will be presented. Recent results obtained by the use of $^3$He as a buffer gas has allowed us to extend our sensitivity to higher axion masses than our previous measurements with $^4$He. With about 1 h of data taking at each of 252 different pressure settings we have scanned the axion mass range 0.39 eV$ \\le m_{a} \\le $ 0.64 eV. From the absence of an excess of x rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g$_{a\\gamma} \\le 2.3\\times 10^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ at 95% C.L., the exact value depending on the pressure setting. CAST published results represent the best experimental limit on the photon couplings to axions and other similar exotic particles dubbed WISPs (Weakly Interacting Slim Particles) in the considered mass range and for the first time the limit enters the region favored by QCD axion models. Preliminary sensitivities for axion masses up to 1.16 eV will also be shown reaching mean upper limits on the axion-photon coupling of g$_{a\\gamma} \\le 3.5\\times 10^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ at 95% C.L. Expected sensibilities for the extension of the CAST program up to 2014 will be presented. Moreover long term options for a new helioscope experiment will be evoked.

E. Ferrer-Ribas; M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; S. Borghi; H. Brńuninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; C. Ezer; G. Fanourakis; P. Friedrich; J. Galßn; J. A. GarcÝa; A. Gardikiotis; J. G. Garza; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gˇmez; E. Gruber; T. Guth÷rl; R. Hartmann; F. Haug; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakov\\vci?; M. Karuza; K. K÷nigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Kr?mar; M. Kuster; B. Laki?; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubi?i?; V. Lozza; G. Lutz; G. Luzˇn; J. Morales; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt; T. Rashba; H. Riege; A. RodrÝguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; P. S. Silva; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Tomßs; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test ResultsŚCast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 Î 10-11 to 2.3 Î 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 Î 10-10 to 3.8 Î 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 Î 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 Î 10-10 to 3.8 Î 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 Î 10-9 to 1.8 Î 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

pn-CCDs in a Low-Background Environment: Detector Background of the CAST X-ray Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CAST experiment at CERN (European Organization of Nuclear Research) searches for axions from the sun. The axion is a pseudoscalar particle that was motivated by theory thirty years ago, with the intention to solve the strong CP problem. Together with the neutralino, the axion is one of the most promising dark matter candidates. The CAST experiment has been taking data during the last two years, setting an upper limit on the coupling of axions to photons more restrictive than from any other solar axion search in the mass range below 0.1 eV. In 2005 CAST will enter a new experimental phase extending the sensitivity of the experiment to higher axion masses. The CAST experiment strongly profits from technology developed for high energy physics and for X-ray astronomy: A superconducting prototype LHC magnet is used to convert potential axions to detectable X-rays in the 1-10 keV range via the inverse Primakoff effect. The most sensitive detector system of CAST is a spin-off from space technology, a Wolter I ty...

Kuster, M; Cebrißn, S; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Hartmann, R; Kang, D; Kotthaus, R; Lutz, Gerhard; Rodriquez, A; StrŘder, L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of NZP ceramic based {open_quotes}cast-in-place{close_quotes} diesel engine port liners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BSX (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6-2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24}) and CSX (Ca{sub l-x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) type NZP ceramics were fabricated and characterized for: (i) thermal properties viz., thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, thermal stability and thermal shock resistance; (ii) mechanical properties viz., flexure strength and elastic modulus; and (iii) microstructures. Results of these tests and analysis indicated that the BS-25 (x=0.25 in BSX) and CS-50 (x=0.50 in CSX) ceramics had the most desirable properties for casting metal with ceramic in place. Finite element analysis (FEA) of metal casting (with ceramic in place) was conducted to analyze thermomechanical stresses generated and determine material property requirements. Actual metal casting trials were also conducted to verify the results of finite element analysis. In initial trials, the ceramic cracked because of the large thermal expansion mismatch (hoop) stresses (predicted by FEA also). A process for introduction of a compliant layer between the metal and ceramic to alleviate such destructive stresses was developed. The compliant layer was successful in preventing cracking of either the ceramic or the metal. In addition to these achievements, pressure slip casting and gel-casting processes for fabrication of NZP components; and acoustic emission and ultrasonics-based NDE techniques for detection of microcracks and internal flaws, respectively, were successfully developed.

Nagaswaran, R.; Limaye, S.Y.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (Energy SMARRT): Manufacturing Advanced Engineered Components Using Lost Foam Casting Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a subtask of Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?Energy SMARRT├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬Ł) Program. Through this project, technologies, such as computer modeling, pattern quality control, casting quality control and marketing tools, were developed to advance the Lost Foam Casting process application and provide greater energy savings. These technologies have improved (1) production efficiency, (2) mechanical properties, and (3) marketability of lost foam castings. All three reduce energy consumption in the metals casting industry. This report summarizes the work done on all tasks in the period of January 1, 2004 through June 30, 2011. Current (2011) annual energy saving estimates based on commercial introduction in 2011 and a market penetration of 97% by 2020 is 5.02 trillion BTU├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?s/year and 6.46 trillion BTU├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?s/year with 100% market penetration by 2023. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.03 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Harry Littleton; John Griffin

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Casting of Devotional Images in the Himalayas: History, Tradition and Modern Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-,ic cr'Jcible 20 C'II high and 16 cn in external dia~eter. These crucib:es are imported from India a~d are used especially for casting copper. Firing the mould and melting the copper 5.40 p.m. The fire in t!1e kiln is reactlvated .... ith paper, dry... imported from China to ~epal in the 18th century) partially destroys the gilding, but gives the efrect of mild corrosion which successfully dupes ma~y'buyers of Tibetan and Himalayan a~tique5. Finally vermilion and other ritual substances may be smeared...

Bue, Erberto Lo

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe. The fitting is now being manufactured. The 12-inch ball valve for allowing no-blow access was also procured. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module inter-connects and of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to optimize the design of the robot elements and surface control electronics and software. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) has been completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to the design, fabrication and testing of a entry fitting in a 4-inch prototype and is now being used to complete drawings for use in 12-inch diameter pipe. Task 8--System Integration and Laboratory Validation continued developing the robot module inter-connects and development of a master LabView-based system display and control software.

Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fracture toughness studies of gray and ductile cast irons using a J-integral approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

it to flow into the area where the crack has propagated. 4. The specimen is broken open and then the aa is measured using a ruler, a magnifying 33 Pr~ Surface Figure 13. Scheamtic of a gray cast iron specimen which has been fatigue precracked, pulled... to the difficulty in determining the frac- tuze toughness of gray iron. As the specimen is pulled, the flakes open up; and nucleate small miczocracks which appear to coalesce with very little local plastic flow giving a very low tough- ness to the material...

Floyd, Donna Lynne Woodall

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity

Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industryĺs Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Results and perspectives of the solar axion search with the CAST experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The status of the solar axion search with the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) will be presented. Recent results obtained by the use of $^3$He as a buffer gas has allowed us to extend our sensitivity to higher axion masses than our previous measurements with $^4$He. With about 1 h of data taking at each of 252 different pressure settings we have scanned the axion mass range 0.39 eV$ \\le m_{a} \\le $ 0.64 eV. From the absence of an excess of x rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g$_{a\\gamma} \\le 2.3\\times 10^{-10}$ GeV$^{-1}$ at 95% C.L., the exact value depending on the pressure setting. CAST published results represent the best experimental limit on the photon couplings to axions and other similar exotic particles dubbed WISPs (Weakly Interacting Slim Particles) in the considered mass range and for the first time the limit enters the region favored by QCD axion models. Preliminary sensitivities for axion masses up to 1.16 eV will also be s...

Ferrer-Ribas, E; Aune, S; Barth, K; Belov, A; Borghi, S; Brńuninger, H; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Cetin, S A; Collar, J I; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Eleftheriadis, C; Elias, N; Ezer, C; Fanourakis, G; Friedrich, P; Galßn, J; GarcÝa, J A; Gardikiotis, A; Gazis, E N; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Gˇmez, H; Gruber, E; Guth÷rl, T; Hartmann, R; Haug, F; Hasinoff, M D; Hoffmann, D H H; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Jakov\\vci?, K; Karuza, M; K÷nigsmann, K; Kotthaus, R; Kr?mar, M; Kuster, M; Laki?, B; Laurent, J M; Liolios, A; Ljubi?i?, A; Lozza, V; Lutz, G; Luzˇn, G; Morales, J; Niinikoski, T; Nordt, A; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Raffelt, G; Rashba, T; Riege, H; RodrÝguez, A; Rosu, M; Ruz, J; Savvidis, I; Silva, P S; Solanki, S K; Stewart, L; Tomßs, A; Tsagri, M; van Bibber, K; Vafeiadis, T; Villar, J; Vogel, J K; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Final Report, Volume 3, Guidance Document for the Evaluation of Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 is comprised of the Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (A890-5A) which is equivalent to wrought 2507. The objective of this work was to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬Ł for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). The various tests which were carried out were ASTM A923 Test Method A, B and C (Sodium Hydroxide Etch Test, Charpy Impact Test and Ferric Chloride Corrosion Test), ferrite measurement using Feritscope├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬«, ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method and X-Ray Diffraction, hardness measurement using Rockwell B and C and microstructural analysis using SEM and EDS.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The mechanical response of a uranium-nobium alloy: a comparison of cast versus wrought processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rigorous experimentation and validation program is being undertaken to create constitutive models that elucidate the fundamental mechanisms controlling plasticity in uranium-6 wt.% niobium alloys (U-6Nb). The first, 'wrought', material produced by processing a cast ingot I'ia forging and forming into plate was studied. The second material investigated is a direct cast U-6Nb alloy. The purpose of the investigation is to detennine the principal differences, or more importantly, similarities, between the two materials due to processing. It is well known that parameters like grain size, impurity size and chemistry affect the deformation and failure characteristics of materials. Metallography conducted on these materials revealed that the microstructures are quite different. Characterization techniques like tension, compression, and shear were performed to find the principal differences between the materials as a function of stress state. Dynamic characterization using a split Hopkinson pressure bar in conjunction with Taylor impact testing was conducted to derive and thereafter validate constitutive material models. The Mechanical Threshold Strength Model is shown to accurately capture the constitutive response of these materials and Taylor cylinder tests are used to provide a robust way to verify and validate the constitutive model predictions of deformation by comparing finite element simulations with the experimental results. The primary differences between the materials will be described and predictions about material behavior will be made.

Cady, Carl M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Shuh - Rong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopez, Mike F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, Deniese R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Casting Apparatus Including A Gas Driven Molten Metal Injector And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The filtering molten metal injector system includes a holder furnace, a casting mold supported above the holder furnace, and at least one molten metal injector supported from a bottom side of the casting mold. The holder furnace contains a supply of molten metal. The mold defines a mold cavity for receiving the molten metal from the holder furnace. The molten metal injector projects into the holder furnace. The molten metal injector includes a cylinder defining a piston cavity housing a reciprocating piston for pumping the molten metal upward from the holder furnace to the mold cavity. The cylinder and piston are at least partially submerged in the molten metal when the holder furnace contains the molten metal. The cylinder or the piston includes a molten metal intake for receiving the molten metal into the piston cavity when the holder furnace contains molten metal. A conduit connects the piston cavity to the mold cavity. A molten metal filter is located in the conduit for filtering the molten metal passing through the conduit during the reciprocating movement of the piston. The molten metal intake may be a valve connected to the cylinder, a gap formed between the piston and an open end of the cylinder, an aperture defined in the sidewall of the cylinder, or a ball check valve incorporated into the piston. A second molten metal filter preferably covers the molten metal intake to the injector.

Trudel, David R. (Westlake, OH); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA); Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Arnaud, Guy (Morin Heights, CA); Bigler, Nicolas (Riviere-Beaudette, CA)

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solidification, growth mechanisms, and associated properties of Al-Si and magnesium lightweight casting alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continually rising energy prices have inspired increased interest in weight reduction in the automotive and aerospace industries, opening the door for the widespread use and development of lightweight structural materials. Chief among these materials are cast Al-Si and magnesium-based alloys. Utilization of Al-Si alloys depends on obtaining a modified fibrous microstructure in lieu of the intrinsic flake structure, a process which is incompletely understood. The local solidification conditions, mechanisms, and tensile properties associated with the flake to fiber growth mode transition in Al-Si eutectic alloys are investigated here using bridgman type gradient-zone directional solidification. Resulting microstructures are examined through quantitative image analysis of two-dimensional sections and observation of deep-etched sections showing three-dimensional microstructural features. The transition was found to occur in two stages: an initial stage dominated by in-plane plate breakup and rod formation within the plane of the plate, and a second stage where the onset of out-of-plane silicon rod growth leads to the formation of an irregular fibrous structure. Several microstructural parameters were investigated in an attempt to quantify this transition, and it was found that the particle aspect ratio is effective in objectively identifying the onset and completion velocity of the flake to fiber transition. The appearance of intricate out-of-plane silicon instability formations was investigated by adapting a perturbed-interface stability analysis to the Al-Si system. Measurements of silicon equilibrium shape particles provided an estimate of the anisotropy of the solid Si/liquid Al-Si system and incorporation of this silicon anisotropy into the model was found to improve prediction of the instability length scale. Magnesium alloys share many of the benefits of Al-Si alloys, with the added benefit of a 1/3 lower density and increased machinability. Magnesium castings often contain additions of heavier elements, such as zinc, zirconium, and rare earth elements, which significantly improve high temperature performance. However, additions of these elements can lead to macrosegregational effects in castings, which are detectable by radiographic scans. The effect of these flow-line indications on alloy mechanical properties is not well quantified. An examination of these flow-line indications and their effects on mechanical properties in three magnesium-based casting alloys was performed here in order to determine the best practice for dealing with affected castings. Preliminary results suggest the flow-lines do not measurably impact bulk material properties. Three additional methods of characterizing three-dimensional material structures are also presented: a minimum spanning tree analysis is utilized to quantify local structure in Cu-Zr liquid phase simulations obtained from molecular dynamics; the radial distribution function is applied to directionally solidified Al-Si structures in an attempt to extract local spacing data; and the critical diameter measurement is also defined and applied to irregular eutectic Al-Si structures.

Hosch, Timothy

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A survey of foundries that cast red brass products to ascertain an effective pouring rate of molten metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SURVEY OF FOUNDRIES THAT CAST RED BRASS PRODUCTS TO ASCERTAIN AN EFPECTIVE POURING RATE OF MOLTEN METAL A Thesis by RONALD KEE TOM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject: Industrial Technology A SURVEY OF FOUNDRIES THAT CAST RED BRASS PRODUCTS TO ASCERTAIN AN EFFECTIVE POURING RATE OF MOLTEN METAL A Thesis by RONALD KEE TOM Approved as to style and content by...

Tom, Ronald Kee

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki Higuchi and Manabu T . Abe1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

551 Estimation of Food Consumption fr om Pellets Cast by Captive Ural Owls ( Strix uralensis ) Aki of the Ural Owl ( Strix uralensis) based on pellet analysis. Though it is possible to identify pr ey items- tat and manage for this species. In this study, ingested food and cast pellet mass were quantified

303

Tel: +44 (0) 1603 591574 Email: business@uea.ac.uk Web: www.uea.ac.uk/business Gender, caste and growth assessment in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to change, gender relations have to be accounted for in growth policy and practice. In India, where caste Gender, caste and growth assessment in India Women in many countries don't tend to contribute to will experience different opportunities and benefits from those belonging to others. In 2006 the India country

Everest, Graham R

304

Brimacombe Memorial Symposium, Vancouver, Canada, October 1-4, 2000, Met Soc., CIM, pp. 595-611. Analysis of the Potential Productivity of Continuous Cast Molds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be on the order of 3 mm for most grades and casting conditions. The models are then applied to predict maximum to casting speed are predicted to be extremely high, exceeding 21 m/min for a conventional 800-mm long, 200 and liquid flux lubrication. This work suggests that if shortening mold length can solve lubrication, taper

Thomas, Brian G.

305

Systematic Microstructural and Corrosion Performance Evaluation of CK-3MCuN and CN-3MN High Molybdenum Stainless Steel Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are widely accepted for their high strength, excellent weldability, and good corrosion resistance over a wide range of temperatures in highly oxidizing aqueous and gaseous media in chemical processing and other environments. With their desirable performance, high molybdenum austenitic stainless steel castings are increasingly applied in industry in a similar manner as wrought materials. In general, cast and wrought stainless and high alloy steels are anticipated to possess equivalent resistance to corrosive media, and they are frequently used in conjunction with each other. However, alloying element segregation usually is more evident in castings than in wrought counterparts. Segregation of alloying elements can lead to the formation of secondary phases, such as sigma. Mechanical properties and especially the corrosion resistance of castings may be affected by the secondary phases. In addition, improper heat treatment procedures c an also lead to the formation of carbides and secondary phases in high alloy and austenitic stainless steels.

C.D. Lundin; S. Wen; W. Liu; G. Zhou

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair robots for cast-iron pipe to assure their commercial success. For Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train), previous problems with bladder design and elastomeric material expansion in the large mains were addressed. A new bladder based on a commercially available design was obtained and tested with success. Minor improvements were highlighted during patch-setting tests and are now being pursued. For Task 5 (Design and Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera), the previous field tests showed clearly that, in mains with low gas velocities, it will be necessary to improve the system's capacity to remove debris from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (the flails were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) falls directly to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak-free repair. Similarly, it is also deemed necessary to design an assembly to capture existing servicetap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. Task 6 (Design and Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabVIEW. However, this must now be revisited to add control routines for the coupon catcher that will be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design and Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design for a bolt-on entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast-iron pipe in the current quarter. The drilling assembly for cutting an access hole through the wall of the gas main was also designed, along with a plug assembly to allow removing all tools from the live main and setting a blind flange on the entry fitting prior to burial. These designs are described in detail in the report. Task 8 (System Integration and Laboratory Validation) continued with the development of the robot module i

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair robots for cast-iron pipe to assure their commercial success. For Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train), work has been directed on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera), the recent field tests showed clearly that, in mains with low gas velocities, it will be necessary to improve the system's capacity to remove debris from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (the flails were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) falls directly to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak-free repair. Similarly, it is also deemed necessary to design an assembly to capture existing service-tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; for example, one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. Designs for new features to accomplish these goals for the large robotic system were pursued and are presented in this report. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabVIEW. However, this must now be revisited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of the entry fitting for 12-inch diameter cast iron pipe in the previous quarter. Field tests with the 4-inch

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Report of Separate Effects Testing for Modeling of Metallic Fuel Casting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to give guidance regarding the best investment of time and effort in experimental determination of parameters defining the casting process, a Flow-3D model of the casting process was used to investigate the most influential parameters regarding void fraction of the solidified rods and solidification speed for fluid flow parameters, liquid heat transfer parameters, and solid heat transfer parameters. Table 1 summarizes the most significant variables for each of the situations studied. A primary, secondary, and tertiary effect is provided for fluid flow parameters (impacts void fraction) and liquid heat transfer parameters (impacts solidification). In Table 1, the wetting angle represents the angle between the liquid and mold surface as pictured in Figure 1. The viscosity is the dynamic viscosity of the liquid and the surface tension is the property of the surface of a liquid that allows it to resist an external force. When only considering solid heat transfer properties, the variations from case to case were very small. Details on this conclusion are provided in the section considering solid heat transfer properties. The primary recommendation of the study is to measure the fluid flow parameters, specifically the wetting angle, surface tension, and dynamic viscosity, in order of importance, as well as the heat transfer parameters latent heat and specific heat of the liquid alloy. The wetting angle and surface tension can be measured simultaneously using the sessile drop method. It is unclear whether there is a temperature dependency in these properties. Thus measurements for all three parameters are requested at 1340, 1420, and 1500 degrees Celsius, which correspond to the minimum, middle, and maximum temperatures of the liquid alloy during the process. In addition, the heat transfer coefficient between the mold and liquid metal, the latent heat of transformation, and the specific heat of the liquid metal all have strong influences on solidification. These parameters should be measured to achieve better simulation fidelity. Information on all the mentioned parameters is virtually nonexistent. Presently, all the parameters within the casting model are estimates based on pure U, or another alloy such as U-Ni.

Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Decroix, David S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korzekwa, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Robert M. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fielding, R. [Idaho National Laboratory; Kennedy, R [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Modeling Transient Slag-Layer Phenomena in the Shell/mold Gap in Continuous Casting of Steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with oil lubrication, powder(/slag) lubrication leads to more uniform and usually lower heat transfer.[5-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams, the models are applied to study the effect of casting speed and mold-powder viscosity. The study finds that liquid-slag lubrication would produce negligible stresses. A lower mold

Thomas, Brian G.

310

Evaluation of cast carbon steel and aluminum for rack insert in MCO Mark 1A fuel basket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document evaluates the effects ofusing a cast carbon steel or aluminum instead of 3O4L stainless steel in the construction ofthe fuel rack insert for the Spent Nuclear Fuel MCO Mark IA fuel baskets. The corrosion, structural, and cost effects are examined.

Graves, C.E., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Distributed Protocol for the Bounded-Hops Converge-cast in Ad-Hoc Networks0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Distributed Protocol for the Bounded-Hops Converge-cast in Ad-Hoc Networks0 Andrea E. F. Clementi (centralized) heuristics. 1 Introduction An ad-hoc (wireless) network consists of a set of radio stations connected by wireless links. In an ad hoc network, a transmission range is assigned to every station

Rossi, Gianluca

312

Dynamic daylight control system implementing thin cast arrays of polydimethylsiloxane-based millimeter-scale transparent louvers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic daylight control system implementing thin cast arrays of polydimethylsiloxane: Daylight control system Dynamic window system Energy-efficiency Transparent louvers a b s t r a c in standard office buildings. The development of daylight control systems that maximize the penetration

Aizenberg, Joanna

313

AFM/LFM surface studies of a ternary polymer blend cast on substrates covered by a self-assembled monolayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AFM/LFM surface studies of a ternary polymer blend cast on substrates covered by a self force microscopy; Friction; Self-assembly; Surface thermodynamics (including phase transitions); Growth are of utmost current interest. In many practical appli- cations films of incompatible mixtures are pre- pared

Zbigniew, Postawa

314

Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot-cast multicrystalline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Crystal Growth 287 (2006) 402┬ş407 Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade ingot silicon (mc-Si) ingot casting for cost-effective solar cell wafer production. Highly sensitive to the invited talk ``Transition metals in photovoltaic-grade multicrystalline silicon'' by A.A. Istratov, T

315

Cast polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic module manufacturing technology improvements. Semiannual subcontract report, 8 December 1993--30 June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work done under a 3-year program to advance Solarex`s cast polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology, reduce module production cost, increase module performance, and expand Solarex`s commercial production capacities. The accomplishments described in this report are as follows: (1) the authors designed modifications to casting stations, ceramic molds, and sizing saws to allow for casting and sizing of larger ingots; (2) they demonstrated the casting of ingots with 17% larger volume; (3) the selected and purchased a new wire saw from HCT Shaping Systems; (4) they demonstrated wafering of eight bricks (2,400 wafers or {approximately}4.4 kilowatts at the cell level) in a 6.5-h run; (5) they demonstrated 14% average cell efficiency in the laboratory using an aluminum paste back surface field; (6) the Automation and Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) completed a modeling study of the Solarex module assembly process; (7) they identified and qualified three new lower-cost back sheet materials through accelerated environmental tests; and (8) they designed and built a test structure for mounting frameless modules, and selected two adhesives and began testing their ability to hold modules to the structure.

Wohlgemuth, J. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Prevention of Porosity Formation and Other Effects of Gaseous Elements in Iron Castings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron foundries have observed porosity primarily as interdendritic porosity in large freezing range alloys such as Ni-Hard I and hypoeutectic high Cr alloys or pinholes and fissure defects in gray and ductile irons. For most iron foundries, porosity problems occur sporadically, but even occasional outbreaks can be costly since even a very small amount of porosity can significantly reduce the mechanical properties of the castings. As a result when porosity is detected, the castings are scrapped and remelted, or when the porosity is undetected, defective parts are shipped to the consumer. Neither case is desirable. This project was designed to examine various factors contributing to the porosity formation in iron castings. Factors such as solubility of gases in liquid and solid iron alloys, surface tension of liquid iron alloys, and permeability of dendritic structures were investigated in terms of their effect on the porosity formation. A method was developed to predict how much nitrogen the molten alloy picks up from air after a given amount of holding time for a given melting practice. It was shown that small batches of iron melts in an induction furnace can end up with very high concentration of nitrogen (near solubility limit). Surface tension of liquid iron alloys was measured as a function of temperature. Effect of minor additions of S, Ti, and Al on the surface tension of liquid iron alloys was investigated. Up to 18% change in surface tension was detected by minor element additions. This translates to the same amount of change in gas pressure required in a bubble of a given size to keep the bubble stable. A new method was developed to measure the permeability of dendritic structures in situ. The innovative aspect of these experiments, with respect to previous interdendritic permeability measurements, was the fact that the dendritic structure was allowed to form in situ and was not cooled and re-heated for permeability tests. A permeability model was developed and tested using the results of the permeability experiments. The permeability model for flow parallel to the columnar dendrites predicted the experimental permeability results closely when the liquid volume fraction data from equilibrium calculations were used. The permeability gradient model was constructed in order to test the impact of interdendritic channel constriction on the flow of liquid through the mushy zone of a casting. The model examines two different regimes: (i) Dendritic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in liquid volume fraction and dendrite arm spacing, and (ii) Eutectic solidification regime where the permeability is dominated by changes in viscosity of eutectic mixture. It is assumed that the eutectic mixture behaves like a slurry whose viscosity increases with increasing solid fraction. It is envisioned that this model can be developed into a tool that can be very useful for metal casters.

Albany Research Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Age hardening and creep resistance of cast AlľCu alloy modified by praseodymium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of praseodymium on age hardening behavior and creep resistance of cast AlľCu alloy were investigated. The results indicated that praseodymium facilitated the formation of the ?? precipitates during the age process and improved the hardness of the AlľCu alloy. Besides, praseodymium resulted in the formation of the Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase in the grain boundaries and among the dendrites of the modified alloy. Because of the good thermal stability of Al{sub 11}Pr{sub 3} phase, it inhibits grain boundary migration and dislocation movement during the creep process, which contributes to the improvement in the creep resistance of the modified alloy at elevated temperatures. - Highlights: Ľ Pr addition enhances the hardness and creep resistance of the AlľCu alloy. Ľ Pr addition facilitates the formation of the ?? precipitates. Ľ Pr addition results in the formation of the Al11Pr3 phase in the AlľCu alloy.

Bai, Zhihao; Qiu, Feng; Wu, Xiaoxue; Liu, Yingying; Jiang, Qichuan, E-mail: jqc@jlu.edu.cn

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

CAST solar axion search with 3^He buffer gas: Closing the hot dark matter gap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) has finished its search for solar axions with 3^He buffer gas, covering the search range 0.64 eV < m_a <1.17 eV. This closes the gap to the cosmological hot dark matter limit and actually overlaps with it. From the absence of excess X-rays when the magnet was pointing to the Sun we set a typical upper limit on the axion-photon coupling of g_ag < 3.3 x 10^{-10} GeV^{-1} at 95% CL, with the exact value depending on the pressure setting. Future direct solar axion searches will focus on increasing the sensitivity to smaller values of g_a, for example by the currently discussed next generation helioscope IAXO.

M. Arik; S. Aune; K. Barth; A. Belov; S. Borghi; H. Brauninger; G. Cantatore; J. M. Carmona; S. A. Cetin; J. I. Collar; E. Da Riva; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; C. Eleftheriadis; N. Elias; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; P. Friedrich; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; A. Gardikiotis; J. G. Garza; E. N. Gazis; T. Geralis; E. Georgiopoulou; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gomez; M. Gomez Marzoa; E. Gruber; T. Guthorl; R. Hartmann; S. Hauf; F. Haug; M. D. Hasinoff; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; I. G. Irastorza; J. Jacoby; K. Jakovcic; M. Karuza; K. Konigsmann; R. Kotthaus; M. Krcmar; M. Kuster; B. Lakic; P. M. Lang; J. M. Laurent; A. Liolios; A. Ljubicic; V. Lozza; G. Luzon; S. Neff; T. Niinikoski; A. Nordt; T. Papaevangelou; M. J. Pivovaroff; G. Raffelt; H. Riege; A. Rodriguez; M. Rosu; J. Ruz; I. Savvidis; I. Shilon; P. S. Silva; S. K. Solanki; L. Stewart; A. Tomas; M. Tsagri; K. van Bibber; T. Vafeiadis; J. Villar; J. K. Vogel; S. C. Yildiz; K. Zioutas

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ceramic plasma-sprayed coating of melting crucibles for casting metal fuel slugs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal cycling and melt reaction studies of ceramic coatings plasma-sprayed on Nb substrates were carried out to evaluate the performance of barrier coatings for metallic fuel casting applications. Thermal cycling tests of the ceramic plasma-sprayed coatings to 1450 degrees C showed that HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating had good cycling characteristics with few interconnected cracks even after 20 cycles. Interaction studies by 1550 degrees C melt dipping tests of the plasma-sprayed coatings also indicated that HfN and Y2O3 do not form significant reaction layer between Uľ20 wt.% Zr melt and the coating layer. Plasma-sprayed Y2O3 coating exhibited the most promising characteristics among HfN, TiC, ZrC, and Y2O3 coating.

K.H. Kim; C.T. Lee; C.B. Lee; R.S. Fielding; J.R. Kennedy

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle.

King, Edward L. (Trenton, OH); Follstaedt, Donald W. (Middletown, OH); Sussman, Richard C. (West Chester, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method and apparatus for separating continuous cast strip from a rotating substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The continuous casting of strip, ribbon and wire is improved by using a free jet nozzle which provides a fluid that follows a rotating substrate surface to the separation point. The nozzle includes an inclined surface having a ratio of its length to the gap between the substrate and the nozzle edge of 5:1 to 15:1. The inclined surface improves the ability of the jet to tangentially follow the substrate in a direction opposite to its rotation to the separation point. This also allows a close positioning of the nozzle to the substrate which serves to provide a back-up mechanical separation means by using the edge of nozzle lip. The nozzle may be rotated from its operating position for cleaning of the substrate and the nozzle. 4 figures.

King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.; Sussman, R.C.

1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

Muralidharan, Govindarajan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I. (Greensburg, PA) [Greensburg, PA

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

323

Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Properties of cast CF-8 stainless-steel weldments at cryogenic temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ISABELLE is a 400 x 400 GeV proton-proton colliding beam accelerator now under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beams will be guided and focused by superconducting magnets. A total of 722 dipole beam bending magnets and 280 quadrupole beam focusing magnets are required. Centrifugally cast CF-8 stainless steel tubes were selected to provide a rigid support and to house the superconducting magnet assembly. The selection of this material for the support tubes is discussed by Dew-Hughes and Lee. Their study indicates that the presence of delta ferrite strengthens the material but causes a decrease in ductility if the ferrite content is greater than 10%. Brown and Tobler found that the fracture toughness is also decreased as the delta ferrite content is increased.

Chow, J.G.Y.; Klamut, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

CLEAN CAST STEEL TECHNOLOGY: DETERMINATION OF TRANSFORMATION DIAGRAMS FOR DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as sigma (├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬»├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ü├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬│) and chi (├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬»├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ü├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ú) can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling- transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe 22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬»├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ü├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬│ + ├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬»├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ü├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ú) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations, The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities, a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, ├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬»├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬ü├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬│ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by local composition fluctuations in the cast alloy. This may cause discrepancy between thermodynamic prediction and experimental observation.

Chumbley. L., S.

2005-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast StoneŚa cementitious waste formŚare being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Post-cast EDM method for reducing the thickness of a turbine nozzle wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A post-cast EDM process is used to remove material from the interior surface of a nozzle vane cavity of a turbine. A thin electrode is passed through the cavity between opposite ends of the nozzle vane and displaced along the interior nozzle wall to remove the material along a predetermined path, thus reducing the thickness of the wall between the cavity and the external surface of the nozzle. In another form, an EDM process employing a profile as an electrode is disposed in the cavity and advanced against the wall to remove material from the wall until the final wall thickness is achieved, with the interior wall surface being complementary to the profile surface.

Jones, Raymond Joseph (Duanesburg, NY); Bojappa, Parvangada Ganapathy (Schenectady, NY); Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence (Galway, NY); Schotsch, Margaret Jones (Clifton Park, NY); Rajan, Rajiv (Guilderland, NY); Wei, Bin (Mechanicville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Microstructure, microstructural stability and mechanical properties of sand-cast Mgľ4Alľ4RE alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for assessing the phase composition and the results of structural stability tests of the sand-cast Mgľ4Alľ4RE alloy after annealing it at 175 and 250 ░C for 3000 h. The microstructure was analyzed with optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. The phase composition was determined with X-ray diffraction. The structure of the Mgľ4Alľ4RE (AE44) alloy is composed of large grains of ?-Mg solid solution, needle-shaped precipitates of the Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3}phase, polyhedral precipitates of the Al{sub 2}RE phase and Al{sub 10}RE{sub 2}Mn{sub 7} phase. After annealing at 175 ░C for 3000 h, no changes in the alloy structure are observed, whereas after annealing at 250 ░C the precipitates of the Al{sub 11}RE{sub 3} phase are found to be in the initial stages of spheroidization. The coarse-grained structure and unfavorable morphology of the intermetallic phases in the sand-cast AE44 alloy, which are caused by low solidification rates, result in low creep resistance up to 200 ░C and low mechanical properties at ambient temperature and at 175 ░C. - Highlights: Ľ Complement the knowledge about the microstructure of Mg-Al-RE alloys. Ľ Clarify the mechanism of formation of Mg17Al12 phase above 180 ░C. Ľ Applying a chemical dissolution of the ?-Mg in order to phase identification. Ľ Applying a statistical test to assess the spheroidization of precipitates. Ľ Quantitative description of microstructure of Mg-Al-RE alloys.

Rzycho?, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.rzychon@polsl.pl [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Krasi?skiego 8, 40 019 Katowice (Poland); Kie?bus, Andrzej [Silesian University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Krasi?skiego 8, 40 019 Katowice (Poland); Lity?ska-Dobrzy?ska, Lidia [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, 25 Reymonta Street, 30-059 Krakˇw (Poland)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Lost Foam Thin Wall - Feasibility of Producing Lost Foam Castings in Aluminum and Magnesium Based Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, production of near-net shape components by lost foam casting will make significant inroad into the next-generation of engineering component designs. The lost foam casting process is a cost effective method for producing complex castings using an expandable polystyrene pattern and un-bonded sand. The use of un-bonded molding media in the lost foam process will impose less constraint on the solidifying casting, making hot tearing less prevalent. This is especially true in Al-Mg and Al-Cu alloy systems that are prone to hot tearing when poured in rigid molds partially due to their long freezing range. Some of the unique advantages of using the lost foam casting process are closer dimensional tolerance, higher casting yield, and the elimination of sand cores and binders. Most of the aluminum alloys poured using the lost foam process are based on the Al-Si system. Very limited research work has been performed with Al-Mg and Al-Cu type alloys. With the increased emphasis on vehicle weight reduction, and given the high-strength-to-weight-ratio of magnesium, significant weight savings can be achieved by casting thin-wall (? 3 mm) engineering components from both aluminum- and magnesium-base alloys.

Fasoyinu, Yemi [CanmetMATERIALS] [CanmetMATERIALS; Griffin, John A. [University of Alabama - Birmingham] [University of Alabama - Birmingham

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter cast iron repair robots to assure their commercial success. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module in the last quarter 5. In this quarter, work has been concentrated on increasing the nitrogen bladder reservoir volume to allow at least two complete patch inflation/patch setting cycles in the event the sleeve does not set all ratchets in the same row on the first attempt. This problem was observed on a few of the repair sleeves that were recently installed during field tests with the small-diameter robotic system. For Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) it was observed that it will be necessary to add a stiff brush to push debris away from the immediate vicinity of the bell and spigot joints in mains having low gas velocities. Otherwise, material removed by the cleaning flails (which were found to be very effective in cleaning bell and spigot joints) simply falls to the low side of the pipe and accumulates in a pile. This accumulation can prevent the sleeve from achieving a leak free repair. Similarly, it is also necessary to design a small magnet to capture existing service tap coupons and allow their removal from the inside of the pipe. These coupons were found to cause difficulty in launching and retrieving the small pipe repair robot; one coupon lodged beneath the end of the guide shoe. These new features require redesign of the pipe wall cleaning train and modification to the patch setting train. Task 6 (Design & Build Surface Control and Monitoring System) was previously completed with the control and computer display functions being operated through LabView. However, this must now be re-visited to add control routines for the coupon catcher to be added. This will most likely include a lift-off/place-on magnet translation function. Task 7 (Design & Fabricate Large Diameter Live Access System) progressed to completing the detailed design of th

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide range of coiled-tubing string designs and pipe environments. Work conducted in the second quarter consisted of: (1) selecting a preferred pan/zoom/tilt camera; (2) initiating design of the digital control electronics and switching power supply for the control and operation of the in-pipe robotic modules; (3) continuing design of the repair sleeve and (4) initial testing of the wall-cleaning device. Activities in the third quarter included: (1) development of the system's pan/zoom/tilt camera control electronics and operating software, and implementing these in the surface and downhole modules and (2) further testing of the wall-cleaning elements used to clean the inside of the bell and spigot joints. Most recently, fourth quarter developments were centered on designing and testing the pipe-wall cleaning device including the selection of the drive motor and its control electronics. In addition, efforts were also focused on the design of the repair sleeve. Details of these activities are described in the body of the report along with a summary of events scheduled for the next quarter.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide range of coiled-tubing string designs and pipe environments. Work conducted in the second quarter consisted of: (1) selecting a preferred pan/zoom/tilt camera; (2) initiating design of the digital control electronics and switching power supply for the control and operation of the in-pipe robotic modules; (3) continuing design of the repair sleeve and (4) initial testing of the wall-cleaning device. Most recently, activities in the third quarter included: (1) development of the system's pan/zoom/tilt camera control electronics and operating software, and implementing these in the surface and downhole modules and (2) further testing of the wall-cleaning elements used to clean the inside of the bell and spigot joints. Details of these activities are described in the body of the report along with a summary of events scheduled for the fourth quarter.

Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Multifaced stone and ceramic moulds from Bronze Age Anatolia : building an analytical protocol of mould properties and behavior during the process of metal casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A three phase analytical protocol is developed to systematize the study of multifaceted serpentinite bronze-casting moulds from Bronze Age Anatolia (ca. 3500-1700 B.C.). These moulds represent a class of metal processing ...

Bišer, Katherine K. (Katherine Kershen)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

An evaluation of joint repair methods for cast iron natural gas distribution mains and the preliminary development of an alternative joint seal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approximately 10 percent of the natural gas pumped into distribution systems is unaccounted for. A significant portion of this amount is leakage from joints in 50 to 100 year old cast iron main. Because of the cumulative ...

Rogers, Thomas Edward

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology: Improved Die Casting Process to Preserve the Life of the Inserts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to study the combined effects of die design, proper internal cooling and efficient die lubricants on die life. The project targeted improvements in die casting insert life by: Optomized Die Design for Reduced Surface Temperature: The life of die casting dies is significantly shorter when the die is exposed to elevated temperature for significant periods of time. Any die operated under conditions leading to surface temperature in excess of 1050oF undergoes structural changes that reduce its strength. Optimized die design can improve die life significantly. This improvement can be accomplished by means of cooling lines, baffles and bubblers in the die. A key objective of the project was to establish criteria for the minimal distance of the cooling lines from the surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. The Uddeholm Dievar steel evaluated in this program showed superior resistance to thermal fatigue resistance. Based on the experimental evidence, cooling lines could be placed as close as 0.5"┬Ł from the surface. Die Life Extension by Optimized Die Lubrication: The life of die casting dies is affected by additions made to its surface with the proper lubricants. These lubricants will protect the surface from the considerable temperature peaks that occur when the molten melt enters the die. Dies will reach a significantly higher temperature without this lubricant being applied. The amount and type of the lubricant are critical variables in the die casting process. However, these lubricants must not corrode the die surface. This effort was supported with alloys and machining by BohlerUddeholm, Dunn Steel, HH Stark and Rex Buckeye. In plant testing and evaluation was conducted as in-kind cost share at St. Clair Die Casting. Chem- Trend participated in the program with die lubricants and technical support. Experiments conducted with these lubricants demonstrated good protection of the substrate steel. Graphite and boron nitride used as benchmarks are capable of completely eliminating soldering and washout. However, because of cost and environmental considerations these materials are not widely used in industry. The best water-based die lubricants evaluated in this program were capable of providing similar protection from soldering and washout. In addition to improved part quality and higher production rates, improving die casting processes to preserve the life of the inserts will result in energy savings and a reduction in environmental wastes. Improving die life by means of optimized cooling line placement, baffles and bubblers in the die will allow for reduced die temperatures during processing, saving energy associated with production. The utilization of optimized die lubricants will also reduce heat requirements in addition to reducing waste associated with soldering and washout. This new technology was predicted to result in an average energy savings of 1.1 trillion BTU's/year over a 10 year period. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on commercial introduction in 2010, a market penetration of 70% by 2020 is 1.26 trillion BTU's/year. Along with these energy savings, reduction of scrap and improvement in casting yield will result in a reduction of the environmental emissions associated with the melting and pouring of the metal which will be saved as a result of this technology. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.025 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

David Schwam, PI; Xuejun Zhu, Sr. Research Associate

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Process for casting hard-faced, lightweight camshafts and other cylindrical products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for casting a hard-faced cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft includes the steps of: (a) preparing a composition formed from a molten base metal and an additive in particle form and having a hardness value greater than the hardness value of the base metal; (b) introducing the composition into a flask containing a meltable pattern of a cylindrical product such as an automobile camshaft to be manufactured and encased in sand to allow the composition to melt the pattern and assume the shape of the pattern within the sand; and (c) rotating the flask containing the pattern about the longitudinal axes of both the flask and the pattern as the molten base metal containing the additive in particle form is introduced into the flask to cause particles of the additive entrained in the molten base metal to migrate by centrifugal action to the radial extremities of the pattern and thereby provide a cylindrical product having a hardness value greater at it's radial extremities than at its center when the molten base metal solidifies.

Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); Argetsinger, Edward R. (Albany, OR); Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Modeling of material and energy flow in an EBCHR casting system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical and experimental analysis is made of fluid flow and heat transfer in a continuous casting system with an electron-beam energy source. For a cylindrical ingot confined in a water-cooled crucible, a two-dimensional, steady-state model is developed which includes the effects of free convection in the pool and conduction in the two-phase and solid regions. A modified Galerkin finite element method is used to solve for the flow and temperature fields simultaneously with the upper and lower boundaries of the pool. The calculation grid deforms along vertical spines as these phase boundaries move. Heat flows are measured in a steady-state experiment involving a short ingot and no pouring. Heat transfer coefficients representing contact resistance are determined, and measured heat flows are compared with model values. Flow and temperature fields along with solidification-zone boundaries are calculated for the experimental case and a case in which the ingot cooling is improved.

Westerberg, K.W. [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); McClelland, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Modeling of material and energy flow in an EBCHR casting system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical and experimental analysis is made of fluid flow and heat transfer in a continuous casting system with an electron-beam energy source. For a cylindrical ingot confined in a water-cooled crucible, a two-dimensional, steady-state model is developed which includes the effects of free convection in the pool and conduction in the two-phase and solid regions. A modified Galerkin finite element method is used to solve for the flow and temperature fields simultaneously with the upper and lower boundaries of the pool. The calculation grid deforms along vertical spines as these phase boundaries move. Heat flows are measured in a steady-state experiment involving a short ingot and no pouring. Heat transfer coefficients representing contact resistance are determined, and measured heat flows are compared with model values. Flow and temperature fields along with solidification-zone boundaries are calculated for the experimental case and a case in which the ingot cooling is improved.

Westerberg, K.W. [Aspen Technology, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); McClelland, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fracture mechanics analysis of cast duplex stainless steel elbows containing a surface crack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some components of the primary loop of a PWR are made of cast duplex stainless steel. This kind of steel may age even at relatively low temperatures, (below 400 C, which is within the temperature range of PWR service conditions), leading to a significant decrease of its toughness. This is why a large research program was initiated on the fracture behavior of aged duplex stainless steel elbows in France. The main task of this program was to test three 2/3-scale models of aged PWR primary loop elbows. The first two tests (called SEM1 and SEM2) were conducted under in-plane closure bending at 320 C; the third (called SEM3) was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane closure bending at 60 C. The first two elbows contained a semi-elliptical notch machined into the outer surface of one flank, oriented either longitudinally (SEM1 test) or circumferentially (SEM2 test); the third elbow contained both notches described above, one on each flank. This paper presents the results of the experiments, the finite element calculations and the ductile fracture mechanics analyses that were performed.

Delliou, P.A. le; Semete, P. [Electricite de France, Moret Sur Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Ignaccolo, S. [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France). Direction de l`Equipement

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Microstructural characteristics and corrosion behavior of a super duplex stainless steel casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The machining of super duplex stainless steel castings is usually complicated by the difficulty involved in maintaining the dimensional tolerances required for given applications. Internal stresses originating from the solidification process and from subsequent heat treatments reach levels that exceed the material's yield strength, promoting plastic strain. Stress relief heat treatments at 520 deg. C for 2 h are an interesting option to solve this problem, but because these materials present a thermodynamically metastable condition, a few precautions should be taken. The main objective of this work was to demonstrate that, after solution annealing at 1130 deg. C and water quenching, stress relief at 520 deg. C for 2 h did not alter the duplex microstructure or impair the pitting corrosion resistance of ASTM A890/A890M Grade 6A steel. This finding was confirmed by microstructural characterization techniques, including light optical and scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion potential measurements in synthetic sea water containing 20,000 ppm of chloride ions were also conducted at three temperatures: 5 deg. C, 25 deg. C and 60 deg. C.

Martins, Marcelo [Industrial Manager of SULZER BRASIL S/A and Professor of the Sao Paulo Salesian University Center (UNISAL), Americana Division, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: marcelo.martins@sulzer.com; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos [Department of Materials, Aeronautical and Automotive Engineering, Sao Carlos School of Engineering, University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP Brazil (Brazil)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Methods for the In-Situ Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. Its engineering properties made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that make current ultrasonic in-service inspection of components quite challenging. To address inspection needs, new ultrasonic inspection approaches are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious and variable effects of the microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam may require knowledge of the microstructure, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detection (POD). The ability to classify microstructure type (e.g. polycrystalline or columnar) has the potential to guide selection of optimal NDE approaches. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic and electromagnetic methods for classifying CASS microstructures, when making measurements from the outside surface of the component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of these measurements to discriminate between two consistent microstructures - equiaxed-grain material versus columnar-grain material. The potential for fusion of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements for in-situ microstructure characterization in CASS materials will be explored.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ruud, Clayton O.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

E(Race)ing gender: Stratified identities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the appropriation of white standards, and rejecting (as seen in Janie's trial for her husband's death) those institutions as the basis of one's identity. The cultural and social price that Janie pays, furthermore, challenges her adaptive capacity to stratify her...

Nguyen, Le Thuy Thi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

IllumInatIng of Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

funding sources 29 master's and do degrees awarded 23,000+ recipients of CTS-produced newsletters. You will find both the quantitative and qualitative accounts of CTS--the statistics and the stories identity and launched our signature publication Catalyst to better capture the innovative spirit and energy

Minnesota, University of

347

Bachelor projekt Dipl.Ing.IT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vedligeholdelse af produktkonfigureringssystemer Anders Degn Kongens Lyngby, 29. april 2006 IMM-B.Eng-2006-17 #12 Lyngby, Denmark Phone +45 45253351, Fax +45 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-B.Eng-2006 papers der forventes udgivet andetsteds i Juni 2006. Projektet er udf├Şrt i perioden 2. februar 2006 til 1

348

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Material development in the SI{sub 3}N{sub 4} system using glass encapsulated Hip`ing. Final report, Phase 2: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP`ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Textures in Strip-Cast Aluminum Alloys: Their On-Line Monitoring and Quantitative Effects on Formability. Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum sheets produced by continuous casting (CC) provide energy and economic savings of at least 25 and 14 percent, respectively, over sheets made from conventional direct chill (DC) ingot casting and rolling. As a result of the much simpler production route in continuous casting, however, the formability of CC aluminum alloys is often somewhat inferior to that of their DC counterparts. The mechanical properties of CC alloys can be improved by controlling their microstructure through optimal thermomechanical processing. Suitable annealing is an important means to improve the formability of CC aluminum alloy sheets. Recrystallization of deformed grains occurs during annealing, and it changes the crystallographic texture of the aluminum sheet. Laboratory tests in this project showed that this texture change can be detected by either laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy or resonance EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) spectroscopy, and that monitoring this change allows the degree of recrystallization or the ''recrystallized fraction'' in an annealed sheet to be ascertained. Through a plant trial conducted in May 2002, this project further demonstrated that it is feasible to monitor the recrystallized state of a continuous-cast aluminum sheet in-situ on the production line by using a laser-ultrasound sensor. When used in conjunction with inline annealing, inline monitoring of the recrystallized fraction by laser-ultrasound resonance spectroscopy offers the possibility of feed-back control that helps optimize processing parameters (e.g., annealing temperature), detect production anomalies, ensure product quality, and further reduce production costs of continuous-cast aluminum alloys. Crystallographic texture strongly affects the mechanical anisotropy/formability of metallic sheets. Clarification of the quantitative relationship between texture and anisotropy/formability of an aluminum alloy will render monitoring and control of its texture during the sheet production process even more meaningful. The present project included a study to determine how the anisotropic plastic behavior of a continuous-cast AA 5754 aluminum alloy depends on quantifiable texture coefficients. Formulae which show explicitly the effects of texture on the directional dependence of the q-value (a formability parameter) and of the uniaxial flow stress, respectively, were derived. Measurements made on a batch of as-received AA 5754 hot band and its O-temper counterpart corroborate the validity of these formulae. On the other hand, these measurements also indicate that some microstructure(s) other than texture could play a significant role in the plastic anisotropy of the AA 5754 alloy. For the q-value of a set of O-temper samples of this alloy, the additional microstructure that affects plastic anisotropy was shown to be grain shape. A formula that captures both the effects of crystallographic texture and grain shape on the q-value of the O-temper material was derived. A simple quadratic plastic potential that delivers this q-value formula was written down. Verification of the adequacy of this plastic potential, however, requires further investigations.

Man, Chi-Sing

2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Long-term embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems. Semiannual report, April--September 1992: Volume 7, No. 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on longterm thermal embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems during the six months from April--September 1992. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, tearing modulus, and J{sub IC} of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The ``saturation`` impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Mechanical properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from impact energy and flow stress of the unaged material and the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. The J{sub IC} values are determined from the estimated J-R curve and flow stress. Examples of estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented. A common ``lower-bound`` J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature.

Chopra, O.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Comparison of Creep-Rupture Tested Cast Alloys HR282, IN740 and 263 for Possible Application in Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbine and Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast forms of traditionally wrought Ni-base precipitation-strengthened superalloys are being considered for service in the ultra-supercritical conditions (760░C, 35MPa) of next-generation steam boilers and turbines. After casting and homogenization, these alloys were given heat-treatments typical for each in the wrought condition to develop the gamma-prime phase. Specimens machined from castings were creep-rupture tested in air at 800░C. In their wrought forms, alloy 282 is expected to precipitate M23C6 within grain boundaries, alloy 740 is expected to precipitate several grain boundary phases including M23C6, G Phase, and ? phase, and alloy 263 has M23C6 and MC within its grain boundaries. This presentation will correlate the observed creep-life of these cast alloys with the microstructures developed during creep-rupture tests, with an emphasis on the phase identification and chemistry of precipitated grain boundary phases. The suitability of these cast forms of traditionally wrought alloys for turbine and boiler components will also be discussed.

Jablonski, P D; Evens, N; Yamamoto, Y; Maziasz, P

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

353

Elden Tefft: An Informal Look at a Founding Father of Twentieth Century Bronze Casting in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melts and runs out down a hole left in the bottom of the mold. This leaves a hollow in the dried plaster in exactly the same shape left by the wax model. The hole in the bottom of the mold is then plugged up and melted bronze is poured into the mold... and the bronze solidifies in the hollow left behind in the plaster when the wax melted and ran out. The lost wax process gets its name because the wax disappears when the mold is heated. Using the lost wax casting technique, large and complex sculptures can...

Voorhees, Craig

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Effect of Process Parameters on Abnormal Grain Growth during Friction Stir Processing of a Cast Al Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of process parameters and friction stir processing (FSP) run configurations on the stability of nugget microstructure at elevated temperatures were evaluated. Cast plates of an Al-7Si- 0.6Mg alloy were friction stir processed using a combination of tool rotation rates and tool traverse speeds. All single pass runs showed some extent of abnormal grain growth (AGG), whereas multi-pass runs were more resistant to AGG. Additionally, higher tool rpm was found to be beneficial for controlling AGG. These effects were analyzed by comparing the result of this work with other published results and AGG models.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John A.; Grant, Glenn J.

2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Enhanced heat transfer surface for cast-in-bump-covered cooling surfaces and methods of enhancing heat transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An annular turbine shroud separates a hot gas path from a cooling plenum containing a cooling medium. Bumps are cast in the surface on the cooling side of the shroud. A surface coating overlies the cooling side surface of the shroud, including the bumps, and contains cooling enhancement material. The surface area ratio of the cooling side of the shroud with the bumps and coating is in excess of a surface area ratio of the cooling side surface with bumps without the coating to afford increased heat transfer across the element relative to the heat transfer across the element without the coating.

Chiu, Rong-Shi Paul (Glenmont, NY); Hasz, Wayne Charles (Pownal, VT); Johnson, Robert Alan (Simpsonville, SC); Lee, Ching-Pang (Cincinnati, OH); Abuaf, Nesim (Lincoln City, OR)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The effect of processing upon the fracture behavior of cast and forged low alloy steel wellhead components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as to style and content by: W. L. Bradl (Chairman of Co ittee) ornwe (Member) D. N. Li tie (Member) C. F. ettl oroug (Head of Department) May 1987 ABSTRACT The Effect of processing Upon the Fracture Behavior of Cast and Forged Low Alloy Steel... at several temperatures for material from the 4140 23 cm (9") diameter bar. Table 8 ? Values of K and tearing resistance (TR) 66 Jc at several temperatures for material from 4140 15 cm (6") diameter bar. vii Page Table 9 ? Values of KJ and tearing...

Desadier, Christopher Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

A recommended safety program for the Mabry Foundry and Machine Company and Iron Castings Incorporated of Beaumont, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kunse, Safety Ehglneer s p Texas Empl oyer ~ s Insurance Ass ociat ion, Beaumont Division, Beaumont, Texas made it possible fox' the authox' to ' secure descriptions of patt accidents occurring at the planta concerned in thea prob1em TABLR... ACCIDE5fTS Fsis and conclusions dram froa accidents involving Rahu Foundry and Raehine Coapany froa August 1, 19/6 'so Jul+ 31 y 1953 a o e o e o e o o o e e 26 Conalns iona dram froa accidents involving Xren Castings, Incorporated fron Rarch 1...

Begnaud, Edward Marshall

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction (E-SMARRT): Optimization of Heat Treatments on Stainless Steel Castings for Improved Corrosion Resistance and Mechanical Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is commonly believed that high alloy steel castings have inferior corrosion resistance to their wrought counterparts as a result of the increased amount of microsegregation remaining in the as-cast structure. Homogenization and dissolution heat treatments are often utilized to reduce or eliminate the residual microsegregation and dissolve the secondary phases. Detailed electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and light optical microscopy (LOM) were utilized to correlate the amount of homogenization and dissolution present after various thermal treatments with calculated values and with the resultant corrosion resistance of the alloys.The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the homogenization and dissolution kinetics were investigated using stainless steel alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. The influence of heat treatment time and temperature on the impact toughness and corrosion reistance of cast stainless steel alloys CF-3, CF-3M, CF-8, and CF-8M was also investigated.

John N. DuPont; Jeffrey D. Farren; Andrew W. Stockdale; Brett M. Leister

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

359

Heat and corrosion resistant cast CN-12 type stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cast stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 0.5 wt. % to about 10 wt. % manganese, 0.02 wt. % to 0.50 wt. % N, and less than 0.15 wt. % sulfur provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. Alloys of the present invention also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon. Such solution strengthening enhances the high temperature precipitation-strengthening benefits of fine dispersions of NbC. Such solid solution effects also enhance the stability of the austenite matrix from resistance to excess sigma phase or chrome carbide formation at higher service temperatures. The presence of sulfides is substantially eliminated.

Mazias, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McGreevy, Tim (Morton, IL); Pollard,Michael James (East Peoria, IL); Siebenaler, Chad W. (Peoria, IL); Swindeman, Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Manufacture of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys by Conventional Casting and Hot-Working Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Carpenter Technology Corporation (CarTech) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation program to explore the feasibility for scale up of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels by conventional casting and rolling techniques. CarTech successfully vacuum melted 30lb heats of four AFA alloy compositions in the range of Fe-(20-25)Ni-(12-14)Cr-(3-4)Al-(1-2.5)Nb wt.% base. Conventional hot/cold rolling was used to produce 0.5-inch thick plate and 0.1-inch thick sheet product. ORNL subsequently successfully rolled the 0.1-inch sheet to 4 mil thick foil. Long-term oxidation studies of the plate form material were initiated at 650, 700, and 800 C in air with 10 volume percent water vapor. Preliminary results indicated that the alloys exhibit comparable (good) oxidation resistance to ORNL laboratory scale AFA alloy arc casting previously evaluated. The sheet and foil material will be used in ongoing evaluation efforts for oxidation and creep resistance under related CRADAs with two gas turbine engine manufacturers. This work will be directed to evaluation of AFA alloys for use in gas turbine recuperators to permit higher-temperature operating conditions for improved efficiencies and reduced environmental emissions.

Brady, M.P.; Yamamoto, Y.; Magee, J.H. (Carpenter Technol. Corp.)

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Hybrid optics for the visible produced by bulk casting of sol-gel glass using diamond-turned molds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent combinations of diffractive and refractive functions in the same optical component allow designers additional opportunities to make systems more compact and enhance performance. This paper describes a research program for fabricating hybrid refractive/diffractive components from diamond-turned molds using the bulk casting of sol-gel silica glass. The authors use the complementary dispersive nature of refractive and diffractive optics to render two-color correction in a single hybrid optical element. Since diamond turning has matured as a deterministic manufacturing technology, techniques previously suitable only in the infrared are now being applied to components used at visible wavelengths. Thus, the marriage of diamond turning and sol-gel processes offers a cost-effective method for producing highly customized and specialized optical components in high quality silica glass. With the sol-gel casting method of replication, diamond-turned mold costs can be shared over many pieces. Diamond turning takes advantage of all of the available degrees of freedom in a single hybrid optical element: aspheric surface to eliminate spherical aberration, kinoform surface for control of primary chromatic aberration, and the flexibility to place the kinoform on non-planar surfaces for maximum design flexibility. The authors discuss the critical issues involved in designing the hybrid element, single point diamond-turning the mold, and fabrication in glass using the sol-gel process.

Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C.; Maxey, L.C.; Cunningham, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R. [Geltech Inc., Alachua, FL (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of three-wavelength CCD image pyrometer used for the temperature field measurements of continuous casting billets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper develops an imaging based three-color pyrometer for the monitoring of temperature distribution in a continuous casting billet. A novel optical device, together with an embedded electronic system, is designed to sequentially collect a dark image and three thermal images with specified wavelengths on a same monochromatic charge-coupled-device (CCD). The three thermal images provide the basis for the determination of target temperature, while the dark image is used to online eliminate the dark noise of CCD with a differential method. This image pyrometer is not only independent of target emissivity but also overcomes the dissimilarity of measuring accuracy between the micro-sensors of CCD resulted from the non-uniformity of pixelsĺ intensity response and the vignetting of optical system. Furthermore, a precise two-color temperature field measuring model on the CCD pyrometer is established, based on which a self-adaptive light-integration mechanism is presented. Compared with the traditional fixed light-integration method, the measuring range of the pyrometer is greatly extended and its sensitivity in low temperature segment is improved. The test results in a steel factory demonstrate that the pyrometer is capable of meeting the requirement of surface temperature measurements about casting billets. Reliability and accuracy of measurement results are also discussed herein.

Xie, Zhi; Bai, Haicheng [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Synthetical Automation for Process Industries, School of Information Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information from the voxel model for display to the user.

Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information form the voxel model for display to the user.

Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Development of Cost-Effective Low-Permeability Ceramic and Refractory Components for Aluminum Melting and Casting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent review by the U.S. Advanced Ceramics Association, the Aluminum Association, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (DOE/OIT) described the status of advanced ceramics for aluminum processing, including monolithics, composites, and coatings. The report observed that monolithic ceramics (particularly oxides) have attractive properties such as resistance to heat, corrosion, thermal shock, abrasion, and erosion [1]. However, even after the developments of the past 25 years, there are two key barriers to commercialization: reliability and cost-effectiveness. Industry research is therefore focused on eliminating these barriers. Ceramic coatings have likewise undergone significant development and a variety of processes have been demonstrated for applying coatings to substrates. Some processes, such as thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines, exhibit sufficient reliability and service life for routine commercial use. Worldwide, aluminum melting and molten metal handling consumes about 506,000 tons of refractory materials annually. Refractory compositions for handling molten aluminum are generally based on dense fused cast silica or mullite. The microstructural texture is extremely important because an interlocking mass of coarser grains must be bonded together by smaller grains in order to achieve adequate strength. At the same time, well-distributed microscopic pores and cracks are needed to deflect cracks and prevent spalling and thermal shock damage [2]. The focus of this project was to develop and validate new classes of cost-effective, low-permeability ceramic and refractory components for handling molten aluminum in both smelting and casting environments. The primary goal was to develop improved coatings and functionally graded materials that will possess superior combinations of properties, including resistance to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting. When these materials are successfully deployed in aluminum smelting and casting operations, their superior performance and durability will give end users marked improvements in uptime, defect reduction, scrap/rework costs, and overall energy savings resulting from higher productivity and yield. The implementation of results of this program will result in energy savings of 30 trillion Btu/year by 2020. For this Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) project, riser tube used in the low-pressure die (LPD) casting of aluminum was selected as the refractory component for improvement. In this LPD process, a pressurized system is used to transport aluminum metal through refractory tubes (riser tubes) into wheel molds. It is important for the tubes to remain airtight because otherwise, the pressurized system will fail. Generally, defects such as porosity in the tube or cracks generated by reaction of the tube material with molten aluminum lead to tube failure, making the tube incapable of maintaining the pressure difference required for normal casting operation. Therefore, the primary objective of the project was to develop a riser tube that is not only resistant to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting, but is also less permeable, so as to achieve longer service life. Currently, the dense-fused silica (DFS) riser tube supplied by Pyrotek lasts for only 7 days before undergoing failure. The following approach was employed to achieve the goal: (1) Develop materials and methods for sealing surface porosity in thermal-shock-resistant ceramic refractories; (2) Develop new ceramic coatings for extreme service in molten aluminum operations, with particular emphasis on coatings based on highly stable oxide phases; (3) Develop new monolithic refractories designed for lower-permeability applications using controlled porosity gradients and particle size distributions; (4) Optimize refractory formulations to minimize wetting by molten aluminum, and characterize erosion, corrosion, and spallation rates under realistic service conditions; and (5) Scale up the processing methods to full-sized components and perform field testi

Kadolkar, Puja [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A National Assistance Extension Program for Metal Casting: a foundation industry. Final report for the period February 16, 1994 through May 15, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRP award was proposed as an umbrella project to build infrastructure and extract lessons about providing extension-enabling services to the metal casting industry through the national network of Manufacturing Technology Center`s (MTC`s). It targeted four discrete task areas required for the MCC to service the contemplated needs of industry, and in which the MCC had secured substantial involvement of partner organizations. Task areas identified included Counter-Gravitational Casting, Synchronous Manufacturing, Technology Deployment, and Facility and Laboratory Improvements. Each of the task areas includes specific subtasks which are described.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution: A slow positron beam study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

Liu, Y.F. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Qin, Q.L. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Yang, W. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Wen, W. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Zhai, T. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Yu, B. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Liu, D.Y. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Luo, A. [GM Research and Development Center] [GM Research and Development Center; Song, GuangLing [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping Welds and Thick Section Primary System Cast Piping Welds JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the NRC at PNNL to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced NDE methods for the inspection of LWR components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This interim technical letter report (TLR) provides a synopsis of recent investigations at PNNL aimed at evaluating the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of CASS welds in nuclear reactor piping. A description of progress, recent developments and interim results are provided.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Morra, Marino; Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Anderson, Michael T.

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

Xarxes i Serveis en Smart Cities II Nom de l'assignatura (cat., cast., angl.): Xarxes i Serveis en Smart Cities II, Redes y Servicios en Smart Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xarxes i Serveis en Smart Cities II 1 Nom de l'assignatura (cat., cast., angl.): Xarxes i Serveis en Smart Cities II, Redes y Servicios en Smart Cities II, Networks and Services in Smart Cities II de diferents tipus d'algoritmes per anÓlisis predictiu en smart cities. Analitzar el comportament de

PolitŔcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

370

Introduction to Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (IEOR) It is fair to say the industrial engineers and operations researchers cast the widest net of all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conduct real-time system monitoring to optimize operations. IEOR is also known as operations managementIntroduction to Industrial Engineering and Operations Research (IEOR) It is fair to say the industrial engineers and operations researchers cast the widest net of all engineers with regard

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

371

Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes IX Edited by Peter R. Sahm, Preben N. Hansen and James G. Conley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Casting, Welding and Advanced Solidification Processes IX Edited by Peter R. Sahm to the Modelling of Welding Phenomena G. A. Taylor, M. Hughes and K. Pericleous Centre for Numerical Modelling of welding phenomena is presented. The framework includes models from both the fields of Computational Fluid

Taylor, Gary

372

Final report to the strategic environmental research and development program on near-net shape casting of uranium-6% niobium alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fabrication methods traditionally used in the fabrication of depleted uranium parts within the Department of Energy (DOE) are extremely wasteful, with only 3% of the starting material actually appearing as finished product. The current effort, funded by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), was conceived as a means to drastically reduce this inefficiency and the accompanying waste by demonstrating the technology to cast simple parts close to their final shape in molds made from a variety of materials. As a part of this coordinated study, LLNL was given, and has achieved, two primary objectives: (1) to demonstrate the feasibility of using refractory metal for reusable molds in the production of castings of uranium-6 wt% niobium alloy (U-6Nb); and (2) to demonstrate the utility of detailed simulations of thermal and fluid flow characteristics in the understanding and improvement of the near-net shape casting process. In both cases, our efforts were focused on a flat plate castings, which serve as simple prototypical parts. This report summarizes the results of LLNL work in each area.

Gourdin, W.H.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Influence of strontium addition on the mechanical properties of gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of strontium (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1 wt%) addition on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the gravity cast Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy were investigated. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the main phases are ??Mg, ??Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} and Mg{sub 2}Sn in the Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy. With addition The tensile testing results showed that the yield and ultimate tensile strength and elongation of Mg-3Al-3Sn alloy increased by adding Sr up to 0.1 wt.% and then is gradually decreased with the addition of more alloying element.

Germen, GŘl?ah, E-mail: gulsahgermen@hotmail.com; ?evik, HŘseyin, E-mail: gulsahgermen@hotmail.com [Mersin University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Mersin, 33343 (Turkey); Kurnaz, S. Can [Sakarya University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Adapazarř, 54187 (Turkey)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

Sgobba, Stefano; 10.1016/S0924-0136(03)00373-X

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Final Technical Report Quantification and Standardization of Pattern Properties for the Control of the Lost Foam Casting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project takes a fresh look at the ''white side'' of the lost foam casting process. We have developed the gel front hypothesis for foam pyrolysis behavior and the magnetic metal pump method for controlling lost foam casting metal fill event. The subject of this report is work done in the improvement of the Lost Foam Casting Process. The original objective of this project was to improve the control of metal fill by understanding the influence of foam pattern and coating properties on the metal fill event. Relevant pattern properties could then be controlled, providing control of the metal fill event. One of the original premises of this project was that the process of metal fill was relatively well understood. Considerable previous work had been done to develop fluid mechanical and heat transfer models of the process. If we could just incorporate measured pattern properties into these models we would be able predict accurately the metal fill event. As we began to study the pyrolysis behavior of EPS during the metal fill event, we discovered that the chemical nature of this event had been completely overlooked in previous research. Styrene is the most prevalent breakdown product of EPS pyrolysis and it is a solvent for polystyrene. Much of the styrene generated by foam pyrolysis diffuses into intact foam, producing a molten gel of mechanically entangled polystyrene molecules. Much of the work of our project has centered on validation of this concept and producing a qualitative model of the behavior of EPS foam undergoing pyrolysis in a confined environment. A conclusion of this report is that styrene dissolution in EPS is a key phenomenon in the pyrolysis process and deserves considerable further study. While it is possible to continue to model the metal fill event parametrically using empirical data, we recommend that work be undertaken by qualified researchers to directly characterize and quantify this phenomenon for the benefit of modelers, researchers, and workers in the field. Another original premise of this project was that foam pattern and coating properties could be used to efficiently control metal fill. After studying the structure of EPS foam in detail for the period of this contract, we have come to the conclusion that EPS foam has an inherent variability at a scale that influences metal fill behavior. This does not allow for the detailed fine control of the process that we originally envisioned. We therefore have sought other methods for the control of the metal fill event. Of those, we now believe that the magnetic metal pump shows the most promise. We have conducted two casting trials using this method and preliminary results are very encouraging. A conclusion of our report is that, while every effort should continue to be made to produce uniform foam and coatings, the use of the magnetic metal pump should be encouraged and closed loop control mechanisms should be developed for this pouring method.

Ronald Michaels

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Field Evaluations of Low-Frequency SAFT-UT on Cast Stainless Steel and Dissimilar Metal Weld Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Center in Charlotte, North Carolina, on evalutating a low frequency ultrasonic inspection technique used for examination of cast stainless steel (CSS) and dissimilar metal (DMW) reactor piping components. The technique uses a zone-focused, multi-incident angle, low frequency (250-450 kHz) inspection protocol coupled with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The primary focus of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the utility, effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection techniques as related to the inservice ultrasonic inspection of coarse grained primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs).

Diaz, Aaron A.; Harris, R. V.; Doctor, Steven R.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The higher strength H-Series of cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat-treating industry. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc. with research participation by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies. Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) was also a partner in this project. Each team partner had well-defined roles. Duraloy Technologies led the team by identifying the base alloys that were to be improved from this research. Duraloy Technologies also provided an extensive creep data base on current alloys, provided creep-tested specimens of certain commercial alloys, and carried out centrifugal casting and component fabrication of newly designed alloys. Nucor Steel was the first partner company that installed the radiant burner tube assembly in their heat-treating furnace. Other steel companies participated in project review meetings and are currently working with Duraloy Technologies to obtain components of the new alloys. EIO is promoting the enhanced performance of the newly designed alloys to Ohio-based companies. The Timken Company is one of the Ohio companies being promoted by EIO. The project management and coordination plan is shown in Fig. 1.1. A related project at University of Texas-Arlington (UT-A) is described in Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired Mechanical and Corrosion Properties (ORNL/TM-2005/81/R1). The final report on another related project at the University of Tennessee by George Pharr, Easo George, and Michael Santella has been published as Development of Combinatorial Methods for Alloy Design and Optimization (ORNL/TM-2005-133). The goal of the project was to increase the high-temperature strength by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C) of H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels. Meeting such a goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The goal of the project was achieved by using the alloy design methods developed at ORNL, based on precise microcharacterization and identification of critical microstructure/properties relationships and combining them with the modern computational science-based tools that calculate phases, phase fractions, and phase compositions based on alloy compositions. The combined approach of microcharacterization of phases and computational phase prediction would permit rapid improvement of the current alloy composition of an alloy and provide the long-term benefit of customizing alloys within grades for specific applications. The project was appropriate for the domestic industry because the current H-Series alloys have reached their limits both in high-temperature-strength properties and in upper use temperature. The desire of Duraloy's industrial customers to improve process efficiency, while reducing cost, requires that the current alloys be taken to the next level of strength and that the upper use temperature limit be increased. This project addressed a specific topic from the subject call: to develop materials for manufacturing processes that will increase high-temperature strength, fatigue resistance, corrosion, and wear resistance. The outcome of the project would benefit manufacturing processes in the chemical, steel, and heat-treating industries.

Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Biomaterials 23 (2002) 44834492 A novel porous cells scaffold made of polylactidedextran blend by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-casting and particle-leaching [19,20], phase-separation [21], emulsion freeze dry- ing [22], gas-foaming [23] and 3D-printing

Yang, Jian

379

Ultrasonic Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructure: Discrimination between Equiaxed- and Columnar-Grain Material ľ An Interim Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and inspection of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components used in the nuclear power industry is neither as effective nor reliable as is needed due to detrimental effects upon the interrogating ultrasonic beam and interference from ultrasonic backscatter. The root cause is the coarse-grain microstructure inherent to this class of materials. Some ultrasonic techniques perform better for particular microstructural classifications and this has led to the hypothesis that an ultrasonic inspection can be optimized for a particular microstructural class, if a technique exists to reliably classify the microstructure for feedback to the inspection. This document summarizes scoping experiments of in-situ ultrasonic methods for classification and/or characterization of the material microstructures in CASS components from the outside surface of a pipe. The focus of this study was to evaluate ultrasonic methods and provide an interim report that documents results and technical progress. An initial set of experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that in-service characterization of cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) is feasible, and that, if reliably performed, such data would provide real-time feedback to optimize in-service inspections in the field. With this objective in mind, measurements for the experiment were restricted to techniques that should be robust if carried forward to eventual field implementation. Two parameters were investigated for their ability to discriminate between different microstructures in CASS components. The first parameter was a time-of-flight ratio of a normal incidence shear wave to that of a normal incidence longitudinal wave (TOFRSL). The ratio removed dependency on component thickness which may not be accurately reported in the field. The second parameter was longitudinal wave attenuation. The selected CASS specimens provided five equiaxed-grain material samples and five columnar-grain material samples for a two-class discrimination problem. Qualitative TOFRSL estimates and a threshold algorithm classified all 10 material samples correctly and indicated a reliable and robust technique. Qualitative longitudinal wave attenuation estimates and a threshold algorithm also classified all 10 materials samples correctly; however, the technique was not as robust as TOFRSL. The experiments provided promising results and demonstrated that good potential exists for future development of techniques to implement real-time classification of CASS material. However, the reported measurements need to be substantiated with measurements on additional specimens.

Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.; Watson, Bruce E.; Peters, Timothy J.; Dixit, Mukul; Bond, Leonard J.

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Crystallization Behavior of Porous PLA Prepared by Modified Solvent Casting/Particulate Leaching Technique for Potential Use of Tissue Engineering Scaffold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The porous PLA foams potential for tissue engineering usage are prepared by a modified solvent casting/particulate leaching method with different crystallinity. Since in typical method the porogens are solved in the solution and flow with the polymers during the casting and the crystallinity behavior of PLA chains in the limited space cannot be tracked, in this work the processing is modified by diffusing the PLA solution into a steady salt stack. With a thermal treatment before leaching while maintaining the stable structure of the porogens stack, the crystallinity of porous foams is made possible to control. The characterizations indicate the crystallization of porous foams is in a manner of lower crystallibility than the bulk materials. Pores and caves of around 250{\\mu}m size are obtained in samples with different crystallinity. The macro-structures are not much impaired by the crystallization nevertheless the morphological effect of the heating process is still obvious.

Ran Huang; Xiaomin Zhu; Haiyan Tu; Ajun Wan

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Truhan, Jr., John J [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Heat and corrosion resistant cast CF8C stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CF8C type stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 18.0 weight percent to about 22.0 weight percent chromium and 11.0 weight percent to about 14.0 weight percent nickel; from about 0.05 weight percent to about 0.15 weight percent carbon; from about 2.0 weight percent to about 10.0 weight percent manganese; and from about 0.3 weight percent to about 1.5 weight percent niobium. The present alloys further include less than 0.15 weight percent sulfur which provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. The disclosed alloys also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon.

Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN); McGreevy, Tim (Washington, IL); Pollard, Michael James (Peoria, IL); Siebenaler, Chad W. (Dunlap, IL); Swindeman, Robert W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Heat and corrosion resistant cast CF8C stainless steel with improved high temperature strength and ductility  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CF8C type stainless steel alloy and articles formed therefrom containing about 18.0 weight percent to about 22.0 weight percent chromium and 11.0 weight percent to about 14.0 weight percent nickel; from about 0.05 weight percent to about 0.15 weight percent carbon; from about 2.0 weight percent to about 10.0 weight percent manganese; and from about 0.3 weight percent to about 1.5 weight percent niobium. The present alloys further include less than 0.15 weight percent sulfur which provides high temperature strength both in the matrix and at the grain boundaries without reducing ductility due to cracking along boundaries with continuous or nearly-continuous carbides. The disclosed alloys also have increased nitrogen solubility thereby enhancing strength at all temperatures because nitride precipitates or nitrogen porosity during casting are not observed. The solubility of nitrogen is dramatically enhanced by the presence of manganese, which also retains or improves the solubility of carbon thereby providing additional solid solution strengthening due to the presence of manganese and nitrogen, and combined carbon.

Maziasz, Philip J.; McGreevy, Tim; Pollard, Michael James; Siebenaler, Chad W.; Swindeman, Robert W.

2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

384

Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping through Large-Bore Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel (CASS) Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sound field beam mapping exercise was conducted to assist in understanding the effects of coarse-grained microstructures found in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials on acoustic longitudinal wave propagation. Ultrasonic laboratory measurements were made on three specimens representing four different grain structures. Phased array (PA) probes were fixed on each specimen surface and excited in the longitudinal mode at specific angles while a point receiver was scanned in a raster pattern over the end of the specimen, generating a transmitted sound field image. Three probes operating at nominal frequencies of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0 MHz were used. A 6.4 mm (0.25-in.) thick slice was removed from the specimen end and beam mapping was repeated three times, yielding four full sets of beam images. Data were collected both with a constant part path for each configuration (probe, specimen and slice, angle, etc.) and with a variable part path (fixed position on the surface). The base specimens and slices were then polished and etched to reveal measureable grain microstructures that were compared to the sound field interactions and scattering effects seen in the collected data.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Coble, Jamie B.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Usefulness of gel-casting method in the fabrication of nonstoichiometric CaZrO{sub 3}-based electrolytes for high temperature application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogels obtained from lower toxicity monomers of N-(hydroxymethyl)acrylamide and N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide were applied to form nonstoichiometric CaZrO{sub 3}-based electrolytes. A coprecipitation-calcination method with ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}) in concentrated NH{sub 3} aqueous solution was used to synthesise CaZrO{sub 3} involving 51 mol.% CaO (CZ-51) powder. The gas-tight CaZrO{sub 3}-based rods were prepared by the gel-casting method with 45 vol.% suspension and then sintered at 1500 deg. C-2 h. It was found that in low oxygen partial pressure, the nonstoichiometric CaZrO{sub 3} obtained by gel-casting method were pure oxide ion conductors. These samples exhibited comparable electrical conductivity values to isostatically compressed pellets starting from the same powder. The results of experiments on thermochemical stability of CZ-51 gel-cast shapes at high temperatures in air or gas mixtures involving 2-50 vol.% H{sub 2}, as well as the corrosion resistance in exhaust gases from a self-ignition engine were also presented and discussed. The thermal resistance of CaZrO{sub 3} obtained rods against molten nickel or iron was also examined. Based upon these investigations, it is evident that only in hydrogen-rich gas atmospheres can the stability of CaZrO{sub 3} shapes be limited due to the presence of CaO precipitation as a second phase. The nonstoichiometric CaZrO{sub 3} (CZ-51) gel-cast materials were also tested in solid galvanic cells, designed to study thermodynamic properties of oxide materials, important for SOFC and energy technology devices. In this way, the Gibbs energy of NiM{sub 2}O{sub 4}, M = Cr, Fe, at 650-1000 deg. C was determined. The CaZrO{sub 3} involving 51 mol.% CaO gel-cast sintered shapes seems to be promising solid electrolytes for electrochemical oxygen probes in control of metal processing and thermodynamic studies of materials important for the development of the energy industry.

Dudek, Magdalena [AGH - University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Energy and Fuels, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Improvements in Low-Frequency, Ultrasonic Phased-Array Evaluation for Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor (LWR) components. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. This particular study focused on the evaluation of custom-designed, low-frequency (500 kHz) phased-array (PA) probes for examining welds in thick-section cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping. In addition, research was conducted to observe ultrasonic sound field propagation effects from known coarse-grained microstructures found in parent CASS material. The study was conducted on a variety of thick-wall, coarse-grained CASS specimens that were previously inspected by an older generation 500-kHz PA-UT probe and acquisition instrument configuration. This comparative study describes the impact of the new PA probe design on flaw detection and sizing in a low signal-to-noise environment. The set of Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) CASS specimens examined in this study are greater than 50.8-mm (2.0-in.) thick with documented flaws and microstructures. These specimens are on loan to PNNL from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) NDE Center in Charlotte, North Carolina. The flaws contained within these specimens are thermal fatigue cracks (TFC) or mechanical fatigue cracks (MFC) and range from 13% to 42% in through-wall extent. In addition, ultrasonic signal continuity was evaluated on two CASS parent material ring sections by examining the edge-of-pipe response (corner geometry) for regions of signal loss.

Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

SYMPOSIUM SUMMARY ISSUES AT THE FORE IN THE LAND OF MAGNUSON AND STEVENS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-CHAIRS: DAVID ARMSTRONG AND ANDRE PUNT SESSION AND PANEL CHAIRS Session 1: Penny Henderschedt Student Note-takers: S1 Beth Phillips, S2 Megsie Siple, S3 Peter Kuriyama

Washington at Seattle, University of

388

ELSEVIER Forest Ecology and Management 95 (1997) 109-115 Fores\\;;ology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area growth and foliage efficiency of loblolly pine plantations Kunjin Shi a, Quang V. Cao b7 with stand age, peaked between ages36 and 51, and decreased after that. Volume growth increased with leaf area for young stands and decreased for older stands, whereas foliage efficiency consistently decreased

Cao, Quang V.

389

Multifunctional virus scaffolds fore energy applications : nanomaterials synthesis and two dimensional assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological systems inherently posses the ability to synthesize and assemble nanomaterials with remarkable precision, as evident in biomineralization. These unique abilities of nature continue to inspire us to develop new ...

Nam, Ki Tae

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

WA_1995_019_DONNELLY_CORPORATION_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WA00030ASEAMERICASRequesttoAssignTitletoWaiver-Inv.pdf WA1995018OPTICALCOATINGLABORATORYINCWaiverofDomesti.pdf WA04009ROCKWELLSCIENTIFICCOWailve...

391

SUNY-ESF (Partner Institution) 1 Fore stry Drive , Syracuse , NY 13210  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lor of Landscape Archite cture (B.L.A.) Landscape Architecture (HEGIS Code 0204) Bache lor of Scie nce in sustainable construction and renewable materials. Environmental Biology (HEGIS Code 0420) Environmental

Raina, Ramesh

392

/users/nfj/work/41/may/ms7146ForesC/7146.dvi  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered┬ëPNG IHDR┬Ç├ŹSolar Energy41 (Dollars and Sense(ANL-IN-03-032) --effects of

393

WA_03_010_SHELL_SOLAR_INDUSTRIES_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage ┬╗of| Department of Energy VentilationforEnergyDepartment ofDepartment of

394

'Fore!' heads up, wide use of more flexible metallic glass coming your  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | BlandinePrinceton Plasma PhysicsLEDDayDepartment

395

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Surface Engineered Coating Systems for Aluminum Pressure Die Casting Dies: Towards a 'Smart' Die Coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of this research program was to design and develop an optimal coating system that extends die life by minimizing premature die failure. In high-pressure aluminum die-casting, the die, core pins and inserts must withstand severe processing conditions. Many of the dies and tools in the industry are being coated to improve wear-resistance and decrease down-time for maintenance. However, thermal fatigue in metal itself can still be a major problem, especially since it often leads to catastrophic failure (i.e. die breakage) as opposed to a wear-based failure (parts begin to go out of tolerance). Tooling costs remain the largest portion of production costs for many of these parts, so the ability prevent catastrophic failures would be transformative for the manufacturing industry.The technology offers energy savings through reduced energy use in the die casting process from several factors, including increased life of the tools and dies, reuse of the dies and die components, reduction/elimination of lubricants, and reduced machine down time, and reduction of Al solder sticking on the die. The use of the optimized die coating system will also reduce environmental wastes and scrap parts. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on initial dissemination to the casting industry in 2010 and market penetration of 80% by 2020, is 3.1 trillion BTU's/year. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.63 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Dr. John J. Moore; Dr. Jianliang Lin,

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Formation and characterization of microstructure of as-cast Mgľ6Gdľ4YľxZnľ0.5Zr (x = 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 wt.%) alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mgľ6Gdľ4YľxZnľ0.5Zr (x = 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 wt.%) alloys were prepared via conventional ingot metallurgy (I/M) in this study. The as-cast microstructures of these alloys were established by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. Lamellar stacking order (SF) and 14H-type long period stacking order (LPSO) structure within ?-Mg matrix are formed in the three as-cast alloys. The eutectic secondary phase is (Mg,Zn){sub 24}(Gd,Y){sub 5} for the alloy containing 0.3 wt.% Zn, while, it is (Mg,Zn){sub 3}(Gd,Y) for the alloys containing 0.5 wt.% Zn and 0.7 wt.% Zn. Moreover, X phase-(Mg,Zn){sub 12}(Gd,Y) is formed in the latter two as-cast alloys. - Highlights: Ľ LPSO structure has first been found in as-cast Mgľ6Gdľ4YľxZnľ0.5Zr. Ľ X-phase exists in as-cast Mgľ6Gdľ4Yľ0.3(0.5)Znľ0.5Zr. Ľ Zn content results in different ?-phase in the studied alloys.

Wu, Y.J. [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Xu, C. [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zheng, F.Y. [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Peng, L.M., E-mail: plm616@sjtu.edu.cn [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Y.; Ding, W.J. [National Engineering Research Center of Light Alloy Net Forming, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solid-phase synthesis of high-alumina cements by high-temperature treatment on the surface of molten cast iron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of block and monolithic concreting technology in the construction of thermal power plants together with the technical and economic advantages arising from the use of high-alumina cements in the production of refractory concretes have made the development of new methods for the production of high-alumina cement clinkers mandatory. To this end the authors of this paper study the kinetics of synthesis of such clinkers obtained by their firing on the surface of molten cast iron as the heat transfer agent. Among the results presented are a structural and quantitative analysis of the clinker along with phase and activation energy studies.

Fedorov, N.F.; Gavrilov, A.P.; Ivanov, N.I.; Khalina, O.M.

1986-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

398

Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5 Super Duplex Stainless Steel (Cast Equivalent of 2507)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Final Report, Volume 5, Data Package for ASTM A923 Supporting Inclusion of A890-5A Super Duplex Stainless Steel ( Cast Equivalent of 2507)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 5 is the Data Package for the evaluation of Super Duplex Stainless Steel Castings prepared at the end of work comprised in volumes 3 and 4. The document deals with the various evaluation methods used in the work documented in volume 3 and 4. This document covers materials regarding evaluation of the A890-5A material in terms of inclusion in ASTM A923. The various tests which were conducted on the A890-5A material are included in this document.

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬Ł for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬« and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬« and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬? 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 ├?┬?├?┬ó├?┬?├?┬?├?┬?├?┬? 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best method for calculating volume percentage ferrite was determined between the Ferits

Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

The corrosion performance of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D in 3.5% NaCl solution saturated with Mg(OH){sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental behavior of die-cast magnesium alloy MRI230D designated for high-temperature applications was evaluated in comparison with regular AZ91D alloy. The microstructure examination was carried out using SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis; the corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution was evaluated by immersion test, salt spray testing, potentiodynamic polarization analysis, and stress corrosion behavior by Slow Strain Rate Testing (SSRT). Although the general corrosion resistance of MRI230D was slightly improved compared to that of AZ91D alloy its stress corrosion resistance was relatively reduced. The variations in the environmental behavior of the two alloys were mainly due to the differences in their chemical composition and microstructure after die casting. In particular, the differences were related to the reduced Al content in MRI230D and the addition of Ca to this alloy, which consequently affected its relative microstructure and electrochemical characteristics. - Research Highlights: {yields}Corrosion and SCC resistance of a new Mg alloy MRI230D was evaluated vs. regular AZ91D. {yields}MRI230D has a minor advantage in corrosion performance compared with AZ91D. {yields}The SCC resistance of MRI230D by SSRT analysis was relatively reduced. {yields}The reduced SCC resistance of MRI230D was due to the detrimental effect of Ca on ductility.

Aghion, E., E-mail: egyon@bgu.ac.il; Lulu, N.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fabrication and Performance of Ni-YSZ Anode Supported Cell for Coal Derived Syngas Application by Tape Casting and Spin Coating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-YSZ anode supported cell has been developed for direct utilization of coal derived syngas as fuel in the temperature range of 700-850░ C. The porous Ni-YSZ anode substrate was prepared based on processes of slip casting and lamination of anode tape. Then thin-film YSZ electrolyte was deposited on pre-sintered anode substrate via a colloidal spin coating technique and an optimized final sintering route. Dense and crackfree YSZ electrolyte was successfully obtained after sintering at 1440C for 4hrs. Processing factors like pre-sintering of anode, solvent, coating cycles and sintering route on the final properties of YSZ film was studied. A power density of 0.62W/cm2 has been achieved for the anode supported cell tested in 97%H2/3%H2O at 800░C. EIS test results indicated the cell performance was essentially influenced by interfacial resistance and charge transfer process.

Gong, Mingyang (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Jiang, Yinglu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV); Johnson, C.D.; Xingbo, Liu (West Virginia U., Morgantown WV)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Chapter XVIII An e'Learn ing Portal to Teach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Grunwald University ofFlorida, USA B. Hoover University ~/Florida, USA G.L. Bruland University ofHawai 'i

Grunwald, Sabine

405

General Motors Perspective Dr.-Ing.Wolfgang Oelerich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon fiber composite vessels Range: 320 km Over 2.5 million km (1.5 million miles) More than 19 measures to increase effective composite strength: Materials: fiber strength variability, translation Tank cost sources: Carbon fiber 40%, other 60% Hydrogen storage system costs are linear in Hydrogen

406

, ZHOU Q ing2jun , Chen R ay T.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

le 2ring m ic roresona tor as a prac tica l optica l filte r. The influence of optica l loss is a lso ana lyzed. Low optica l loss w ill cause sha rp a ttenua tion of the filte ring response and seve re optica l loss a lso can w iden the bandw id th and inc rease the bandw id th ra tio. Key words: integ ra

Chen, Ray

407

Leadership in Challenging Times InspIrIng greatness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Christenson Arnold Fishman Sandra Kenney TRAFFIC MANAGER Karen Duarte PROJECT COORDINATORS Leslie Bucci '77 depression, allstate was launched, W.K. Kellogg doubled his advertising spending,and p&g became a marketing

Blais, Brian

408

The physical function-ing of a city sometimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time and space scales ┬ş hence they are important and must be incorporated in weather, air pollution combustion (C) from vehicles, industry and buildings rather than the biological processes of photosynthesis of energy and water can be affected dramatically by the specific construction mate- rials, land cover

409

Center for Biotechnology Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Sagerer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed innovative new courses of study which attract gifted students from all over the world. The CeBiTec not only shines in the international world of science; it also has important cooperation partners in many such as the application of biofuels, and for new microscope techniques, to name just a few. The CeBiTec has continually

Moeller, Ralf

410

Investigador Departamento Nazario Ramrez, PhD Ing. Industrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Setup, maintain, analyze data from energy balance stations UPR Agricultural Experiment Station at Juana of atmospheric patterns on water quality Atmospheric measurements of air pollution in MayagŘuez city Julio M

Gilbes, Fernando

411

STEM-ing the Tide | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENT OF MELANIE KENDERDINE

412

Sandia National Laboratories: concentrates sunlight onto a fall-ing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Releasehy-drogen poweracquisitionscience Caterpillar,curtain

413

12 MOMENTUM SPrINg we can improve such processes."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

down cellulose into starch and then into ethanol. And it's this processing that is the focus of animal or fiber into glucose and, ultimately, ethanol must be able to survive the high flow-through rate involved- ate fuel. There's even one microor- ganism in the rumen that converts fiber directly into ethanol

Hamza, Iqbal

414

Computational pproach to the Statistical echanics of rotein ol ing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1995 bstract A statistical mechanical approach to the protein folding problem is devel- oped based of the statistical mechanics of protein folding by com- puter simulation. Even though we have taken advantage of new". A theoretical understanding of the protein-folding problem, i.e. how proteins fold to their native states from

Istrail, Sorin

415

BULLBTIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISII COMMISSION. 109 37.-PREBERVXNG FlBM IN BCOTLAND B Y 'J'IIE ROOWEN PROCKtBB.*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The commercial advantages of tlie new process are there- fore considerablc. 2. A box of dried ling similar preservation of dried fish,an experiment with fresh hs~iseemsto have been equally successful. Tho fish fish accord- ing to the above process amounts in this country to SG&[$31.63], the cost of cask being S4

416

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical T.S. Nielsen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical Methods T.S. Nielsen1 , H. Madsen1 , H considered in the ANEMOS project for short-term fore- casting of wind power. The total procedure typically in for prediction of wind power or wind speed, estimating the uncertainty of the wind power forecast, and finally

Paris-Sud XI, Universit├ę de

417

National Environmental Research Institute University of Aarhus . Denmark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

support: Danish Environmental Protection Agency Please cite as: Illerup, J.B., Nielsen, O-K., Winther, M the fore- casts are available, i.e. the latest official forecast from the Danish Energy Authority. The emis measures. Official Danish forecasts of activity rates are used in the models for those sectors for which

418

Simulated Convective Invigoration Processes at Trade Wind Cumulus Cold Pool ZHUJUN LI AND PAQUITA ZUIDEMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convection and cold pools using a nestedşWeather Research and Fore- casting Model simulation of 19 January ratio drops in simulated cold pools fall within the envelope of observed cases, and the wind enhancement pools invigorating convection at their downwind boundary and suppressing thermals in- side the stable

Zuidema, Paquita

419

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

Scitovski, Rudolf

420

Building a Parallel Spatio-Temporal Data-Text Corpus for Summary Ross Turner*, Somayajulu Sripada*, Ehud Reiter* and Ian P Davy**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pounds. Modern weather fore- casting is driven by Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) Models. Recent and the associated weather prediction data they are based upon. We also show how observations from an analysis.turner,yaji.sripada,e.reiter}@abdn.ac.uk idavy@weather3000.com Abstract We describe a corpus of naturally occurring road ice weather forecasts

Reiter, Ehud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Technical Report DHPC-015 Spatial Interpolation on Distributed,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meteorological models provide a regular prediction of atmospheric weather con- ditions, typically on a forward the best numerical weather models are not able to provide detailed high-resolution fore- casts and have for numerical weather mod- els. Of particular interest is the new infra-red channel added to the GMS series

Hawick, Ken

422

Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics (2001) 8: 439448 Nonlinear Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

implementations of ensemble fore- casting in global numerical weather prediction models rely on two different and theoretical elements. Of particular practical inter- est is the problem of numerical weather prediction. One) equations to operational numerical weather prediction mod- els (e.g. Buizza and Palmer, 1995; Buizza, 1995

Boyer, Edmond

423

Engaging the public and stakeholders in the develop-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Forecast Ad- visory Committee Reviews the methods, demand forecasting tools, input assumptions and forecast results, used in developing the Council's demand fore- casts Natural Gas Advisory Committee work on forecasts, Members include a wide range of stakeholders from utilities, consumer groups

424

Scientific databases have recently become a challenging research area for a number of reasons: 1) the amount of data stored in scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures, solar radiation, and output of numeric models of groundşwater flow or weather foreş casting of reasons: 1) the amount of data stored in scientific databases is rapidly increasing, with orders of magnitude increases on the horizon, 2) the data are becoming increasing complex, as more complicated data

Ward, Matthew

425

P11.3 EFFECTS OF NESTING FREQUENCY AND LATERAL BOUNDARY PERTURBATIONS ON THE DISPERSION OF LIMITED-AREA ENSEMBLE FORECASTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P11.3 EFFECTS OF NESTING FREQUENCY AND LATERAL BOUNDARY PERTURBATIONS ON THE DISPERSION OF LIMITED of ensemble fore- casts, also lack consistent perturbations. Pertur- bations growing on the nested domain on the effect of LBC update in- terval on the nested-grid ensemble dispersion. Other results will be presented

Xue, Ming

426

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 26 FEBRUARY 2014 | DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE2120 Taming hurricanes with arrays of o shore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models (Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory (GFDL) and Hurricane Weather Research and Fore- casting to themselves? This study uses an advanced climate┬şweather computer model that correctly treats the energy only right behind the walls, and limit the access of populations to coastal zones. Large arrays of wind-wave

427

TESLA: Taylor Expanded Solar Analog Forecasting Bengu Ozge Akyurek, Alper Sinan Akyurek, Jan Kleissl and Tajana Simunic Rosing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESLA: Taylor Expanded Solar Analog Forecasting Bengu Ozge Akyurek, Alper Sinan Akyurek, Jan- ergy resources within the Smart Grid, solar forecasting has become an important problem for hour]. It is difficult to obtain an accurate result from the weather and solar predictions. Accurate fore- casting

Simunic, Tajana

428

Oxidation of Slurry Aluminide Coatings on Cast Stainless Steel Alloy CF8C-Plus at 800oC in Water Vapor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, cast austenitic stainless steel, CF8C-Plus, has been developed for a wide range of high temperature applications, including diesel exhaust components, turbine casings and turbocharger housings. CF8C-Plus offers significant improvements in creep rupture life and creep rupture strength over standard CF8C steel. However, at higher temperatures and in more aggressive environments, such as those containing significant water vapor, an oxidation-resistant protective coating will be necessary. The oxidation behavior of alloys CF8C and CF8C-Plus with various aluminide coatings were compared at 800oC in air plus 10 vol% water vapor. Due to their affordability, slurry aluminides were the primary coating system of interest, although chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation coatings were also compared. Additionally, a preliminary study of the low cycle fatigue behavior of aluminized CF8C-Plus was conducted at 800oC. Each type of coating provided substantial improvements in oxidation behavior, with simple slurry aluminides showing very good oxidation resistance after 4,000 h testing in water vapor. Preliminary low cycle fatigue results indicated that thicker aluminide coatings degraded high temperature fatigue properties of CF8C-Plus, whereas thinner coatings did not. Results suggest that appropriately designed slurry aluminide coatings are a viable option for economical, long-term oxidation protection of austenitic stainless steels in water vapor.

Haynes, James A [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Kumar, Deepak [ORNL; Zhang, Ying [Tennessee Technological University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Effect of tungsten addition on the toughness and hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in wear-resistant Fe-B-C cast alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of tungsten additions of 0%, 1.12%, 2.04%, and 3.17% (in wt.%) on the morphology, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in Fe-B-C cast alloy were investigated. The results indicate that, with the increase of tungsten addition, the morphology and distribution of Fe{sub 2}B have no change and a new W-containing phase, except the (Fe, W){sub 2}B with a certain tungsten solution, does not form, and that the fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B increases first and then decreases, while the hardness increases first and then has a little change. Compared with the fracture toughness (3.8 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}) of Fe{sub 2}B without tungsten addition, the toughness at 2.04 wt.% tungsten can be improved by about above 80% and achieves about 6.9 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, and variation characteristics of hardness and toughness of Fe{sub 2}B were also testified by viewing the indentation marks and cracks on the Fe{sub 2}B, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Poor toughness of Fe2B decreases obviously the wear resistance of the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's toughness increases first and then decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's hardness first increases and then has little change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The toughness at 2.04 % W can be improved by above 80% more than that at 0% W.

Huang, Zhifu, E-mail: hzf@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xing, Jiandong; Lv, Liangliang

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Improved Life of Die Casting Dies of H13 Steel by Attaining Improved Mechanical Properties and Distortion Control During Heat Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this project is to increase die casting die life by using fast enough quenching rates to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in premium grade H-13 steel dies. The main tasks of the project were to compile a database on physical and mechanical properties of H-13; conduct gas quenching experiments to determine cooling rates of dies in difference vacuum furnaces; measure the as-quenched distortion of dies and the residual stresses; generate finite element analysis models to predict cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress of gas quenched dies; and establish rules and create PC-based expert system for prediction of cooling rates, distortion, and residual stress in vacuum/gas quenched H-13 dies. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes have been measured under a variety of gas pressure. Dimensional changes caused by the gas quenching processes have been determined by accurate mapping of all surfaces with coordinate measuring machines before and after the quench. Residual stresses were determined by the ASTM E837 hole-drilling strain gage method. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a comprehensive database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties has been compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes has been conducted using the TRAST/ABAQUS codes. There is a good fit between the predicted and measured distortion contours. However, the magnitude of the predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required before it can be used to predict distortion and residual stress in a quantitative manner. This last step is a prerequisite to generating rules for a reliable expert system.

J. F. Wallace; D. Schwam

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Short-Term Load Forecasting This paper discusses the state of the art in short-term load fore-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectrum of time intervals. In therange of seconds, when load variationsare small and random, the automatic by a number of generation control functions such as hydro scheduling, unit commitment, hydro-ther- mal present, functions such as fuel, hydro, and maintenance scheduling are performed to ensure that the load

Gross, George

433

Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601Department ofEnergy PHEVAbengoa Bioenergy

434

ITP Metal Casting: Implementation of Metal Casting Best Practices |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department ofIOWA1999) |

435

Technical Letter Report Assessment of Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Method for Welds in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Pressurizer Surge Line Piping JCN N6398, Task 1B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light water reactor components. The scope of this research encompasses primary system pressure boundary materials including cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS); dissimilar metal welds; piping with corrosion-resistant cladding; weld overlays, inlays and onlays; and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in coarse-grained steel components. In this effort, PNNL supports cooperation with Commissariat Ó lĺEnergie Atomique (CEA) to assess reliable inspection of CASS materials. The NRC Project Manager has established a cooperative effort with the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN). CEA, under funding from IRSN, are supporting collaborative efforts with the NRC and PNNL. Regarding its work on the NDE of materials, CEA is providing its modeling software (CIVA) in exchange for PNNL offering expertise and data related to phased-array detection and sizing, acoustic attenuation, and back scattering on CASS materials. This collaboration benefits the NRC because CEA performs research and development on CASS for ╔lectricitÚ de France (EdF). This technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of welds in CASS pressurizer (PZR) surge line nuclear reactor piping. A set of thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs) was implanted into three CASS PZR surge-line specimens (pipe-to-elbow welds) that were fabricated using vintage CASS materials formed in the 1970s, and flaw responses from these cracks were used to evaluate detection and sizing performance of the PA-UT methods applied. This effort was comprised of multiple elements that included use of microstructural knowledge (dimensional analysis, grain orientation, and grain type) as well as sound field modeling to more effectively modify inspection parameters and enhance the inspection outcomes. Advanced probe design and sound field simulations were employed to enhance detection and characterization of circumferentially oriented flaws, and an assessment of lateral (circumferential) flaw localization capability and performance was also conducted. An evaluation of flaw detection, length sizing, depth sizing, and signal-to-noise ratio was performed for all flaws in the subject specimens, as a function of various inspection parameters, and finally, measurements were made to quantify and assess the baseline CASS material noise and its potential impact on flaw detection.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Mathews, Royce; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

436

Filter casting nanoscale porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

437

Spray casting of metallic preforms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal alloy is melted in a crucible and ejected from the bottom of the crucible as a descending stream of molten metal. The descending stream is impacted with a plurality of primary inert gas jets surrounding the molten metal stream to produce a plume of atomized molten metal droplets. An inert gas is blown onto a lower portion of the plume with a plurality of auxiliary inert gas jets to deflect the plume into a more restricted pattern of high droplet density, thereby substantially eliminating unwanted overspray and resulting wasted material. The plume is projected onto a moving substrate to form a monolithic metallic product having generally parallel sides.

Flinn, John E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Burch, Joseph V. (Shelley, ID); Sears, James W. (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

DOE CAST ALL EMPLOYEE NOTIFICATION  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChiefAppropriation FY 2012Control Work

439

0. Beckermann Department of Mechanical Engineering,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by conducting a series of experiments covering a wide range of hot and cold wall temperatures. It is found the steady-state interface is almost vertical andparallel to the cold wall. Strong subcool- ing results number of applications, including latent heat storage, materials process- ing, crystal growth, casting

Beckermann, Christoph

440

Quantification and utilization of subjectively determined data in the construction of mathematical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Justification of the Use of Expertise Previous Uses of Expertise in Fore- casting The DELPHI Method PATTERN Improvement of Existing Methods. A NEW METHOD . Introduction Collection of Data. Analysis of Data and Decision Conclusion. 1 I 2 3 4 6 7... III. A SAMPLE PROBLEM 54 REFERENCES 85 CHAPTER I THE STATE OF THE ART Introduction The building of models designed to assist in the description of future events has often encountered a very serious limitation. This is due to the methods...

Haynes, Grady Lee

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fore cast ing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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441

A numerical technique for predicting wind fields using a Lagrangian approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lagrangian accelerations in ter~s of the fields of velocity snd geopotcntiel height of s constant pressure surface. The first is based on the simplified equations of horizontal, frictionless motion o. a particle; the second is based on a vsristional... of the individ- ual forecaster. It would be desirable to develop an ob)ective method f or determining ageostrophic accelerations and applying these to fore- cast atmospheric motions. Present. Status The geostrophic assumption hae been used both as a tool...

Barnes, Stanley Louis

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Silicon ingot casting: Heat Exchanger Method (HEM)/multi-wire slicing: Fixed Abrasive Slicing Technique (FAST), Phase IV. Quarterly progress report No. 2, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon ingot size cast by HEM has been extended to 34 cm x 34 cm x 10 cm. A 20 kg ingot has been solidified at 3 kg/hr with no crucible attachment or ingot cracking problems. Another ingot of 26 kg weight has also been solidified. The heat treatment used to develop a graded structure caused cracking on the inside surface of the first large crucibles. The thermal conditions were altered to minimize high gradients and the cracking was eliminated. A high degree of single crystallinity has been maintained as the size of the ingots has been increased. A graphite retainer made out of flat plates was used to produce an ingot with flat sides and rounded curves. It is now possible to electroplate diamonds only on the cutting edge of the wire. The advantages associated with diamonds on the cutting edge only are lower kerf, improved accuracy by improved seating in the support rollers, and less degradation of the rollers. This has resulted in less wander of wires and will reduce costs by using less diamonds and less degradation of rollers. The main failure mechanism of wires - diamond pullout - has been minimized by using filler diamonds to prevent erosion of the nickel matrix. It has been shown that an electroplated wirepack can be used to slice three 10 cm diameter silicon ingots without significant diamond pullout. IPEG analysis of value added costs of sheet formation using conservative and optimistic extension of HEM and FAST technologies yields $27.05/m/sup 2/ ($0.191/w) and $13.49/m/sup 2/ (0.095/w), respectively. Assuming cost goals of other tasks are met, the projected costs are $0.654/w, co