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Sample records for ford bakken granite

  1. FORD | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD FORD PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2009, the Department of Energy issued a $5.9 billion loan to the Ford Motor Company to upgrade 13 facilities in Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, and Ohio. The resulting state-of-the-art assembly and manufacturing plants have the enhanced flexibility of producing multiple-platform, fuel-efficient advanced technology vehicles in response to changing market demands and fuel

  2. Ford | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Ford Place: Dearborn, MI Website: www.ford.com References: FORD-NREL CRADA1 Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership...

  3. Experience reveals better Bakken stimulation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, D.D. )

    1991-04-29

    In the Bakken formation, stimulation treatments are used sparingly in horizontal well completions. but in vertical wells, stimulation is used extensively and successfully. This article shows the stimulation designs that are effective in the Bakken formation.

  4. FORD | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORD FORD DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_ATVM_Ford.pdf (749.84 KB) More Documents & Publications Driving Economic Growth: Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Before House Subcommittee on Energy and Power and Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations - Committee on Energy and Commerce Before the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations - Energy and Commerce Committee

  5. 05643_GeoMech_Bakken | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 6242014 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation ...

  6. Treating-pressure analysis in the Bakken formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, D.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Bakken formation is an oil-producing interval in the Williston basin. Usually, commercial Bakken wells are linked to an anisotropic natural fracture network. Hydraulic fracturing treatments have been used extensively in vertical wells and to a limited extent in horizontal wells. In this paper, bottom hole treating pressure (BHTP's) are analyzed to improve understanding of hydraulic fracture propagation in the Bakken.

  7. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  8. Bakken shale typifies horizontal drilling success

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibman, P.R. )

    1990-12-01

    Given the favorable production response that has been obtained from horizontal drilling in vertical- fractured reservoirs such as the Bakken shale and, more recently, the Austin chalk, industry interest in this technology has mushroomed in the U.S. Indeed, it is difficult to find a good-sized oil company these days that is not involved in a horizontal drilling project or is giving it serious consideration. In response to growing evidence of successful field applications, the realization is dawning on the investment community that horizontal drilling represents a significant technological development with positive implications for both the exploration and production business, and the oilfield services industry.

  9. Ford's CNG vehicle research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.J.

    1983-06-01

    Several natural gas vehicles have been built as part of Ford's Alternative Fuel Demonstration Fleet. Two basic methods, compressed gas (CNG), and liquified gas (LNG) were used. Heat transfer danger and the expense and special training needed for LNG refueling are cited. CNG in a dual-fuel engine was demonstrated first. The overall results were unsatisfactory. A single fuel LNG vehicle was then demonstrated. Four other demonstrations, testing different tank weights and engine sizes, lead to the conclusion that single fuel vehicles optimized for CNG use provide better fuel efficiency than dual-fuel vehicles. Lack of public refueling stations confines use to fleet operations.

  10. Ford Electric Battery Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Battery Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ford Electric Battery Group Place: Dearborn, MI References: Ford Battery1 Information About Partnership with NREL...

  11. 05643_GeoMech_Bakken | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery Last Reviewed 6/24/2014 DE-08NT0005643 Goal The goal of this project is to determine the geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota, and use these results to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing in order to improve the ultimate recovery of this vast oil resource. Performer University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND 58202-7134 Background Compared to the success of

  12. Source-potential rating index-evaluation of Bakken formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirkle, F.L., Dembicki, H.

    1985-05-01

    The Bakken formation, an organic-rich, oil-prone unit, is the source of the crude oils found in the middle Bakken and overlying Madison Group. Thickness, organic carbon, and vitrinite reflectance data for the Bakken were gathered from 101 wells within the Williston basin and evaluated in terms of source potential. An index exists that combines sediment thickness, organic carbon content, and thermal maturity data into a single mappable parameter that indicates areas of potential hydrocarbon generation. Multiplying the average percent organic carbon by the effective source rock thickness of a formation yields a richness factor that is then multiplied by maturity scaling factors to give source potential ratings for oil and/or gas generation. By using burial-history curves and thermal-maturation modeling, the rating index can be used to look at source potential through geologic time. The Bakken Formation has been evaluated with the aid of the rating index. The source-potential rating index provides objective semiquantitative measures by which the source potential of a single formation can be compared within an area or the source potential of two or more formations can be compared within the same or different basins. The Bakken did not begin to reach high source potential until toward the end of the Late Cretaceous. This contrasts with previous authorities who believed the Bakken was at peak generation and expelling hydrocarbons throughout the Cretaceous.

  13. President Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 |...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 President Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 Washington, DC President Ford signs the Energy Reorganization Act of ...

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Ford Motor Company | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ford Motor Company Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Ford Motor Company Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Ford Motor Company Joined the Challenge: January 2013 ...

  15. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  16. GM-Ford-Chrysler: Allocating Loan Authority

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement from GM, Ford, and Chrysler: "Allocating the $25 Billion in Direct Loan Authority to Loan Applicants"

  17. Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Kegang; Zeng, Zhengwen; He, Jun; Pei, Peng; Zhou, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Huang, Luke; Ostadhassan, Mehdi; Jabbari, Hadi; Blanksma, Derrick; Feilen, Harry; Ahmed, Salowah; Benson, Steve; Mann, Michael; LeFever, Richard; Gosnold, Will

    2013-12-31

    On October 1, 2008 US DOE-sponsored research project entitled “Geomechanical Study of Bakken Formation for Improved Oil Recovery” under agreement DE-FC26-08NT0005643 officially started at The University of North Dakota (UND). This is the final report of the project; it covers the work performed during the project period of October 1, 2008 to December 31, 2013. The objectives of this project are to outline the methodology proposed to determine the in-situ stress field and geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA to increase the success rate of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing so as to improve the recovery factor of this unconventional crude oil resource from the current 3% to a higher level. The success of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing depends on knowing local in-situ stress and geomechanical properties of the rocks. We propose a proactive approach to determine the in-situ stress and related geomechanical properties of the Bakken Formation in representative areas through integrated analysis of field and well data, core sample and lab experiments. Geomechanical properties are measured by AutoLab 1500 geomechanics testing system. By integrating lab testing, core observation, numerical simulation, well log and seismic image, drilling, completion, stimulation, and production data, in-situ stresses of Bakken formation are generated. These in-situ stress maps can be used as a guideline for future horizontal drilling and multi-stage fracturing design to improve the recovery of Bakken unconventional oil.

  18. Regional geology and petroleum potential of Bakken Formation, southwestern Manitoba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martiniuk, C.D.

    1988-07-01

    The Bakken Formation has been documented as an excellent petroleum source rock within the Williston basin and has, in some localities, been established as a producing zone. Recent exploration in the Daly field of southwestern Manitoba has led to the discovery and subsequent development of several oil pools within the middle member of the Bakken. The 21 active wells within these pools have produced 20,773.8 m/sup 3/ (130,667.2 bbl) of oil (40.2/degrees/ API) as of December 31, 1987. Through much of the Williston basin, the Bakken typically consists of three members: a lower, highly radioactive, black shale member; a middle siltstone member; and an upper black shale member (identical to the lower member). In southwestern Manitoba, the lower member is absent in most areas due to nondeposition and overstep of the overlying middle member. In these areas, the middle member unconformably overlies eroded red dolomitic shales of the Devonian Lyleton (Three Forks) Formation. The middle member is a relatively uniform blanket deposit averaging 4 m (13 ft) thick. It consists of interbedded tan to greenish-gray, very fine to medium-grained, well-sorted dolomitic sandstone and siltstone with angular to subrounded grains. Oil accumulation in the middle member is largely the result of stratigraphic trapping and appears, in part, to be localized where a basal sandstone (associated with middle member thickening) is concentrated in minor erosional lows on the Lyleton surface. The black shales of the upper member form a thin (2 m or 6.6 ft average), uniform cap throughout the map area and are overlain by the carbonates of the Mississippian Lodgepole Formation (Souris Valley Beds). Maximum thickness of the Bakken reaches 32 m (105 ft) in the Waskada field area, where the lower shale member is locally present.

  19. Horizontal drilling the Bakken Formation, Williston basin: A new approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefever, J.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Horizontal drilling is an attractive new approach to exploration and development of the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken Formation in the southwestern part of North Dakota. This drilling technique increases the probability of success, the profit potential, the effective drainage area maximizing recoverable reserves, and the productivity by encountering more natural occurring fractures. The target formation, the Mississippian/Devonian Bakken, consists of three members in an overlapping relationship, a lower organic-rich black shale, a middle siltstone/limestone, and an upper organic-rich black shale. It attains a maximum thickness of 145 ft and thins to a feather edge along its depositional limit. Considered to be a major source rock for the Williston basin, the Bakken is usually overpressured where productive. Overpressuring is attributed to intense hydrocarbon generation. Reservoir properties are poor with core fluid porosities being generally 5% or less and permeabilities ranging from 0.1 to 0.2 md. The presence of natural fractures in the shale are necessary for production. Two types of fractures are associated with Bakken reservoirs: large vertical fractures (of tectonic origin) and microfractures (probably related to hydrocarbon generation). An economic comparison between horizontal and vertical wells show that well completion costs are approximately two times higher (average costs; $1,500,000 for a horizontal to $850,000 for a vertical) with average payout for horizontal wells projected to occur in half the time (1.5 yr instead of 3.4 yr). Projected production and reserves are considered to be 2 to 4 times greater from a horizontal well.

  20. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, Frederick

    2012-03-01

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  1. GM-Ford-Chrysler: IFR Consolidated Application Feature | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy IFR Consolidated Application Feature GM-Ford-Chrysler: IFR Consolidated Application Feature (66.33 KB) More Documents & Publications GM-Ford-Chrysler: Issues Related to Vehicle Eligibility GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs

  2. J. Chris Ford, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chris Ford, Ph.D. - Technical Advisor to the Director Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Most Recent by Chris Ford Unlocking Growth Opportunities for Minority Businesses...

  3. NREL to Host Demonstration of Ford's Electric Ranger PU Truck

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Laboratory to Host Demonstration of Ford's Electric Ranger Pickup Truck ... Media are invited to cover Ford's demonstration of the Electric Ranger at the National ...

  4. Horizontal drilling in the Bakken Formation - The hunt for an elephant that never left the source system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, L. ); Le Fever, J. )

    1991-06-01

    New organic-geochemical studies show that bitumen extracted from the upper and lower shale members of the Mississippian Madison Group oils, and that the Bakken shales have contributed only a minor percentage of the conventionally produced oil in the Williston basin. Instead, organic-rich madison marls are an adequate source for the Madison oils. Also, few pathways exist for vertical migration of Bakken-generated oil to shallower Madison reservoirs. Vertical wells in older Bakken oil pools are perforated in one or all of the three units adjacent to the two Bakken shales but are not necessarily perforated in the Bakken shales. Rock-Eval analyses of 6- to 12-in. spaced core samples show that where Bakken shales are thermally mature, the three adjacent organic-poor units contain 10-20 times the hydrocarbons (HCs) they could have generated. Thus, Bakken-generated HCs appear to have moved into the three adjacent units, probably via fractures created by volume expansion of organic matter during HC generation in the Bakken shales. Bakken well histories reveal that unsuccessful Bakken wells appear due to questionable techniques during these operations and not a lack of fractures. If a large in-place resource base exists in the Bakken source system, its commercial recovery will depend on new exploration, drilling, completion, and production technologies and on how much of the generated oil is in fractures rather than dispersed throughout the rocks.

  5. Conodonts of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, M.D.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    The Bakken Formation is a thin (maximum 145 ft, 45 m), clastic unit in the subsurface of Williston basin in the United States and Canada. The Bakken is similar in lithologic character and stratigraphic position to other black shale units deposited on the North American craton during the Late Devonian and Early Mississippian. The Bakken was initially considered entirely Mississippian in age. Paleontologic study of regional physical equivalents and analysis of the macrofauna in Saskatchewan has suggested that the Bakken is actually both Devonian and Mississippian. Conodonts were obtained from cores of the Bakken in an effort to determine the age of the formation in North Dakota and to assess the oil generation potential. Nearly 700 conodonts have been recovered, but are unevenly distributed within the Bakken Formation. A majority was obtained from thin (approximately 0.5 cm), fossil-rich beds within the upper shale. Conodonts from the top of the upper shale reveal a Mississippian (Kinderhookian) age and are here assigned to the Lower Siphonodella crenulata Zone. Only rare, fragmentary conodonts have been found in the middle member. Conodont evidence from the middle of the lower shale suggests a late Devonian (Famennian) age (Upper Polygnathus styriacus Zone) for this member. Conodont color has been established as a geothermometer in carbonate rocks. Color alteration indices of conodonts from the Bakken range from 1.5 to approximately 2.5 and indicate a pattern of increasing temperature with depth. These results suggest possible hydrocarbon generation from shallower depths than has been reported previously for the Bakken. The lack of agreement in interpreted hydrocarbon generation depths may be due to, among other things, the clastic nature of the Bakken Formation.

  6. Breaking into Bakken potential on the Fort Peck reservation, northeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monson, L.M.; Lund, D.F. )

    1991-06-01

    Necessary ingredients for a Bakken play involve overpressuring, thermal maturity, stratigraphic thinning, hydrocarbon content, and the presence of fractures to free the oil. Bakken thickness varies on the reservation from 0 to 25 m. The Upper Shale Member is uniformly 3-4 m. Thickness is related to a northwest structural grain, especially in the northeast where fold axes are located parallel to the Opheim syncline. This strike is coincident with the general salt solution edge of the Devonian Prairie Evaporites. The Bakken is about 16 m thick along this dissolution boundary and may contain the necessary fracturing. Structural flexure near the Wolf Creek Nose, and especially off the northeast and eastern flanks of the Poplar dome, may have suitably fractured the Bakken as well. Well logs in this area have good resistivity separation in the Middle Siltstone Member of the Bakken, which may be used to detect fracturing in this low-porosity reservoir. Present depth of the Bakken varies from about 2,100 to 3,050 m. Electrical resistivities indicate, however, that much of the reservation's Bakken was subjected to sufficient depths to generate hydrocarbons. Other physical properties, based on porosity and gamma-ray logs, confirm that organic carbon content is adequate, if not exceptionally high. Regional and Laramide uplift, coupled with glacial erosion and rebound, probably explain the present elevation of the Bakken in this area. Significant overpressuring exists in the Bakken over at least half of the reservation as determined by sonic-log calculations and sparse drill-stem test pressures.

  7. Ford Debuts Solar Energy Concept Car

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ford Motor Company unveiled the C-MAX Solar Energi Concept, a sun-powered vehicle with the potential to deliver what a plug-in hybrid offers without depending on the electric grid for fuel.

  8. A comparison of the rates of hydrocarbon generation from Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken formation petroleum source rocks, Williston Basin, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, D.M.; Elsinger, R.J.; Inden, R.F.; Palacas, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    Recent successes in the Lodgepole Waulsortian Mound play have resulted in the reevaluation of the Williston Basin petroleum systems. It has been postulated that hydrocarbons were generated from organic-rich Bakken Formation source rocks in the Williston Basin. However, Canadian geoscientists have indicated that the Lodgepole Formation is responsible for oil entrapped in Lodgepole Formation and other Madison traps in portions of the Canadian Williston Basin. Furthermore, geoscientists in the U.S. have recently shown oils from mid-Madison conventional reservoirs in the U.S. Williston Basin were not derived from Bakken Formation source rocks. Kinetic data showing the rate of hydrocarbon formation from petroleum source rocks were measured on source rocks from the Lodgepole, False Bakken, and Bakken Formations. These results show a wide range of values in the rate of hydrocarbon generation. Oil prone facies within the Lodgepole Formation tend to generate hydrocarbons earlier than the oil prone facies in the Bakken Formation and mixed oil/gas prone and gas prone facies in the Lodgepole Formation. A comparison of these source rocks using a geological model of hydrocarbon generation reveals differences in the timing of generation and the required level of maturity to generate significant amounts of hydrocarbons.

  9. Ron Ness will provide comments on the workforce needs of Bakken...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    needs of Bakken and North Dakota's energy industry and the tremendous growth in jobs over the past few years. He will focus on the Empower North Dakota initiatives on ...

  10. Petroleum source rocks and stratigraphy of Bakken formation in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, R.L.

    1984-07-01

    The Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) of North Dakota consists of upper and lower, black, organic-rich shales separated by a calcareous siltstone middle member. Organic-carbon measurements revealed the Bakken shales to be very organic-rich (average of 11.33 wt.% of organic carbon), and visual kerogen typing revealed this organic matter to be predominantly an amorphous type that is inferred to be sapropelic. The onset of hydrocarbon generation was determined to occur at an average depth of 9000 ft (2.74 km) by interpreting plots of geochemical parameters with depth (e.g., ratios of hydrocarbon to nonhydrocarbon, saturated hydrocarbon to organic carbon, pyrolytic hydrocarbon to organic carbon, and the pyrolysis production index). Hydrocarbon content and thermal kerogen breakdown increase greatly in the Bakken shales where they are buried at depths greater than 9000 ft (2.74 km). The effective source area of the Bakken, as determined by maps of the above geochemical parameters, lies mostly in McKenzie, Williams, Dunn, and Billings Counties. Oil generation was probably initiated in the Bakken about 75 Ma (Late Cretaceous) at a temperature of about 100/sup 0/C (212/sup 0/F), with initial expulsion of oil from the Bakken probably occurring 70 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The amount of oil generated by the Bakken in North Dakota, as calculated from pyrolysis data, is 92.3 billion bbl. If only 10% of this oil was actually expelled from the shales, it could easily account for the 3 billion bbl of known type II oil reserves in the Williston basin.

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dawn Ford Site - 038

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dawn Ford Site - 038 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Dawn Ford Site (038) Active UMTRCA Title II site; when complete, site will be managed by LM Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Ford, WA, Disposal Site Location: Ford, Washington Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Disposal site Site Disposition: Remediation under UMTRCA Title II - site not ready to transition Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials

  12. President Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 President Ford Signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 Washington, DC President Ford signs the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974. The Atomic Energy Commission is abolished. The Energy Research and Development Administration, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Energy Resources Council are established

  13. Thermal history of Bakken shale in Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosnold, W.D. Jr.; Lefever, R.D.; Crashell, J.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Stratigraphic and thermal conductivity data were combined to analyze the thermostratigraphy of the Williston basin. The present thermostratigraphy is characterized by geothermal gradients of the order of 60 mK/m in the Cenozoic and Mesozoic units, and 30 mK/m in the Paleozoic units. The differences in geothermal gradients are due to differences in thermal conductivities between the shale-dominated Mesozoic and Cenozoic units and the carbonate-dominated Paleozoic units. Subsidence and compaction rates were calculated for the basin and were used to determine models for time vs. depth and time vs. thermal conductivity relationships for the basin. The time/depth and time/conductivity relationships include factors accounting for thermal conductivity changes due to compaction, cementation, and temperature. The thermal history of the Bakken shale, a primary oil source rock in the Williston basin, was determined using four different models, and values for Lopatin's time-temperature index (TTI) were calculated for each model. The first model uses a geothermal gradient calculated from bottom-hole temperature data, the second uses present-day thermostratigraphy, the third uses the thermostratigraphic relationship determined in this analysis, and the fourth modifies the third by including assumed variations in continental heat flow. The thermal histories and the calculated TTI values differ markedly among the models with TTI values differing by a factor of about two between some models.

  14. Thermal modeling of Bakken Formation of Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.

    1986-08-01

    Organic geochemical analyses provide a quantitative basis on which conceptual models of thermal maturation may be built. Contour maps of maturation indices of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin show anomalous patterns that are not dependent on burial depth. One such area is on the western side of the Nesson anticline. One-dimensional modeling incorporating a uniform, constant heat flow, lithology-dependent thermal conductivities, and decompaction factors indicates that these areas are less mature than surrounding regions. This is due primarily to decreasing burial depth and thinning of low-thermal-conductivity Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. Additional heat transfer to these regions may be due in part to heat transfer by fluid movement through aquifers or vertical fractures. The influence of these fluid systems is simulated through the use of a two-dimensional finite difference program. Basic assumptions are made concerning heat flow, thermal properties, and ground-water flow rates through time. Modeling of the time-temperature history is simplified by restricting the study to the time of greatest maturation, the post-Jurassic.

  15. Subtask – CO2 storage and enhanced bakken recovery research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, James; Hawthorne, Steven; Smith, Steven; Braunberger, Jason; Liu, Guoxiang; Klenner, Robert; Botnen, Lisa; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John; Doll, Thomas

    2014-05-31

    Small improvements in productivity could increase technically recoverable oil in the Bakken Petroleum System by billions of barrels. The use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in tight oil reservoirs is a relatively new concept. The large-scale injection of CO2 into the Bakken would also result in the geological storage of significant amounts of CO2. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has conducted laboratory and modeling activities to examine the potential for CO2 storage and EOR in the Bakken. Specific activities included the characterization and subsequent modeling of North Dakota study areas as well as dynamic predictive simulations of possible CO2 injection schemes to predict the potential CO2 storage and EOR in those areas. Laboratory studies to evaluate the ability of CO2 to remove hydrocarbons from Bakken rocks and determine minimum miscibility pressures for Bakken oil samples were conducted. Data from a CO2 injection test conducted in the Elm Coulee area of Montana in 2009 were evaluated with an eye toward the possible application of knowledge gained to future injection tests in other areas. A first-order estimation of potential CO2 storage capacity in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota was also conducted. Key findings of the program are as follows. The results of the research activities suggest that CO2 may be effective in enhancing the productivity of oil from the Bakken and that the Bakken may hold the ability to geologically store between 120 Mt and 3.2 Gt of CO2. However, there are no clear-cut answers regarding the most effective approach for using CO2 to improve oil productivity or the storage capacity of the Bakken. The results underscore the notion that an unconventional resource will likely require unconventional methods of both assessment and implementation when it comes to the injection of CO

  16. Petroleum generation and expulsion in the constrained Bakken petroleum system and its relevance to the formation of fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscio, G.P.A.; Horsfield, B.; Welte, D.

    1995-08-01

    The lack of direct and unequivocal evidence for the existence of fractures in the Bakken petroleum system (Williston Basin, U.S.A./Canada) has led to controversial discussions with respect to the magnitude, orientation and frequency of fractures and especially their formation mechanism. Amongst other hypotheses, the creation of overpressuring as a result of high petroleum generation rates was called upon to induce fracturing. On the basis of a comprehensive organic geochemical study incorporating source rock and reservoir data, the present contribution provides evidence for an alternative pressure-controlled fracture formation mechanism: Mass balance calculations performed on Bakken Shale samples covering a maturity spectrum from 0.3% to 1.1% R{sub o} has revealed that the main phase of petroleum formation took place very early during catagenesis (ca. 0.4 - 0.8% R{sub o}) and that its potential has already been realized in those areas of the basin which currently produce from Bakken reservoirs. (1) It has been shown recently that the Bakken petroleum system represents a closed system, i.e. the Bakken sourced oils have not entered the Madison reservoirs. Hence, overall high expulsion efficiencies indicate that Bakken Shale over- and underlying units might represent the principal reservoirs and, most importantly, the strata where overpressuring should be expected. (2) Detailed analysis of Bakken sourced oils which are produced from Bakken reservoirs imply that their bulk and molecular composition may have been altered by significant in-situ thermal alteration which took place after the main phase of expulsion. (3) The hypothesized process of reimpregnation of petroleum from the reservoir back into the source rock system may account for locally occurring high concentrations of solvent extractable organic matter in Bakken Shales.

  17. GRANITE RELIABLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PROJECT STATISTICS: GRANITE RELIABLE PROJECT SUMMARY OWNERS BAIF Granite Holdings & Freshet Wind Energy LOCATION Coos County, New Hampshire FINANCIAL SUMMARY LOAN PROGRAM TITLE ...

  18. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  19. Organic carbon in Bakken Formation, United States portion of Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.; Hester, T.C.

    1983-12-01

    The upper and lower members of the Mississippian and Devonian Bakken Formation in the United States portion of the Williston basin are black shales that are extremely rich in organic matter and are the source of much of the oil found in the basin. Organic-carbon values are calculated from formationdensity logs using the equation: TOC = (154.497//rho/) -57.261, where TOC is organic-carbon content (wt. %) and /rho/ is formation density (g/cm/sup 3/). Test calculations comparing this equation to laboratory organic-carbon analyses from 39 wells in North Dakota show an average absolute difference of 1.1% in organic-carbon content. Organic-carbon content, calculated at 159 locations in North Dakota and 107 in Montana, averages 12.1% for the upper member of the Bakken Formation and 11.5% for the lower member. There is a regional depletion of organic carbon, paralleling present-day isotherms, that reflects the conversion of organic matter to oil and subsequent expulsion of the oil from the formation. The mass of organic carbon in the Bakken Formation is approximately evenly divided between the upper and lower members, and it totals about 126 X 10/sup 12/ kg in the study area, of which 102 X 10/sup 12/ kg are in the thermally mature region. The assumption that 167 mg HC/g TOC have migrated out of the mature Bakken shales leads to a tentative estimate that hydrocarbons equivalent to 132 billion bbl of 43/sup 0/ (API gravity) oil have been expelled from the United States portion of the upper and lower members of the Bakken Formation.

  20. AVTA: 2010 Ford Fusion HEV Testing Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ford Fusion HEV Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Ford Fusion HEV Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Ford Fusion hybrid-electric

  1. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  2. Ford Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ford Motor Co - Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme Place: Allen Park, Michigan...

  3. GM-Ford-Chrysler: Issues Related to Vehicle Eligibility | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy GM-Ford-Chrysler: Issues Related to Vehicle Eligibility (206.57 KB) More Documents & Publications GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs GM-Ford-Chrysler: IFR Consolidated Application Feature

  4. Granite Falls Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Granite Falls Energy Place: Granite Falls, Minnesota Zip: 56241 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References: Granite Falls Energy1 This article is...

  5. Recognition of hydrocarbon expulsion using well logs: Bakken Formation, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, R.; Zelt, F.B.; Morgan, S.R.; Passey, Q.R. ); Snavely, P.D. III; Webster, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Upper Mississippian-Lower Devonian Bakken Formation forms a source/carrier/reservoir system in the Williston basin. Hydrocarbon expulsion within the Bakken has been identified by overlaying sonic and resistivity logs. Typically, these curves track in organically lean, water-saturated mudrocks because both respond mainly to porosity; however, in thermally mature organic-rich rocks and hydrocarbon reservoirs or carrier beds, the curves separate due to the anomalously high resistivity associated with replacement of pore water by hydrocarbons. Sonic/resistivity-log overlays for wells throughout the Montana and North Dakota parts of the Williston basin reveal significant increases and maximum in-curve separation within the middle siltstone member of the Bakken at subsurface temperatures of about 170 and 200{degree}F, respectively. Sequence-stratigraphic characteristics of the Bakken define the framework within which the expulsion process operates. The organic-rich upper and lower shale members represent the transgressive and early highstand systems tracts of two adjacent depositional sequences. A sequence boundary within the intervening middle siltstone member separates nearshore siltstone and sandstone of the late highstand systems tract in the lower sequence from cross-bedded subtidal to intertidal sandstones of the lowstand systems tract in the upper sequence. Reservoir properties vary across this sequence boundary. The authors attribute the log separation in the siltstone member to hydrocarbons expelled from the adjacent shales. Abrupt shifts in several geochemical properties of the shale members, indicative of hydrocarbon generation occur over the same subsurface temperature range as the rapid increase in log separation in the middle siltstone, thus indicating the contemporaneity of generation and expulsion.

  6. Fracture-enhanced porosity and permeability trends in Bakken Formation, Williston basin, western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freisatz, W.B.

    1988-07-01

    Fractures play a critical role in oil production from the Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) in the North Dakota portion of the Williston basin. The Bakken Formation in the study area is known for its low matrix porosity and permeability, high organic content, thermal maturity, and relative lateral homogeneity. Core analysis has shown the effective porosity and permeability development within the Bakken Formation to be related primarily to fracturing. In theory, lineaments mapped on the surface reflect the geometry of basement blocks and the zones of fracturing propagated upward from them. Fracturing in the Williston basin is thought to have occurred along reactivated basement-block boundaries in response to varying tectonic stresses and crustal flexure throughout the Phanerozoic. Landsat-derived lineament maps were examined for the area between 47/degrees/ and 48/degrees/ north lat. and 103/degrees/ and 104/degrees/ west long. (northern Billings and Golden Valley Counties, and western McKenzie County, North Dakota) in an attempt to identify large-scale fracture trends. In the absence of major tectonic deformation in the craton, a subtle pattern of fracturing has propagated upward through the sedimentary cover and emerged as linear topographic features visible on these large-scale, remote-sensed images.

  7. Developing an oil generation model for resource assessment of Bakken formation, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charpentier, R.R.; Krystinik, K.B.

    1984-04-01

    A model was developed for oil generation in the Devonian and Mississippian Bakken Formation, which has been proposed as the main hydrocarbon source rock within the Williston basin. The data consisted of formation temperatures and of density, neutron-porosity, resistivity, and gamma-ray logs from more than 250 wells in North Dakota and Montana. The upper and the lower shale members of the Bakken Formation were studied. Regression analysis, analysis of residuals, and cluster, discriminant, and factor analyses were used in an attempt to separate depositional effects--especially variations in organic content-from maturity. Regression and analysis of residuals indicate differences both areally and between the upper and lower members. In the upper member, and less strongly in the lower member, the center of the basin differs from the basin margins in that it has extreme residuals--either high or low. Clustering and residual analyses show roughly the same areal patterns. Inverse relationships, similar to those suggested by other workers, were found between formation temperature and organic content and between density logs and organic content. Also found, though, was that the addition of other factors, such as neutron porosity, helps to indicate organic content. Preliminary results show that it may be possible to model oil generation by using statistical techniques on well-log data. In particular, the model has the potential to refine estimates of the amount of hydrocarbons generated by the Bakken Formation in the Williston basin.

  8. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-ATVM-Ford

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORD By upgrading 13 facilities across 6 states, Ford was able to meet consumer demand for better fuel e ciency in more than a dozen popular vehicles. OWNER Ford Motor Company LOCATIONS Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Ohio LOAN AMOUNT $5.9 Billion ISSUANCE DATE September 2009 PERMANENT U.S. JOBS SUPPORTED 33,000 GASOLINE SAVED 268,000,000 Gallons Annually CLIMATE BENEFIT 2,380,000 Metric Tons of C0 2 Prevented Annually INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY

  9. Subtask1.10 – CO2 storage and enhanced bakken recovery research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, James

    2014-05-31

    Small improvements in productivity could increase technically recoverable oil in the Bakken Petroleum System by billions of barrels. The use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in tight oil reservoirs is a relatively new concept. The large-scale injection of CO2 into the Bakken would also result in the geological storage of significant amounts of CO2. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has conducted laboratory and modeling activities to examine the potential for CO2 storage and EOR in the Bakken. Specific activities included the characterization and subsequent modeling of North Dakota study areas as well as dynamic predictive simulations of possible CO2 injection schemes to predict the potential CO2 storage and EOR in those areas. Laboratory studies to evaluate the ability of CO2 to remove hydrocarbons from Bakken rocks and determine minimum miscibility pressures for Bakken oil samples were conducted. Data from a CO2 injection test conducted in the Elm Coulee area of Montana in 2009 were evaluated with an eye toward the possible application of knowledge gained to future injection tests in other areas. A first-order estimation of potential CO2 storage capacity in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota was also conducted. Key findings of the program are as follows. The results of the research activities suggest that CO2 may be effective in enhancing the productivity of oil from the Bakken and that the Bakken may hold the ability to geologically store between 120 Mt and 3.2 Gt of CO2. However, there are no clear-cut answers regarding the most effective approach for using CO2 to improve oil productivity or the storage capacity of the Bakken. The results underscore the notion that an unconventional resource will likely require unconventional methods of both assessment and implementation when it comes to the injection of CO

  10. Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

    2012-07-31

    Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

  11. Technology-Based Oil and Natural Gas Plays: Shale Shock! Could There Be Billions in the Bakken?

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This report presents information about the Bakken Formation of the Williston Basin: its location, production, geology, resources, proved reserves, and the technology being used for development. This is the first in a series intending to share information about technology-based oil and natural gas plays.

  12. Road to Fuel Savings: Ford, Magna Partnership Help Vehicles Shed the Pounds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Ford, Magna Partnership Help Vehicles Shed the Pounds Road to Fuel Savings: Ford, Magna Partnership Help Vehicles Shed the Pounds August 20, 2014 - 1:08pm Addthis Pictured here is Ford's Lightweight Concept vehicle, a prototype that is nearly 25 percent lighter than an equivalent conventional vehicle. Using a mix of advanced materials, Ford -- in partnership with Magna International -- shaved about 800 pounds off the baseline vehicle, making a midsize sedan roughly the

  13. GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Proposed Product Cost for Advanced Technology Vehicles" GM-Ford-Chrysler: ATV Proposed Product Costs (143.54 KB) More Documents & Publications GM-Ford-Chrysler: Issues Related to Vehicle Eligibility GM-Ford-Chrysler: IFR Consolidated Application Feature

  14. Statistical model for source rock maturity and organic richness using well-log data, Bakken Formation, Williston basin, United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. Principal components, cluster, and discriminant analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. Present-day total organic carbon values are high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin, and low in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using a regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, hydrocarbon maturity effects were partially separated from depositional effects. These analyses suggest that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the limits of the Bakken and increased to a high in northeastern Montana. The pre-maturation distribution of total organic carbon and the present-day total organic carbon distribution, as determined by statistical analyses of well-log data, agree with the results of geochemical analyses. The distributions can be explained by a relatively simple depositional pattern and thermal history for the Bakken. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  15. A Proposed New Classification Of The Granites Of Egypt | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    classified according to relative age (old and younger granites), dominant colour (grey, red and pink granites), type localities (Shaitian, Gattarian and Gharib granites) or their...

  16. Status of LLNL granite projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramspott, L.D.

    1980-12-31

    The status of LLNL Projects dealing with nuclear waste disposal in granitic rocks is reviewed. This review covers work done subsequent to the June 1979 Workshop on Thermomechanical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository and is prepared for the July 1980 Workshop on Thermomechanical-Hydrochemical Modeling for a Hardrock Waste Repository. Topics reviewed include laboratory determination of thermal, mechanical, and transport properties of rocks at conditions simulating a deep geologic repository, and field testing at the Climax granitic stock at the USDOE Nevada Test Site.

  17. EERE Success Story-Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research at ORNL | Department of Energy Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber Research at ORNL EERE Success Story-Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber Research at ORNL May 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis EERE provided funding to Dow Chemical, Ford Motor Company, and ORNL to demonstrate a novel polymer fiber material and production process technology. These funds support EERE's strategy of investing in emerging technologies that create high-quality, domestic manufacturing jobs

  18. Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8&v Mr. Thomas Mahl Granite City Steel Company 20th and State Streets Granite City, IL 62040 Dear Mr. Mahl: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has ...

  19. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control Thermoelectric HVAC for Light-Duty Vehicle Applications Automotive Thermoelectric Generators ...

  20. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi Fleet PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford CMAX Energi (a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle).

  1. evan granite | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evan granite evan-granite.png Evan Granite is an NETL research chemical engineer who serves as the technical portfolio lead for NETL's in-house research on rare earth detection and recovery. Rare earth elements are used in many consumer products such as fluorescent lighting, computers, and cell phones, as well as being important components of catalysts, sorbents, magnets, and defense systems. Granite's research projects encompass the capture of mercury, arsenic, selenium, and phosphorus from

  2. A resource evaluation of the Bakken Formation (Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian) continuous oil accumulation, Williston Basin, North Dakota and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Upper Devonian and Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation in the United States portion of the Williston Basin is both the source and the reservoir for a continuous oil accumulation -- in effect a single very large field -- underlying approximately 17,800 mi{sup 2} (46,100 km{sup 2}) of North Dakota and Montana. Within this area, the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation is not significantly influenced by the water column and cannot be analyzed in terms of conventional, discrete fields. Rather, the continuous accumulation can be envisioned as a collection of oil-charged cells, virtually all of which are capable of producing some oil, but which vary significantly in their production characteristics. Better well-performance statistics are linked regionally to higher levels of thermal maturity and to lower levels of reservoir heterogeneity. Although portions of the Bakken Formation continuous oil accumulation have reached a mature stage of development, the accumulation as a whole is far from depleted.

  3. SUBTASK 1.7 EVALUATION OF KEY FACTORS AFFECTING SUCCESSFUL OIL PRODUCTION IN THE BAKKEN FORMATION, NORTH DAKOTA PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren D. Schmidt; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen; Damion J. Knudsen; John A. Harju; Edward N. Steadman

    2011-10-31

    Production from the Bakken and Three Forks Formations continues to trend upward as forecasts predict significant production of oil from unconventional resources nationwide. As the U.S. Geological Survey reevaluates the 3.65 billion bbl technically recoverable estimate of 2008, technological advancements continue to unlock greater unconventional oil resources, and new discoveries continue within North Dakota. It is expected that the play will continue to expand to the southwest, newly develop in the northeastern and northwestern corners of the basin in North Dakota, and fully develop in between. Although not all wells are economical, the economic success rate has been near 75% with more than 90% of wells finding oil. Currently, only about 15% of the play has been drilled, and recovery rates are less than 5%, providing a significant future of wells to be drilled and untouched hydrocarbons to be pursued through improved stimulation practices or enhanced oil recovery. This study provides the technical characterizations that are necessary to improve knowledge, provide characterization, validate generalizations, and provide insight relative to hydrocarbon recovery in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations. Oil-saturated rock charged from the Bakken shales and prospective Three Forks can be produced given appropriate stimulation treatments. Highly concentrated fracture stimulations with ceramic- and sand-based proppants appear to be providing the best success for areas outside the Parshall and Sanish Fields. Targeting of specific lithologies can influence production from both natural and induced fracture conductivity. Porosity and permeability are low, but various lithofacies units within the formation are highly saturated and, when targeted with appropriate technology, release highly economical quantities of hydrocarbons.

  4. A chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation from the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K. ); Gosnold, W.D. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. The modeling incorporates kinetic methods to simulate chemical reactions and 1-dimensional conductive heat flow models to simulate thermal histories of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation source rock. We developed thermal histories of the source rock for 53 wells in the basin using stratigraphic and heat flow data obtained by the University of North Dakota. Chemical kinetics for hydrocarbon generation, determined from Pyromat pyrolysis, were, then used with the diennal histories to calculate the present day value of the Rock-Eval T[sub max] for each well. The calculated Rock-Eval T[sub max] values agreed with measured values within amounts attributable to uncertainties in the chemical kinetics and the heat flow. These optimized thermal histories were then used with a more detailed chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, modified from a model developed for the Cretaceous La Luna shale, to simulate pore pressure development and detailed aspects of the hydrocarbon chemistry. When compared to values estimated from sonic logs, the pore pressure calculation underestimates the role of hydrocarbon generation and overestimates the role of compaction disequilibrium, but it matches well the general areal extent of pore pressures of 0.7 times lithostatic and higher. The simulated chemistry agrees very well with measured values of HI, PI, H/C atomic ratio of the kerogen, and Rock-Eval S1. The model is not as successful in simulating the amount of extracted bitumen and its saturate content, suggesting that detailed hydrous pyrolysis experiments will probably be needed to further refine the chemical model.

  5. A chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation from the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.J.; Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.; Gosnold, W.D.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes a model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin. The modeling incorporates kinetic methods to simulate chemical reactions and 1-dimensional conductive heat flow models to simulate thermal histories of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation source rock. We developed thermal histories of the source rock for 53 wells in the basin using stratigraphic and heat flow data obtained by the University of North Dakota. Chemical kinetics for hydrocarbon generation, determined from Pyromat pyrolysis, were, then used with the diennal histories to calculate the present day value of the Rock-Eval T{sub max} for each well. The calculated Rock-Eval T{sub max} values agreed with measured values within amounts attributable to uncertainties in the chemical kinetics and the heat flow. These optimized thermal histories were then used with a more detailed chemical kinetic model of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion, modified from a model developed for the Cretaceous La Luna shale, to simulate pore pressure development and detailed aspects of the hydrocarbon chemistry. When compared to values estimated from sonic logs, the pore pressure calculation underestimates the role of hydrocarbon generation and overestimates the role of compaction disequilibrium, but it matches well the general areal extent of pore pressures of 0.7 times lithostatic and higher. The simulated chemistry agrees very well with measured values of HI, PI, H/C atomic ratio of the kerogen, and Rock-Eval S1. The model is not as successful in simulating the amount of extracted bitumen and its saturate content, suggesting that detailed hydrous pyrolysis experiments will probably be needed to further refine the chemical model.

  6. AVTA: Ford Escape PHEV Advanced Research Vehicle 2010 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a plug-in hybrid electric Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  7. Fuel-tolerance tests with the Ford PROCO engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choma, M.A.; Havstad, P.H.; Simko, A.O.; Stockhausen, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of fuel tolerance tests were conducted utilizing Ford's PROCO engine, a direct fuel injection stratified charge engine developed for light duty vehicles. These engine tests were run on the dynamometer and in vehicles. Data indicate an 89 RON octane requirement, relatively low sensitivity to volatility characteristics and good fuel economy, emission control and operability on a certain range of petroleum fuel and alcohol mixes including 100% methanol. Fuels such as JP-4 and Diesel fuel are not at present suitable for this engine. There were no engine modifications tested that might improve the match between the engine and a particular fuel. The 100% methanol test was conducted with a modified fuel injection pump. Durability aspects including compatibility of various fuels with the materials in the fuel system were not addressed.

  8. Granite State Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Electric Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Granite State Electric Co Place: New York Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Reference Page: www.whitehouse.govblog...

  9. US Energy Secretary Chu Announces Finalized $5.9 Billion Loan for Ford

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motor Company | Department of Energy Finalized $5.9 Billion Loan for Ford Motor Company US Energy Secretary Chu Announces Finalized $5.9 Billion Loan for Ford Motor Company September 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Today, Secretary Steven Chu announced that the Department of Energy has closed on its loan offer of $5.9 billion to Ford Motor Company to transform factories across Illinois, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio to produce more fuel efficient models. The loan is part

  10. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  11. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-05-11

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  12. Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Energy Systems

    2010-11-23

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  13. Developing an oil generation model for resource assessment of the Bakken Formation, US portion of the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using well-log data. Principal components analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis were used on bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. These analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. The pattern of present-day total organic carbon (TOC) is high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin. Low values of TOC occur in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using the regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, it is possible to separate maturity effects from those of original deposition. These analyses reveal that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the shoreline and increased offshore to a high in northeast Montana. The pre-maturation and present-day TOC distributions derived using statistical analyses and well-log data can easily be explained by the depositional pattern and thermal history that would be expected in this basin, and by geochemical analyses. 9 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

  15. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite2_FUSRAP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Illinois Granite City, Illinois Site FUSRAP Site Granite Map Background-The Granite City Site, located in Granite City, Illinois, was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-In the late 1950s and early 1960s, two federal government-owned betatron particle accelerators were used at the

  17. Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production increases over the past several years in the Bakken, Permian Basin, and Eagle Ford formations accounted for almost all of crude oil production growth in the United ...

  18. Ford Van Dyke: Compressed Air Management Program Leads to Improvements that Reduce Energy Consumption at an Automotive Transmission Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    Staff at the Ford Van Dyke Transmission Plant in Sterling Heights, Michigan, have increased the efficiency of the plant’s compressed air system to enhance its performance while saving energy and improving production.

  19. FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAB B 02-12-08 Article VI Briefing Interagency Ford Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States and Article VI: A Record of Accomplishment February 6, 2008 Introduction YOUR PRESENTERS TODAY: * THOMAS P. D'AGOSTINO, Administrator, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy * WILLIAM H. TOBEY, Deputy Administrator for Nuclear Nonproliferation, NNSA * DR. CHRISTOPHER A. FORD, United States Special Representative for Nuclear Nonproliferation WHAT IS NNSA? * Semi-autonomous agency within Energy Department responsible, inter alia, for developing, manufacturing,

  1. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-WIND-Granite

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GRANITE RELIABLE As one of the first U.S. projects to use larger, more e cient turbines, Granite Reliable is a pioneering American wind farm. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNERS BAIF Granite Holdings & Freshet Wind Energy LOCATION Coos County, New Hampshire LOAN AMOUNT $169 Million ISSUANCE DATE September 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 99 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 224,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 130,000 Metric Tons of CO 2 Prevented Annually

  2. Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Granite Creek Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  3. Granite County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Granite County, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.3374643, -113.4647823 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  4. Integration of Rooftop Photovoltaic Systems in St. Paul Ford Site's Redevelopment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olis, D.; Mosey, G.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to estimate how much electricity the redeveloped Ford Motor Company assembly plant site in St. Paul, Minnesota, might consume under different development scenarios and how much rooftop photovoltaic (PV) generation might be possible at the site. Because the current development scenarios are high-level, preliminary sketches that describe mixes of residential, retail, commercial, and industrial spaces, electricity consumption and available rooftop area for PV under each scenario can only be grossly estimated. These results are only indicative and should be used for estimating purposes only and to help inform development goals and requirements moving forward.

  5. Plane shock wave studies of Westerly granite and Nugget sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, D.B.; Anderson, G.D.

    1980-12-01

    Plane shock wave experiments were performed by using a light-gas gun on dry and water-saturated Westerly granite and dry Nugget sandstone. Changes in the slopes of the shock velocity versus particle velocity curves at 2 to 3 GPa and 1 to 2 GPa for dry granite and for dry sandstone, respectively, are attributed to the onset of pore collapse. However, there is little apparent loss of shear strength in either dry rock over the stress range of the experiments (i.e., 9.3 GPa in Westerly granite and 9.2 GPa in Nugget sandstone). Agreement between the shock wave data and quasistatic, uniaxial strain data for the dry rock implies the absence of rate-dependence in uniaxial strain. The shock data on saturated granite agree well with those for dry granite, thus suggesting there was no loss in shear strength as a result of pore pressure buildup.

  6. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite ...

  7. Mike Ford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mike lives in Knoxville and is a technical sales representative for the Garland Company, which is a manufacturer of high-performance roofing and building envelope materials. Prior to Garland he...

  8. EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 01: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH EA-1801: Granite Reliable Power Wind Park Project in Coos County, NH June 25, 2010 EA-1801: Final Environmental Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire July 23, 2010 EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact Granite Reliable Power Wind Project, Coos County, New Hampshire

  9. Granite State Electric Co (New Hampshire) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (New Hampshire) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Granite State Electric Co (Liberty Utilities) Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-375-7413 Website: www.libertyutilities.c...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City IL Site - IL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Contamination from rubbing off of oxidized uranium during handling. IL.28-3 IL.28-5 ... Aerial photograph of the Granite City, Illinois, Site IL.28-1 - DOE Memo; Wagoner to Price...

  11. 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 4757 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), including testing HEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2010 Ford Fusion HEV (VIN: 3FADP0L34AR144757). Battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Off-shelf portion of Harris delta: a reexamination of downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, M.

    1989-03-01

    This study relates the Eagle Ford-equivalent Harris delta north of the Stuart City shelf edge with the downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford section south of that shelf edge. Together, they comprised one large deltaic complex that divided into two major lobes at an avulsion site near Anderson County. One lobe prograded southwestward toward Kurten field in Brazos County; the other (now partly eroded) prograded southeastward beside the low-lying Sabine (uplift) landmass into Polk County. The Polk County lobe crossed the Stuart City shelf edge in the Seven Oaks-Hortense field area and continued to prograde southward into deeper and higher energy water. Such an environment caused this off-shelf Harris delta to oversteepen, resulting in frequent slumps and gravity flows that deposited debris-flow and turbidite sands along with predominantly fine-grained prodelta sediments. More familiar deltaic facies (outer fringe) are present in the uppermost section. Numerous structural and stratigraphic maps and cross sections illustrate the progradation of the downdip Harris delta and its features. The progradation was arrested for a time by deeper water at the older and more precipitous Sligo shelf edge. This progradational hiatus is recorded by a relatively strong reflection that separates two seismic sequences. The younger, onlapping sequence appears to represent continued Harris delta sedimentation. Among the interesting features mapped seismically and/or geologically are mounded reflections that represent the largest slumping events, thickness anomalies associated with the carbonate substrate, and erosional( ) channels at the section top. These off-shelf Harris delta deposits appear to interfinger laterally with a genetically different eastern (Tuscaloosa ) sequence in Tyler and Jasper Counties.

  13. Off-shelf portion of Harris delta: Reexamination of downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, M.H. ); Van Siclen, D.C.; Sheriff, R.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study related the Eagle Ford equivalent Harris delta north of the Stuart City shelf edge with downdip Woodbine-Eagle Ford section south of that shelf edge. Together, they comprised one large deltaic complex that divided into two major lobes at an avulsion site near Anderson County, Texas. One lobe prograded southwestward toward Kurten field in Brazos County, the other (now partly eroded) prograded southeastward beside the low-lying Sabine (uplift) landmass into Polk County. The Polk County lobe crossed the Stuart City shelf edge in the Seven Oaks-Hortense field area, and continued to prograde southward into deeper and higher energy water. Such an environment caused this off-shelf Harris delta to oversteepen, resulting in frequent slumps and gravity flows that deposited debris-flow and turbidite sands along with predominantly fine-grained prodelta sediments. More familiar deltaic facies (outer fringe) are present in the uppermost section. Numerous structural and stratigraphic maps and cross sections illustrate the progradation of the downdip Harris delta and its features. The progradation was arrested for a time by deeper water at the older and more precipitous Sligo shelf edge. This progradational hiatus is recorded by a relatively strong reflection that separates two seismic sequences. The younger onlapping sequence appears to represent continued Harris delta sedimentation. among the interesting features mapped seismically and/or geologically are: mounded reflections that represent the largest slumping events, thickness anomalies associated with the carbonate substrate, and erosional( ) channels at the section top. These off-shelf Harris delta deposits appear to interfinger laterally with a genetically different eastern (Tuscaloosa ) sequence in Tyler and Jasper Counties.

  14. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market Demonstration and Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This project is in support of our national goal to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. By supporting efforts that contribute toward the successful mass production of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, our nation’s transportation-related fuel consumption can be offset with energy from the grid. Over four and a half years ago, when this project was originally initiated, plug-in electric vehicles were not readily available in the mass marketplace. Through the creation of a 21 unit plug-in hybrid vehicle fleet, this program was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and to help build cross-industry familiarity with the technology and interface of this technology with the grid. Ford Escape PHEV Demonstration Fleet 3 March 26, 2014 Since then, however, plug-in vehicles have become increasingly more commonplace in the market. Ford, itself, now offers an all-electric vehicle and two plug-in hybrid vehicles in North America and has announced a third plug-in vehicle offering for Europe. Lessons learned from this project have helped in these production vehicle launches and are mentioned throughout this report. While the technology of plugging in a vehicle to charge a high voltage battery with energy from the grid is now in production, the ability for vehicle-to-grid or bi-directional energy flow was farther away than originally expected. Several technical, regulatory and potential safety issues prevented progressing the vehicle-to-grid energy flow (V2G) demonstration and, after a review with the DOE, V2G was removed from this demonstration project. Also proving challenging were communications between a plug-in vehicle and the grid or smart meter. While this project successfully demonstrated the vehicle to smart meter interface, cross-industry and regulatory work is still needed to define the vehicle-to-grid communication interface.

  15. Radionuclide Transport in Fracture-Granite Interface Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Mori, A

    2007-09-12

    In situ radionuclide migration experiments, followed by excavation and sample characterization, were conducted in a water-conducting shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland to study diffusion paths of radionuclides in fractured granite. In this work, we employed a micro-scale mapping technique that interfaces laser ablation sampling with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA/ICP-MS) to measure the fine-scale (micron-range) distribution of actinides ({sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np) in the fracture-granite interface zones. Long-lived {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 237}Np were detected in flow channels, as well as in the adjacent rock matrix, using the sensitive, feature-based mapping of the LA/ICP-MS technique. The injected sorbing actinides are mainly located within the advective flowing fractures and the immediately adjacent regions. The water-conducting fracture studied in this work is bounded on one side by mylonite and the other by granitic matrix regions. These actinides did not penetrate into the mylonite side as much as the relatively higher-porosity granite matrix, most likely due to the low porosity, hydraulic conductivity, and diffusivity of the fracture wall (a thickness of about 0.4 mm separates the mylonite region from the fracture) and the mylonite region itself. Overall, the maximum penetration depth detected with this technique for the more diffusive {sup 237}Np over the field experimental time scale of about 60 days was about 10 mm in the granitic matrix, illustrating the importance of matrix diffusion in retarding radionuclide transport from the advective fractures. Laboratory tests and numerical modeling of radionuclide diffusion into granitic matrix was conducted to complement and help interpret the field results. Measured apparent diffusivity of multiple tracers in granite provided consistent predictions for radionuclide transport in the fractured granitic rock.

  16. Results of the radiological survey at the Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaja, R.E.; Cottrell, W.D.

    1990-07-01

    In the late 1950s and early 1960s, uranium ingots were x-rayed for the Atomic Energy Commission at the South Plant facility of the Granite City Steel Company, Granite City, Illinois. The x-ray equipment is still housed in a building on the southern end of the property. At the time of the survey, neither the equipment nor the building had been used for some time. It is the policy of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to verify that such sites are in compliance with current federal guidelines. Because documentation establishing the current radiological condition of the property is unavailable, a radiological survey was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1989. The survey included: measurement of gamma exposure rates both indoors and outdoors; collection and radionuclide analysis of soil and debris samples; and measurements to determine alpha and beta-gamma surface contamination. 3 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2005 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2005 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, the age-1 and older fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Age-0 Chinook salmon are more difficult to distinguish between wild and non-adclipped hatchery fish and therefore classified as unknown rearing. The total annual hatchery spring/summer Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 0.34 times greater in 2005 than in 2004. The wild spring/summer Chinook catch was 0.34 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 0.67 times less than in 2004. Wild steelhead trout catch was 0.72 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 1,152 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2005, the Snake River trap captured 219 hatchery and 44 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 110 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 6 and were terminated on June 3. The trap was out of operation for a total of one day due to heavy debris. FPC requested that the trap be restarted on June 15 through June 22 to collect and PIT tag age-0 Chinook salmon. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 1.06 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.26 times greater than in 2004. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2005 was 1.41 times greater and wild steelhead trout collection was 1.27 times greater than the previous year. Trap operations

  18. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veenstra, Mike; Purewal, Justin; Xu, Chunchuan; Yang, Jun; Blaser, Rachel; Sudik, Andrea; Siegel, Don; Ming, Yang; Liu, Dong'an; Chi, Hang; Gaab, Manuela; Arnold, Lena; Muller, Ulrich

    2015-06-30

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically on the development of low-cost, on-board hydrogen storage technologies capable of achieving high energy densities and fast kinetics for hydrogen uptake and release. As present-day technologies -- which rely on physical storage methods such as compressed hydrogen -- are incapable of attaining established Department of Energy (DOE) targets, development of materials-based approaches for storing hydrogen have garnered increasing attention. Material-based storage technologies have potential to store hydrogen beyond twice the density of liquid hydrogen. To hasten development of these ‘hydride’ materials, the DOE previously established three centers of excellence for materials storage R&D associated with the key classes of materials: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen, and adsorbents. While these centers made progress in identifying new storage materials, the challenges associated with the engineering of the system around a candidate storage material are in need of further advancement. In 2009 the DOE established the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence with the objective of developing innovative engineering concepts for materials-based hydrogen storage systems. As a partner in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence, the Ford-UM-BASF team conducted a multi-faceted research program that addresses key engineering challenges associated with the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. First, we developed a novel framework that allowed for a material-based hydrogen storage system to be modeled and operated within a virtual fuel cell vehicle. This effort resulted in the ability to assess dynamic operating parameters and interactions between the storage system and fuel cell power plant, including the evaluation of performance throughout various drive cycles. Second, we engaged in cost modeling of various incarnations of the storage systems. This analysis

  19. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon smolts O. nerka during the 2002 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2002 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 11.4 times greater in 2002 than in 2001. The wild Chinook catch was 15.5 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 2.9 times greater than in 2001. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.8 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 3,996 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2002, the Snake River trap captured 69 hatchery and 235 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 114 hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant increase in catch in 2002 was due to a 3.1 fold increase in hatchery Chinook production and a more normal spring runoff. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on June 7. The trap was out of operation for a total of four days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 4.2 times greater and wild Chinook salmon catch was 2.4 times greater than in 2001. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the 2001 numbers. Wild steelhead trout collection in 2002 was 81% of the previous year's catch. Trap operations began on March 10 and were terminated on May 29 due to high flows. The trap was out of operation for four days due to high flow or debris. The increase

  20. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2004 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2004 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 1.1 times greater in 2004 than in 2003. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times greater than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.2 times greater than in 2003. Wild steelhead trout catch was 1.6 times greater than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 978 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2004, the Snake River trap captured 23 hatchery and 18 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 60 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on June 4. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 10.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 19.0% less than in 2003. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2004 was 20.0% less and wild steelhead trout collection was 22.3% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 7 and were terminated on May 28 due to high flows. There were two days when the trap was taken out of service because wild Chinook catch was very low, hatchery Chinook catch was very high, and the weekly quota of PIT tagged hatchery Chinook had been met. Travel time (d) and migration rate (km

  1. Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : .' . .Y-" ._ ; / Bechfel / / Interoffice Memorandum TO File Subject Granite City PRAR Data Copies to M. Kaye B. Stanley J. Wood The fo$lowing data packages contain the post-remedial action sampling data, waste management data, and health and safety data that were reported in the Granite City PRAR. File No. Date Frolll Of At I UOLJU 7330 September 9, 1993 S. B. Hill FUSRAP E&T .' Oak Ridge Ext. 6-5211 D-15056 6-23-93 Direct and transferable contamination survey of betatron room with

  2. Smolt Monitoring at the Head of Lower Granite Reservoir and Lower Granite Dam, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Putnam, Scott A.

    2009-02-18

    This project monitored the daily passage of Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, steelhead trout O. mykiss, and sockeye salmon O. nerka smolts during the 2003 spring out-migration at migrant traps on the Snake River and Salmon River. In 2003 fish management agencies released significant numbers of hatchery Chinook salmon and steelhead trout above Lower Granite Dam that were not marked with a fin clip or coded-wire tag. Generally, these fish were distinguishable from wild fish by the occurrence of fin erosion. Total annual hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was 2.1 times less in 2003 than in 2002. The wild Chinook catch was 1.1 times less than the previous year. Hatchery steelhead trout catch was 1.7 times less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout catch was 2.1 times less than the previous year. The Snake River trap collected 579 age-0 Chinook salmon of unknown rearing. During 2003, the Snake River trap captured five hatchery and 13 wild/natural sockeye salmon and 36 coho salmon O. kisutch of unknown rearing. Differences in trap catch between years are due to fluctuations not only in smolt production, but also differences in trap efficiency and duration of trap operation associated with flow. The significant differences in catch between 2003 and the previous year were due mainly to low flows during much of the trapping season and then very high flows at the end of the season, which terminated the trapping season 12 days earlier than in 2002. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 27. The trap was out of operation for a total of zero days due to mechanical failure or debris. Hatchery Chinook salmon catch at the Salmon River trap was 16.8% less and wild Chinook salmon catch was 1.7 times greater than in 2002. The hatchery steelhead trout collection in 2003 was 5.6% less than in 2002. Wild steelhead trout collection was 19.2% less than the previous year. Trap operations began on March 9 and were terminated on May 24 due to high

  3. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Don Karner; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen–50% CNG fuel.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend, Ford F-150 -- Operating Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, James Edward

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service’s Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  5. U. S. Energy Information Administration | Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 2,400 2,800 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 Oil production thousand barrels/day 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 18,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 Natural gas production million cubic feet/day 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 2,000 Bakken Eagle Ford Haynesville Marcellus Niobrara Permian Utica September-2015 September-2016 New-well oil production per rig

  6. Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

  7. Laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured Climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Failor, R.; Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Vandergraaf, T.

    1982-06-01

    This report documents our laboratory studies of radionuclide transport in fractured granite cores. To simulate natural conditions, our laboratory studies used naturally fractured cores and natural ground water from the Climax Granite Stock at the Nevada Test Site. For comparison, additional tests used artificially fractured granite cores or distilled water. Relative to the flow of tritiated water, {sup 85}Sr and /sup 95m/Tc showed little or no retardation, whereas {sup 137}Cs was retarded. After the transport runs the cores retained varying amounts of the injected radionuclides along the fracture. Autoradiography revealed some correlation between sorption and the fracture fill material. Strontium and cesium retention increased when the change was made from natural ground water to distilled water. Artificial fractures retained less {sup 137}Cs than most natural fractures. Estimated fracture apertures from 18 to 60 {mu}m and hydraulic conductivities from 1.7 to 26 x 10{sup -3} m/s were calculated from the core measurements.

  8. Table 2. U.S. tight oil plays: production and proved reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Basin","Play","State(s)","Production","Reserves" "Williston","Bakken","ND, MT, SD",270,4844,387,5972,1128 "Western Gulf","Eagle Ford","TX",351,4177,497,5172,995 "Permian","Bo...

  9. Shear induced permeability test: Stripa Granite X-ray CT files and explanation

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-01-21

    This folder contains X-ray CT images and an explanation related to the shear induced permeability testing of Stripa granite

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Granite City Army Depot - IL 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GRANITE CITY ARMY DEPOT ( IL.0-02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Granite City , Illinois IL.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.0-02-1 Site Operations: Site was used for storage of GSA thorium residues until circa 1964. IL.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD IL.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive

  11. Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

  12. Shear induced permeability test: Stripa Granite Temperature Pressure and Displacement Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-06-21

    Spreadsheet containing the raw measured data, calibrated data, and brief explanation of data for Test1 Stripa Granite Geomechanical/Geochemical Test. Stress on fracture ~20.7 MPa.

  13. Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba

    2011-12-26

    One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

  14. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Low-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended hydrogen fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents results of 16,942 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 30% hydrogen/70% CNG fuel.

  15. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: High-Percentage Hydrogen/CNG Blend Ford F-150 Operating Summary - January 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karner, D.; Francfort, J.E.

    2003-01-22

    Over the past two years, Arizona Public Service, a subsidiary of Pinnacle West Capital Corporation, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, tested four gaseous fuel vehicles as part of its alternative fueled vehicle fleet. One vehicle operated initially using compressed natural gas (CNG) and later a blend of CNG and hydrogen. Of the other three vehicles, one was fueled with pure hydrogen and two were fueled with a blend of CNG and hydrogen. The three blended-fuel vehicles were originally equipped with either factory CNG engines or factory gasoline engines that were converted to run CNG fuel. The vehicles were variously modified to operate on blended fuel and were tested using 15 to 50% blends of hydrogen (by volume). The pure-hydrogen-fueled vehicle was converted from gasoline fuel to operate on 100% hydrogen. All vehicles were fueled from the Arizona Public Service's Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant, which was developed to dispense gaseous fuels, including CNG, blends of CNG and hydrogen, and pure hydrogen with up to 99.9999% purity. The primary objective of the test was to evaluate the safety and reliability of operating vehicles on hydrogen and blended fuel, and the interface between the vehicles and the hydrogen fueling infrastructure. A secondary objective was to quantify vehicle emissions, cost, and performance. Over a total of 40,000 fleet test miles, no safety issues were found. Also, significant reductions in emissions were achieved by adding hydrogen to the fuel. This report presents the results of 4,695 miles of testing for one of the blended fuel vehicles, a Ford F-150 pickup truck, operating on up to 50% hydrogen-50% CNG fuel.

  16. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W.

    2014-09-03

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%–63% and 46%–54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50–2.59 and 2.45–2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35–5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32–5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%–0.34% and 0.39%– 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m{sup 2}/g–21.93 m{sup 2}/g and 25.76 m{sup 2}/g–26.83 m{sup 2}/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  17. Granite disposal of U.S. high-level radioactive waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Mariner, Paul E.; Lee, Joon H.; Hardin, Ernest L.; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Francis D.; Price, Ronald H.; Lord, Anna Snider

    2011-08-01

    This report evaluates the feasibility of disposing U.S. high-level radioactive waste in granite several hundred meters below the surface of the earth. The U.S. has many granite formations with positive attributes for permanent disposal. Similar crystalline formations have been extensively studied by international programs, two of which, in Sweden and Finland, are the host rocks of submitted or imminent repository license applications. This report is enabled by the advanced work of the international community to establish functional and operational requirements for disposal of a range of waste forms in granite media. In this report we develop scoping performance analyses, based on the applicable features, events, and processes (FEPs) identified by international investigators, to support generic conclusions regarding post-closure safety. Unlike the safety analyses for disposal in salt, shale/clay, or deep boreholes, the safety analysis for a mined granite repository depends largely on waste package preservation. In crystalline rock, waste packages are preserved by the high mechanical stability of the excavations, the diffusive barrier of the buffer, and favorable chemical conditions. The buffer is preserved by low groundwater fluxes, favorable chemical conditions, backfill, and the rigid confines of the host rock. An added advantage of a mined granite repository is that waste packages would be fairly easy to retrieve, should retrievability be an important objective. The results of the safety analyses performed in this study are consistent with the results of comprehensive safety assessments performed for sites in Sweden, Finland, and Canada. They indicate that a granite repository would satisfy established safety criteria and suggest that a small number of FEPs would largely control the release and transport of radionuclides. In the event the U.S. decides to pursue a potential repository in granite, a detailed evaluation of these FEPs would be needed to inform site

  18. Hydrothermally altered and fractured granite as an HDR reservoir in the EPS-1 borehole, Alsace,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genter, A.; Traineau, H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the European Hot Dry Rocks Project, a second exploration borehole, EPS-1, has been cored to a depth of 2227 m at Soultz-sous-Forets (France). The target was a granite beginning at 1417 m depth, overlain by post-Paleozoic sedimentary cover. Structural analysis and petrographic examination of the 800-m porphyritic granite core, have shown that this rock has undergone several periods of hydrothermal alteration and fracturing. More than 3000 natural structures were recorded, whose distribution pattern shows clusters where low-density fracture zones (less than 1 per meter) alternate with zones of high fracture density (more than 20 per meter). Vein alteration, ascribed to paleohydrothermal systems, developed within the hydrothermally altered and highly fractured zones, transforming primary biotite and plagioclase into clay minerals. One of these zones at 2.2 km depth produced a hot-water outflow during coring, indicating the existence of a hydrothermal reservoir. Its permeability is provided by the fracture network and by secondary porosity of the granitic matrix resulting from vein alteration. This dual porosity in the HDR granite reservoir must be taken into account in the design of the heat exchanger, both for modeling the water-rock interactions and for hydraulic testing.

  19. Chemical migration by contact metamorphism between granite and silt/carbonate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Papike, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of trace element signatures between the metamorphosed and unmetamorphosed samples from granite-silt/carbonate system suggests that some elements do migrate during contact metamorphism. The relative degree of migration varies depending on the element. The evidence of chemical migration in silt and carbonate is convincing on a several-meter scale.

  20. Pyrolysis kinetics for the Bakken shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    Pyrolysis kinetics are reported and compared for rapid open pyrolysis experiments: Py-TG-FTIR, Py-FID, and Py-MS. Where the type of information obtained overlapped, the results were very similar. The principal activation energy for total hydrocarbon generation using a parallel reaction model is 52 kcal/mol. As with most petroleum source rocks, carbon dioxide generation tends to lead oil formation while ethene and methane generation tend to lag oil generation. The midpoint of oil generation for a geological heating rate of 3 {degrees}C/m.y. is predicted to be between 130 and 140{degrees}C. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. STEVE SHEPHERD Bakken Workforce Development Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    isolated and have experienced persistent and historical poverty and chronic unemployment. ... the reservations in western North Dakota, and work toward breaking the cycle of poverty. ...

  2. Ford Cleveland: Inside-Out Analysis Identifies Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities at Metal Casting Plant; Industrial Technologies Program Metal Casting BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-09-01

    The Ford Cleveland Casting Plant used results from its plant-wide energy efficiency assessment to identify 16 energy- and cost-saving projects. These projects addressed combustion, compressed air, water, steam, motor drive, and lighting systems. When implemented, the projects should save a total of$3.28 million per year. In addition, two long-term projects were identified that together would represent another$9.5 million in cost savings.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  4. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-02-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration in spring, 1984. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week in April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Scattered descaling, where at least 10% of scales are missing from at least one side of a fish, was always more extensive than was classical descaling, ranging from 2.5 times greater for Clearwater hatchery steelhead to 6.8 times greater for Clearwater wild steelhead. Mean total length of chinook salmon yearlings was the same at all the traps, i.e., 128 mm (117 mm fork length) +- 1 mm.

  5. Uranium in granites from the Southwestern United States: actinide parent-daughter systems, sites and mobilization. First year report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silver, L T; Williams, I S; Woodhead, J A

    1980-10-01

    Some of the principal findings of the study on the Lawler Peak Granite are: the granite is dated precisely by this work at 1411 +- 3 m.y., confirming its synchroneity with a great regional terrane of granites. Uranium is presently 8-10 times crustal abundance and thorium 2-3 times in this granite. Uranium is found to be enriched in at least eight, possibly ten, primary igneous mineral species over the whole-rock values. Individual mineral species show distinct levels in, and characteristics ranges of, uranium concentration. It appears that in a uraniferous granite such as this, conventional accuracy mineral suites probably cannot account for most of the uranium in the rock, and more rare, high U-concentration phases also are present and are significant uranium hosts. It appears that at least two different geological episodes have contributed to the disturbance of the U-Th-Pb isotope systems. Studies of various sites for transient dispersal of uranium, thorium, and radiogenic lead isotopes indicate a non-uniform dispersal of these components. It appears that the bulk rock has lost at least 24 percent of its original uranium endowment, accepting limited or no radiogenic lead or thorium migration from the sample.

  6. Between-hole acoustic surveying and monitoring of a granitic rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulsson, B.N.P.; King, M.S.

    1980-02-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to present preliminary results of an acoustic monitoring study performed as part of a comprehensive rock mechanic and geophysics research program (Ref.20) associated with large-scale heater tests in an abandoned iron-ore mine in central Sweden. The investigation was performed in a fractured granitic rock mass at a sub-surface depth of 340 m, in a drift adjacent to the original iron-ore mine workings. Acoustic monitoring took place between four empty, dry, vertical boreholes of 10 m depth spaced in the vicinity of a vertical heater borehole in the floor of a drift.

  7. Light oil yield improvement project at Granite City Division Coke/By-Product Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holloran, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Light oil removal from coke oven gas is a process that has long been proven and utilized throughout many North American Coke/By-Products Plants. The procedures, processes, and equipment requirements to maximize light oil recovery at the Granite City By-Products Plant will be discussed. The Light Oil Yield Improvement Project initially began in July, 1993 and was well into the final phase by February, 1994. Problem solving techniques, along with utilizing proven theoretical recovery standards were applied in this project. Process equipment improvements and implementation of Operator/Maintenance Standard Practices resulted in an average yield increase of 0.4 Gals./NTDC by the end of 1993.

  8. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1986-08-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1985 spring outmigration at three migrant traps, one each on the Snake, Clearwater, and Salmon rivers. Yearling chinook migration rate between Salmon River release sites and the Salmon River scoop trap averaged 23 km per day, about half the migration rate for the same brand groups when migrating from the Salmon River trap to the Snake River trap (48 km/day). Average migration rates for branded chinook and steelhead between release sites and the head of Lower Granite Reservoir were both near 27 km per day. The yearling chinook migration begins in earnest when Salmon River discharge makes a significant rise in early to mid-April. Most yearling chinook pass into Lower Granite Reservoir in April followed by passage of steelhead in May. Chinook smolt recapture data from the Snake River trap suggest a strong dependence of migration rate on quantity of Snake and Salmon river discharge. The ability of the Salmon River trap to catch yearling chinook decreased as discharge increased. No correlation between discharge level and efficiency was observed at the Snake or Clearwater trap for chinook or steelhead smolts. When comparing the size of smolts in the Salmon and Clearwater rivers, the former river has smaller yearling chinook and larger hatchery and wild steelhead. Salmon River hatchery steelhead smolts in 1985 averaged 2 cm smaller than in 1983 and were much healthier than in 1983. 4 refs., 32 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buettner, Edwin W.; Nelson, V. Lance

    1990-01-01

    This project monitored the daily passage of smolts during the 1988 spring outmigration at two migrant traps; one each on the Snake and Clearwater rivers. Due to the low runoff year, chinook salmon catch at the Snake River trap was very low. Steelhead trout catch was higher than normal, probably due to trap modifications and because the trap was moved to the east side of the river. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout catch at the Clearwater River trap was similar to 1987. Total cumulative recovery of PIT tagged fish at the three dams, with PIT tag detection systems was: 55% for chinook salmon, 73% for hatchery steelhead trout, and 75% for wild steelhead trout. Travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged chinook salmon and steelhead trout, marked at the head of the reservoir, was affected by discharge. Statistical analysis showed that as discharge increased from 40 kcfs to 80 kcfs, chinook salmon travel time decreased three fold, and steelhead trout travel time decreased two fold. There was a statistical difference between estimates of travel time through Lower Granite Reservoir for PIT tagged and freeze branded steelhead trout, but not for chinook salmon. These differences may be related to the estimation techniques used for PIT tagged and freeze branded groups, rather than real differences in travel time. 10 figs, 15 tabs.

  10. Smolt Condition and Timing of Arrival at Lower Granite Reservoir, 1983-1984 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scully, Richard J.; Buettner, Edwin W.

    1985-12-01

    Hatcheries released 9.3 million chinook salmon and 6.3 million steelhead smolts and presmolts upriver from Lower Granite Reservoir for migration In spring, 1984. We operated smolt monitoring traps at Whitebird from March 14 to May 12, Snake River from March 22 to May 15 and Clearwater from March 29 to May 13. Peak passage of yearling chinook salmon occurred the third week In April at both Whitebird and Snake River traps. Passage of steelhead was still increasing when high water stopped trapping in mid-May. Median migration rates for branded chinook salmon between release sites and Whitebird were 3, 17 and 15 miles/day for Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat smolts, respectively, an average of 11.6 miles/day. Average migration rate for these three groups between Whitebird and Snake River trap was 28 miles/day. Average migration rate between release sites and Snake River (the head of Lower Granite Reservoir) was 13.2 miles/day and from that point on through the reservoir to the dam, 1.9 miles/day. Salmon River discharge, when considered along with other environmental factors, had the greatest effect on migration rate of smolts branded both at hatcheries and at the Whitebird trap and migrating to the head of Lower Granite Reservoir. Migration rate for steelhead released from Dworshak Hatchery and recaptured at the Clearwater trap was 34 miles/day. Survival rates to the Snake River trap of branded chinook salmon smolts released at Hells Canyon Dam, Rapid River, South Fork Salmon and Decker Flat were 52%, 65%, 68% and 35%, respectively. Classical descaling, where at least 40% of the scales are missing from at least two of five areas on the side of a smolt, ranged from 0 to 5.3% at hatcheries for chinook salmon and was less than 1% for steelhead. Descaling rate often Increased about 1% at release sites. Classical descaling at Whitebird, Clearwater and Snake River traps averaged 4.5, 2.5 and 1.5% for chinook salmon, 2.1, 0.4 and 1.4% for wild steelhead and 8

  11. Women @ Energy: Kelley Herndon Ford

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "You’ll likely work on many different projects in your professional life, so I encourage you to experience a diverse set of disciplines--don’t focus too narrowly too soon. Once you find something you like, work hard, ask for help, and don’t give up." Read more from Kelley on her profile here.

  12. Knatokie Ford | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy on the Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. storage_theory_session_eiazab.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials

    kitchens are

  13. Strength and permeability tests on ultra-large Stripa granite core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorpe, R.; Watkins, D.J.; Ralph, W.E.; Hsu, R.; Flexser, S.

    1980-09-01

    This report presents the results of laboratory tests on a 1 meter diameter by 2 meters high sample of granitic (quartz monzonite) rock from the Stripa mine in Sweden. The tests were designed to study the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the rock. Injection and withdrawal permeability tests were performed at several levels of axial stress using a borehole through the long axis of the core. The sample was pervasively fractured and its behavior under uniaxial compressive stress was very complicated. Its stress-strain behavior at low stresses was generally similar to that of small cores containing single healed fractures. However, this large core failed at a peak stress of 7.55 MPa, much less than the typical strength measured in small cores. The complex failure mechanism included a significant creep component. The sample was highly permeable, with flows-per-unit head ranging from 0.11 to 1.55 cm/sup 2//sec. Initial application of axial load caused a decrease in permeability, but this was followed by rapid increase in conductivity coincident with the failure of the core. The hydraulic regime in the fracture system was too intricate to be satisfactorily modeled by simple analogs based on the observed closure of the principal fractures. The test results contribute to the data base being compiled for the rock mass at the Stripa site, but their proper application will require synthesis of results from several laboratory and in situ test programs.

  14. Permeameter studies of water flow through cement and clay borehole seals in granite, basalt and tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.L.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-10-01

    Boreholes near a repository must be sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide-contaminated water to the accessible environment. The objective of this research is to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. Flow through a sealed borehole is compared with flow through intact rock. Cement or bentonite seals have been tested in granite, basalt, and welded tuff. The main conclusion is that under laboratory conditions, existing commercial materials can form high quality seals. Triaxial stress changes about a borehole do not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal. Temperature but especially moisture variations (drying) significantly degrade the quality of cement seals. Performance partially recovers upon resaturation. A skillfully sealed borehole may be as impermeable as the host rock. Analysis of the influence of relative seal-rock permeabilities shows that a plug with permeability one order of magnitude greater than that of the rock results in a flow increase through the hole and surrounding rock of only 1-1/2 times compared to the undisturbed rock. Since a borehole is only a small part of the total rock mass, the total effect is even less pronounced. The simplest and most effective way to decrease flow through a rock-seal system is to increase the seal length, assuming it can be guaranteed that no dominant by-pass flowpath through the rock exists.

  15. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer

  16. Thermal analysis for a spent reactor fuel storage test in granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montan, D.N.

    1980-09-01

    A test is conducted in which spent fuel assemblies from an operating commercial nuclear power reactor are emplaced in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site. In this generic test, 11 canisters of spent PWR fuel are emplaced vertically along with 6 electrical simulator canisters on 3 m centers, 4 m below the floor of a storage drift which is 420 m below the surface. Two adjacent parallel drifts contain electrical heaters, operated to simulate (in the vicinity of the storage drift) the temperature fields of a large repository. This test, planned for up to five years duration, uses fairly young fuel (2.5 years out of core) so that the thermal peak will occur during the time frame of the test and will not exceed the peak that would not occur until about 40 years of storage had older fuel (5 to 15 years out of core) been used. This paper describes the calculational techniques and summarizes the results of a large number of thermal calculations used in the concept, basic design and final design of the spent fuel test. The results of the preliminary calculations show the effects of spacing and spent fuel age. Either radiation or convection is sufficient to make the drifts much better thermal conductors than the rock that was removed to create them. The combination of radiation and convection causes the drift surfaces to be nearly isothermal even though the heat source is below the floor. With a nominal ventilation rate of 2 m{sup 3}/s and an ambient rock temperature of 23{sup 0}C, the maximum calculated rock temperature (near the center of the heat source) is about 100{sup 0}C while the maximum air temperature in the drift is around 40{sup 0}C. This ventilation (1 m{sup 3}/s through the main drift and 1/2 m{sup 3}/s through each of the side drifts) will remove about 1/3 of the heat generated during the first five years of storage.

  17. Climax Granite, Nevada Test Site, as a host for a rock mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high level nuclear wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-02-01

    This document discusses the potential of the Climax pluton, at the Nevada Test Site, as the host for a granite mechanics test facility related to the geologic disposal of high-level nuclear waste. The Climax granitic pluton has been the site of three nuclear weapons effects tests: Hard Hat, Tiny Tot, and Piledriver. Geologic exploration and mapping of the granite body were performed at the occasion of these tests. Currently, it is the site Spent Fuel Test (SFT-C) conducted in the vicinity of and at the same depth as that of the Piledriver drifts. Significant exploration, mapping, and rock mechanics work have been performed and continue at this Piledriver level - the 1400 (ft) level - in the context of SFT-C. Based on our technical discussions, and on the review of the significant geological and rock mechanics work already achieved in the Climax pluton, based also on the ongoing work and the existing access and support, it is concluded that the Climax site offers great opportunities for a rock mechanics test facility. It is not claimed, however, that Climax is the only possible site or the best possible site, since no case has been made for another granite test facility in the United States. 12 figures, 3 tables.

  18. New Models Help Optimize Development of Bakken Shale Resources...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC - Exploration and field development in the largest continuous oil play in ... School of Mines (CSM), through research funded by FE's Oil and Natural Gas Program. ...

  19. Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting #9 Bakken Workforce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... available over the years, our ability to deliver education and training grew. BSC began offering online programs in 1998 and was able to expand them exponentially (especially ...

  20. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  1. Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Independent Statistics & Analysis Drilling Productivity Report The seven regions analyzed in this report accounted for 92% of domestic oil production growth and all domestic natural gas production growth during 2011-14. August 2016 For key tight oil and shale gas regions U.S. Energy Information Administration Contents Year-over-year summary 2 Bakken Region 3 Eagle Ford Region 4 Haynesville Region 5 Marcellus Region 6 Niobrara Region 7 Permian Region 8 Utica Region 9 Explanatory notes 10

  2. Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends EIA Conference, July 15, 2014 2 * Drilling Productivity Report performance review - Permian - Eagle Ford - Bakken * Crude oil production projections - Short-Term Energy Outlook - Annual Energy Outlook - International tight oil outlook * New DPR region highlights: Utica Drilling Productivity Report review - major tight

  3. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom

    2014-05-23

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  4. Raw neutron scattering data for strain measurement of hydraulically loaded granite and marble samples in triaxial stress state

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Polsky, Yarom

    This entry contains raw data files from experiments performed on the Vulcan beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a pressure cell. Cylindrical granite and marble samples were subjected to confining pressures of either 0 psi or approximately 2500 psi and internal pressures of either 0 psi, 1500 psi or 2500 psi through a blind axial hole at the center of one end of the sample. The sample diameters were 1.5" and the sample lengths were 6". The blind hole was 0.25" in diameter and 3" deep. One set of experiments measured strains at points located circumferentially around the center of the sample with identical radii to determine if there was strain variability (this would not be expected for a homogeneous material based on the symmetry of loading). Another set of experiments measured load variation across the radius of the sample at a fixed axial and circumferential location. Raw neutron diffraction intensity files and experimental parameter descriptions are included.

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at

  6. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain

  7. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to

  10. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S.

    2005-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release

  11. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish

  12. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.

    2003-03-01

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of

  13. Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A.

    2004-02-01

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No

  14. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy

    2004-02-01

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is

  15. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

  16. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R.

    2003-03-01

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River

  17. Investigation of exfoliation joints in Navajo sandstone at the Zion National Park and in granite at the Yosemite National Park by tectonofractographic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahat, D.; Grossenbacher, K.; Karasaki, K.

    1995-04-01

    Tectonofractographic techniques have been applied to the study of joint exfoliation in the Navajo sandstone at Zion National Park and in the granite at Yosemite National Park. New types of fracture surface morphologies have been observed which enabled the discerning of incipient joints and consequent fracture growth in these rocks. Incipient jointing in the sandstone is mostly manifested by elliptical and circular fractures (meters to tens meters across) initiating from independent origins. They interfere with each other and grow to larger circular fractures producing exfoliation surfaces up to hundreds of meters across. Less frequently, series of large concentric undulations demonstrate the propagation of a large fracture front producing exfoliation from an individual origin. One such fracture front reveals refraction of undulations at a layer boundary. Certain en echelon fringes surround the joint mirror plane with well defined rims of en echelons and hackles which enable the determination of the tensile fracture stress, {sigma}f. Arches in Zion National Park are ubiquitous in shape and size, revealing stages in their evolution by a mechanical process, which was associated with exfoliation, but independent of local faulting. Exfoliation and arching mostly occurred on vertical surfaces of N-NNW and NE sets of prominent joints, but there are also deviations from this general trend. In Yosemite National Park large exfoliations (hundreds of meters in size) developed on the El Capitan cliff by the interaction and merging of many previous smaller incipient joints that vary in size from meters to tens of meter.

  18. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1986-03-30

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

  19. Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Ford Motor Company (CRADA No. PNNL/265): “Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

    2013-02-14

    Reducing NOx emissions and particulate matter (PM) are primary concerns for diesel vehicles required to meet current LEV II and future LEV III emission standards which require 90+% NOx conversion. Currently, urea SCR as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) are being used for emission control system components by Ford Motor Company for 2010 and beyond diesel vehicles. Because the use of this technology for vehicle applications is new, the relative lack of experience makes it especially challenging to satisfy durability requirements. Of particular concern is being able to realistically simulate actual field aging of the catalyst systems under laboratory conditions. This is necessary both as a rapid assessment tool for verifying improved performance and certifiability of new catalyst formulations, and to develop a good understanding of deactivation mechanisms that can be used to develop improved catalyst materials. In addition to NOx and PM, the hydrocarbon (HC) emission standards are expected to become much more stringent during the next few years. Meanwhile, the engine-out HC emissions are expected to increase and/or be more difficult to remove. Since HC can be removed only when the catalyst becomes warm enough for its oxidation, three-way catalyst (TWC) and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) formulations often contain proprietary zeolite materials to hold the HC produced during the cold start period until the catalyst reaches its operating temperature (e.g., >200°C). Unfortunately, much of trapped HC tends to be released before the catalyst reaches the operating temperature. Among materials effective for trapping HC during the catalyst warm-up period, siliceous zeolites are commonly used because of their high surface area and high stability under typical operating conditions. However, there has been little research on the physical properties of these materials related to the adsorption and release of various hydrocarbon species found in

  20. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, X.; Fu, Tao

    2014-03-28

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile

  1. Passage Distribution and Federal Columbia River Power System Survival for Steelhead Kelts Tagged Above and at Lower Granite Dam, Year 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colotelo, Alison H.A.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Jones, Bryan W.; Hanson, Amanda C.; Trott, Donna M.; Greiner, Michael J.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Brown, Richard S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Li, Xinya; Fu, Tao

    2014-12-15

    Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations have declined throughout their range in the last century and many populations, including those of the Snake River Basin are listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. The reasons for their decline are many and complex, but include habitat loss and degradation, overharvesting, and dam construction. The 2008 Biological Opinion calls for an increase in the abundance of female steelhead through an increase in iteroparity (i.e., repeat spawning) and this can be realized through a combination of reconditioning and in-river survival of migrating kelts. The goal of this study is to provide the data necessary to inform fisheries managers and dam operators of Snake River kelt migration patterns, survival, and routes of dam passage. Steelhead kelts (n = 487) were captured and implanted with acoustic transmitters and passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tags at the Lower Granite Dam (LGR) Juvenile Fish Facility and at weirs located in tributaries of the Snake and Clearwater rivers upstream of LGR. Kelts were monitored as they moved downstream through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) by 15 autonomous and 3 cabled acoustic receiver arrays. Cabled receiver arrays deployed on the dam faces allowed for three-dimensional tracking of fish as they approached the dam face and were used to determine the route of dam passage. Overall, 27.3% of the kelts tagged in this study successfully migrated to Martin Bluff (rkm 126, as measured from the mouth of the Columbia River), which is located downstream of all FCRPS dams. Within individual river reaches, survival per kilometer estimates ranged from 0.958 to 0.999; the lowest estimates were observed in the immediate forebay of FCRPS dams. Steelhead kelts tagged in this study passed over the spillway routes (spillway weirs, traditional spill bays) in greater proportions and survived at higher rates compared to the few fish passed through powerhouse routes (turbines and juvenile

  2. Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gin, Stephane; Ryan, Joseph V.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Cabie, M.

    2013-06-26

    We report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements of diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution-precipitation models

  3. Contribution of atom-probe tomography to a better understanding of glass alteration mechanisms: Application to a nuclear glass specimen altered 25 years in a granitic environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gin, Stephane; Ryan, Joseph V.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Neeway, James J.; Cabie, M.

    2013-04-08

    Here, we report and discuss results of atom probe tomography (APT) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) applied to a borosilicate glass sample of nuclear interest altered for nearly 26 years at 90°C in a confined granitic medium in order to better understand the rate-limiting mechanisms under conditions representative of a deep geological repository for vitrified radioactive waste. The APT technique allows the 3D reconstruction of the elemental distribution at the reactive interphase with sub-nanometer precision. Profiles of the B distribution at pristine glass/hydrated glass interface obtained by different techniques are compared to show the challenge of accurate measurements ofmore » diffusion profiles at this buried interface on the nanometer length scale. Our results show that 1) Alkali from the glass and hydrogen from the solution exhibit anti-correlated 15 ± 3 nm wide gradients located between the pristine glass and the hydrated glass layer, 2) boron exhibits an unexpectedly sharp profile located just at the outside of the alkali/H interdiffusion layer; this sharp profile is more consistent with a dissolution front than a diffusion-controlled release of boron. The resulting apparent diffusion coefficients derived from the Li and H profiles are DLi = 1.5 × 10-22 m2.s-1 and DH = 6.8 × 10-23 m2.s-1. These values are around two orders of magnitude lower than those observed at the very beginning of the alteration process, which suggests that interdiffusion is slowed at high reaction progress by local conditions that could be related to the porous structure of the interphase. As a result, the accessibility of water to the pristine glass could be the rate-limiting step in these conditions. More generally, these findings strongly support the importance of interdiffusion coupled with hydrolysis reactions of the silicate network on the long-term dissolution rate, contrary to what has been suggested by recent interfacial dissolution

  4. GRANITE RELIABLE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon DOE-LPOProject-PostersWINDGranite-Reliable.pdf More Documents & Publications USG OREGON EA-1801: Finding of No Significant Impact DOE-LPOOutreachLPO-OverviewCSP

  5. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin, Volume XIV; Evaluation of 2006 Prediction of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead at Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day and Bonneville Dams using Program Real Time, Technical Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim

    2007-01-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2006 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 32 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. Twenty-four stocks are of wild yearling chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2006, and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2006 migration. These stocks originate in drainages of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through the tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling chinook salmon and the steelhead trout runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead trout forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams.

  6. Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XV : Evaluation of the 2007 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild and Hatchery-Reared Salmon and Steelhead Smolts to Rock Island, Lower Granite, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams using Program RealTime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, Jim; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.

    2008-12-01

    Program RealTime provided monitoring and forecasting of the 2007 inseason outmigrations via the internet for 26 PIT-tagged stocks of wild ESU Chinook salmon and steelhead to Lower Granite and/or McNary dams, one PIT-tagged hatchery-reared ESU of sockeye salmon to Lower Granite Dam, one PIT-tagged wild stock of sockeye salmon to McNary Dam, and 20 passage-indexed runs-at-large, five each to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams. Nineteen stocks are of wild yearling Chinook salmon which were captured, PIT-tagged, and released at sites above Lower Granite Dam in 2007 and have at least one year's historical migration data previous to the 2007 migration. These stocks originate in 19 tributaries of the Salmon, Grande Ronde and Clearwater Rivers, all tributaries to the Snake River, and are subsequently detected through tag identification and monitored at Lower Granite Dam. Seven wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large of Snake or Upper Columbia River ESU salmon and steelhead were monitored at McNary Dam. Three wild PIT-tagged runs-at-large were monitored at Lower Granite Dam, consisting of the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and the steelhead runs. The hatchery-reared PIT-tagged sockeye salmon stock from Redfish Lake was monitored outmigrating through Lower Granite Dam. Passage-indexed stocks (stocks monitored by FPC passage indices) included combined wild and hatchery runs-at-large of subyearling and yearling Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead forecasted to Rock Island, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville dams.

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Dawn Ford Site - 038

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials ... After the owner completes U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license termination the ...

  8. West Ford Flat Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  9. AVTA: 2013 Ford Focus All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  10. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  12. Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform ... Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy Information ...

  13. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  14. AVTA: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. ...

  15. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  16. Ford County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.6540069, -99.8124935 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  17. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. Updates to the EIA Eagle Ford Play Maps

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... play, and lower initial GORsoil-rich wells are shown in green along the northern portion. ... gas relative to oil). December 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updates to ...

  19. Electricity Generation from Geothermal Resources on the Fort...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - hottest water - is intercepted when drilling through to Bakken Dirt and Rock Madison Formation (water) Bakken Formation (oil) DATA ANALYSIS *760 bottom hole temperatures ...

  20. 43291-1-8-eerc | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation Last Reviewed 9172012 ... involving the use of proppants in the Bakken Formation, and thereby assist in ...

  1. Biofuels Issues and Trends - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  2. Granite Creek Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Location Red House, CA County Humboldt County, CA Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Geothermal...

  3. Granite Wind LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind, LLC Place: Redlands, California Zip: 92373 Sector: Wind energy Product: An Apple Valley, California based wind developer. Coordinates: 34.055282, -117.18258 Show...

  4. Granite City, Illinois, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... After reviewing records and radiological surveys for more than 600 sites connected with the nuclear weapons program, DOE identifed 46 sites that required cleanup, including the ...

  5. Granite Reliable Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Group Energy Purchaser Green Mountain Power Central Vermont Public Service New England Power Pool Location Milan NH Coordinates 44.74039314, -71.28376007 Show...

  6. Granite Springs Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  7. Before the House Subcommittees on Energy and Oversight- Committee on Science, Space, and Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Subject: Bakken Petroleum By: Christopher Smith, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

  8. EERE Success Story-Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Set To Scale Up Industry Plasma oxidation oven. Photo Courtesy: RMX Technologies EERE Success Story-Plasma Oxidation of Carbon Fiber Precursor ...

  9. "INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE FORD NUCLEAR REACTOR, REVISION 1, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2013-08-01

    At the NRC?s request, ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the FNR during the period of December 4 through 6, 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections and measurement and sampling activities. Confirmatory activities also included the review and assessment of UM?s project documentation and methodologies. Surface scans identified elevated activity in two areas. The first area was on a wall outside of Room 3103 and the second area was in the southwest section on the first floor. The first area was remediated to background levels. However, the second area was due to gamma shine from a neighboring source storage area. A retrospective analysis of UM?s FSS data shows that for the SUs investigated by the ORAU survey team, UM met the survey requirements set forth in the FSSP. The total mean surface activity values were directly compared with the mean total surface activity reported by UM. Mean surface activity values determined by UM were within two standard deviations of the mean determined by ORAU. Additionally, all surface activity values were less than the corresponding gross beta DCGL{sub W}. Laboratory analysis of the soil showed that COC concentrations were less than the respective DCGL{sub W} values. For the inter-lab comparison, the DER was above 3 for only one sample. However, since the sum of fractions for each of the soil samples was below 1, thus none of the samples would fail to meet release guidelines. Based on the findings of the side-by-side direct measurements, and after discussion with the NRC and ORAU, UM decided to use a more appropriate source efficiency in their direct measurement calculations and changed their source efficiency from 0.37 to 0.25.

  10. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE FORD NUCLEAR REACTOR, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALTIC, NICK A

    2013-07-25

    At the NRC?s request, ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the FNR during the period of December 4 through 6, 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections and measurement and sampling activities. Confirmatory activities also included the review and assessment of UM?s project documentation and methodologies. Surface scans identified elevated activity in two areas. The first area was on a wall outside of Room 3103 and the second area was in the southwest section on the first floor. The first area was remediated to background levels. However, the second area was due to gamma shine from a neighboring source storage area. A retrospective analysis of UM?s FSS data shows that for the SUs investigated by the ORAU survey team, UM met the survey requirements set forth in the FSSP. The total mean surface activity values were directly compared with the mean total surface activity reported by UM. Mean surface activity values determined by UM were within two standard deviations of the mean determined by ORAU. Additionally, all surface activity values were less than the corresponding gross beta DCGLW. Laboratory analysis of the soil showed that COC concentrations were less than the respective DCGLW values. For the inter-lab comparison, the DER was above 3 for only one sample. However, since the sum of fractions for each of the soil samples was below 1, thus none of the samples would fail to meet release guidelines. Based on the findings of the side-by-side direct measurements, and after discussion with the NRC and ORAU, UM decided to use a more appropriate source efficiency in their direct measurement calculations and changed their source efficiency from 0.37 to 0.25.

  11. Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber Research at ORNL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and ORNL to demonstrate a novel polymer fiber material and production process technology. ... in research and development, materials science, and high-volume polymer processing. ...

  12. Development of the 2011MY Ford Super Duty Catalyst System | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    including catalyst layout to maximize NOx conversion and balance of precious metals for oxidation function during ... Urea SCR and DPF System for Tier 2 Diesel Light-Duty Trucks ...

  13. Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

  14. Ford Plug-In Project: Bringing PHEVs to Market | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. vss_02_frenette.pdf (1.33 MB

  15. Ford Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Powered F-700 May Set Sales Records

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... The converted engine uses a state-of- the-art electronic technology (a closed-loop engine management system to equal diesel power and torque, while providing high efficien- cy and ...

  16. Ford-Dow Partnership Is Linked to Carbon Fiber Research at ORNL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National lab teams up with two companies to establish better manufacturing and production process technology.

  17. Argonne working with Ford and FCA US to study dual-fuel vehicles | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Visiting IIT Professor Carrie Hall troubleshoots the engine wiring harness. The Argonne system can replicate speed and load conditions found during typical vehicle operation for both naturally aspirated as well as turbocharged engines. (Click to view larger.) Visiting IIT Professor Carrie Hall troubleshoots the engine wiring harness. The Argonne system can replicate speed and load conditions found during typical vehicle operation for both naturally aspirated as well as

  18. U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Bakken formation in North Dakota and Montana hit 1 million barrels per day last November. However, winter storms caused a drop in the oil output from the Bakken formation ...

  19. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technologies Office 2015 Peer Review 8250 Bakken wells 2275 Madison wells 437 ... 3.2 GW e to produce oil from the Bakken and Three Forks fields during the next ...

  20. E&P Focus Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Winter 2011 Issue PDF-1.83MB In this issue read about NETL research focusing on R&D in the Bakken Shale. Included are an overview of activity levels in the Bakken and its ...

  1. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    this winter. So far this year, the gap between Bakken and WTI prices has narrowed, and once again, the Bakken price has risen above the WTI price, albeit modestly (Figure 1)....

  2. Michigan's 14th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Ford Ford Electric Battery Group Ford Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme General Motors NextEnergy Trenton...

  3. Wayne County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corporation EaglePicher Horizon Batteries LLC Ford Ford Electric Battery Group Ford Motor Co Sustainable Technologies and Hybrid Programme Full Circle Developments Inc General...

  4. Mr. Fred Steinkuehler Granite City Steel Division National Steel...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Duplicate photographs can be provided, We do not understand the need to keep the consent confidential; however, the form will not be given out except as required by law or on the ...

  5. Porosity, permeability, and their relationship in granite, basalt, and tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report discusses the porosity, storage, and permeability of fractured (mainly crystalline) rock types proposed as host rock for nuclear waste repositories. The emphasis is on the inter-relationships of these properties, but a number of reported measurements are included as well. The porosity of rock is shown to consist of fracture porosity and matrix porosity; techniques are described for determining the total interconnected porosity through both laboratory and field measurement. Permeability coefficient, as obtained by experiments ranging from laboratory to crustal scale, is discussed. Finally, the problem of determining the relationship between porosity and permeability is discussed. There is no simple, all encompassing relationship that describes the dependence of permeability upon porosity. However, two particular cases have been successfully analyzed: flow through a single rough fracture, and flow through isotropic porous rock. These two cases are discussed in this report.

  6. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural fractures at low pressures, and to create a geothermal reservoir. Authors Albert Genter and Herve Traineau Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal...

  7. Impact of environmental dewatering of Lower Granite and Little...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These organisms provide an important food resource for both migrating salmonids and resident fish species; thus, impacts of contemplated dewatering schemes require evaluation. The ...

  8. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program Hatcheries Division: Ford Hatchery, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Mike; Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia

    2002-11-01

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  9. Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water use in N.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dakota Bakken region | Argonne National Laboratory Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water use in N. Dakota Bakken region By Angela Hardin * May 19, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint Increased water use in the rapidly growing oil industry in North Dakota's Bakken oil shale region, or play, is surprisingly due not only to oil well development but also to people, according to a recent study by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory. Increased oil

  10. Understanding the reservoir important to successful stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, D.D. )

    1991-04-22

    In anisotropic Bakken shale reservoirs, fracture treatments serve to extend the well bore radius past a disturbed zone and vertically connect discrete intervals. Natural fractures in the near-well bore area strongly control the well deliverability rate. The Bakken is one of the few shale formations in the world with commercial oil production. This article covers the Bakken reservoir properties that influence production and stimulation treatments. The concluding part will discuss the design and effectiveness of the treatments.

  11. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Houston, TX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NETL R&D Tackles Technological Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation Recent development of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota and eastern Montana is a good example of persistent analysis of geologic data and adaptation of new completion technologies overcoming the challenges posed by unconventional reservoirs. However, as with most unconventional plays, as Bakken development continues, questions regarding exactly how to refine newly applied

  12. STATEMENT OF CHRISTOPHER SMITH PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    quality guidelines. The key questions yet to be addressed are whether the chemical makeup of the crude oils from the Bakken and other tight oil formations differs from...

  13. Film Tells the Story of Indian Country's Energy Development from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    drilling and fracking boom on North Dakota's Bakken Oil Plate, the story of Indian Country energy development emerged through the eyes of a diverse array of Native stakeholders. ...

  14. Final Meeting Summary Page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The site of the proposed test borehole is within approximately fifty miles of active wells in the Bakken oil shale formation. The characterization test for the deep borehole ...

  15. Department of Energy Announces First Quadrennial Energy Review...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... in New England, to be held in Hartford, CT; infrastructure constraints related to Bakken, to be held in North Dakota; electricity transmission storage and distribution in the ...

  16. Five ways scientists can make soil less dirty | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... challenges, contact partners@anl.gov. Related People M. Cristina Negri Next article: Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water use in N. Dakota Bakken region

  17. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of crude oil in the United States; its Bakken and ... coal to nine other states. Montana's four refineries, with almost 30% of U.S. Petroleum Administration for ...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    crudes with growing production, such as Bakken, and global seaborne crudes that are linked to the price of Brent have encouraged refiners to bring more domestically produced...

  19. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bakken and other U.S. shale formations. Operators are combining horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing-the same technologies used to significantly boost shale gas...

  20. Ron Ness - bismarck_qermeeting_ness_presentation.pptx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How The Bakken has Impacted North Dakota's Workforce Opportunities" 1 Million bbls per Day * North Dakota ranks 20 in world * 50 million per day of economic activity * State ...

  1. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Granite City Steel Division, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Diagram of the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, ...

  2. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LIST OF FIGURES 1 2 General location of the Granite City Steel Facility' Granite City, ... and debris samples at the Granite City Steel Facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . ...

  3. Ir I L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    General location of the Granite City Steel Facility , Granite City , Illinois . . . . ... and debris samples at the Granite City Steel Facility, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . ...

  4. shaleoil1.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... USA CANADA SD ND MT Saskatchewan Manitoba Dunn Wa rd Dawson McL ea n McK en zie Morton ... SIGNIFICANT BAKKEN OIL FIELDS Bakken Shale Extent Canada MT ID IL IA WY NV NE SD MN ND WI ...

  5. Fleet of Advanced Vehicles to be Tested, Demonstrated at NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Fuel Cell powered Ford Focus Hydrogen Fuel Cell powered Hyundai Tucson Hybrid Electric Toyota Highlander Neighborhood Electric GEM car Plug-in Hybrid Electric Ford Escape ...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Issues Rules for Auto Loan Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5.9 Billion Loan for Ford Motor Company Obama Administration Awards First Three Auto Loans for Advanced Technologies to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors...

  7. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Ford 2,773,175 Partners * Vehma International * Ford Motor Company This presentation ... and test the vehicle, c) demonstrate integration of the light weight material vehicle ...

  8. EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

  9. Engineering test plan for field radionuclide migration experiments in climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Stone, R.; Lord, D.; Rector, N.; Failor, R.

    1982-05-01

    This Engineering Test Plan (ETP) describes field studies of radionuclide migration in fractured rock designed for the Climax grainite at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the ETP is to provide a detailed written document of the method of accomplishing these studies. The ETP contains the experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan, system schematics, a description of the test facility, and a brief outline of the laboratory support studies needed to understand the chemistry of the rock/water/radionuclide interactions. Results of our initial hydrologic investigations are presented along with pretest predictions based on the hydrologic test results.

  10. Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-12-01

    Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

  11. PNL-8807 UC-O00 IMPACT OF EXPERIMENTALDEWATERINGOF LOWER GRANITE

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for both migrating salmonidsand resident fish species; thus, impactsof ... functioning of the food web supporting the fish species of interest (salmonids), and it is ...

  12. Calculated and measured drift closure during the spent-fuel test in Climax granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Butkovich, T.R.

    1982-04-01

    Horizontal and vertical measurements of drift closures have been made with a manually operated tape extensometer since about 6 weeks after the emplacement of the spent fuel at various locations along the length of the drifts. The averaged closures are less than 0.6 mm from the onset of measurements through about two years after the spent fuel emplacement. These results have been compared with thermo-elastic finite element calculations using measured medium properties. The comparisons show that most of the closure of the drifts occurred between the time the spent fuel was emplaced and the time of first measurement. The comparisons show that the results track each other, in that where closure followed by dilation is measured, the calculations also show this effect. The agreement is excellent, although where closures of less than 0.2 mm are measured the comparison with calculations is limited by measurement reproducability. Once measurements commenced the averaged measured closures remain to within 30% of the calculated total closure in each drift. 9 figures, 1 table.

  13. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of oil from the layers of shale like those in the Bakken Formation is not the same as the extraction of oil from oil shale plays. See This Week In Petroleum, March 4, 2009.)...

  14. Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into a wellbore ...

  15. Temporary oilfield workers are major factor in increased water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... For more information, visit the Office of Science website. A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. ...

  16. Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... May 23, 2016 A row of tanker trucks transport water from Lake Sakakawea in North Dakota's Bakken region to oil well production sites. The water is injected under high pressure into ...

  17. FINAL-west-doe-rfi-comments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... not hesitate to contact me at ebakken@tep.com or by telephone at (520) 918-8351. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Erik Bakken, President of the Board WEST Associates

  18. CX-008312: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carbon Dioxide Storage and Enhanced Bakken Recovery Research Program CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-6-2014_Imaging Techniques Applied to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Pores within shale are generally only on the scale of nanometers, for example: Bakken Shale, 5 nm; Monterey Shale, 10-16 nm; Anadarko Basin, 50 nm; and Appalachian Devonian ...

  20. CX-005588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken FormationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 04/11/2011Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. CX-001700: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Investigation of the Souring Bakken Oil ReservoirsCX(s) Applied: B3.6, A1Date: 04/22/2010Location(s): Grand Forks, North DakotaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  2. Publications | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... PDF-2.55MB May, 2009: NETL R&D Tackles Technical Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation PDF-2.3MB arrowsmdrkorange.gif Program Fact Sheets Natural Gas & Oil ...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to 8.7 million bd in 2014. Increasing production of light crude oil in low-permeability or tight resource formations in regions like the Bakken, Permian Basin, and Eagle...

  4. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Bakken crudes, is where most of the refineries have built or are in the process of building rail unloading facilities. Tesoro, the largest refiner on the West Coast, opened...

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2014 ratio estimated at 3,600 cfb of oil produced. Like the Bakken Basin, Permian drilling has been almost exclusively oil-directed since early 2011. On June 20, Baker...

  6. U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in April of 2014. 51 The domestic oil boom is due primarily to new production of light sweet crude from unconventional tight-oil formations in North Dakota (Bakken) and Texas ...

  7. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    light sweet crude slate. As previously discussed in TWIP, there has been substantial investment in crude-by-rail infrastructure on the East Coast to accommodate receipts of Bakken...

  8. US Energy Secretary Chu Announces Finalized $5.9 Billion Loan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    offers to Ford Motor Company, Tesla Motors, and Nissan Motors for a total of 8 billion. ... to Ford Motor Company, Nissan Motors and Tesla Motors Secretary Chu's Remarks for an Auto ...

  9. Final_Testimony(2).pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... 1 like Nissan, Tesla, Fisker and Ford to make advanced vehicles in the United States. ... of nearly 1 Manufacturers Ford, Nissan, Tesla and Fisker are funded by the Advanced ...

  10. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ford, Andrew (Andrew Ford) - School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Washington State University Fowlie, Meredith (Meredith Fowlie) - ...