Sample records for footprints doe developed

  1. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Development DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs Senior Executive Service Candidate Development Program (SESCDP): This...

  2. Development of a tool for forecasting a warehouse facility footprint and enabling rapid scenario analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutterer, Lucas B. (Lucas Benjamin)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Companies in every industry, including both manufacturers and service providers, must make decisions about their operational footprint -the amount of building space required for business needs such as storing inventory and ...

  3. Progress on Footprint Reduction at the Hanford Site - 12406

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenney, Dale E. [CH2M HILL, Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Seeley, Paul [Cenibark International, Inc., Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Farabee, Al [U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to reduce the footprint of legacy sites throughout the EM complex. Footprint reduction is being accomplished by focusing cleanup activities on decontamination and demolition of excess contaminated facilities, soil and groundwater remediation, and solid waste disposition. All of these initiatives are being accomplished with established technologies in proven regulatory frameworks. Ultimately, completion of these environmental cleanup activities will reduce the monitoring and maintenance costs associated with managing large federal facilities, allowing EM to place more focus on other high priority cleanup efforts and facilitate a successful transition to land-term stewardship of these sites. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) investment, the Department's cleanup footprint has been reduced by 45 percent to date, from 2411 km{sup 2} (931 mi{sup 2}) to 1336 km{sup 2} (516 mi{sup 2}s). With this significant progress on footprint reduction, the Department is on track towards their goal to reduce its overall footprint by approximately 90 percent by 2015. In addition, some areas cleaned up may become available for alternate uses (i.e. recreation, conservation, preservation, industrialization or development). Much of the work to reduce the complex's footprint occurred at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina and the Hanford Site in Washington, but cleanup continues across the complex. Footprint reduction is progressing well at the Hanford Site, supported predominantly through ARRA investment. To date, 994 km{sup 2} (384 mi{sup 2}) (65%) of footprint reduction have been achieved at Hanford, with a goal to achieve a 90% reduction by Fiscal Year 2015. The DOE EM and DOE Richland Operations Office, continue to make great progress to reduce the legacy footprint of the Hanford Site. Footprint reduction is being accomplished by focusing cleanup activities on decontamination and demolition of excess facilities, both contaminated and uncontaminated, waste site cleanup activities, and debris pile removal. All of these activities can be accomplished with proven technologies and within established regulatory frameworks. Footprint reduction goals for Fiscal Year 2011 were exceeded, largely with the help of ARRA funding. As cleanup projects are completed and the total area requiring cleanup shrinks, overall costs for surveillance and maintenance operations and infrastructure services decrease. This work completion and decrease in funding requirements to maintain waste sites and antiquated facilities allows more focus on high priority site missions (i.e. groundwater remediation, tank waste disposition, etc.) and moves Site areas closer to transition from EM to the Legacy Management program. The progress in the Hanford footprint reduction effort will help achieve success in these other important mission areas. (authors)

  4. DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes policy, requirements, and responsibilities for the oversight, management, and administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) activities at DOE facilities. Cancels DOE O 483.1 Admin Chg 1 and DOE M 483.1-1.

  5. DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 483.1, DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, dated 1-12-01, which establishes requirements for the performance of technology transfer through the use of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs). Canceled by DOE O 483.1A.

  6. DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, requirements, and responsibilities for the oversight, management, and administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) activities at DOE facilities. No cancellation.

  7. DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, requirements, and responsibilities for the oversight, management, and administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) activities at DOE facilities. Admin Chg, dated 9-18-2013. Canceled by DOE O 483.1A.

  8. DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in DOE Nuclear Safety Applications (draft), December 2010 DOE Standard on Development and Use of Probabilistic...

  9. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  10. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  11. Technology development for DOE SNF management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Einziger, R.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Murphy, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process used to identify technology development needs for the same management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. Needs were assessed for each of the over 250 fuel types stores at DOE sites around the country for each stage of SNF management--existing storage, transportation, interim storage, and disposal. The needs were then placed into functional groupings to facilitate integration and collaboration among the sites.

  12. DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop And Explore...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop And Explore Geothermal Energy Resources DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop And Explore Geothermal Energy Resources...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC., Custom Home, Downers Grove, IL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC.,...

  14. DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development Milestone DOE-Sponsored Syngas Cleanup Demonstration Project Reaches Development Milestone February 19, 2015...

  15. Recent Developments in DOE FUSRAP - 13014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Christopher [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Kothari, Vijendra [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States); Hooten, Gwen; Starr, Ken [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States); Bahrke, Cheri; Gillespie, Joey; Widdop, Michael [Stoller LMS Team, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States)] [Stoller LMS Team, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado (United States); Darr, Bob [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States)] [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management assumed responsibility for the DOE FUSRAP in 2003. Since then, DOE has evaluated existing guidance and program needs to ensure that the program will remain effective in maintaining protectiveness at remediated FUSRAP sites. DOE has identified crucial elements that must be addressed to meet this goal. Knowledge of the sites and the program must be preserved and accessible to future custodians. Program processes must be defined and coordinated with other agencies. Long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) requirements for the sites must be based on human health risk and regulatory compliance, and those requirements must be well defined. Useful and accurate program information must be available to stakeholders. DOE has addressed these needs through development of a comprehensive program plan, an LTS and M plan for each completed FUSRAP site, a records finding aid, and a public information web site. These developments help ensure that the current knowledge is preserved and passed on to future custodians and stakeholders. (authors)

  16. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  17. Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to...

  18. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

  19. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On carbon footprints and growing energy use Curtis M.reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organizationhis own organization's carbon footprint and answers this

  20. DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop DOE Alaska Native Village Renewable Energy Project Development Workshop March 30, 2015 9:00AM AKDT to April 1,...

  1. DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Standard, Development and Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessments in Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Applications, 1210 DOE Draft Standard, Development and Use of...

  2. DOE and USCAR Announce $70 Million Project to Accelerate Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Announce 70 Million Project to Accelerate Development of Lightweight, High-Strength Materials DOE and USCAR Announce 70 Million Project to Accelerate Development of Lightweight,...

  3. DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug, Vemurafenib August 18, 2011 - 1:03pm...

  4. DOE-APPROVED COOPERATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT LANGUAGE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANGUAGE AND GUIDANCE The Modular Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was developed to promote consistency throughout the Department of Energy (DOE). The...

  5. Carbon Footprint Calculator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This calculator estimates the amount of carbon emissions you and members of your household are responsible for. It does not include emissions associated with your work or getting to work if you commute by public transportation. It was developed by IEEE Spectrum magazine.

  6. Stages of Project Development - DOE Directives, Delegations,...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    estimates and their relationship to each other as well as to the key decisions. g4301-1chp3.pdf -- PDF Document, 44 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: ID: DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 3...

  7. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlatterer, Joerg C., E-mail: joerg.schlatterer@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Wieder, Matthew S. [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)] [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Brenowitz, Michael [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High {sup {center_dot}}OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels-Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ({sup {center_dot}}OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) can produce sufficient {sup {center_dot}}OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels-Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C-C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme's active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels-Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to {sup {center_dot}}OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop's flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated {sup {center_dot}}OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  8. "LIFE OF FIELD" DEVELOPMENT DECISIONS, DOE-SUPPORTED SIMULATION SOFTWARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    -friendly versions of two reservoir simulators originally developed by DOE ­ BOAST and CO2 PROPHET ­ can be used, Polymer flooding, ASP or lower concentration flooding, and CO2). WHO SHOULD ATTEND Petroleum Engineers, and ultimately enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes. DOE-developed simulation software packages

  9. Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

  10. What's your water footprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower..., the time of day you run your sprinkler system, and how long the water runs while you brush your teeth. Conservation in such everyday tasks is important, but water experts have begun to use a more all-encompassing survey of water use by calculating...

  11. What's your water footprint?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower..., the time of day you run your sprinkler system, and how long the water runs while you brush your teeth. Conservation in such everyday tasks is important, but water experts have begun to use a more all-encompassing survey of water use by calculating...

  12. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Help

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOE

  13. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Interesting Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOE DNA

  14. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Menu Synopsis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOE DNA

  15. RCSP Development Phase | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    help support regulatory development and industry in commercialization and deployment of CCS. The storage types and formations being tested are considered regionally significant...

  16. Development of a Dynamic DOE Calibration Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cell characterization * Train and validate dynamic models * Apply models for system optimization Results * Dynamic emissions models have been developed (validation error on the...

  17. 2014 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Assumptions A number of key terms are used to interpret the manufacturing energy and carbon footprints. The terms associated with the energy footprint analysis are...

  18. Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling This presentation by Aaron...

  19. UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    UCSF Sustainability Baseline Assessment: Carbon Footprint Analysis Final Issue Date: March 21, 2010 #12;Carbon Footprint Analysis Background This chapter of the Sustainability Assessment focuses on UCSF

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Dwell Development, Seattle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    blown cellulose, R-42 XPS under slab, triple-pane windows, and a ductless mini-split heat pump. Dwell Development - Seattle, WA More Documents & Publications DOE Zero Energy Ready...

  1. Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

  2. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY By: Yasser Dessouky #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply chain for a single

  3. Opportunities for industry participation in DOE`s environmental management technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedick, R.C. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Walker, J.S. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Science and Technology

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METC has managed about 85 research, development, and demonstration projects on behalf of DOE-EM`s Office of Science and Technology that include those in each of the four major environmental remediation and waste management problem areas: subsurface contaminants (radionuclides, heavy metals, dense nonaqueous phase liquids); decontamination and decommissioning of facilities; high-level waste tank remediation; and mixed waste characterization/treament/disposal. All projects within the Industry Programs are phased or have optional tasks at specific go/no-go decision points, allowing DOE to make investment decisions at various points in the technology development cycle to ensure that we are meeting the technology development goals and the needs of the customer or end-user. This decision making process is formalized in a Technology Investment Decision Model. A brief summary is given of R&D requirements (technology needs) in each of the above-mentioned 4 problem areas.

  4. Does imperfect competition foster capital accumulation in a developing economy ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Does imperfect competition foster capital accumulation in a developing economy ? Pascal Belan competition and capital accumulation in a dual economy, with traditional and modern sectors and two types. Capitalists accumulate wealth in the modern sector. The economy is open to cap- ital flows, but capitalists

  5. DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Definitions and Assumptions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October 2012 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

  7. The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    The Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries H . S C O T T M A T T H E W S , C H R I and organizations are pursuing "carbon footprint" projects to estimate their own contributions to global climate change. Protocol definitions from carbon registries help organizations analyze their footprints

  8. Notice of Intent to Issue DOE N 314.1, DOE-Flex: DOE's Telework Program while Developing a Successor Order (5-6-11)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is to develop DOE N 3XX, which will establish the requirements and responsibilities for the Department's telework/flexiplace program.

  9. DOE SNF technology development necessary for final disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, D.L.; Fillmore, D.L.; Windes, W.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing technology is inadequate to allow safe disposal of the entire inventory of US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Needs for SNF technology development were identified for each individual fuel type in the diverse inventory of SNF generated by past, current, and future DOE materials production, as well as SNF returned from domestic and foreign research reactors. This inventory consists of 259 fuel types with different matrices, cladding materials, meat composition, actinide content, and burnup. Management options for disposal of SNF include direct repository disposal, possible including some physical or chemical preparation, or processing to produce a qualified waste form by using existing aqueous processes or new treatment processes. Technology development needed for direct disposal includes drying, mitigating radionuclide release, canning, stabilization, and characterization technologies. While existing aqueous processing technology is fairly mature, technology development may be needed to apply one of these processes to SNF different than for which the process was originally developed. New processes to treat SNF not suitable for disposal in its current form were identified. These processes have several advantages over existing aqueous processes.

  10. Recent Developments in DOE FUSRAP | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuringDepartment ofRecent Developments in DOE FUSRAP

  11. DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelopEnergyof EnergyDOE,Department|

  12. Network Level Footprints of Facebook Applications Atif Nazir1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuah, Chen-Nee

    Network Level Footprints of Facebook Applications Atif Nazir1,* , Saqib Raza1,* , Dhruv Gupta1 popular OSNs. With over 81,000 third-party applications on Facebook alone, their impact is hard to predict and even harder to study. We have developed and launched a number of Facebook appli- cations, all of which

  13. Network Level Footprints of Facebook Applications Atif Nazir1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Network Level Footprints of Facebook Applications Atif Nazir1,* , Saqib Raza1,* , Dhruv Gupta1 of the most popular OSNs. With over 81,000 third-party applications on Facebook alone, their impact is hard to predict and even harder to study. We have developed and launched a number of Facebook appli- cations, all

  14. DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid Electric Trucks DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid Electric Trucks February 25, 2015 -...

  15. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2006 MECS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy and Carbon Footprints provide a mapping of energy from supply to end use in manufacturing. They show us where energy is used and lost—and where greenhouse gases (GHGs) are emitted. Footprints are available below for 15 manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for U.S. manufacturing as a whole. Analysis of these footprints is also available in the U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis report.

  16. DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

  17. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.] [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  18. 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints: Definitions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    key terms and details assumptions and references used in the Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints (2010 MECS) Definitions and Assumptions for the Manufacturing Energy and...

  19. Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Understanding the 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Cement...

  20. USDA and DOE Biomass Research And Development Technical Advisory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Announces Members of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board DOE Announces 62.4M in "Clean Coal" R&D Awards USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research...

  1. UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN CARBON FOOTPRINT REPORT 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN CARBON FOOTPRINT REPORT 2012 Analysis carried out by: ENERGY RESEARCH ..................................................................................................................3 1.1 What is a Carbon Footprint?.......................................................................................4 1.2 Background to Carbon Footprinting at UCT

  2. Uk’e koley (no footprint) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winnestaffer, Jessica E.D. [Chickaloon Native Village] [Chickaloon Native Village

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Chickaloon Native Village is a federally-recognized Alaska Native Tribe that has long been devoted to being a good steward to the environment, understanding that it is our responsibility to take care of the land that has been loaned to us for the short time we are here. The goal of this project was to conduct a feasibility study to assess the energy uses, loads, and efficiencies for all of our current Tribally owned and operated buildings and rental housing units, to determine if it makes economic and environmental sense to install renewable energy systems on each building to lower our carbon footprints and to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels. The goal was met and we have developed a plan for installing renewable energy systems on several Tribal buildings where the benefits will be most notable.

  3. Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

  4. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE O 470.5, Integrating Existing Technical Security Program Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This memorandum provides justification for the development of one integrated and consolidated set of requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Security Program (TSP). This Order will combine the existing necessary requirements from DOE Manual (M) 205.1-3, Telecommunications Security Manual, dated 4-17-2006 and DOE M 470.4-4A chg.1, Information Security Manual, dated 10-12-2010; Section D -Technical Surveillance Countermeasures, into a single DOE Order defining the DOE TSP.

  5. USDA and DOE Award Biomass Research and Development Grants to...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and national laboratory partners on a balanced portfolio of research in biomass feedstocks and conversion technologies. For more information on DOE's Biomass Program,...

  6. How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    · How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

  7. New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    New Studies Portray Unbalanced Perspective on Biofuels DOE Committed to Environmentally Sound Biofuels Development DOE Response based on contributions from Office of Biomass Program; Argonne National, Hill, Tilman, Polasky and Hawthorne study ("Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt") claims

  8. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved.

  9. NERSC Cyber Security Challenges That Require DOE Development and Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    ) is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high performance computing, information, data, and impacts the productivity of the DOE Science community. In particular, NERSC and other high performance computing (HPC) centers have special security challenges that are unlikely to be met unless DOE funds

  10. CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    CALCULATING THE CARBON FOOTPRINT SUPPLY CHAIN FOR THE SEMICONDUCTOR INDUSTRY A LEARNING TOOL By a complete supply chain #12;Carbon Footprint Supply Chain Carbon Trust defines carbon footprint of a supply chain as follows: "The carbon footprint of a product is the carbon dioxide emitted across the supply

  11. U.S. DOE methodology for the development of geologic storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basin level. The US-DOE methodology is intended for external users such as the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs), future project developers, and governmental...

  12. Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy or creating waste? Big changes for a smaller carbon footprint and less pollution The Lab is working to reduce emissions by nearly 30 percent from energy use in...

  13. DOE Cooperative Research and Development Agreements | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at Bettis DOE CompletesDepartmentDOE

  14. An Indigenous Application for Estimating Carbon footprint of academia library systems based on life cycle assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Saurabh; David Dornfeld

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR ESTIMATING CARBON FOOTPRINT OF ACADEMIA LIBRARY SYSTEMSacross the world. A carbon footprint is a measure of thethat can calculate the carbon footprint of a library system

  15. IS THE TAIL WAGGING THE DOG? AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CARBON FOOTPRINTS AND FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delmas, Magali A; Nairn-Birch, Nicholas S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of carbon footprint estimation boundaries.ANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CARBON FOOTPRINTS AND FINANCIALANALYSIS OF CORPORATE CARBON FOOTPRINTS AND FINANCIAL

  16. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the GHG emissions (“carbon footprint”) of crop production inMaterials and methods – “carbon footprint” calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is “the total set of

  17. DOE Announces Additional Steps in Developing Sustainable Biofuels Industry

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of ENERGYAgreesof Energy DOE|

  18. DOE Laboratories Help Develop Promising New Cancer Fighting Drug,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE Fits Princeton PlasmaDepartment

  19. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE Fits

  20. DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop And Explore Geothermal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE FitsEnergy Resources | Department of

  1. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Nobel Chemists Associated with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOE DNAthe

  2. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Nobel Physicists Associated

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOE

  3. DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop And Explore Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&DDepartment offorEnergy LabSmartDOE LessonsEnergy

  4. DOE Leverages Fossil Energy Expertise to Develop and Explore Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&DDepartment offorEnergy LabSmartDOE

  5. 2011 DOE Vehicle Technologies KIVA-Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S.Energy MoreEnergyEnergyWednesday, May 25DOE

  6. DOE's Coal Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency, and MoreEnergyof Energy DOEEnergyDOE's Coal

  7. Development Wells At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy

  8. Development Wells At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump to:

  9. Development Wells At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump4Wister

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Brookside Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ceilings, R-10 rigid polyiso on basement walls, a tankless gas water heater, and a heat pump with gas furnace backup. Brookside Development: Singer Village Derby - Derby, CT...

  11. LEED for Neighborhood Development: Does it Capture Livability?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Hannah Elizabeth; Aranoff, Miriam; Lavine, Ethan; Suteethorn, Kanokwalee Mam

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and Environmental Design for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) is a fairly new system for rating neighborhoods on the sustainability

  12. Guide to good practices for developing learning objectives. DOE Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide to good practices provides information and guidance on the types of and development of learning objectives in a systematic approach to training program. This document can serve as a reference during the development of new learning objectives or refinement of existing ones.

  13. Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    Treading Lightly Steps Toward Reducing Our Carbon Footprint This is one section of The University reducing the UA's carbon footprint. The Facilities Management recycling and waste department supports long

  14. Streamlined carbon footprint computation : case studies in the food industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yin Jin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the greatest barriers in product Carbon Footprinting is the large amount of time and effort required for data collection across the supply chain. Tesco's decision to downsize their carbon footprint project from the ...

  15. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.; Lorenz, T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant opportunities exist for improving energy efficiency in U.S. manufacturing. A first step in realizing these opportunities is to identify how industry is using energy. Where does it come from? What form is it in? Where is it used? How much...

  16. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.; Lorenz, T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant opportunities exist for improving energy efficiency in U.S. manufacturing. A first step in realizing these opportunities is to identify how industry is using energy. Where does it come from? What form is it in? Where is it used? How much...

  17. DOE Tour of Zero: The MassDevelopment Devens Green Zero-Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Devens Green Zero-Energy Community Custom Home by Transformations Inc. DOE Tour of Zero: The MassDevelopment Devens Green Zero-Energy Community Custom Home by Transformations Inc....

  18. Development of HVAC System Performance Criteria Using Factorial Design and DOE-2 Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, D.; Jones, J. W.; Hunn, B. D.; Banks, J. A.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach is described for the development of Heating, Ventilating, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) System Performance Criteria for the Texas Building Energy Design Standard. This approach integrates a design of experimental methodology and DOE-2...

  19. Steam Challenge: Developing A New DOE Program to Help Industry be Steam Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, T.; Hart, F.

    Last year, the Alliance to Save Energy, the Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies, and a cadre of private companies and associations formed an innovative "Steam Partnership" with the goal of developing a new, DOE technical...

  20. Final Technical Report on DOE Junior Faculty Development Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munsat, Tobin

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this project we developed and contstructed the Colorado FRC facility, which included a custom vacuum vessel, high voltage and firing circuitry, two plasma gun electrodes, and pumping system, and several diagnostics. Density measurements were made with a multichannel CO{sub 2} (10.6 ?m) laser interferometer. We also developed and a high-resolution magnetic probe array for 3-axis measurements of magnetic fluctuations. We constructed and implemented a triple Langmuir probe for making time-resolved measurements of plasma density, potential, and temperature. By calculating the time history of the gun eigenvalue, we observed indications that the Taylor formation paradigm applies. To estimate the spectral characteristics of fluctuations in an FRC, we developed a technique to extract the relevant spectral information using data from the high-resolution multi-point magnetic probe.

  1. Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    #12;i Water footprint assessment of crop production in Shaanxi, China Bachelor Thesis Civil, Yangling, China Keywords: Agricultural crops, water footprint, Shaanxi province, CROPWAT #12;ii #12;iii ABSTRACT The water footprint, introduced by professor A.Y. Hoekstra, is an indicator of freshwater use

  2. Ris-R-Report Emerging product carbon footprint standards and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-Report Emerging product carbon footprint standards and schemes and their possible trade Bolwig and Peter Gibbon Title: Emerging product carbon footprint standards and schemes and their possible, use and disposal. The outcome of these calculations is referred to as "product carbon footprints

  3. DOE's Research Efforts in Developing CCS Technologies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelopEnergy Oak

  4. DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009)|Publishes Roadmap for Developing

  5. DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelop Low-carbon Emission Coal Technologies

  6. DOE's Coal Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelop Low-carbon Emission CoalEnergyCoal

  7. DOE, Invensys Operations Management to Develop, Deploy Operator Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterialsDevelopEnergyof Energy

  8. DOE's Advanced Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Program to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergyBoilersPlantof EnergyEnergyDepartment ofDevelop

  9. Development of a Dynamic DOE Calibration Model | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T A * S HBatteries withAbstract Development|

  10. Support for DOE program in mineral waste-form development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmour, H. III; Hare, T.M.; Russ, J.C.; Batchelor, A.D.; Paisley, M.J.; Freed, L.E.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research investigation relates to sintered simulation ceramic waste forms of the generic SYNROC compositional type. Though they have been formulated with simulated wastes only, they serve as prototypes for potential hot, processed, crystalline waste forms whose combined thermodynamic stability and physical integrity are considered to render them capable of long-term imobilization of high-level radwastes under deep geologic disposal conditions. The problems involved are nontrivial, largely because of the very complex nature of the radwastes: a typical waste stream would contain more than 31 cation species. When the stabilizing matrix constituents are included, the final batch composition must successfully account (and find substitutional homes for some 35 different cation species. One of the important objectives of this study thus has been to develop a computer-based method for simulating these complex ion substitutions, and for calculating the resultant phase demands and batch formulations. Primary goals of the study have been (1) use of that computer simulation capability to incorporate rationally the radwaste ions from a specific waste stream (PW-7a) into the available SYNROC lattice sites and (2) utilization of existing ceramic processing and sintering methodologies to assure (and to understand) the attainment of high density, fine microstructure, full phase development and other features of the sintered product which are known to relate directly to its integrity and leach resistance. Though improved resistance to leaching has been a continuing goal, time and budget constraints have precluded initiation of any leachability studies of these new compositions during this contract period. 27 references, 15 figures, 6 tables.

  11. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

  12. Capsule review of the DOE research and development and field facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of the roles of DOE's headquarters, field offices, major multiprogram laboratories, Energy Technology and Mining Technology Centers, and other government-owned, contractor-operated facilities, which are located in all regions of the US. Descriptions of DOE facilities are given for multiprogram laboratories (12); program-dedicated facilities (biomedical and environmental facilities-12, fossil energy facilities-7, fusion energy facility-1, nuclear development facilities-3, physical research facilities-4, safeguards facility-1, and solar facilities-2); and Production, Testing, and Fabrication Facilities (nuclear materials production facilities-5, weapon testing and fabrication complex-8). Three appendices list DOE field and project offices; DOE field facilities by state or territory, names, addresses, and telephone numbers; DOE R and D field facilities by type, contractor names, and names of directors. (MCW)

  13. Audit of Administration of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements at DOE National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE established policies to ensure that Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAS) enhance US competitiveness in the world economy, provide a reasonable return on resources invested, and enable successful commercialization of technologies developed. DOE`s Office of Technology Partnerships issued a General Guidance Memorandum to DOE operations offices establishing policy goals for technology transfer programs, including CRADAS. Our audit disclosed that efforts to manage CRADAs at three national laboratories did not fully achieve DOE`s policy goals outlined in the General Guidance Memorandum. Specifically, the audit showed that: (1) joint work statements did not always contain clearly defined information that allowed DOE to facilitate technology transfer or to evaluate CRADAs potential benefits; (2) CRADA statements of work did not always contain adequate documentation or address potential benefits; (3) the national laboratories reviewed did not have effective mechanisms for continuous self-appraisal or measures of overall program success; and (4) CRADA provisions did not exist to ensure an accurate evaluation of partner contributions.

  14. EM Exceeds DOE Sustainability Goals and Reduces its Carbon Footprint |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartmentStatementEnergyEliminates

  15. ORAU Supports DOE Footprint Reduction Efforts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.of Energy OPCOPSAID InitialWhat'sORAU

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE News Release-DOE Completes Cleanup at New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Completes Cleanup at New York, California Sites Recovery Act funds accelerate cleanup; support job creation and footprint reduction WASHINGTON, D.C. - Last month, the U.S....

  17. DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and Interaction with Standards Development Organizations- August 1, 2000

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs).

  18. Comparison of the Unique Mobility and DOE-developed ac electric drive systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, G.H.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison was made between the most recent DOE-developed AC electric vehicle drive systems and that which is independently under development by Unique Mobility of Golden, Colorado. The DOE-developed AC systems compared in this study are the Single-Shaft Electric Propulsion System (ETX-II) developed by Ford Motor Company and the General Electric Company under contract number DE-AC07-85NV10418, the Dual-Shaft Electric Propulsion (DSEP) System developed by Eaton Corporation under contract number DOE-AC08-84NV-10366, and the anticipated results of the Modular Electric Vehicle (MEV) system currently being developed by Ford and General Electric under contract number DE-AC07-90ID13019. The Unique Mobility brushless DC electric vehicle drive system represents their latest electric drive technology and is being developed in cooperation with BMW Technik Gmbh of Germany. Comparisons of specific volume, specific weight, efficiency and expected vehicle performance are made of the different systems based upon measured system performance data where available. One conclusion presented is that the Unique Mobility drive system under development with BMW appears to provide comparable performance to the AC systems studied.

  19. Notice of Intent to Revise DOE O 483.1, Cooperative Research and Development Agreements and DOE M 483.1-1, Cooperative Research and Development Agreements Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Justification memorandum approving revision of the outdated DOE O 483.1 to incorporate DOE M 483.1-1 into the revised order.

  20. Development of DOE complex wide authorized release protocols for radioactive scrap metals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S. Y.

    1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the next few decades, several hundred thousand tons of metal are expected to be removed from nuclear facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex as a result of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. These materials, together with large quantities of tools, equipment, and other items that are commonly recovered from site cleanup or D&D activities, constitute non-real properties that warrant consideration for reuse or recycle, as permitted and practiced under the current DOE policy. The provisions for supporting this policy are contained in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. The objective of this study is to develop readily usable computer-based release protocols to facilitate implementation of the Handbook in evaluating the scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The protocols provide DOE with an effective oversight tool for managing release activities.

  1. DOES THE LOCAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT? SOME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 DOES THE LOCAL EMBEDDEDNESS OF ENERGY PRODUCTION CONTRIBUTE TO SUSTAINABLE RURAL DEVELOPMENT underlines the spatial transition of energy production relating to the spreading of wind turbines Europe. From a rural perspective, the spreading of wind energy parks is the comeback of energy production

  2. Energy Efficient Refinery Process Developed with U.S. D.O.E. Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mings, W. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY EFFICIENT REFINERY PROCESS DEVELOPED WITH U.S. D.O.E. SUPPORT Walter J. Mings, P.E. EG&G Idaho, Inc. Idaho Falls, Idaho Abstract The United States Department of Energy histori cally has encouraged private efforts to develop en ergy... with potential for extensive industrial energy savings. INTRODUCTION An innovative energy saving refinery process (also called the catalytic distillation process) for pro ducing MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) was devel oped by two Houston companies...

  3. Fact #693: September 19, 2011 Average Vehicle Footprint for Cars...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and the average track width of the vehicle. The upcoming Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards have fuel economy targets based on the vehicle footprint. The...

  4. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint - Sector: Iron and Steel (NAICS 3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006)...

  5. Footprinter(tm) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana, California: EnergyFootprinter(tm)

  6. Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco-Environmental assessment of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accepted Manuscript Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment Corre O, Feidt M, Carbon Footprint and emergy combination for Eco- Environmental assessment of cleaner ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 CARBON FOOTPRINT AND EMERGY COMBINATION FOR ECO- ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF CLEANER

  7. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE DOE DIRECT LIQUEFACTION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN OF THE LATE TWENTIETH CENTURY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.P. Burke; S.D. Brandes; D.C. McCoy; R.A. Winschel; D. Gray; G. Tomlinson

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the petroleum price and supply disruptions of 1973, the U.S. government began a substantial program to fund the development of alternative fuels. Direct coal liquefaction was one of the potential routes to alternative fuels. The direct coal liquefaction program was funded at substantial levels through 1982, and at much lower levels thereafter. Those processes that were of most interest during this period were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels. By 1999, U.S. government funding for the development of direct coal liquefaction ended. Now that the end of this campaign has arrived, it is appropriate to summarize the process learnings derived from it. This report is a summary of the process learnings derived from the DOE direct coal liquefaction process development campaign of the late twentieth century. The report concentrates on those process development programs that were designed to produce primarily distillate fuels and were largely funded by DOE and its predecessors in response to the petroleum supply and price disruptions of the 1970s. The report is structured as chapters written by different authors on most of the major individual DOE-funded process development programs. The focus of the report is process learnings, as opposed to, say, fundamental coal liquefaction science or equipment design. As detailed in the overview (Chapter 2), DOE's direct coal liquefaction campaign made substantial progress in improving the process yields and the quality of the distillate product. Much of the progress was made after termination by 1983 of the major demonstration programs of the ''first generation'' (SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS) processes.

  8. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, Joshua P., E-mail: jpnewell@umich.edu [School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Vos, Robert O., E-mail: vos@usc.edu [Spatial Sciences Institute, University of Southern California (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a 'carbon neutral' flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and forest carbon modeling communities is necessary.

  9. Comprehensive carbon footprint analysis of the value chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , carbon sequestration) VTT: expertise in sustainability assessment (life cycle analysis, carbon footprint of wood supply 2.Carbon sequestration Managed stand Unmanaged stand photos: Erkki Oksanen/Metla #12;VTT of the results Quality - wood & biomass Biodiversity Carbon - sequestration - footprint Economics - cost

  10. ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh: Homework (1 for each week @10%): 40% Personal carbon account (report): 30% Final exam: 30% Course schedule Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major

  11. Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

  12. Future challenges and DOE/NNSA-JAEA cooperation for the development of advanced safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Rebecca S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Clelland - Kerr, John [NNSA-NA-242; Senzaki, Masao [JAEA; Hori, Masato [JAEA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has been cooperating with Japan on nuclear safeguards for over thirty years. DOE/NNSA has collaborated with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and its predecessors in addressing the need for innovative solutions to nuclear transparency and verification issues in one of the world's most advanced nuclear fuel cycle states. This collaboration includes over ninety activities that have involved nearly every facility in the JAEA complex and many national laboratories in the U.S. complex. The partnership has yielded new technologies and approaches that have benefited international safeguards not only in Japan, but around the world. The International Atomic Energy Agency uses a number of safeguards solutions developed under this collaboration to improve its inspection efforts in Japan and elsewhere. Japanese facilities serve as test beds for emerging safeguards technologies and are setting the trend for new nuclear energy and fuel cycle development worldwide. The collaboration continues to be an essential component of U.S. safeguards outreach and is integral to the DOE/NNSA's Next Generation Safeguards Initiative. In addition to fostering international safeguards development, the cooperation is an opportunity for U.S. scientists to work in facilities that have no analog in the United States, thus providing crucial real-life experience for and aiding development of the next generation of U.S. safeguards specialists. It is also an important element of promoting regional transparency thereby building confidence in the peaceful nature of nuclear programs in the region. The successes engendered by this partnership provide a strong basis for addressing future safeguards challenges, in Japan and elsewhere. This paper summarizes these challenges and the associated cooperative efforts that are either underway or anticipated.

  13. Standard for developing and issuing DOE safety guides and implementation guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard establishes the style, format, content, and process for preparing and issuing DOE guides. It is intended for use by all DOE components, including contractors. The DOE guides provide information on DOE`s expectations on meeting the provisions of rules, orders, notices, manuals, immediate action directives, and regulatory standards (requirements documents) or policies.

  14. Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

  15. The Ninth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Development Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nearly 200 lighting leaders from across North America gathered in Detroit from November 12–13, 2014, for the ninth annual Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Market Development Workshop, hosted by DOE. The diverse audience spanned the spectrum of SSL stakeholders, representing industry, government, efficiency organizations, utilities, municipalities, designers, specifiers, retailers, and distributors. The workshop’s purpose was to create a forum for airing issues and questions regarding today’s solid-state lighting products, and identifying strategies that will speed market adoption.

  16. LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOX,K.J.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2001. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2001 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2002. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2001 was $6 million. The actual allocation totaled $5.3 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

  17. COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 9, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke...

  18. DOE (Department of Energy) nuclear weapon R and T (research, development, and testing): Objectives, roles, and responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otey, G.R.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the DOE nuclear weapons research, development, and testing program is given along with a description of the program objectives and the roles and responsibilities of the various involved organizations. The relationship between the DoD and DOE is described and the division of responsibilities for weapon development as well as the coordinated planning and acquisition activities are reviewed. Execution of the RD T program at the nuclear weapons laboratories is outlined. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  19. AGRY 598/FNR 598 Ecological Footprints, Spring 2010 Pfendler 203, TTh, 1:30 -2:45 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Scott A.

    that residents of Tippecanoe County can use to quantify their stormwater footprint, carbon footprint and backyard this tool. Students will learn how to: o Quantify a stormwater footprint o Quantify a carbon footprint o1/5 Syllabus AGRY 598/FNR 598 Ecological Footprints, Spring 2010 Pfendler 203, TTh, 1:30 - 2:45 pm

  20. DOE Community- and Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presented by the Tribal Energy Program and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy with support from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory, this interactive workshop will...

  1. JM to Develop DOE P 364.1, Health and Safety Training Reciprocity

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The policy will provide expectations for the acceptance of equivalent worker safety and health training across the DOE Complex.

  2. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Digby Macdonald; Brian Marx; Balaji Soundararajan; Morgan Smith

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The different tasks that have been carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA), which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals, and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool for studying the crack tip processes in relation to the chemical, mechanical, electrochemical, and microstructural properties of the system. Experiments are currently being carried out to explore these crack tip processes by simultaneous measurement of the acoustic activity at the crack tip in an effort to validate the coupling current data. These latter data are now being used to deterministically predict the accumulation of general and localized corrosion damage on carbon in prototypical DOE liquid waste storage tanks. Computer simulation of the cathodic and anodic activity on the steel surfaces is also being carried out in an effort to simulate the actual corrosion process. Wavelet analysis of the coupling current data promises to be a useful tool to differentiate between the different corrosion mechanisms. Hence, wavelet analysis of the coupling current data from the DOE waste containers is also being carried out to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data which is bound to contain noise fluctuations due to any or all of the above mentioned processes.

  3. Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

  4. Preliminary estimation of the footprint and survivability of the Chelyabinsk Meteor fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parigini, Cristina; Haya-Ramos, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several differences between the planetary entry of space vehicles and that of asteroids. In this work we do investigate the applicability of classical methods and approaches developed for debris analysis to asteroid entry. In particular, the in-house DEBRIS tool, which has been designed and developed to address the debris problem for uncontrolled re-entry objects, is used here to predict the survivability and the ground footprint of asteroid fragments. The results obtained for the Chelyabinsk event are presented as test case. A comparison with the current available information is provided, proving the validity of the proposed approach.

  5. DOE's Hydrogen Fuel Cell Activities: Developing Technology and Validating it through Real-World Evaluation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation prepared for the May 12, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Conference that describes DOE's current hydrogen fuel cell technology validation projects.

  6. Nanoplasmonic molecular ruler for nuclease activity and DNA footprinting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fanqing Frank; Liu, Gang L; Lee, Luke P

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a nanoplasmonic molecular ruler, which can perform label-free and real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (e.g., DNA) length changes and perform nucleic acid footprinting. In various embodiments the ruler comprises a nucleic acid attached to a nanoparticle, such that changes in the nucleic acid length are detectable using surface plasmon resonance. The nanoplasmonic ruler provides a fast and convenient platform for mapping nucleic acid-protein interactions, for nuclease activity monitoring, and for other footprinting related methods.

  7. Development of Advanced Electrochemical Emission Spectroscopy for Monitoring Corrosion in Simulated DOE Liquid Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Digby D. Macdonald; Brian M. Marx; Sejin Ahn; Julio de Ruiz; Balaji Soundararaja; Morgan Smith; and Wendy Coulson

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Various forms of general and localized corrosion represent principal threats to the integrity of DOE liquid waste storage tanks. These tanks, which are of a single wall or double wall design, depending upon their age, are fabricated from welded carbon steel and contain a complex waste-form comprised of NaOH and NaNO{sub 3}, along with trace amounts of phosphate, sulfate, carbonate, and chloride. Because waste leakage can have a profound environmental impact, considerable interest exists in predicting the accumulation of corrosion damage, so as to more effectively schedule maintenance and repair. The different tasks that are being carried out under the current program are as follows: (1) Theoretical and experimental assessment of general corrosion of iron/steel in borate buffer solutions by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), ellipsometry and XPS techniques; (2) Development of a damage function analysis (DFA) which would help in predicting the accumulation of damage due to pitting corrosion in an environment prototypical of DOE liquid waste systems; (3) Experimental measurement of crack growth rate, acoustic emission signals and coupling currents for fracture in carbon and low alloy steels as functions of mechanical (stress intensity), chemical (conductivity), electrochemical (corrosion potential, ECP), and microstructural (grain size, precipitate size, etc) variables in a systematic manner, with particular attention being focused on the structure of the noise in the current and its correlation with the acoustic emissions; (4) Development of fracture mechanisms for carbon and low alloy steels that are consistent with the crack growth rate, coupling current data and acoustic emissions; (5) Inserting advanced crack growth rate models for SCC into existing deterministic codes for predicting the evolution of corrosion damage in DOE liquid waste storage tanks; (6) Computer simulation of the anodic and cathodic activity on the surface of the steel samples in order to exactly predict the corrosion mechanisms; (7) Wavelet analysis of EC noise data from steel samples undergoing corrosion in an environment similar to that of the high level waste storage containers, to extract data pertaining to general, pitting and stress corrosion processes, from the overall data. The Point Defect Model (PDM) is directly applied as the theoretical assessment method for describing the passive film formed on iron/steels. The PDM is used to describe general corrosion in the passive region of iron. In addition, previous work suggests that pit formation is due to the coalescence of cation vacancies at the metal/film interface which would make it possible to use the PDM parameters to predict the onset of pitting. This previous work suggests that once the critical vacancy density is reached, the film ruptures to form a pit. Based upon the kinetic parameters derived for the general corrosion case, two parameters relating to the cation vacancy formation and annihilation can be calculated. These two parameters can then be applied to predict the transition from general to pitting corrosion for iron/mild steels. If cation vacancy coalescence is shown to lead to pitting, it can have a profound effect on the direction of future studies involving the onset of pitting corrosion. The work has yielded a number of important findings, including an unequivocal demonstration of the role of chloride ion in passivity breakdown on nickel in terms of cation vacancy generation within the passive film, the first detection and characterization of individual micro fracture events in stress corrosion cracking, and the determination of kinetic parameters for the generation and annihilation of point defects in the passive film on iron. The existence of coupling between the internal crack environment and the external cathodic environment, as predicted by the coupled environment fracture model (CEFM), has also been indisputably established for the AISI 4340/NaOH system. It is evident from the studies that analysis of coupling current noise is a very sensitive tool f

  8. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION REVIEW AND SURVEY of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 301 Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.N. Bailey

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION REVIEW AND SURVEY of the Argonne National Laboratory Building 301 Footprint, Argonne Illinois 5061-SR-01-0

  9. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partiallyassesses three alternative energy technologies, including

  10. Savannah River Site Footprint Reduction Results under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - 13302

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flora, Mary [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Bldg. 730-4B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Adams, Angelia [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [United States Department of Energy Bldg. 730-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Pope, Robert [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency Region IV Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is an 802 square-kilometer United States Department of Energy (US DOE) nuclear facility located along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, managed and operated by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions. Construction of SRS began in the early 1950's to enhance the nation's nuclear weapons capability. Nuclear weapons material production began in the early 1950's, eventually utilizing five production reactors constructed to support the national defense mission. Past operations have resulted in releases of hazardous constituents and substances to soil and groundwater, resulting in 515 waste sites with contamination exceeding regulatory thresholds. More than 1,000 facilities were constructed onsite with approximately 300 of them considered radiological, nuclear or industrial in nature. In 2003, SRS entered into a Memorandum of Agreement with its regulators to accelerate the cleanup using an Area Completion strategy. The strategy was designed to focus cleanup efforts on the 14 large industrial areas of the site to realize efficiencies of scale in the characterization, assessment, and remediation activities. This strategy focuses on addressing the contaminated surface units and the vadose zone and addressing groundwater plumes subsequently. This approach streamlines characterization and remediation efforts as well as the required regulatory documentation, while enhancing the ability to make large-scale cleanup decisions. In February 2009, Congress approved the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) to create jobs and promote economic recovery. At SRS, ARRA funding was established in part to accelerate the completion of environmental remediation and facility deactivation and decommissioning (D and D). By late 2012, SRS achieved 85 percent footprint reduction utilizing ARRA funding by accelerating and coupling waste unit remediation with D and D of remnant facilities. Facility D and D activities were sequenced and permitted with waste unit remediation activities to streamline regulatory approval and execution. Achieving footprint reduction fulfills the Government's responsibility to address legacy contamination; allows earlier completion of legally enforceable compliance agreement milestones; and enables future potential reuse of DOE resources, including land and infrastructure for other missions. Over the last 3.5 years significant achievements were met that contributed to footprint reduction, including the closure of 41 waste units (including 20 miles of radiologically contaminated stream) and decommissioning of 30 facilities (including the precedent setting in situ closure of two former production reactors, the first in the DOE Complex). Other notable achievements included the removal of over 39,750 cubic meters of debris and 68,810 cubic meters of contaminated soils, including 9175 cubic meters of lead-contaminated soil from a former site small arms testing range and treatment of 1,262 cubic meters of tritium-laden soils and concrete using a thermal treatment system. (authors)

  11. The net carbon footprint of a newly created boreal hydroelectric reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    The net carbon footprint of a newly created boreal hydroelectric reservoir Cristian R. Teodoru,1 present here the first comprehensive assessment of the carbon (C) footprint associated with the creation-term at rates exceeding the carbon footprint of the pre-flood landscape, although the sources of C supporting

  12. GreenColo: Incentivizing Tenants for Reducing Carbon Footprint in Colocation Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Shaolei

    1 GreenColo: Incentivizing Tenants for Reducing Carbon Footprint in Colocation Data Centers energy consumption of data centers worldwide has resulted in a large carbon footprint, raising serious their servers for carbon efficiency. In this paper, we aim at minimizing the carbon footprint of geo

  13. REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    REVIEW PAPER Strategies for reducing the carbon footprint of field crops for semiarid areas emission. To provide the potential solution, we estimated the carbon footprint [i.e., the total amount the effect of crop sequences on the carbon footprint of durum wheat. Key strategies for reducing the carbon

  14. Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

  15. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 436.1-1, Sustainable Print Management -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOE Directives, Delegations, and

  16. Automatic Construction of Building Footprints from Airborne LIDAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    data are essential for construc- tion of urban landscape models, assessment of urban heat island effect for extraction of building footprints. Manual derivation of building geometric data from a remote sensing image due to the influence of sun shadow and relief displacement of high buildings in remote sensing images

  17. CARBON FOOTPRINT STUDY OF A ZERO ENERGY COSUMPTION RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    frequently the term of zero energy building (ZEB) is called when designing a new building. A net zero-energyCARBON FOOTPRINT STUDY OF A ZERO ENERGY COSUMPTION RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION Tiberiu Catalina 1 and coal), which provides currently more than 80% of the primary energies marketed in the world

  18. Software-related Energy Footprint of a Wireless Broadband Module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the power consumption. This opens up for potential energy savings by creating better ap- plications Keywords 3G, Energy footprint, Power consumption, Wireless broad- band 1. INTRODUCTION The battery lifetime the energy consumption is an essential part of de- veloping new hardware components, it has been a neglected

  19. Eight Advanced Coal Projects Chosen for Further Development by DOE's University Coal Research Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has selected eight new projects to further advanced coal research under the University Coal Research Program. The selected projects will improve coal conversion and use and will help propel technologies for future advanced coal power systems.

  20. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE O 470.X, Insider Threat Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes top-level responsibilities and requirements for DOE's Insider Threat Program, which is intended to deter, detect, and mitigate insider threat actions by all Federal and contractor employees.

  1. DOE Announces Selections from Solid-State Lighting Product Development Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the selection of five (5) applications in response to the Solid-State...

  2. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 5)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce its selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities. Fourteen...

  3. Healthy habits: reducing our carbon footprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecoveryG -Hazmat workHowHealthy

  4. DOE Mentoring Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development coordinates this mentoring program for DOE Federal Employees.

  5. Wind energy development experience central and south west: EPRI/DOE-turbine verification program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, W.; Treece, J. [Central and South West Services, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Turbine Verification Program (TVP) is a partnership of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and utility participants. The objectives of the TVP program are as follows: (1) Provide a limited market for newly designed wind turbines prior to their achievement of a fully commercial status. (2) Share the cost of the project so that it can be considered a prudent capital investment. (3) Determine the economic viability of wind turbine generation. (4) Promote utility participation in wind power projects and the evaluation of the latest commercial wind turbines. (5) Determine and document the performance of the wind turbines to meet TVP objectives. (6) Communicate the experiences gained in a turbine verification project to other utilities and turbine manufacturers. (7) Create a project whereby the expertise available through EPRI and DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory is readily accessible for utilities in their early use of wind power. EPRI and DOE awarded funds to select utilities based on the proposed projects ability to help commercialize state-of-the-art wind turbine technology. The funding will cover a portion of the costs associated with a 6 MW wind farm. In addition to funding the project, EPRI and the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided valuable technical expertise.

  6. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints Scope | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECS 2006) |Footprints Scope

  7. DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE Contract DOEEnergy Site FacilityTrucks |

  8. NERSC Cyber Security Challenges That Require DOE Development andSupport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draney, Brent; Campbell, Scott; Walter, Howard

    2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional security approaches do not adequately addressall the requirements of open, scientific computing facilities. Many ofthe methods used for more restricted environments, including almost allcorporate/commercial systems, do not meet the needs of today's science.Use of only the available "state of the practice" commercial methods willhave adverse impact on the ability of DOE to accomplish its sciencegoals, and impacts the productivity of the DOE Science community. Inparticular, NERSC and other high performance computing (HPC) centers havespecial security challenges that are unlikely to be met unless DOE fundsdevelopment and support of reliable and effective tools designed to meetthe cyber security needs of High Performance Science. The securitychallenges facing NERSC can be collected into three basic problem sets:network performance and dynamics, application complexity and diversity,and a complex user community that can have transient affiliations withactual institutions. To address these problems, NERSC proposes thefollowing four general solutions: auditing user and system activityacross sites; firewall port configuration in real time;cross-site/virtual organization identity management and access control;and detecting security issues in application middleware. Solutions arealsoproposed for three general long term issues: data volume,application complexity, and information integration.

  9. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING'' for the period starting June 23, 2003 through September 30, 2004. TerraTek has reviewed applicable literature and documentation and has convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. TerraTek has designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties in obtaining ultra-high speed motors for this feasibility work were encountered though they were sourced mid 2004. TerraTek is progressing through Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests''. Some improvements over early NASA experiments have been identified.

  10. SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high (greater than 10,000 rpm) rotational speeds. The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development and test results that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill ''faster and deeper'' possibly with rigs having a smaller footprint to be more mobile. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The project draws on TerraTek results submitted to NASA's ''Drilling on Mars'' program. The objective of that program was to demonstrate miniaturization of a robust and mobile drilling system that expends small amounts of energy. TerraTek successfully tested ultrahigh speed ({approx}40,000 rpm) small kerf diamond coring. Adaptation to the oilfield will require innovative bit designs for full hole drilling or continuous coring and the eventual development of downhole ultra-high speed drives. For domestic operations involving hard rock and deep oil and gas plays, improvements in penetration rates is an opportunity to reduce well costs and make viable certain field developments. An estimate of North American hard rock drilling costs is in excess of $1,200 MM. Thus potential savings of $200 MM to $600 MM are possible if drilling rates are doubled [assuming bit life is reasonable]. The net result for operators is improved profit margin as well as an improved position on reserves. The significance of the ''ultra-high rotary speed drilling system'' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm--usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document details the progress to date on the program entitled ''SMALLER FOOTPRINT DRILLING SYSTEM FOR DEEP AND HARD ROCK ENVIRONMENTS; FEASIBILITY OF ULTRA-HIGH SPEED DIAMOND DRILLING'' for the period starting June 23, 2003 through September 30, 2004. (1) TerraTek has reviewed applicable literature and documentation and has convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance. (2) TerraTek has designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments. Some difficulties in obtaining ultra-high speed motors for this feasibility work were encountered though they were sourced mid 2004. (3) TerraTek is progressing through Task 3 ''Small-scale cutting performance tests''. Some improvements over early NASA experiments have been identified.

  11. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE Guide 436.1-1, Sustainable Print Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide will support Executive Order (E.O.) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade. signed on March 19, 2015, which requires the Federal Government to lead by example to create a clean energy economy that will increase prosperity, promote energy security, protect the interests of taxpayers, and safeguard the health of the environment. Under E.O. 13693, Federal agencies are required to increase energy efficiency, eliminate waste, and leverage agency acquisitions by reducing costs and resources in their printing activities. This Guide also aligns with the requirements of DOE O 436.1, Departmental Sustainability.

  12. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 436.1-1, Sustainable Print Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide will support Executive Order (E.O.) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade. signed on March 19, 2015, which requires the Federal Government to lead by example to create a clean energy economy that will increase prosperity, promote energy security, protect the interests of taxpayers, and safeguard the health of the environment. Under E.O. 13693, Federal agencies are required to increase energy efficiency, eliminate waste, and leverage agency acquisitions by reducing costs and resources in their printing activities. This Guide also aligns with the requirements of DOE O 436.1, Departmental Sustainability.

  13. DOE Facilitates Market-Driven Solutions to Develop and Deploy New

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE F 1300.2 Record

  14. DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE F 1300.2

  15. DOE Funds 21 Research, Development and Demonstration Projects for up to $78

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE F 1300.2Million to Promote Enhanced

  16. DOE Live Video Presentation: Smart Grid Development in the U.S. |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE FitsEnergy Resources | Department

  17. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy Development on DOE Legacy Management Lands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperational Management »EnergyHubs | DepartmentCloudLegacy

  18. DOE to Host Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 29-30 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRUJuly 29,of Energy DOE site facilityDepartment

  19. DOE Funds 21 Research, Development and Demonstration Projects for up to $78

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOE Fuel CellMillion to Promote

  20. DOE to Provide Nearly $20 Million to Further Development of Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |ProductionDepartment ofDOE toDepartment

  1. DOE to Provide up to $14 Million to Develop Advanced Batteries for Plug-in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency, and MoreEnergyof Energy DOEEnergy DOE toHybrid

  2. DOE to Provide Nearly $20 Million to Further Development of Advanced

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 ChairsEnergyawards contract for sludgeDOE to HostSystemsBatteries

  3. Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) | Open

  4. Development Wells At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |

  5. Development Wells At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump4 wells

  6. Development Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump4

  7. The State of Data Management in the DOE Research and Development Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterTheManagement |DevelopmenttheTHE

  8. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MANUFACTURING THROUGH AN ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SUPPLY Chris Y.Footprint, Alternative Energy, Cost of Ownership ABSTRACTmanufacturing is to use alternative energies to partially

  9. DOE Community-/Facility-Scale Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Finance Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This interactive workshop will walk participants through five steps to help tribes understand the process for and potential pitfalls of developing community- and facility-scale renewable energy...

  10. Seven Projects That Will Advance Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Research Selected by DOE for Further Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seven projects that will help develop low-cost solid oxide fuel cell technology for environmentally responsible central power generation from the Nation’s abundant fossil energy resources have been selected for further research by the Department of Energy.

  11. Online Catalog of Isotope Products from DOE's National Isotope Development Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) interfaces with the User Community and manages the coordination of isotope production across the facilities and business operations involved in the production, sale, and distribution of isotopes. A virtual center, the NIDC is funded by the Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications (IDPRA) subprogram of the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. The Isotope subprogram supports the production, and the development of production techniques of radioactive and stable isotopes that are in short supply for research and applications. Isotopes are high-priority commodities of strategic importance for the Nation and are essential for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research; a goal of the program is to make critical isotopes more readily available to meet domestic U.S. needs. This subprogram is steward of the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) facility at BNL, and hot cell facilities for processing isotopes at ORNL, BNL and LANL. The subprogram also coordinates and supports isotope production at a suite of university, national laboratory, and commercial accelerator and reactor facilities throughout the Nation to promote a reliable supply of domestic isotopes. The National Isotope Development Center (NIDC) at ORNL coordinates isotope production across the many facilities and manages the business operations of the sale and distribution of isotopes.

  12. GE Hosts Visit by DOE to Kick Off High-Efficiency GeneratorDevelopment Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    design and HTS winding unprecedented in its simplicity. Recent progress in HTS wire manufacturing has.5-year program to move high-temperature superconducting (HTS) generator technology toward full on GE's extensive research into HTS materials and generators, the development program will lead

  13. Footprint traversal by ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Garai; Jesrael Mani; Debashish Chowdhury

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes (CRE) are bio-molecular motors in eukaryotic cells. These are driven by a chemical fuel, namely, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). CREs actively participate in many cellular processes that require accessibility of specific segments of DNA which are packaged as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin is a nucleosome where 146 bp $\\sim$ 50 nm of a double stranded DNA (dsDNA) is wrapped around a spool formed by histone proteins. The helical path of histone-DNA contact on a nucleosome is also called "footprint". We investigate the mechanism of footprint traversal by a CRE that translocates along the dsDNA. Our two-state model of a CRE captures effectively two distinct chemical (or conformational) states in the mechano-chemical cycle of each ATP-dependent CRE. We calculate the mean time of traversal. Our predictions on the ATP-dependence of the mean traversal time can be tested by carrying out {\\it in-vitro} experiments on mono-nucleosomes.

  14. Methodology for Carbon Footprint in Forestry Findings and Ways of Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ; in our application case it was 2008. 2.2 Bibliography A lot of studies focus on carbon sequestrationMethodology for Carbon Footprint in Forestry Findings and Ways of Improvement Gabriel Chauvet1 Auvergne, Site de Marmilhat, F-63370 Lempdes Abstract. Classic methodologies for carbon footprint are made

  15. Ecological footprint of an organization: can it really be Gondran Natacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    's ability to meet human demand for biological resources' consumption and CO2 sequestration. The Ecological land, built-up land and carbon uptake land. For each component, the ecological footprint is obtained Footprint Network (for example, FAO for harvested products). Concerning the carbon emission factors

  16. Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services Kien Le , Ozlem electricity consumptions translate into large carbon footprints, since most of the electricity in the US such as government imposed Kyoto- style carbon limits. Extensive simulations and real experiments show that our

  17. Overview of the U.S. DOE Accident Tolerant Fuel Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Lance L. Snead

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Fuel Cycle Research and Development Advanced Fuels Campaign has been given the responsibility to conduct research and development on enhanced accident tolerant fuels with the goal of performing a lead test assembly or lead test rod irradiation in a commercial reactor by 2022. The Advanced Fuels Campaign has defined fuels with enhanced accident tolerance as those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. This paper provides an overview of the FCRD Accident Tolerant Fuel program. The ATF attributes will be presented and discussed. Attributes identified as potentially important to enhance accident tolerance include reduced hydrogen generation (resulting from cladding oxidation), enhanced fission product retention under severe accident conditions, reduced cladding reaction with high-temperature steam, and improved fuel-cladding interaction for enhanced performance under extreme conditions. To demonstrate the enhanced accident tolerance of candidate fuel designs, metrics must be developed and evaluated using a combination of design features for a given LWR design, potential improvements to that design, and the design of an advanced fuel/cladding system. The aforementioned attributes provide qualitative guidance for parameters that will be considered for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. It may be unnecessary to improve in all attributes and it is likely that some attributes or combination of attributes provide meaningful gains in accident tolerance, while others may provide only marginal benefits. Thus, an initial step in program implementation will be the development of quantitative metrics. A companion paper in these proceedings provides an update on the status of establishing these quantitative metrics for accident tolerant LWR fuel.1 The United States FCRD Advanced Fuels Campaign has embarked on an aggressive schedule for development of enhanced accident tolerant LWR fuels. The goal of developing such a fuel system that can be deployed in the U.S. LWR fleet in the next 10 to 20 years supports the sustainability of clean nuclear power generation in the United States.

  18. Developing a Research Proposal | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application toDeveloping

  19. DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of the FY 2010 budget request for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds likely to be available in 2010 would (assuming that they would be split evenly between FY 2010 and FY 2011) result in a doubling in funding available for energy research, development, and deployment (ERD and D) from $3.6 billion in FY 2009 to $7.2 billion in FY 2010. Without the stimulus funds, DOE ERD and D investments in FY 2010 would decrease very slightly when compared to FY 2009. Excluding the $7.5 billion for the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loans in FY 2009, the FY 2010 budget request for deployment represents a 33 percent decrease from the FY 2009 levels from $520 million to $350 million. This decrease is largely due to the large amounts of funds appropriated in ARRA for DOE deployment programs, or $23.6 billion, which are three times greater than those appropriated in the FY 2009 budget. These very substantial funding amounts, coupled with the broad range of institutional innovations the administration is putting in place and movement toward putting a price on carbon emissions, will help accelerate innovation for a broad range of energy technologies. DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and the Energy Innovation Hubs are important initiatives that could contribute to two weak points of the government's energy innovation effort, namely funding high-risk projects in transformational technologies and in companies that have not traditionally worked with the government and strengthening the integration of basic and applied research in priority areas. Increasing the funding for different types of energy storage research, providing some support for exploring opportunities in coal-to-liquids with carbon capture and storage (CCS) and coal-and-biomass-to-liquids with CCS, and reducing funding for fission RD and D are other actions that Congress could take in the short-term. Energy storage may play a crucial role in the future of the power and transportation systems, which together consume two thirds of primary energy in the United States. A recent National Academy of Science report recommended carrying out detailed scenario assessments of the penetration of unconventional fuels from coal and coal and biomass with CCS. And the research plan provided for nuclear fission does not justify spending as many funds as were requested. The proposed funding for FY 2010 and the resources from ARRA, however, do not guarantee that the United States will finally enjoy the predictable and consistent publicly-funded energy technology innovation effort that it needs. The Obama administration must put in place a comprehensive energy technology innovation strategy that will ensure that an expanded ERD3 effort is both sustainable and efficient. This commission would be charged with, inter alia, developing a strategy that optimizes the integration of the various stages of innovation (research, development, demonstration, early deployment), as well as integrates efforts across technology areas. The database upon which this analysis is based may be downloaded in Excel format at: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/19119/ .

  20. US DOE-AECL cooperative program for development of high-level radioactive waste container fabrication, closure, and inspection techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, E.W.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) plan to initiate a cooperative research program on development of manufacturing processes for high-level radioactive waste containers. This joint program will benefit both countries in the development of processes for the fabrication, final closure in a hot-cell, and certification of the containers. Program activity objectives can be summarized as follows: to support the selection of suitable container fabrication, final closure, and inspection techniques for the candidate materials and container designs that are under development or are being considered in the US and Canadian repository programs; and to investigate these techniques for alternate materials and/or container designs, to be determined in future optimization studies relating to long-term performance of the waste packages. The program participants will carry out this work in a conditional phased approach, and the scope of work for subsequent years will evolve subject to developments in earlier years. The overall term of this cooperative program is planned to run roughly three years. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. A supply chain carbon footprint analysis of the University of California, Berkeley Christopher M. Jones and Daniel M. Kammen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    A supply chain carbon footprint analysis of the University of California, Berkeley Christopher M.S. university to calculate its supply chain carbon footprint. The genesis of this project was an understanding conducted a carbon footprint analysis that combined information from the reported emissions inventory

  2. Research and development separation technology: The DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure summarizes the Office of Industrial Programs' RandD efforts in the advancement of separation technology. The purpose of this brochure is to provide interested parties with information on federal industrial energy conservation activities in separation technology. The brochure is comprised of the following sections: Separation Technology, summarizes the current state of separation technology and its uses. Potential Energy Savings, discusses the potential for industrial energy conservation through the implementation of advanced separation processes. Office of Industrial Programs' RandD Efforts in Separation Technology Development, describes the separation RandD projects conducted by IP. RandD Data Base, lists contractor, principal investigator, and location of each separation-related RandD effort sponsored by IP.

  3. Report on Performance of Prototype Dynatronix Power Supplies Developed Under a Phase I DOE SBIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Merriman, Jason H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prototype power supplies fabricated by Dynatronix, Inc. This project supports the advancement of electroforming capabilities to produce ultra-high purity copper. Ultra-high purity copper is an essential material used for a range of current and future fundamental nuclear physics programs such as the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The Mach 30 power supplies are a new design built to the specifications from the requirements of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with regard to timing, voltage, current output, and the required tolerances. The parameters used in these tests were developed empirically over a number of years based on a combination of thermodynamic and kinetics of the electroplating process. The power supplies were operated in a typical cleanroom environment for the production electroforming at PNNL. The units that were received by PNNL in July, 2010 have performed satisfactorily and have demonstrated short term durability.

  4. Guidance for Developing and Implementing Institutional Controls for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at DOE Legacy Management Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidance document is to help U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) personnel understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the provisions of DOE...

  5. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Development of Cost-effective, Energy-efficient Steel Framing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nader R. Elhajj

    2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Steel members in wall construction form a thermal bridge that interrupts the insulation layer of a wall. This causes higher rate of heat transfer by conduction through the wall framing than through other parts of the wall. One method to reduce the thermal bridging effect is to provide a break, such as insulating sheathing. A thermally efficient slit-web and stud was developed in this program to mitigate the conductivity of steel. The thermal performance of the slit-web stud was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using hotbox testing. The thermal test results showed that the prototype slit-web stud performed 17% better than the solid-web stud, using R-13 fiber glass batts with exterior OSB sheathing and interior drywall. The structural behavior of this slit-web stud was evaluated in axial, bending, shear, shearwall, and stub-column tests. Test results indicated that the slitweb stud performed similarly or better than the solid-web stud in most structural performance characteristics investigated. Thus, the prototype slit-web stud has been shown to be thermally efficient, economiexecy viable, structurally sound, easily manufactured and usable in a range of residential installations.

  6. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO2 particle fuel up to about 10% FIMA and 1150°C, UO2 fuel is known to have limitations because of CO formation and kernel migration at the high burnups, power densities, temperatures, and temperature gradients that may be encountered in the prismatic modular HTGRs. With uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel, the kernel composition is engineered to prevent CO formation and kernel migration, which are key threats to fuel integrity at higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients. Furthermore, the recent poor fuel performance of UO2 TRISO fuel pebbles measured in Chinese irradiation testing in Russia and in German pebbles irradiated at 1250°C, and historic data on poorer fuel performance in safety testing of German pebbles that experienced burnups in excess of 10% FIMA [1] have each raised concern about the use of UO2 TRISO above 10% FIMA and 1150°C and the degree of margin available in the fuel system. This continues to be an active area of study internationally.

  7. Development of subcontractor indirect cost and other direct cost at the DOE Fernald Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossman, R.L. [Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) took great strides in the development of cost estimates at Fernald. There have been many opportunities to improve on how the policies and procedures pertaining to cost estimates were to be implemented. As FERMCO took over the existing Fernald facility, the Project Controls Division began to format the estimating procedures and tools to do business at Fernald. The Estimating Department looked at the problems that pre-existed at the site. One of the key problems that FERMCO encountered was how to summarized the direct and indirect accounts of each subcontracted estimate. Direct costs were broken down by prime and sub-prime accounts. This presented a level of detail that had not been experienced at the site before; it also created many issues concerning accounts and definitions to be applied to ``all other accounts associated with a project.`` Existing subcontract indirect cost accounts were reviewed from existing historical estimates. It was found that some were very detailed and some were not. The Estimating Department was given the task of standardizing the accounts and percentages for each of the subcontractor indirect costs. Then, as the project progressed, the percentages could be revised with actual estimates, subcontract comparisons, or with level of effort (LOE) accounts, which would represent qualified people assigned a task for the completion of each project. The approach is to assign particular employees to perform a specific task within a project from start to finish, and then to reassign the individual(s) to a new project (if it was available) integrating the expertise available with the skills required by the other operable units.

  8. Looking for Darwin's footprints in the microbial world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, B. Jesse; David, Lawrence A.; Friedman, Jonathan; Alm, Eric J.

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As we observe the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birthday, microbiologists interested in the application of Darwin's ideas to the microscopic world have a lot to celebrate: an emerging picture of the (mostly microbial) Tree of Life at ever-increasing resolution, an understanding of horizontal gene transfer as a driving force in the evolution of microbes, and thousands of complete genome sequences to help formulate and refine our theories. At the same time, quantitative models of the microevolutionary processes shaping microbial populations remain just out of reach, a point that is perhaps most dramatically illustrated by the lack of consensus on how (or even whether) to define bacterial species. We summarize progress and prospects in bacterial population genetics, with an emphasis on detecting the footprint of positive Darwinian selection in microbial genomes.

  9. EM Wins Awards for Taking Big Steps to Reduce DOE's Electronics Footprint

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |FinalEESS-7EstesnewslettersPrevious EM policyDepartment of|

  10. Relationships between Vehicle Mass, Footprint, and Societal Risk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  11. Transport mode and network architecture : carbon footprint as a new decision metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrieu, Nelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the tradeoffs between carbon footprint, cost, time and risk across three case studies of United States' perishable or consumer packaged goods firms and their transportation partners. Building upon ...

  12. How Citizens and Politicians Talk About Their Carbon Footprint: A Discourse Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacRitchie, Julie

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    citizens and politicians talk about their carbon footprint. One-on-one interviews were conducted and then transcribed and analysed using discursive psychology techniques, similar to Edwards and Potter (1992). Three themes of interest emerged from...

  13. A method to measure paddle and detector pressures and footprints in mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogg, Peter; Szczepura, Katy [University of Salford, Salford, Greater Manchester M6 6PU (United Kingdom); Darlington, Alison [Pennine Acute Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M8 5RB (United Kingdom); Maxwell, Anthony [Royal Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bolton BL4 0JR (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Compression is necessary in mammography to improve image quality and reduce radiation burden. Maximizing the amount of breast in contact with the image receptor (IR) is important. To achieve this, for the craniocaudal projection, there is no consensus within the literature regarding how the IR should be positioned relative to the inframammary fold (IMF). No information exists within the literature to describe how pressure balancing between IR and paddle, and IR breast footprint, might be optimized. This paper describes a novel method for measuring the respective pressures applied to the breast from the IR and the paddle and a method to simultaneously measure the breast footprints on the IR and the paddle. Methods: Using a deformable breast phantom and electronic pressure-sensitive mat, area and pressure readings were gathered from two mammography machines and four paddles at 60, 80, and 100 N with the IR positioned at -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2 cm relative to the IMF (60 combinations in total). Results: Paddle and IR footprints were calculated along with a uniformity index (UI). For all four paddle/machine/pressure combinations the greatest IR footprint was achieved at IMF +2 cm. The UI indicates that the best pressure/footprint balance is achieved at IMF +1 cm. Conclusions: The authors' method appears to be suited to measuring breast footprints and pressures on IR and paddle and a human female study is planned.

  14. DOE/CF-0088

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    used to effectively improve coordination between other parts of DOE. EM has developed 16 corporate performance measures to enable the program to monitor annual and life-cycle...

  15. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual describes DOE's explosives safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives.

  16. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 3)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce eight selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  17. DOE Announces Selections for Solid-State Lighting Core Technology and Product Development Funding Opportunities (Round 4)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce 13 selections in response to the Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Core...

  18. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 415.1-1, Information Technology Project Execution Model Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed guide will support consistent and effective implementation of DOE O 415.1 and will assist IT Program and Project Managers in effectively managing and applying sound project management to IT projects subject to that order.

  19. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States); Grant, D.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

  20. Baseline effects on carbon footprints of biofuels: The case of wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric, E-mail: johnsonatlantic@gmail.com [Atlantic Consulting, 8136 Gattikon (Switzerland); Tschudi, Daniel [ETH, Berghaldenstrasse 46, 8800 Thalwil (Switzerland)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As biofuel usage has boomed over the past decade, so has research and regulatory interest in its carbon accounting. This paper examines one aspect of that carbon accounting: the baseline, i.e. the reference case against which other conditions or changes can be compared. A literature search and analysis identified four baseline types: no baseline; reference point; marginal fossil fuel; and biomass opportunity cost. The fourth one, biomass opportunity cost, is defined in more detail, because this is not done elsewhere in the literature. The four baselines are then applied to the carbon footprint of a wood-fired power plant. The footprint of the resulting wood-fired electricity varies dramatically, according to the type of baseline. Baseline type is also found to be the footprint's most significant sensitivity. Other significant sensitivities are: efficiency of the power plant; the growth (or re-growth) rate of the forest that supplies the wood; and the residue fraction of the wood. Length of the policy horizon is also an important factor in determining the footprint. The paper concludes that because of their significance and variability, baseline choices should be made very explicit in biofuel carbon footprints. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four baseline types for biofuel footprinting are identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One type, 'biomass opportunity cost', is defined mathematically and graphically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Choice of baseline can dramatically affect the footprint result. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 'no baseline' approach is not acceptable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Choice between the other three baselines depends on the question being addressed.

  1. FOOTPRINTS OF IRELAND: HERITAGE AND LANDSCAPE Globally and nationally, we seem to be faced with significant challenges; climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FOOTPRINTS OF IRELAND: HERITAGE AND LANDSCAPE Globally and nationally, we seem to be faced, religious and economic changes across time. Archaeological, historical and scientific research often reveals

  2. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  3. Overview and History of DOE's Hanford Site - 12502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, Karen; McCormick, Matt [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford's DOE offices are responsible for one of the largest nuclear cleanup efforts in the world, cleaning up the legacy of nearly five decades of nuclear weapons production. Nowhere in the DOE Complex is cleanup more challenging than at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Hanford cleanup entails remediation of hundreds of large complex hazardous waste sites; disposition of nine production reactors and the preservation of one as a National Historic Landmark; demolition of hundreds of contaminated facilities including five enormous process canyons; remediation of billions of gallons of contaminated groundwater; disposition of millions of tons of low-level, mixed low-level, and transuranic waste; disposition of significant quantities of special nuclear material; storage and ultimate disposition of irradiated nuclear fuel; remediation of contamination deep in the soil that could impact groundwater; decontamination and decommissioning of hundreds of buildings and structures; and treatment of 56 million gallons of radioactive waste in 177 large underground tanks through the construction of a first-of-its-kind Waste Treatment Plant. Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The DOE Richland Operations Office has a vision and a strategy for completing Hanford's cleanup including the transition to post-cleanup activities. Information on the strategy is outlined in the Hanford Site Completion Framework. The framework describes three major components of cleanup - River Corridor, Central Plateau, and Tank Waste. It provides the context for individual cleanup actions by describing the key challenges and approaches for the decisions needed to complete cleanup. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), is implementing a strategy to achieve final cleanup decisions for the River Corridor portion of the Hanford Site. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) and DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) have prepared this document to describe the strategy and to begin developing the approach for making cleanup decisions for the remainder of the Hanford Site. DOE's intent is that the Completion Framework document will facilitate dialogue among the Tri-Parties and with Hanford's diverse interest groups, including Tribal Nations, State of Oregon, Hanford Advisory Board, Natural Resource Trustees, and the public. Future cleanup decisions will be enhanced by an improved understanding of the challenges facing cleanup and a common understanding of the goals and approaches for cleanup completion. The overarching goals for cleanup are sevenfold. - Goal 1: Protect the Columbia River. - Goal 2: Restore groundwater to its beneficial use to protect human health, the environment, and the Columbia River. - Goal 3: Clean up River Corridor waste sites and facilities to: Protect groundwater and the Columbia River. Shrink the active cleanup footprint to the Central Plateau, and support anticipated future uses of the land. - Goal 4: Clean up Central Plateau waste sites, tank farms, and facilities to: Protect groundwater. Minimize the footprint of areas requiring long-term waste management activities. Support anticipated future uses of the land. - Goal 5: Safely manage and transfer legacy materials scheduled for off-site disposition including special nuclear material (including plutonium), spent nuclear fuel, transuranic waste, and immobilized high-level waste. - Goal 6: Consolidate waste treatment, storage, and disposal operations on the Central Plateau. - Goal 7: Develop and implement institutional controls and long-term stewardship activities that protect human health, the environment, and Hanford's unique cultural, historical and ecological resources after cleanup activities are completed. These goals embody more than 20 years of dialogue among the Tri-Party Agencies, Tribal Nations, State of Oregon, stakeholders, and the public. They carry forward key values captured in forums such as the Hanford Future Site Uses

  4. Notice of Intent to Develop a Page Change for DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Page Change will be strictly limited in scope to changes necessary to accomplish the following objectives: (1) to invoke revised DOE-STD- 1104-20xx, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Document, as a required method; (2) to invoke revised DOE-STD-3009-20xx, Preparation of Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis, as a required method for new nuclear facilities as discussed below; and (3) to make miscellaneous administrative corrections and clarifications based on the one-year implementation review required by DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program. This JM is an update to one approved June 21, 2013.

  5. Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments; Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek, A Schlumberger Company

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The two phase program addresses long-term developments in deep well and hard rock drilling. TerraTek believes that significant improvements in drilling deep hard rock will be obtained by applying ultra-high rotational speeds (greater than 10,000 rpm). The work includes a feasibility of concept research effort aimed at development that will ultimately result in the ability to reliably drill 'faster and deeper' possibly with smaller, more mobile rigs. The principle focus is on demonstration testing of diamond bits rotating at speeds in excess of 10,000 rpm to achieve high rate of penetration (ROP) rock cutting with substantially lower inputs of energy and loads. The significance of the 'ultra-high rotary speed drilling system' is the ability to drill into rock at very low weights on bit and possibly lower energy levels. The drilling and coring industry today does not practice this technology. The highest rotary speed systems in oil field and mining drilling and coring today run less than 10,000 rpm - usually well below 5,000 rpm. This document provides the progress through two phases of the program entitled 'Smaller Footprint Drilling System for Deep and Hard Rock Environments: Feasibility of Ultra-High-Speed Diamond Drilling' for the period starting 30 June 2003 and concluding 31 March 2009. The accomplishments of Phases 1 and 2 are summarized as follows: (1) TerraTek reviewed applicable literature and documentation and convened a project kick-off meeting with Industry Advisors in attendance (see Black and Judzis); (2) TerraTek designed and planned Phase I bench scale experiments (See Black and Judzis). Improvements were made to the loading mechanism and the rotational speed monitoring instrumentation. New drill bit designs were developed to provided a more consistent product with consistent performance. A test matrix for the final core bit testing program was completed; (3) TerraTek concluded small-scale cutting performance tests; (4) Analysis of Phase 1 data indicated that there is decreased specific energy as the rotational speed increases; (5) Technology transfer, as part of Phase 1, was accomplished with technical presentations to the industry (see Judzis, Boucher, McCammon, and Black); (6) TerraTek prepared a design concept for the high speed drilling test stand, which was planned around the proposed high speed mud motor concept. Alternative drives for the test stand were explored; a high speed hydraulic motor concept was finally used; (7) The high speed system was modified to accommodate larger drill bits than originally planned; (8) Prototype mud turbine motors and the high speed test stand were used to drive the drill bits at high speed; (9) Three different rock types were used during the testing: Sierra White granite, Crab Orchard sandstone, and Colton sandstone. The drill bits used included diamond impregnated bits, a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bit, a thermally stable PDC (TSP) bit, and a hybrid TSP and natural diamond bit; and (10) The drill bits were run at rotary speeds up to 5500 rpm and weight on bit (WOB) to 8000 lbf. During Phase 2, the ROP as measured in depth of cut per bit revolution generally increased with increased WOB. The performance was mixed with increased rotary speed, with the depth cut with the impregnated drill bit generally increasing and the TSP and hybrid TSP drill bits generally decreasing. The ROP in ft/hr generally increased with all bits with increased WOB and rotary speed. The mechanical specific energy generally improved (decreased) with increased WOB and was mixed with increased rotary speed.

  6. US DOE Office of Technology Innovation and Development - Integration of the EM R and D Program in 2012 and Beyond - 12537

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collazo, Yvette T.; DeLeon, Gary; Schneider, Steve; Gerdes, Kurt; Szilagyi, Andy [Office of Technology Innovation and Development, U.S. DOE, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Wellman, Dawn; Bredt, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Pierce, Eric [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States); Marra, Jim [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied research and technology development has the potential to accelerate environmental cleanup and reduce the cost for cleanup and closure of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) legacy waste sites throughout the United States. Providing the scientific understanding, knowledge, and technologies to enable successful completion of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mission, the Technology Innovation and Development program is transforming science and innovation into practical solutions for environmental cleanup. Through integration, collaboration, and communication with DOE partner organization, DOE site managers and contractors, these technologies will reduce human health and environmental risk, cost, and time associated with cleanup and closure. The Office of Technology Innovation and Development (OTID) focused efforts in fiscal year 2011 (FY 2011) to a proactive, visionary program balance with integrated, cross-disciplinary applied research and technology development activities. This transition provides the necessary scientific and technical advancements to address near-term needs. In addition, it fills the critical role in providing scientific approaches and advanced technologies that look beyond today's known needs and requirements to provide innovative technologies to make the necessary long-term changes required to facilitate cleanup and bring sites to closure. The outcomes and impacts of this strategy are summarized in the Impact Plan, which describes potential reduction in life-cycle costs through the development and deployment of advanced technologies supporting EM needs associated with waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, deactivation and decommissioning, and spent nuclear fuel and materials disposition. Additionally, the OTID International Program Strategic Plan 2010-2015 outlines cooperation and collaboration with the international community that has similar nuclear legacy management experience and expertise to foster transfer of best science practices being used in the field. (authors)

  7. Decreasing Magmatic Footprints of Individual Volcanos in a Waning Basaltic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.A> Valentine; F.V. Perry

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and characteristics of individual basaltic volcanoes in the waning Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field provide insight into the changing physical nature of magmatism and the controls on volcano location. During Pliocene-Pleistocene times the volumes of individual volcanoes have decreased by more than one order of magnitude, as have fissure lengths and inferred lava effusion rates. Eruptions evolved from Hawaiian-style eruptions with extensive lavas to eruptions characterized by small pulses of lava and Strombolian to violent Strombolian mechanisms. These trends indicate progressively decreasing partial melting and length scales, or magmatic footprints, of mantle source zones for individual volcanoes. The location of each volcano is determined by the location of its magmatic footprint at depth, and only by shallow structural and topographic features that are within that footprint. The locations of future volcanoes in a waning system are less likely to be determined by large-scale topography or structures than were older, larger volume volcanoes.

  8. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 430.1-8, Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, calls for the agency to "establish a corporate, holistic, and performance-based approach to real property life-cycle asset management." It discusses requirements to properly plan, acquire, maintain, recapitalize, and dispose of assets, while recognizing the importance of stakeholder involvement, privatization, cultural and natural preservation, and local economic development.

  9. Notice of Intent to Develop DOE G 430.1-8, Asset Revitalization Initiative Guide for Sustainable Asset Management and Reuse

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, calls for the agency to "establish a corporate, holistic, and performance-based approach to real property life-cycle asset management." It discusses requirements to properly plan, acquire, maintain, recapitalize, and dispose of assets, while recognizing the importance of stakeholder involvement, privatization, cultural and natural preservation, and local economic development.

  10. The Development, Content, Design, and Conduct of the 2011 Piloted US DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Criticality Safety Engineering Training and Education Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1973 the University of New Mexico conducted the first nationwide criticality safety training and education week-long short course for nuclear criticality safety engineers. Subsequent to that course, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) developed very successful 'hands-on' subcritical and critical training programs for operators, supervisors, and engineering staff. Since the inception of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCT&SP) in 1983, the DOE has stimulated contractor facilities and laboratories to collaborate in the furthering of nuclear criticality as a discipline. That effort included the education and training of nuclear criticality safety engineers (NCSEs). In 1985 a textbook was written that established a path toward formalizing education and training for NCSEs. Though the NCT&SP went through a brief hiatus from 1990 to 1992, other DOE-supported programs were evolving to the benefit of NCSE training and education. In 1993 the DOE established a Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) and undertook a comprehensive development effort to expand the extant LACEF 'hands-on' course specifically for the education and training of NCSEs. That successful education and training was interrupted in 2006 for the closing of the LACEF and the accompanying movement of materials and critical experiment machines to the Nevada Test Site. Prior to that closing, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was commissioned by the US DOE NCSP to establish an independent hands-on NCSE subcritical education and training course. The course provided an interim transition for the establishment of a reinvigorated and expanded two-week NCSE education and training program in 2011. The 2011 piloted two-week course was coordinated by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and jointly conducted by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) classroom education and facility training, the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) hands-on criticality experiments training, and the US DOE National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC) hands-on criticality experiments training that is jointly supported by LLNL and LANL and located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) This paper provides the description of the bases, content, and conduct of the piloted, and future US DOE NCSP Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Education Project.

  11. A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES TO MITIGATE IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    A SKY-HIGH CHALLENGE: THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AVIATION IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, AND MEASURES but not subnational scale. In this thesis, I present what seems to be the first detailed analysis of the carbon footprint (CF) of civil aviation at a subnational level together with an assessment of what key stakeholders

  12. Keeping British Columbia "the best place on Earth": Reducing the carbon footprint of air traffic in British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    1 Keeping British Columbia "the best place on Earth": Reducing the carbon footprint of air traffic the aviation industry in British Columbia. Specifically, I calculate the carbon footprint of civil aviation). Aviation is not only intricately integrated into the global economy but also one of the most carbon

  13. www.planetearth.nerc.ac.uk Autumn 2014 Trout in hot water Biodiversity and big data Bioenergy's carbon footprint Sustainable drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    's carbon footprint · Sustainable drainage Intothe #12;Front cover image courtesy Ben Langford About us NERC to account ­ bioenergy's carbon footprint What's the true cost of growing our fuel? 22 The science

  14. State and local economic development tools : how does the range of state-level economic development tools available to a locality influence the way local resources are deployed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piercy, Brett I. (Brett Ianthe)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) expenditures for economic development in selected states were analyzed to explore whether differences in economic development tools, policies and programs available at ...

  15. Assignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back of the assignment (from IPCC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    Assignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back capita, relative to other countries. 3) Use the carbon footprint calculator at 1) http utility bill. Use the # of people living in your house. a) What is your carbon footprint, in metric

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 10, NO. 1, JANUARY 2013 99 Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjaafar, Saifallah

    , traditional models can be modified to support decision-making that accounts for both cost and carbon footprint initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint. It is the conventional thinking that such initiatives.2203304 Index Terms--Carbon emissions, carbon footprint, climate con- trol, environmental policy, operations

  17. DOE Explosives Safety Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Manual describes the Departments explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  18. Soil moisture variability of root zone profiles within SMEX02 remote sensing footprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as the par- titioning of incoming solar radiation and long wave radia- tion into outgoing long wave radiation.e., various active and passive microwave sensors), which provide mean sur- face soil moisture (0­5 cm) values footprints can provide a blueprint to design ground-based experiments and net- works and to efficiently use

  19. Ecological and environmental footprint of 50 years of agricultural expansion in Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Ecological and environmental footprint of 50 years of agricultural expansion in Argentina E R N E Gestio´n Ambiental (GIGA), Av. Spinetto 785, 6300 Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina, wINCITAP-CONICET, Ruta 35, km 335, 6300 Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina, zUNLPam, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales

  20. A household carbon footprint calculator for islands: Case study of the United States Virgin Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    of California, 310 Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history. Also, electricity and food are much larger contributors to total footprint than in the US. Results high in the cost and quality of electricity and transportation, and also impacts the provision of basic goods

  1. Toward Institutional Sustainability: A Nitrogen Footprint for the Marine Biological Maggie Notopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    amounts of resources including electricity and food to maintain their daily activities. Food purchases of reactive nitrogen (Nr), all nitrogen compounds other than N2, associated with their use. Most of the Nr: Reactive Nitrogen, Nitrogen Footprint, Sustainability, Fertilizer, Nitrogen Uptake Factors, Virtual

  2. Low Carbon Footprint and Ultra Low NOx Boilers through Efficiency Gain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benz, R,; Staedter, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low Carbon Footprint and Ultra Low NOx Boilers through Efficiency Gain Robert Benz Marcel Staedter... Industrial Energy Technology Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 6-9, 2008. M. Staedter, R. Benz / Low Carbon, Ultra Low NOx through Efficiency Gain where y denotes the mole fraction of excess...

  3. Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

  4. A Discourse Analysis: How Politicians and Citizens talk about their own Carbon Footprints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeden, Elspeth E. R.

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    .’s (2005) study this was water and energy conservation. The current study aimed to find how politicians and citizens in Scotland talk about the more all encompassing topic of their own carbon footprints and their opinions of climate change. Eight citizens...

  5. Genomic and physiological footprint of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on resident marsh fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, Andrew

    ­9, 2010), during the peak of oil landfall (June 28­30, 2010), and after much of the surface oilGenomic and physiological footprint of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill on resident marsh fishes June 13, 2011) The biological consequences of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill are unknown, especially

  6. Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjaafar, Saifallah

    Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1, we illustrate how carbon emission concerns could be integrated into operational decision-making with regard to procurement, production, and inventory management. We show how, by associating carbon emission

  7. Comparative performance of six carbon footprint models for use in Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenny, T. [Centre for the Environment, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Gray, N.F. [Centre for the Environment, School of Natural Sciences, Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: nfgray@tcd.ie

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon footprint models are increasingly being used to manage personal and household carbon dioxide emissions. Six models were compared for their suitability for use in Ireland using typical data for a household of three people. The annual household energy and transportation emissions ranged from 10,540 to 17,361 kg CO{sub 2} yr{sup -1} (mean 12,886; sd 2135) rising to a total footprint of 12,053 to 27, 218 kg CO{sub 2} yr{sup -1} (mean 18,117; sd 5106) when aviation emissions were included. This represents a potential range for individual CO{sub 2} emissions of between 4018 and 9073 kg CO{sub 2}/person/annum, a variation of over 5 tonnes/person. The information provided by these models proved to be inconsistent and often contradictory. The high variability between models was due to a number of anomalies. When these were corrected mean household energy and transportation emissions fell to 12,130 kg CO{sub 2} yr{sup -1} (sd 805), with a total household footprint of 16,552 kg CO{sub 2} yr{sup -1} (sd 1101). Models vary in their complexity in terms of what is included in the overall estimation of emissions making a full analysis of the primary carbon footprint very difficult. When compared to current Irish conversion factors the corrected models either underestimated or overestimated CO{sub 2} emissions by approximately 10%. Current carbon footprint models excluded emissions from CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O underestimating CO{sub 2} emissions for the household by 1.8%.

  8. Understanding the 2010 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 -Helicopter AccidentSeptemberDepartmentUmatillaDOE Nuclear

  9. Memorandum Memorializing Ex Parte Communication, DOE impending...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The meeting was requested by AMCA International to introduce the association's leadership, standards, and experience in developing fan standards to DOE; to learn more about the DOE...

  10. Central Plateau Cleanup at DOE's Hanford Site - 12504

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowell, Jonathan [US DOE (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discussion of Hanford's Central Plateau includes significant work in and around the center of the Hanford Site - located about 7 miles from the Columbia River. The Central Plateau is the area to which operations will be shrunk in 2015 when River Corridor cleanup is complete. This work includes retrieval and disposal of buried waste from miles of trenches; the cleanup and closure of massive processing canyons; the clean-out and demolition to 'slab on grade' of the high-hazard Plutonium Finishing Plant; installation of key groundwater treatment facilities to contain and shrink plumes of contaminated groundwater; demolition of all other unneeded facilities; and the completion of decisions about remaining Central Plateau waste sites. A stated goal of EM has been to shrink the footprint of active cleanup to less than 10 square miles by 2020. By the end of FY2011, Hanford will have reduced the active footprint of cleanup by 64 percent exceeding the goal of 49 percent. By 2015, Hanford will reduce the active footprint of cleanup by more than 90 percent. The remaining footprint reduction will occur between 2015 and 2020. The Central Plateau is a 75-square-mile region near the center of the Hanford Site including the area designated in the Hanford Comprehensive Land Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (DOE 1999) and Record of Decision (64 FR 61615) as the Industrial-Exclusive Area, a rectangular area of about 20 square miles in the center of the Central Plateau. The Industrial-Exclusive Area contains the 200 East and 200 West Areas that have been used primarily for Hanford's nuclear fuel processing and waste management and disposal activities. The Central Plateau also encompasses the 200 Area CERCLA National Priorities List site. The Central Plateau has a large physical inventory of chemical processing and support facilities, tank systems, liquid and solid waste disposal and storage facilities, utility systems, administrative facilities, and groundwater monitoring wells. As a companion to the Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework document, DOE issued its draft Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy in September 2009 to provide an outline of DOE's vision for completion of cleanup activities across the Central Plateau. As major elements of the Hanford cleanup along the Columbia River Corridor near completion, DOE believed it appropriate to articulate the agency vision for the remainder of the cleanup mission. The Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy and the Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework were provided to the regulatory community, the Tribal Nations, political leaders, the public, and Hanford stakeholders to promote dialogue on Hanford's future. The Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy describes DOE's vision for completion of Central Plateau cleanup and outlines the decisions needed to achieve the vision. The Central Plateau strategy involves steps to: (1) contain and remediate contaminated groundwater, (2) implement a geographic cleanup approach that guides remedy selection from a plateau-wide perspective, (3) evaluate and deploy viable treatment methods for deep vadose contamination to provide long-term protection of the groundwater, and (4) conduct essential waste management operations in coordination with cleanup actions. The strategy will also help optimize Central Plateau readiness to use funding when it is available upon completion of River Corridor cleanup projects. One aspect of the Central Plateau strategy is to put in place the process to identify the final footprint for permanent waste management and containment of residual contamination within the 20-square-mile Industrial-Exclusive Area. The final footprint identified for permanent waste management and containment of residual contamination should be as small as practical and remain under federal ownership and control for as long as a potential hazard exists. Outside the final footprint, the remainder of the Central Plateau will be available for other uses consistent with the Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (DOE 1999), while

  11. Argonne model analyzes water footprint of biofuels | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tool predicts the amount of water required to generate various types of cellulosic biofuels. Image courtesy May Wu; click to view larger. An Argonne-developed online analysis...

  12. Gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review. [US DOE supported

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy gasification advanced research and technology development (AR and TD) cross-cut meeting and review was held June 24 to 26, 1981, at Germantown, Maryland. Forty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  13. Modeling the per capita ecological footprint for Dallas County, Texas: Examining demographic, environmental value, land-use, and spatial influences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Hyung Cheal

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses factors driving the variation in the per capita Ecological Footprint (EF) in Dallas County, Texas. A main hypothesis was that scientifically estimated demography, environmental values, spatial attributes, and land-use patterns...

  14. Opportunities to change development pathways toward lower greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Snow, C. (2008). Winery carbon footprint calculator online.so-called energy and carbon “footprints” of their products.energy footprint” and “carbon footprint” refer to the total

  15. Development of adherent ceramic coatings to reduce contact stress damage of ceramics. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne, S.F.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly adherent coatings were deposited on reaction bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN), sintered SiC (SSC), and HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (HSN) and using a newly developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Performance of the coating was assessed by oxidation, strength and contact stress testing. A new method was developed to experimentally determine the strength and Weibull modulus of thin brittle films on ceramic substrates. A significant portion of the study was devoted to numerical modeling of the coatings in order to understand the contributions of residual stress as different coating materials and thicknesses were combined. Coating designs were further analyzed by simulating the crack growth behavior in multilayer films while accounting for the interface fracture mechanics. This work has shown that the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite coating developed in this program can provide resistance to oxidation and contact stress. Commercial application of the composite coating has been successfully demonstrated by useof the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite as a protective coating on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cutting tool.

  16. DOE standard: Radiological control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

  17. USDA, DOE to Invest up to $18.4 million for Biomass Research, Development and Demonstration Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-Japan Working GroupDepartmentDevelopmentPage 1

  18. The Transportation Energy and Carbon Footprints of the 100 Largest U.S. Metropolitan Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Marilyn A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present estimates of the automobile and truck travel based energy and carbon footprints of the largest 100 U.S. metropolitan areas. The footprints are based on the estimated vehicle miles traveled and the transportation fuels consumed. Results are presented on an annual basis and represent end use emissions only. Total carbon emissions, emissions per capita, and emissions per dollar of gross metropolitan product are reported. Two years of annual data were examined, 2000 and 2005, with most of the in-depth analysis focused on the 2005 results. In section 2 we provide background data on the national picture and derive some carbon and energy consumption figures for the nation as a whole. In section 3 of the paper we examine the metropolitan area-wide results based on the sums and averages across all 100 metro areas, and compare these with the national totals and averages. In section 4 we present metropolitan area specific footprints and examine the considerable variation that is found to exist across individual metro areas. In doing so we pay particular attention to the effects that urban form might have on these differences. Finally, section 5 provides a summary of major findings, and a list of caveats that need to be borne in mind when using the results due to known limitations in the data sources used.

  19. CMIC Integrated Ore System Footprints Project A Research Opportunity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for this important mineral deposit type. The goal is to develop state-of-the-art integrated exploration strategies that are applicable over a range of scales. This project will establish the candidate as a global leader time on site as an embedded researcher with direct connections to the Teck Resources exploration crew

  20. Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  2. Understanding Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints, October 2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-JapanCatalysts |Development |U U n n d d e

  3. Understanding the 2014 Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and BatteryUS-EU-JapanCatalysts |Development |U U n n d d

  4. Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringout byDevelopmentTurkey |Department of

  5. DOE SBIR Phase-1 Report on Hybrid CPU-GPU Parallel Development of the Eulerian-Lagrangian Barracuda Multiphase Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Dale M. Snider

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the result from the Phase-1 work on demonstrating greater than 10x speedup of the Barracuda computer program using parallel methods and GPU processors (General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit or Graphics Processing Unit). Phase-1 demonstrated a 12x speedup on a typical Barracuda function using the GPU processor. The problem test case used about 5 million particles and 250,000 Eulerian grid cells. The relative speedup, compared to a single CPU, increases with increased number of particles giving greater than 12x speedup. Phase-1 work provided a path for reformatting data structure modifications to give good parallel performance while keeping a friendly environment for new physics development and code maintenance. The implementation of data structure changes will be in Phase-2. Phase-1 laid the ground work for the complete parallelization of Barracuda in Phase-2, with the caveat that implemented computer practices for parallel programming done in Phase-1 gives immediate speedup in the current Barracuda serial running code. The Phase-1 tasks were completed successfully laying the frame work for Phase-2. The detailed results of Phase-1 are within this document. In general, the speedup of one function would be expected to be higher than the speedup of the entire code because of I/O functions and communication between the algorithms. However, because one of the most difficult Barracuda algorithms was parallelized in Phase-1 and because advanced parallelization methods and proposed parallelization optimization techniques identified in Phase-1 will be used in Phase-2, an overall Barracuda code speedup (relative to a single CPU) is expected to be greater than 10x. This means that a job which takes 30 days to complete will be done in 3 days. Tasks completed in Phase-1 are: Task 1: Profile the entire Barracuda code and select which subroutines are to be parallelized (See Section Choosing a Function to Accelerate) Task 2: Select a GPU consultant company and jointly parallelize subroutines (CPFD chose the small business EMPhotonics for the Phase-1 the technical partner. See Section Technical Objective and Approach) Task 3: Integrate parallel subroutines into Barracuda (See Section Results from Phase-1 and its subsections) Task 4: Testing, refinement, and optimization of parallel methodology (See Section Results from Phase-1 and Section Result Comparison Program) Task 5: Integrate Phase-1 parallel subroutines into Barracuda and release (See Section Results from Phase-1 and its subsections) Task 6: Roadmap of Phase-2 (See Section Plan for Phase-2) With the completion of Phase 1 we have the base understanding to completely parallelize Barracuda. An overview of the work to move Barracuda to a parallelized code is given in Plan for Phase-2.

  6. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L.Information Contact Us Powering Past Pluto:

  7. Volatilization of Fission Products from Metallic Melts in the Melt-Dilute Treatment Technology Development for Al-Based DOE Spent Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.

    1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The melt-dilute treatment technology is being developed to facilitate the ultimate disposition of highly enriched Al-Base DOE spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository such as that proposed for Yucca Mountain. Currently, approximately 28 MTHM is expected to be returned to the Savannah River Site from domestic and foreign research reactors. The melt-dilute treatment technology will melt the fuel assemblies to reduce their volume and alloys them with depleted uranium to isotopically dilute the 235U concentration. The resulting alloy is cast into a form for long term geologic repository storage. Benefits accrued from the melt-dilute process include the potential for significant volume reduction; reduced criticality potential, and proliferation concerns. A critical technology element in the development of the melt-dilute process is the development of offgas system requirements. The volatilization of radioactive species during the melting stage of the process primarily constitutes the offgas in this process. Several of the species present following irradiation of a fuel assembly have been shown to be volatile or semi-volatile under reactor core melt-down conditions. Some of the key species that have previously been studied are krypton, iodine, and cesium. All of these species have been shown to volatilize during melting experiments however, the degree to which they are released is highly dependent upon atmosphere, fuel burnup, temperature, and fuel composition. With this in mind an analytical and experimental program has been undertaken to assess the volatility and capture of species under the melt-dilute operating conditions.

  8. Persistent conductive footprints of 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolichnov, I.; Iwanowska, M.; Colla, E.; Setter, N. [Ceramics Laboratory, EPFL-Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne 1015 (Switzerland); Ziegler, B.; Gaponenko, I.; Paruch, P. [DPMC-MaNEP, University of Geneva, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Huijben, M.; Rijnders, G. [Faculty of Science and Technology and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using conductive and piezoforce microscopy, we reveal a complex picture of electronic transport at weakly conductive 109° domain walls in bismuth ferrite films. Even once initial ferroelectric stripe domains are changed/erased, persistent conductive paths signal the original domain wall position. The conduction at such domain wall “footprints” is activated by domain movement and decays rapidly with time, but can be re-activated by opposite polarity voltage. The observed phenomena represent true leakage conduction rather than merely displacement currents. We propose a scenario of hopping transport in combination with thermionic injection over interfacial barriers controlled by the ferroelectric polarization.

  9. An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

  10. DOE HANDBOOK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project|StatementDOE FuelProgram |Guide for

  11. DOE-0336

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear EnergyMeetingMetricDOE,to

  12. DOE-0344

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear EnergyMeetingMetricDOE,to4

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources and end uses of...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources and end uses of...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources and end uses of...

  17. DOE explosives safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) policy requires that all DOE activities be conducted in a manner that protects the safety of the public and provides a safe and healthful workplace for employees. DOE has also prescribed that all personnel be protected in any explosives operation undertaken. The level of safety provided shall be at least equivalent to that of the best industrial practice. The risk of death or serious injury shall be limited to the lowest practicable minimum. DOE and contractors shall continually review their explosives operations with the aim of achieving further refinements and improvements in safety practices and protective features. This manual describes the Department's explosive safety requirements applicable to operations involving the development, testing, handling, and processing of explosives or assemblies containing explosives. It is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in explosives safety. In addition, it is essential that applicable criteria and requirements for implementing this policy be readily available and known to those responsible for conducting DOE programs.

  18. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology Research (Round 7), Product Development (Round 7), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 2) Funding Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities....

  19. DOE Announces Selections for SSL Core Technology (Round 6), Product Development (Round 6), and U.S. Manufacturing (Round 1) Funding Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory, on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), is pleased to announce the following selections for solid-state lighting (SSL) funding opportunities...

  20. The DOE Virtual University (DVU) Icon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

     The Office of Learning & Workforce Development launched a desktop icon for its virtual university.  The DOE Virtual University (DVU) icon is on most of the DOE desktops (most of HQ, except EIA...

  1. FINAL REPORT –INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY BUILDING 330 PROJECT FOOTPRINT, ARGONNE, ILLINOIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERIKA N. BAILEY

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ORISE conducted onsite verification activities of the Building 330 project footprint during the period of June 6 through June 7, 2011. The verification activities included technical reviews of project documents, visual inspections, radiation surface scans, and sampling and analysis. The draft verification report was issued in July 2011 with findings and recommendations. The contractor performed additional evaluations and remediation.

  2. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review FY07 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review John D. Boyes Sandia National Laboratories Mission Mission Develop advanced electricity storage...

  3. DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country by Addressing Barriers to Renewable Energy Development DOE Tribal Intern Aims to Improve Conditions in Indian Country...

  4. DOE and NRCan Agreement to Enhance Collaboration in Civilian...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE and NRCan Agreement to Enhance Collaboration in Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development DOE and NRCan Agreement to Enhance Collaboration in Civilian Nuclear Energy...

  5. DOE ASSESSMENT SEAB Recommendations Related to High Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of 10 DOE ASSESSMENT SEAB Recommendations Related to High Performance Computing 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to develop and deliver capable exascale...

  6. The DOE s In-Plant Training (INPLT) Model to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; De Fontaine, Mr. Andre [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program; Schoeneborn, Fred C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-Plant Training (INPLT) is a new model for developing energy efficiency expertise within the US manufacturing companies participating in the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program-a nationwide initiative to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity in 10 years. INPLTs are designed to fill a market niche by providing hands on training in a real world manufacturing plant environment. Through INPLTs, participants from multiple manufacturing plants, supply chains, utilities, and other external stakeholders learn how to conduct energy assessments, use energy analysis tools to analyze energy saving opportunities, develop energy management systems, and implement energy savings projects. Typical INPLT events are led by DOE-certified Energy Experts and range from 2-4 days. Topics discussed include: identification of cross-cutting or system specific opportunities; introduction to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems; and energy project implementation and replication. This model is flexible, and can be tailored to suit the needs of specific industries. The INPLTs are a significant departure from the traditional single plant energy assessment model previously employed by DOE. INPLTs shift the focus from the concept of a single-plant s energy profile to a broader focus on training and capacity building among multiple industrial participants. The objective is to enable trainees to identify, quantify, implement and replicate future energy saving projects without continued external assistance. This paper discusses the INPLT model and highlights some of the initial outcomes from the successfully delivered INPLTs and the overall impact in terms of numbers of plants/participants trained, impacted energy footprints, and potential replication of identified opportunities.

  7. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in...

  8. DOE Energy Challenge Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Murray; Michael Schaepe

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objectives: 1. Promote energy efficiency concepts in undergraduate and graduate education. 2. Stimulate and interest in pulp and paper industrial processes, which promote and encourage activities in the area of manufacturing design efficiency. 3. Attract both industrial and media attention. Background and executive Summary: In 1997, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy developed a university design competition with an orientation to the Forest Products Industry. This university design competition is in direct alignment with DOE’s interests in instilling in undergraduate education the concepts of developing energy efficient processes, minimizing waste, and providing environmental benefits and in maintaining and enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S. forest products industry in a global environment. The primary focus of the competition is projects, which are aligned with the existing DOE Agenda 2020 program for the industry and the lines of research being established with the colleges comprising the Pulp and Paper Education and Research Alliance (PPERA). The six design competitions were held annually for the period 1999 through 2004.

  9. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  10. turbine thermal index | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained through this project can directly benefit the U.S. power and utility turbine industry by improving product development that specifically meets DOE advanced turbine program...

  11. The carbon footprint analysis of wastewater treatment plants and nitrous oxide emissions from full-scale biological nitrogen removal processes in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xin, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a general model for the carbon footprint analysis of advanced wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with biological nitrogen removal processes, using a life cycle assessment (LCA) approach. Literature ...

  12. ALTERNATE POWER AND ENERGY STORAGE/REUSE FOR DRILLING RIGS: REDUCED COST AND LOWER EMISSIONS PROVIDE LOWER FOOTPRINT FOR DRILLING OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verma, Ankit

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on alternate drilling energy sources which can make entire drilling process economic and environmentally friendly. One of the major ways to reduce the footprint of drilling operations is to provide more efficient power sources for drilling operations...

  13. DOE-FLEX: DOE's Telework Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the Departments telework program. Cancels DOE N 314.1.

  14. Reducing Logistics Footprints and Replenishment Demands: Nano-engineered Silica Aerogels a Proven Method for Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, W; Coleman, S; Love, A; Reynolds, J; O'Brien, K; Gammon, S

    2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid deployment and the use of objective force aggressively reduce logistic footprints and replenishment demands. Maneuver Sustainment requires that Future Combat Systems be equipped with water systems that are lightweight, have small footprints, and are highly adaptable to a variety of environments. Technologies employed in these settings must be able to meet these demands. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and previously field tested nano-engineered materials for the treatment of water. These materials have been either based on silica aerogel materials or consist of composites of these aerogels with granular activated carbon (GAC). Recent tests have proven successful for the removal of contaminants including uranium, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Silica aerogels were evaluated for their ability to purify water that had been spiked with the nerve agent VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate). These results demonstrated that silica aerogels were able to remove the VX from the supply water and were nearly 30 times more adsorbent than GAC. This performance could result in REDUCING CHANGEOUT FREQUENCY BY A FACTOR OF 30 or DECREASING the VOLUME of adsorbent BY A FACTOR OF 30; thereby significantly reducing logistic footprints and replenishment demands. The use of the nano-engineered Silica Aerogel/GAC composites would provide a water purification technology that meets the needs of Future Combat Systems.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Relationships between Vehicle Mass, Footprint, and Societal Risk

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  16. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  17. A deep proper motion catalog within the Sloan digital sky survey footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munn, Jeffrey A.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy M. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 10391 West Naval Observatory Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86005-8521 (United States); Hippel, Ted von [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Physical Sciences, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Kilic, Mukremin [University of Oklahoma, Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Liebert, James W. [University of Arizona, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Williams, Kurtis A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University-Commerce, P.O. Box 3011, Commerce, TX 75429 (United States); DeGenarro, Steven [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Jeffery, Elizabeth, E-mail: jam@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: hch@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: trudy@nofs.navy.mil, E-mail: ted.vonhippel@erau.edu, E-mail: kilic@ou.edu, E-mail: jamesliebert@gmail.com, E-mail: kurtis.williams@tamuc.edu, E-mail: studiofortytwo@yahoo.com, E-mail: ejeffery@byu.edu [BYU Department of Physics and Astronomy, N283 ESC, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new proper motion catalog is presented, combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with second epoch observations in the r band within a portion of the SDSS imaging footprint. The new observations were obtained with the 90prime camera on the Steward Observatory Bok 90 inch telescope, and the Array Camera on the U.S. Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, 1.3 m telescope. The catalog covers 1098 square degrees to r = 22.0, an additional 1521 square degrees to r = 20.9, plus a further 488 square degrees of lesser quality data. Statistical errors in the proper motions range from 5 mas year{sup ?1} at the bright end to 15 mas year{sup ?1} at the faint end, for a typical epoch difference of six years. Systematic errors are estimated to be roughly 1 mas year{sup ?1} for the Array Camera data, and as much as 2–4 mas year{sup ?1} for the 90prime data (though typically less). The catalog also includes a second epoch of r band photometry.

  18. Water Footprints of Cassava- and Molasses-Based Ethanol Production in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangmeechai, Aweewan, E-mail: aweewan.m@nida.ac.th [National Institute of Development Administration, International College (Major in Public Policy and Management) (Thailand)] [National Institute of Development Administration, International College (Major in Public Policy and Management) (Thailand); Pavasant, Prasert [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Thailand)] [Chulalongkorn University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering (Thailand)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thai government has been promoting renewable energy as well as stimulating the consumption of its products. Replacing transport fuels with bioethanol will require substantial amounts of water and enhance water competition locally. This study shows that the water footprint (WF) of molasses-based ethanol is less than that of cassava-based ethanol. The WF of molasses-based ethanol is estimated to be in the range of 1,510-1,990 L water/L ethanol, while that of cassava-based ethanol is estimated at 2,300-2,820 L water/L ethanol. Approximately 99% of the water in each of these WFs is used to cultivate crops. Ethanol production requires not only substantial amounts of water but also government interventions because it is not cost competitive. In Thailand, the government has exploited several strategies to lower ethanol prices such as oil tax exemptions for consumers, cost compensation for ethanol producers, and crop price assurances for farmers. For the renewable energy policy to succeed in the long run, the government may want to consider promoting molasses-based ethanol production as well as irrigation system improvements and sugarcane yield-enhancing practices, since molasses-based ethanol is more favorable than cassava-based ethanol in terms of its water consumption, chemical fertilizer use, and production costs.

  19. The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moren, Richard J. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States); Grindstaff, Keith D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford's Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area -- the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another first, the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford's LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM's Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program's records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford's LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

  20. space booklet_DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U C L E A R E N E R G Y DOE/NE-0071 U .

  1. DOE MENTOR-PROTÉGÉ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    small business subcontracting goal, and statutory socio-economic goal 2 HISTORY OF DOE MENTOR-PROTG PROGRAM June 9, 1995 The DOE Mentor Protg Program Initiative was...

  2. DOE MENTOR-PROTÉGÉ

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    business subcontracting goal, and statutory socio-economic goals 2 HISTORY OF DOE MENTOR-PROTG PROGRAM June 9, 1995 The DOE Mentor Protg Program Initiative was...

  3. Increasing Community Access to Solar: Designing and Developing a Shared Solar Photovoltaic System (Fact Sheet), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document introduces the Energy Department’s new Guide to Community Shared Solar: Utility, Private, and Nonprofit Project Development. The guide is designed to help those who want to develop community shared solar projects—from community organizers and advocates to utility managers and government officials—navigate the process of developing shared systems, from early planning to implementation.

  4. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards Newsletter highlights the...

  5. DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment Services LLC Loan Application DOE's General Counsel Determines Sudan Act Does Not Bar Areva Enrichment...

  6. DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cell Research and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs May 5, 2014 - 5:50pm...

  7. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Lightweight...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lightweight Materials 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Lightweight Materials Lightweight materials research and development merit review results...

  8. DOE Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Lessons Learned Information Services Catches the Eye of Corporations and Educational Institutions

  9. DOE-FLEX: DOE's Telework Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the Department’s telework program. Canceled by DOE O 314.1.

  10. Measures of the environmental footprint of the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Schneider; B. Carlsen; E. Tavrides; C. van der Hoeven; U. Phathanapirom

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle (FEFC) have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. This work builds upon reports from operating facilities and other primary data sources to build a database of front end environmental impacts. This work also addresses land transformation and water withdrawals associated with the processes of the FEFC. These processes include uranium extraction, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, depleted uranium disposition, and transportation. To allow summing the impacts across processes, all impacts were normalized per tonne of natural uranium mined as well as per MWh(e) of electricity produced, a more conventional unit for measuring environmental impacts that facilitates comparison with other studies. This conversion was based on mass balances and process efficiencies associated with the current once-through LWR fuel cycle. Total energy input is calculated at 8.7 x 10- 3 GJ(e)/MWh(e) of electricity and 5.9 x 10- 3 GJ(t)/MWh(e) of thermal energy. It is dominated by the energy required for uranium extraction, conversion to fluoride compound for subsequent enrichment, and enrichment. An estimate of the carbon footprint is made from the direct energy consumption at 1.7 kg CO2/MWh(e). Water use is likewise dominated by requirements of uranium extraction, totaling 154 L/MWh(e). Land use is calculated at 8 x 10- 3 m2/MWh(e), over 90% of which is due to uranium extraction. Quantified impacts are limited to those resulting from activities performed within the FEFC process facilities (i.e. within the plant gates). Energy embodied in material inputs such as process chemicals and fuel cladding is identified but not explicitly quantified in this study. Inclusion of indirect energy associated with embodied energy as well as construction and decommissioning of facilities could increase the FEFC energy intensity estimate by a factor of up to 2.

  11. DOE LABORATORY OPEN SOURCE SOFTWARE: ADVANCE DOE PROGRAM Approval and other oss Licensing Issues

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Feb 1, 2002, DOE Patent Counsel issued an IPI-II-1-01 for "Development and Use of Open Source Software."

  12. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  13. Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) : does it give indigenous peoples more control over development of their lands in the Philippines?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Ronilda R. (Ronilda Rosario)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1998 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) grants indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) with regard to development projects undertaken on their ancestral lands. ...

  14. Carbon footprint measurement and analysis of a multi-modal logistics network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Adam J. (Adam James)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Motors (GM) is one of the world's largest automobile manufacturing companies and does business in over 120 countries, requiring a complex operations network. Operating with a focus on environmental impact has become ...

  15. Reducing the Environmental Footprint and Economic Costs of Automotive Manufacturing through an Alternative Energy Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. energy supply structure and fossil fuel composition, wethrough reduction of fossil fuel energy consumption, and85% of U.S. energy supplied by fossil fuels (US DOE 2006),

  16. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The following directives are extended until 3-18-06: DOE N 205.8, Cyber Security Requirements for Wireless Devices and Information Systems, dated 2-11-04; DOE N 205.9, Certification and Accreditation Process for Information Systems Including National Security Systems, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.10, Cyber Security Requirements for Risk Management, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.11, Security Requirements for Remote Access to DOE and Applicable Contractor Information Technology Systems, dated 2-19-04. DOE N 205.12, Clearing, Sanitizing, and Destroying Information System Storage Media, Memory Devices, and Other Related Hardware, dated 2-19-04.

  17. Selected DOE Headquarters Publications, October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. (Publications issued during October 1977-September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6.) Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors (and published by DOE) to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department, and environmental development plans and impact statements. Certain publications have been omitted. They include such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, and telephone directories, headquarters publications issued under the DOE-tr and CONF codes, technical reports from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA issued under DOE/JPL and DOE/NASA codes, and weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration. (RWR)

  18. DOE Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help Develop Cheaper Biofuels DOE Researchers Achieve Important Genetic Breakthroughs to Help Develop Cheaper Biofuels...

  19. DOE New Technology: Sharing New Frontiers, April 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamura, A.T.; Henline, D.M. [eds.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of DOE New Technology is to provide information on how to access specific technologies developed through research sponsored by DOE and performed by DOE laboratories or by DOE-contracted researchers. This document describes technologies identified as having potential for commercial applications in addition to a catalog of current patent applications and patents available for licensing from DOE and DOE contractors.

  20. VPP Interagency Agreement Between DOE and DOL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of thia agreement ie for the U. S. Department Of Labor's (DOL) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Directorate of Federal-State Operation8 (FSO) to provide aeeistance to the U. S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Occupational safety (EH-31) in the development bf the DOE Voluntary Protection Program (DOE-WP) at Government-~ned-or-LeaBed Contractor-Operated (GOCO) facilities.

  1. Vintage DOE: Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This vintage video, from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information and the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, does a great job detailing DOE's accomplishments.

  2. DOE-STD-1104

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementation 1 DOE-STD-1104-2014 Roll-out AU Roll-out Contacts 2 Garrett Smith, Director, Nuclear Safety Basis and Facility Design, Office of Nuclear Safety (DOE...

  3. DOE Standard: Fire protection design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of this Standard reflects the fact that national consensus standards and other design criteria do not comprehensively or, in some cases, adequately address fire protection issues at DOE facilities. This Standard provides supplemental fire protection guidance applicable to the design and construction of DOE facilities and site features (such as water distribution systems) that are also provided for fire protection. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the applicable building code, National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Codes and Standards, and any other applicable DOE construction criteria. This Standard replaces certain mandatory fire protection requirements that were formerly in DOE 5480.7A, ``Fire Protection``, and DOE 6430.1A, ``General Design Criteria``. It also contains the fire protection guidelines from two (now canceled) draft standards: ``Glove Box Fire Protection`` and ``Filter Plenum Fire Protection``. (Note: This Standard does not supersede the requirements of DOE 5480.7A and DOE 6430.1A where these DOE Orders are currently applicable under existing contracts.) This Standard, along with the criteria delineated in Section 3, constitutes the basic criteria for satisfying DOE fire and life safety objectives for the design and construction or renovation of DOE facilities.

  4. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards.

  5. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

  6. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-04. DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11/1/99. DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99.

  7. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-05: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Security Systems, dated 11-1-99 and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99. No cancellations.

  8. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective immediately, DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11-1-99, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99, are extended until 9-30-06, unless sooner rescinded.

  9. DOE outlines complex cleanup options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Department said last week it will consider four different strategies for cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex in a draft programmatic environmental impact statement due for release this summer. In an implementation plan released for public comment February 17, DOE also said the EIS would look at centralized, decentralized and regional approaches to management of six types of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Other issues to be addressed in the EIS are development of innovative cleanup technology, budgeting and prioritization, job cutbacks and worker retraining, waste minimization and community involvement in cleanup decisions. However, DOE said it had decided not to address spent nuclear fuel storage in the EIS, as had been previously planned. Instead, spent fuel storage options will be reviewed in another environmental study being done under court order for DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Findings from the INEL study will be incorporated in the department-wide EIS for environmental restoration and waste management.

  10. Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1990-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    "To provide requirements and guidelines for Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to use in developing directives, plans, and/or procedures relating to the conduct of operations at DOE facilities. The implementation of these requirements and guidelines should result in improved quality and uniformity of operations. Change 2, 10-23-2001. Canceled by DOE O 422.1.

  11. DOE plan for UMTRA Project water protection standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was developed to define DOE`s implementation of water protection standards for the UMTRA Project, on an interim basis, until the EPA promulgates revised standards in response to the September, 1985, decision by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. This plan presents the historical background of the development of the Title I standards and the rationale for the DOE implementation approach.

  12. Lessons from Iowa : development of a 270 megawatt compressed air energy storage project in midwest Independent System Operator : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holst, Kent (Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency, Traer, IA); Huff, Georgianne; Schulte, Robert H. (Schulte Associates LLC, Northfield, MN); Critelli, Nicholas (Critelli Law Office PC, Des Moines, IA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iowa Stored Energy Park was an innovative, 270 Megawatt, $400 million compressed air energy storage (CAES) project proposed for in-service near Des Moines, Iowa, in 2015. After eight years in development the project was terminated because of site geological limitations. However, much was learned in the development process regarding what it takes to do a utility-scale, bulk energy storage facility and coordinate it with regional renewable wind energy resources in an Independent System Operator (ISO) marketplace. Lessons include the costs and long-term economics of a CAES facility compared to conventional natural gas-fired generation alternatives; market, legislative, and contract issues related to enabling energy storage in an ISO market; the importance of due diligence in project management; and community relations and marketing for siting of large energy projects. Although many of the lessons relate to CAES applications in particular, most of the lessons learned are independent of site location or geology, or even the particular energy storage technology involved.

  13. DOE Testing Reveals Samsung Refrigerator Does Not Meet Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Articles DOE Energy Star Testing Reveals Inefficient ASKO Dishwasher Electrolux Gibson Air Conditioner and Equator Clothes Washer Fail DOE Energy Star Testing DOE Refers Four...

  14. DOE Technical Standards Archived Collection | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09111995 DOE-STD-1058-93 Guide to Good Practices for Developing and Conducting Case Studies Replaced by DOE-HDBK-1116-98 This guide contains a method for learning...

  15. Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rounds, Robert (Beacon Power, Tyngsboro, MA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

  16. Contribution to the development of DOE ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Data (CMBE) products: Satellite data over the ARM permanent and AMF sites: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, B; Dong, X; Xie, S

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the LLNL ARM infrastructure team Climate Modeling Best Estimate (CMBE) data development, the University of North Dakota (UND)'s group will provide the LLNL team the NASA CERES and ISCCP satellite retrieved cloud and radiative properties for the periods when they are available over the ARM permanent research sites. The current available datasets, to date, are as follows: the CERES/TERRA during 200003-200812; the CERES/AQUA during 200207-200712; and the ISCCP during 199601-200806. The detailed parameters list below: (1) CERES Shortwave radiative fluxes (net and downwelling); (2) CERES Longwave radiative fluxes (upwelling) - (items 1 & 2 include both all-sky and clear-sky fluxes); (3) CERES Layered clouds (total, high, middle, and low); (4) CERES Cloud thickness; (5) CERES Effective cloud height; (6) CERES cloud microphysical/optical properties; (7) ISCCP optical depth cloud top pressure matrix; (8) ISCCP derived cloud types (r.g., cirrus, stratus, etc.); and (9) ISCCP infrared derived cloud top pressures. (10) The UND group shall apply necessary quality checks to the original CERES and ISCCP data to remove suspicious data points. The temporal resolution for CERES data should be all available satellite overpasses over the ARM sites; for ISCCP data, it should be 3-hourly. The spatial resolution is the closest satellite field of view observations to the ARM surface sites. All the provided satellite data should be in a format that is consistent with the current ARM CMBE dataset so that the satellite data can be easily merged into the CMBE dataset.

  17. Corporate Analysis of DOE Safety Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS), Office of Analysis develops analysis tools and performance dashboards, and conducts analysis of DOE safety performance corporately and on a variety of specific environment, safety and health topics.

  18. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    materi- als into ethanol and other fuels. Developing Pichiais the leading U.S. fuel ethanol crop (sorghum is second).to economic lignocellulosic fuel ethanol. The DOE has made

  19. coal feeding | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Supported R&D for CoalBiomass Feed and Gasification Gasification Systems Program R&D The Department of Energy is currently developing technology for high pressure dry coal...

  20. Selected DOE headquarters publications, October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. (Publications issued during October 1977-September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6). Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department, and environmental development plans and impact statements. Certain publications are omitted. They include such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, telephone directories, publications issued under the DOE-tr and CONF codes, technical reports from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA issued under DOE/JPL and DOE/NASA codes, and weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration. (RWR)

  1. BURN CALORIES FREE LISTEN TO THE BIRDS CHECK OUT THE SCENERY MEET FRIENDS REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT FRESH AIR TAKE SHORT-CUTS FEEL THE BREEZE DISCOVER CAMPUS MAKE YOUR OWN ROUTE BURN CALORIES READ A BOOK LISTEN TO THE BIRDS CHECK OUT THE SCENERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    A BOOK LISTEN TO THE BIRDS CHECK OUT THE SCENERY MEET FRIENDS REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT FRESH AIR BURN CALORIES FREE LISTEN TO THE BIRDS CHECK OUT THE SCENERY MEET FRIENDS REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT FRESH AIR CALORIES FREE LISTEN TO THE BIRDS CHECK OUT THE SCENERY MEET FRIENDS RE- DUCE YOUR CARBON FOOTPRINT FRESH

  2. DOE-Imaging grant FG02-06ER15829, entitled "Developing Laser-Induced Re-Collision Electron Self-Diffraction" Brief summary of accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Igor V. Litvinyuk, and Itzik Ben-Itzhak

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our principal goal was the experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Key steps along the development of this experimental technique have been accomplished and reported in the publications listed in this brief report. We started with measuring 3D electron momenta spectra in aligned nitrogen and oxygen molecules. Chakra Maharjan (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) was a lead researcher on this project. Although Chakra succeeded in obtaining those spectra, we were scooped by the publication of identical results in Science by the NRC Ottawa group. Our results were never published as a refereed article, but became a part of Chakra's Ph.D. dissertation. That Science paper was the first experimental demonstration of Laser-Induced Electron Diffraction (LIED). Chakra also worked on wavelength dependence of 3D ATI spectra of atoms and molecules using tunable OPA pulses. Another Ph.D. student, Maia Magrakvelidze (her GRA was funded by the grant), started working on COLTRIMS experiments using OPA pulses (1800 nm wavelength). After some initial experiments it became apparent that COLTRIMS did not yield sufficient count rates of electrons in the high-energy part of the spectrum to see diffraction signatures with acceptable statistics (unfavorable scaling of the electron yield with laser wavelength was partly to blame). Nevertheless, Maia managed to use COLTRIMS and OPA to measure the angular dependence of the tunneling ionization rate in D{sub 2} molecules. Following the initial trial experiments, the decision was made to switch from COLTRIMS to VMI in order to increase the count rates by a factor of {approx}100, which may have given us a chance to see LIED. Research Associate Dr. Sankar De (his salary was funded by the grant), in collaboration with Matthias Kling's group (then at MPQ Garching), proceeded to design a special multi-electrode VMI spectrometer for capturing high-energy ATI electrons and to install it in place of COLTRIMS inside our experimental chamber. That apparatus was later used for the first demonstration of field-free orientation in CO using two-color laser pulses as well as for a series of other experiments, such as pump-probe studies of molecular dynamics with few-cycle laser pulses, control of electron localization in dissociating hydrogen molecules using two-color laser pulses, and ATI spectra of Xe ionized by two-color laser pulses. In parallel, Dipanwita Ray (Ph.D. student of Lew Cocke) worked on measuring angle-resolved ATI spectra of noble gases using a stereo-ATI phasemeter as a TOF electron spectrometer. She observed the angular diffraction structures in 3D ATI spectra of Ar, Kr and Xe, which were interpreted in terms of the Quantitative Rescattering theory newly developed by C.D. Lin. We also attempted to use a much more powerful OPA (five times more energy per pulse than the one we had at JRML) available at the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) in Montreal to observe LIED. Two visits to ALLS by the PI, Igor Litvinyuk, and one visit by the PI's Ph.D. student (Irina Bocharova) were funded by the grant. Though we failed to observe LIED (the repetition rate of the ALLS OPA was too low at only 100 Hz), this international collaboration resulted in several publications on other related subjects, such as the wavelength dependence of laser Coulomb explosion of hydrogen, the wavelength dependence of non-sequential double ionization of neon and argon, the demonstration of charge-resonance enhanced ionization in CO{sub 2}, and the study of non-elastic scattering processes in H{sub 2}. Theoretical efforts to account for the hydrogen Coulomb explosion experiment resulted in another paper by Maia Magrakvelidze as lead author. Although for various reasons we failed to achieve our main goal of observing LIED, we salute the recent success in this endeavor by Lou DiMauro's group (with theoretical support from our KSU colleague C.D. Lin) published in Nature, which validates our approach.

  3. Selected DOE headquarters publications, October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cumulative listing of DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979 is provided along with an index of title keywords. Three types of headquarters publications have been included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations; reports prepared by contractors (and published by DOE headquarters) to describe research and development work they have performed for the department; and environmental development plans, environmental impact statements, and environmental readiness documents. Availabilities of documents are given. (GHT)

  4. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  5. Selected DOE headquarters publications, October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The publication provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. Publications issued during October 1977 to September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6. Publications from 26 headquarters offices are presented and consist of three types: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations; reports prepared by contractors (and published by DOE) to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department under 01-type contracts; and environmental development plans, impact statements, and readiness documents. Availability of the documents is described.

  6. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    limiters (SCCL) or fault current limiters are a family of technologies that can be applied to utility power delivery systems to address the growing problems associated with DOE...

  7. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Designing Effective Residential Retrofit Programs eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program Quality Assurance for Residential...

  8. DOE Building Technologies Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    501c3 * DOE will continue to support SEED, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will provide oversight of the code, while the permanent management plan is established...

  9. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  10. Theme: A: Restoration Thematic Session (LeS): ThS_A1: Footprint assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    · A sustainability framework to compare remediation technologies The methodology was developed within a global

  11. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry [U.C. Davis, Department of Mathematics; Miller, Gregory Hale [.C. Davis, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr. Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams received support from DE-FC02- 01ER25473 and DE-FC02-03ER25579, both while at UCD taking cla

  12. Final Report to DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail Gultepe

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

  13. DOE handbook: Design considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Design Considerations Handbook includes information and suggestions for the design of systems typical to nuclear facilities, information specific to various types of special facilities, and information useful to various design disciplines. The handbook is presented in two parts. Part 1, which addresses design considerations, includes two sections. The first addresses the design of systems typically used in nuclear facilities to control radiation or radioactive materials. Specifically, this part addresses the design of confinement systems and radiation protection and effluent monitoring systems. The second section of Part 1 addresses the design of special facilities (i.e., specific types of nonreactor nuclear facilities). The specific design considerations provided in this section were developed from review of DOE 6430.1A and are supplemented with specific suggestions and considerations from designers with experience designing and operating such facilities. Part 2 of the Design Considerations Handbook describes good practices and design principles that should be considered in specific design disciplines, such as mechanical systems and electrical systems. These good practices are based on specific experiences in the design of nuclear facilities by design engineers with related experience. This part of the Design Considerations Handbook contains five sections, each of which applies to a particular engineering discipline.

  14. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Database Browse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasma PhysicsDOEDOE2Contact Us

  15. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Fielded Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasma PhysicsDOEDOE2Contact

  16. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments QR Code

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOEwith QR

  17. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments RSS Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOEwith

  18. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Snapshots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOEwithA

  19. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Tag Cloud

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The

  20. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The Videos

  1. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments What's New

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help TheXML

  2. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Widget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help TheXMLWidget

  3. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments XML Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help

  4. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments: Fast Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help

  5. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments About

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Garyand TechnicalAboutContact Us Contact UsOffice

  6. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Blog

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Garyand TechnicalAboutContact Us ContactBlog Date:

  7. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Contact Us

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Garyand TechnicalAboutContact Us ContactBlog

  8. Laboratory Directed Research and Development - DOE Directives,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 - -/e),,s -LabgrantsLabperformancelogo

  9. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Search

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT26,go!(RMP)08 -7 2005-2006

  10. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  11. DOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Gas Outlet SolenoidDOE HydrogenDOE Hydrogen Composite Tank ProgramComposite Tank Program Dr. Neel Sirosh DIRECTOR materials, design, process to improve weight efficiency (5,000 psi tanks) · Develop & validate

  12. Radiological Protection for DOE Activities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes radiological protection program requirements that, combined with 10 CFR 835 and its associated implementation guidance, form the basis for a comprehensive program for protection of individuals from the hazards of ionizing radiation in controlled areas. Extended by DOE N 441.3. Cancels DOE 5480.11, DOE 5480.15, DOE N 5400.13, DOE N 5480.11; please note: the DOE radiological control manual (DOE/EH-0256T)

  13. DOE-STD-5506-2007 DOE STANDARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE-STD-5506-2007 April 2007 DOE STANDARD Preparation of Safety Basis Documents for Transuranic on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at Http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ #12;DOE-STD-5506 STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;DOE-STD-5506-2007 ii Available

  14. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Storage 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Energy Storage Energy storage research and development merit review results 2010amr02.pdf More Documents...

  15. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 DOE Energy Storage PEER Review John D. Boyes Sandia National Laboratories Mission Develop advanced electricity storage and PE technologies, in partnership with industry, for...

  16. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Advanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Combustion 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Advanced Combustion Advanced combustion research and development merit review results 2010amr04.pdf...

  17. DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Renewable Energy Project Developmen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs is responsible for...

  18. DOE Office of Indian Energy Professional Course: Tribal Renewable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Professional Courses: Tribal Renewable Energy Project Development and Financing Essentials (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian...

  19. USDA, DOE Announce $18 Million Solicitation for Biomass Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bodman & Johanns Kick Off Renewable Energy Conference with 17.5 Million for Biofuels Research & Development Grants USDA-DOE Make Available 4 Million for Biomass Genomics Research...

  20. RESPONDING TO SOLICITATIONS UNDER DOE WORK FOR OTHERS PROGRAM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This chapter provides guidance on the effect of laws, regulations, and statutes to DOENNSA WFO policy related to the prohibition of DOE Federally Funded Research and Development...

  1. DOE Issues RFP for West Valley Demonstration Project Probabilistic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that will provide support to the DOE, West Valley Demonstration Project, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority in performing a probabilistic analysis...

  2. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electronics and Electrical Machines 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines APEEM research and development merit...

  3. 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Vehicle...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Vehicle Systems Simulation and Testing 2010 DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Merit Review - Vehicle Systems Simulation and Testing Vehicle systems research and development...

  4. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable power plants. The updated version allows users to better understand the potential regional economic impacts of offshore wind development. DOE is using the new...

  5. Selected DOE Headquarters publications, October 1979-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a cumulative listing of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. (Publications issued during October 1977 to September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6.) Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors (and published by DOE) to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department, and environmental development plans, environmental impact statements, and environmental readiness documents. Certain publications have been omitted. They include such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, and telephone directories. Also omitted are weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration and headquarters publications issued under the DOE-tr and CONF codes. (RWR)

  6. Selected DOE Headquarters publications, October 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department, and environmental development plans and impact statements. Such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, telephone directories, headquarters publications issued under the DOE-tr and CONF codes, technical reports from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA issued under DOE/JPL and DOE/NASA codes, and weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration are not included. (RWR)

  7. Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that includes one of the six (6) cocooned reactors on site. These accomplishments relied upon the transparency between DOE cleanup programs and their contractors working together to successfully transition the land while addressing the challenges that arise. All parties, the three different DOE Programs and their respective prime contractors are dedicated to working together and continuing the progress of transitioning land to LTS, in alignment with the Program Plan and compliant with contractual requirements. This paper highlights the accomplishments and collaborative efforts to address the challenges faced as work progresses from the cleanup to transitioning of land parcels to LTS Program.

  8. DOE 2014 Biomass Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

  9. DOE/EA-2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Western Area Power Administration's Right-of-Way Application for the Tucson-Apache 115-kV Transmission Line Tohono O'odham Nation, San Xavier District, Pima County, Arizona (DOE...

  10. DOE Corporate FEOSH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program web site is the connection to current safety and health news and issues: Departmental special emphasis initiatives, upcoming activities, resources, contacts, and much, much more.

  11. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solid-State Solutions for Municipal Lighting: What You'll Need to Know eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program Solid-State...

  12. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT REPORT FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, S.

    2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is to clean up the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons research and production during the Cold War. That mission includes cleaning up nuclear waste, contaminated groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and contaminated facilities covering two million acres of land in thirty-five states. EM's principal program goals include timely completion of tank waste treatment facilities, reduction of the life-cycle costs and acceleration of the cleanup of the Cold War legacy, and reduction of the EM footprint. The mission of the EM Technology Innovation and Development program is to transform science and innovation into practical solutions to achieve the EM mission. During fiscal year 2010 (October 2009-September 2010), EM focused upon accelerating environmental cleanup by expeditiously filling identified gaps in available knowledge and technology in the EM program areas. This report describes some of the approaches and transformational technologies in tank waste processing, groundwater and soil remediation, nuclear materials disposition, and facility deactivation and decommissioning developed during fiscal year 2010 that will enable EM to meet its most pressing program goals.

  13. Identifying a Collaborating DOE Laboratory Scientist | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Identifying a Collaborating DOE Laboratory Scientist DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program SCGSR Home Eligibility Benefits Participant Obligations How to...

  14. Does Doctrine Drive Technology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasko, Dennis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief No. 4 September 2010 Does Doctrine Drive Technology orDoes Technology Drive Doctrine? Dennis Blasko Summary Wthat emphasizes strategy over technology and may hold some

  15. DOE Policy on Decommissioning DOE Facilities Under CERCLA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a policy in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for decommissioning surplus DOE facilities consistent with the...

  16. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order institutes a DOE wide program for the management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and facilitate the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Cancels DOE O 210.2.

  17. DOE Directives | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance DOE G 414.1-2B Admin Change 1, Quality Assurance Program Guide DOE O 221.1A, Reporting Fraud, Waste and Abuse to the Office of the Inspector...

  18. MIT commuter common : measuring and improving the transportation footprint of an urban institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winder, James Ira

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a system for observing, visualizing, and understanding transportation behavior at the scale of an urban institution's entire population. In particular, the Massachusetts institute of Technology (MIT) ...

  19. Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Hayley

    Development of agro-environmental scenarios to support pesticide risk assessment in Europe T reserved. Keywords: Pesticides Risk assessment Agro-environmental scenarios FOOTPRINT Agricultural Kingdom b Pesticide Environmental Fate, 58, St. Annes Rd., London Colney, St. Albans AL2 1LJ, United

  20. PROJECT GOALS This project involved the development of the first Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    emissions, which will in turn allow prioritisation of actions to reduce the ANU carbon footprint. TYPEPROJECT GOALS This project involved the development of the first Carbon Emissions Inventory report and master Excel spreadsheet Figure 1: ANU Carbon Emission by Category (t CO2e) DESCRIPTION

  1. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Converting Plants to Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Somerville, Chris

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Chris Somerville is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls, which comprise most of the body mass of higher plants. He views the knowledge of cell wall structure and function as furthering the development of plants with improved usefulness: these plants are strong potential sources of renewable materials and biofuel feedstocks. His scientific expertise defines an ideal match of his interest - in the development of cellulosic and other solar-to-fuel science - with his recent appointment as Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI). With colleagues in biology, physical sciences, engineering, and environmental and the social sciences, he now leads the EBI multidisciplinary teams' research efforts to develop next-generation, carbon-neutral transportation fuels.

  2. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S C; McCulloch, M; Thomas, B L; Riley, R G; Sklarew, D S; Mong, G M; Fadeff, S K [eds.; Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) provides applicable methods in use by. the US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories for sampling and analyzing constituents of waste and environmental samples. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Laboratory Management Division (LMD) of the DOE. This document contains chapters and methods that are proposed for use in evaluating components of DOE environmental and waste management samples. DOE Methods is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities that will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), or others.

  3. Selected DOE Headquarters publications October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected DOE Headquarters Publications provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. (Publications issued during October 1977-September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6.) Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors (and published by DOE) to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department under 01-type (Headquarters) contracts, and environmental development plans and impact statements. Certain publications are omitted. They include such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, telephone directories, headquarters publications issued under the DOE-tr and CONF codes, technical reports from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and NASA issued under DOE/JPL/ and DOE/NASA codes, and weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration. (RWR)

  4. DOE F 740-MX

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F580.1 DOE F

  5. DOE O 451

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE Contract DOE Internationalwith 17O 451.1B Chg 3

  6. About | DOE Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Garyand TechnicalAbout About DOE Data Explorer The DOE

  7. DOE FOIA Request Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT Page of DOE2 DOE

  8. Feedback | DOE PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget » FYU.S. DOE Office ofPublic Access Feedback

  9. DOE plan for UMTRA Project water protection standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was developed to define DOE's implementation of water protection standards for the UMTRA Project, on an interim basis, until the EPA promulgates revised standards in response to the September, 1985, decision by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. This plan presents the historical background of the development of the Title I standards and the rationale for the DOE implementation approach.

  10. Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  11. Human factors methods in DOE nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, C.T.; Banks, W.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Waters, R.J. (Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of developing a series of guidelines for the use of human factors standards, procedures, and methods to be used in nuclear facilities. This paper discusses the philosophy and process being used to develop a DOE human factors methods handbook to be used during the design cycle. The following sections will discuss: (1) basic justification for the project; (2) human factors design objectives and goals; and (3) role of human factors engineering (HFE) in the design cycle.

  12. Set of Comparable Carbon Footprints for Highway Travel in Metropolitan America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, Frank [ORNL; Sonnenberg, Anthon [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors describe the development of a set of carbon dioxide emissions estimates for highway travel by automobile, truck, bus and other public transit vehicle movements within the nation s 100 largest metropolitan areas, in calendar year 2005. Considerable variability is found to exist across metropolitan areas when these greenhouse gas emissions are measured on a per capita and a per gross metropolitan product (GMP) basis. Least square regression modeling shows a relationship between emissions per capita and per GMP with truck traffic share, transit share, employment density, population dispersion within the metro area, and GMP per capita. As a result many of the nation s largest metropolitan areas tend to have lower CO2 emissions per capita and per GMP than smaller and more recently developed metro areas.

  13. 1996 DOE technical standards program workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop theme is `The Strategic Standardization Initiative - A Technology Exchange and Global Competitiveness Challenge for DOE.` The workshop goal is to inform the DOE technical standards community of strategic standardization activities taking place in the Department, other Government agencies, standards developing organizations, and industry. Individuals working on technical standards will be challenged to improve cooperation and communications with the involved organizations in response to the initiative. Workshop sessions include presentations by representatives from various Government agencies that focus on coordination among and participation of Government personnel in the voluntary standards process; reports by standards organizations, industry, and DOE representatives on current technology exchange programs; and how the road ahead appears for `information superhighway` standardization. Another session highlights successful standardization case studies selected from several sites across the DOE complex. The workshop concludes with a panel discussion on the goals and objectives of the DOE Technical Standards Program as envisioned by senior DOE management. The annual workshop on technical standards has proven to be an effective medium for communicating information related to standards throughout the DOE community. Technical standards are used to transfer technology and standardize work processes to produce consistent, acceptable results. They provide a practical solution to the Department`s challenge to protect the environment and the health and safety of the public and workers during all facility operations. Through standards, the technologies of industries and governments worldwide are available to DOE. The DOE Technical Standards Program, a Department-wide effort that crosscuts all organizations and disciplines, links the Department to those technologies.

  14. Soladigm DOE Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Soladigm's research has produced a fundamental improvement in the technology for dynamic windows by successfully transitioning a low-cost, high-performance dynamic glass fabrication process from a simple 2" research prototype into a full-scale manufacturing environment capable of producing commercial dynamic insulated glass units (IGUs), and developing and optimizing the production process to meet all specifications for mass commercial production. The technology developed under this project is a revolutionary process for fabricating electrochromic glass that today exceeds DOE's 2020 performance and reliability targets at a compelling consumer price point. Before this project, we had demonstrated 2" prototypes using our deposition process that met these performance targets. The goal of this project was to prove that we could transition this lab-scale process to a scalable, "inline" manufacturing process, leveraging existing manufacturing tools capable of achieving a commercially attractive pricepoint in the near-term. Under this project we demonstrated the technical effectiveness of our manufacturing process by achieving or exceeding all of our technical and performance targets for inline fabrication of electrochromic IGUs. These performance specifications exceed DOE's 2020 performance and reliability targets. We also demonstrated the economic feasibility of our manufacturing process by reaching an initial production process that will achieve our target costs, which are compatible with mass adoption.

  15. DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes a DOE wide program for management of operating experience to prevent adverse operating incidents and to expand the sharing of good work practices among DOE sites. Canceled by DOE O 210.2A. Does not cancel other directives.

  16. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-093 VAP Development: Initiation, Development,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1382 THEDOE0-354-150222

  17. DOE JGI Welcome Remarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bristow, Jim [DOE Joint Genome Institute

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Bristow, Deputy Director of Programs at the DOE Joint Genome Institute, discusses the impact of advances in sequencing technologies on large genome centers on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  18. Develop a Web-Based Information System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop a Web-Based Information System Sam Jody Energy Systems Division DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review February 27, 2008 "This presentation does not contain...

  19. Reducing Our Carbon Footprint: Frontiers in Climate Forecasting (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Collins, Bill

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Bill Collins directs Berkeley Lab's research dedicated to atmospheric and climate science. Previously, he headed the development of one of the leading climate models used in international studies of global warming. His work has confirmed that man-made greenhouse gases are probably the main culprits of recent warming and future warming poses very real challenges for the environment and society. A lead author of the most recent assessment of the science of climate change by the United Nations' Integovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Collins wants to create a new kind of climate model, one that will integrate cutting-edge climate science with accurate predictions people can use to plan their lives

  20. The geography and carbon footprint of mobile phone use in Cote d'Ivoire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salnikov, Vsevolod; Youn, Hyejin; Lambiotte, Renaud; Gastner, Michael T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly released Orange D4D mobile phone data base provides new insights into the use of mobile technology in a developing country. Here we perform a series of spatial data analyses that reveal important geographic aspects of mobile phone use in Cote d'Ivoire. We first map the locations of base stations with respect to the population distribution and the number and duration of calls at each base station. On this basis, we estimate the energy consumed by the mobile phone network. Finally, we perform an analysis of inter-city mobility, and identify high-traffic roads in the country.

  1. 1993 DOE technical standards managers workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop is focused on the benefits of the DOE technical standards program, which is focused toward the preferred use of non-Government standards for DOE activities and the development of DOE technical standards when non-Government standards are not available or are inappropriate. One goal of the program is to replace redundant site-specific standards with more universally accepted documents that have been scrutinized by experts. This replacement is discussed at the workshop along with the problems encountered and solutions found. The workshop provided an opportunity for geographically dispersed people to meet and advance their standards knowledge and efforts to support the program. Safety issues have been the driving force behind the program to date. Several companies offer products and services that support the development, processing, and retrieval of standards. This document mostly comprise vugraphs.

  2. Measures of the Environmental Footprint of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett Carlsen; Emily Tavrides; Erich Schneider

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous estimates of environmental impacts associated with the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle have focused primarily on energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Results have varied widely. Section 2 of this report provides a summary of historical estimates. This study revises existing empirical correlations and their underlying assumptions to fit to a more complete set of existing data. This study also addresses land transformation, water withdrawals, and occupational and public health impacts associated with the processes of the front end of the once-through nuclear fuel cycle. These processes include uranium mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication. Metrics are developed to allow environmental impacts to be summed across the full set of front end processes, including transportation and disposition of the resulting depleted uranium.

  3. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T. (comps. and eds.)

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  4. DOE/CF-0090

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department

  5. Quality Assurance Management System Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830.120 and DOE O 414.1

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Elements and DOE contractors should consult this Guide in order to develop and implement effective management systems that are consistent with the Department's quality expectations and that support the Safety Management System Policy, DOE P 450.4. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2A. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere — university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  7. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  8. Selected DOE Headquarters publications, October 1979-January 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning with this issue (DOE/AD-0010/7), this publication provides cumulative listings of and an index to DOE headquarters publications issued since October 1979. (Publications issued during October 1977-September 1979 are covered in DOE/AD-0010/6). Three types of headquarters publications are included: publications dealing mainly with program and policy that are attributed to and issued by headquarters organizations, reports prepared by contractors to describe research and development work they have performed for the Department, and environmental development plans and impact statements. Certain publications have been omitted. They include such items as pamphlets, fact sheets, bulletins, newsletters, telephone directories, publications issued under the DOE/tr, CONF, DOE/JPL, and DOE/NASA codes, and weekly/monthly reports of the Energy Information Administration. (RWR)

  9. Extension of DOE Directives on Security

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Notice extends the following directives until 12/31/02. DOE N 205.1, DOE N 205.2, DOE 205.3, DOE N 471.3, and DOE 473.6.

  10. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton`s Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  11. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Classical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Classical Physics Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of physical forces and their properties. The handbook includes information on the units used to measure physical properties; vectors, and how they are used to show the net effect of various forces; Newton's Laws of motion, and how to use these laws in force and motion applications; and the concepts of energy, work, and power, and how to measure and calculate the energy involved in various applications. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility systems and equipment.

  12. DOE: Support Implementation of EEOICPA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s primary role in the EEOICPA is to provide records to DOL, NIOSH and DOJ, to support claim processing, dose reconstruction and ultimately claim adjudication. The worker records provided by...

  13. Power Challenges of Large Scale Research Infrastructures: the Square Kilometer Array and Solar Energy Integration; Towards a zero-carbon footprint next generation telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ruiz, Valeriano; Silva, Manuel; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Santander-Vela, Juande; Maia, Dalmiro; Antón, Sonia; van Ardenne, Arnold; Vetter, Matthias; Kramer, Michael; Keller, Reinhard; Pereira, Nuno; Silva, Vitor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will be the largest Global science project of the next two decades. It will encompass a sensor network dedicated to radioastronomy, covering two continents. It will be constructed in remote areas of South Africa and Australia, spreading over 3000Km, in high solar irradiance latitudes. Solar Power supply is therefore an option to power supply the SKA and contribute to a zero carbon footprint next generation telescope. Here we outline the major characteristics of the SKA and some innovation approaches on thermal solar energy Integration with SKA prototypes.

  14. Expediting decommissioning under the DOE`s Environmental Restoration Program: Setting the standard, improving the process, and enhancing technological applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, S.; Dorries, J.; Buller, J. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Restoration has developed a joint policy with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for decommissioning under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The policy establishes CERCLA removal action (specifically, non-time-critical removal action) as the appropriate means of responding to releases or threats of releases from contaminated surplus facilities under the jurisdiction, custody, or control of the DOE.

  15. DOE Average Results

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshore WindEnergy's FY2016Appoints DOE

  16. DOE Challenge Home Verification

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshoreDepartmentBegins DOE Challenge Home

  17. DOE F 5631

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F 473.23

  18. DOE F 5634

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F 473.2334 OMBCSCS

  19. DOE F 5634

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F 473.2334

  20. DOE F 5634

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM |TRU Waste Cleanup at1450.5B OMB3.2 DOE F 473.23342

  1. DOE/CF-0084

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department of

  2. DOE/CF-0085

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department of2

  3. DOE/CF-0086

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department of2

  4. DOE/CF-0088

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department of28

  5. DOE/CF-0089

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOE ContractDepartment of4 Volume 1 Department of289

  6. DOE PAGES Beta

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasma PhysicsDOE Allocationportal

  7. DOE Energy Innovation Hubs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,of ScienceCurrent ProjectsResearch » DOE Energy

  8. DOE Challenge Home Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJulyD&D Project for ETTPFeedstockDepartment DOE

  9. DOE Organizational Chart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and Policy (2009) | DepartmentDepartmentDOE, 201418

  10. DOE/EIS-0380

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev.79-SA-0190-SA-032 FISCAL

  11. DOE/EIS-0380

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev.79-SA-0190-SA-032 FISCAL3

  12. DOE/EIS-0380

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-1313 Rev.79-SA-0190-SA-032 FISCAL31

  13. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 Final Environmental(July

  14. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 Final

  15. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 FinalUsed Fuel Disposal in

  16. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 FinalUsed Fuel Disposal in310

  17. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002DOE/EA-13135 FinalUsed Fuel Disposal

  18. DOE Exascale Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy ThisStandardsSeptember 7, 2012DepartmentHudsonWestern DOE

  19. Cameron Salony, DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.05 CalendarINT'L. S C HOLARMedia

  20. DOE/BP-3828

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1 ofDOE Office of

  1. DOE/BP-4674

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1 ofDOE Office of

  2. DOE/EA-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1 ofDOE Office of4 Volume1 FINAL

  3. DOE/EA-XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOENuclear1 ofDOE Office of4 Volume153049

  4. DOE/CF-0059

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiologicalCrosscutting SuccessOperationalDOE Plans2 of 4)349

  5. DOE/CF-0086

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department ofDepartment9-92January 20,Department of Energy4-99 DOE-TSL-4-99

  6. DOE FILE NO.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN RCDBaseline0 0 0 0 0 DOE

  7. DOE's Offices of Environmental

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAboutStatement of Intent (SOI) between the US Dept of Energy (DOE)

  8. Worker Safety and Health Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) Federal and contractor employees in effectively developing, managing, and implementing a worker safety and health program. Cancels DOE G 440.1-1A and DOE G 440.1-8. Adm Chg 1, dated 3-22-13, cancels DOE G 440.1-1B.

  9. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy management, and conservation strategies * Green building technologies * Building codes Program Design and Implementation * Policy and program development * Coordinating...

  10. Westinghouse-DOE integration: Meeting the challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.V.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is in a unique position to affect national environmental management policy approaching the 21st Century. Westinghouse companies are management and operating contractors (MOC,s) at several environmentally pivotal government-owned, contractor operated (GOCO) facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear defense complex. One way the WEC brings its companies together is by activating teams to solve specific DOE site problems. For example, one challenging issue at DOE facilities involves the environmentally responsible, final disposal of transuranic and high-level nuclear wastes (TRUs and HLWS). To address these disposal issues, the DOE supports two Westinghouse-based task forces: The TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria Certification Committee (WACCC) and the HLW Vitrification Committee. The WACCC is developing methods to characterize an estimated 176,287 cubic meters of retrievably stored TRUs generated at DOE production sites. Once characterized, TRUs could be safely deposited in the WIPP repository. The Westinghouse HLW Vitrification Committee is dedicated to assess appropriate methods to process an estimated 380,702 cubic meters of HLWs currently stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). As planned, this processing will involve segregating, and appropriately treating, low level waste (LLW) and HLW tank constituents for eventual disposal. The first unit designed to process these nuclear wastes is the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initiated in 1973, the DWPF project is scheduled to begin operations in 1991 or 1992. Westinghouse companies are also working together to achieve appropriate environmental site restoration at DOE sites via the GOCO Environmental Restoration Committee.

  11. Site characterization criteria (DOE-STD-1022-94) for natural phenomena hazards at DOE sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.C.; Ueng, T.S.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly summarizes requirements of site characterization for Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) at DOE sites. In order to comply with DOE Order 5480.28, site characterization criteria has been developed to provide site-specific information needed for development of NPH assessment criteria. Appropriate approaches are outlined to ensure that the current state-of-the-art methodologies and procedures are used in the site characterization. General and detailed site characterization requirements are provided in the areas of meteorology, hydrology, geology, seismology and geotechnical studies.

  12. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Change 2 approved 06-13-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1A.

  13. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Cancels DOE O 361.1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 2.

  14. DOE`s annealing prototype demonstration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.; Nakos, J.; Rochau, G.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the challenges U.S. utilities face in addressing technical issues associated with the aging of nuclear power plants is the long-term effect of plant operation on reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). As a nuclear plant operates, its RPV is exposed to neutrons. For certain plants, this neutron exposure can cause embrittlement of some of the RPV welds which can shorten the useful life of the RPV. This RPV embrittlement issue has the potential to affect the continued operation of a number of operating U.S. pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants. However, RPV material properties affected by long-term irradiation are recoverable through a thermal annealing treatment of the RPV. Although a dozen Russian-designed RPVs and several U.S. military vessels have been successfully annealed, U.S. utilities have stated that a successful annealing demonstration of a U.S. RPV is a prerequisite for annealing a licensed U.S. nuclear power plant. In May 1995, the Department of Energy`s Sandia National Laboratories awarded two cost-shared contracts to evaluate the feasibility of annealing U.S. licensed plants by conducting an anneal of an installed RPV using two different heating technologies. The contracts were awarded to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Center for Research and Technology Development (CRTD) and MPR Associates (MPR). The ASME team completed its annealing prototype demonstration in July 1996, using an indirect gas furnace at the uncompleted Public Service of Indiana`s Marble Hill nuclear power plant. The MPR team`s annealing prototype demonstration was scheduled to be completed in early 1997, using a direct heat electrical furnace at the uncompleted Consumers Power Company`s nuclear power plant at Midland, Michigan. This paper describes the Department`s annealing prototype demonstration goals and objectives; the tasks, deliverables, and results to date for each annealing prototype demonstration; and the remaining annealing technology challenges.

  15. Overview of DOE-Sponsored Heat Pump Research DOE research activities related to residential and commercial heat pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;Overview of DOE-Sponsored Heat Pump Research DOE research activities related to residential and commercial heat pump technology are supported by the Office of Building Energy Research and Development%) allocated to elec- tric and heat-actuated heat pump research. The remaining 15% is allocated to appliance

  16. Energy and Environmental Footprinting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severson, D.; Whitaker, C.; James, F.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    continues to flourish, often despite earnest, but under-funded attempts to provide a level of corporate governance. This typically results in inconsistent and incomplete information available to corporate; a huge disadvantage to companies challenged... Climbing energy prices and looming carbon regulations are changing the way that industry manages energy. Managing corporate energy and related emissions requires an understanding of the situation at many levels, a corporate strategy, and empowered...

  17. The Renewable Energy Footprint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the shift toward renewable energy comes the potential for staggering land impacts – many millions of acres may be consumed to meet demand for electricity and fuel over the next 20 years. To conservationists’ dismay, the more renewable energy we...

  18. 2015 Call for Proposals for the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Call for Proposals for the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Safety Research and Development (NSR&D) Program 2015 Call for Proposals for the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear...

  19. Order Module--DOE-HDBK-1203-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR TRAINING...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HDBK-1203-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR TRAINING OF TECHNICAL STAFF AND MANAGERS, DOE-HDBK-1204-97, GUIDE TO GOOD PRACTICES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEST ITEMS,DOE-HDBK-1205-97,...

  20. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Council - best practices on financing, marketing, workforce development, business models, and other topics. Case studies are included: http:www.hprcenter.org...

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish the Department's, including the NNSA's, requirements for laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2. Canceled by DOE O 413.2B.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes DOE requirements and responsibilities for laboratory directed research and development while providing laboratory directors with broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2A. Admin Chg 1, 1-31-11.

  3. Public key infrastructure for DOE security research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aiken, R.; Foster, I.; Johnston, W.E. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the Department of Energy`s Second Joint Energy Research/Defence Programs Security Research Workshop. The workshop, built on the results of the first Joint Workshop which reviewed security requirements represented in a range of mission-critical ER and DP applications, discussed commonalties and differences in ER/DP requirements and approaches, and identified an integrated common set of security research priorities. One significant conclusion of the first workshop was that progress in a broad spectrum of DOE-relevant security problems and applications could best be addressed through public-key cryptography based systems, and therefore depended upon the existence of a robust, broadly deployed public-key infrastructure. Hence, public-key infrastructure ({open_quotes}PKI{close_quotes}) was adopted as a primary focus for the second workshop. The Second Joint Workshop covered a range of DOE security research and deployment efforts, as well as summaries of the state of the art in various areas relating to public-key technologies. Key findings were that a broad range of DOE applications can benefit from security architectures and technologies built on a robust, flexible, widely deployed public-key infrastructure; that there exists a collection of specific requirements for missing or undeveloped PKI functionality, together with a preliminary assessment of how these requirements can be met; that, while commercial developments can be expected to provide many relevant security technologies, there are important capabilities that commercial developments will not address, due to the unique scale, performance, diversity, distributed nature, and sensitivity of DOE applications; that DOE should encourage and support research activities intended to increase understanding of security technology requirements, and to develop critical components not forthcoming from other sources in a timely manner.

  4. Technical Assistance to Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spernjak, Dusan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

  5. A DOE EFRC Center 'title' was established at Princeton University and will focus on the science underlying the development of non-petroleum-based fuels, including carbon-neutral biofuels, and their optimal use in transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2you a

  6. DOE Announces Award Selections for Academic-Industry Collaboration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (Raleigh, NC): Development of a Multi-User Network Testbed for Wide-Area Monitoring and Control of Power Systems Using Distributed Synchrophasors. DOE share 200,000; recipient...

  7. DOE Announces Consultation Sessions with Alaska Native Tribes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to provide input on the National Strategy for the Arctic Region 10-year plan to develop renewable energy resources in the Arctic region. DOE supports the goals and activities of...

  8. New Justification Memos - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Develop an Information Sharing and Safeguarding Program Notice DOE G 580.1-1 - Notice of Intent to Revise Department of Energy Guide 580.1-1, Personal Property Management Guide...

  9. A needs assessment for DOE`s packaging and transportation activities - a look into the twenty-first century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Turi, G.; Brancato, R.; Blalock, L. [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)] [Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Merrill, O. [Scientific Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)] [Scientific Applications International Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has performed a department-wide scoping of its packaging and transportation needs and has arrived at a projection of these needs for well into the twenty-first century. The assessment, known as the Transportation Needs Assessment (TNA) was initiated during August 1994 and completed in December 1994. The TNA will allow DOE to better prepare for changes in its transportation requirements in the future. The TNA focused on projected, quantified shipping needs based on forecasts of inventories of materials which will ultimately require transport by the DOE for storage, treatment and/or disposal. In addition, experts provided input on the growing needs throughout DOE resulting from changes in regulations, in DOE`s mission, and in the sociopolitical structure of the United States. Through the assessment, DOE`s transportation needs have been identified for a time period extending from the present through the first three decades of the twenty-first century. The needs assessment was accomplished in three phases: (1) defining current packaging, shipping, resource utilization, and methods of managing packaging and transportation activities; (2) establishing the inventory of materials which DOE will need to transport on into the next century and scenarios which project when, from where, and to where these materials will need to be transported; and (3) developing requirements and projected changes for DOE to accomplish the necessary transport safely and economically.

  10. DOE methods for evaluating environmental and waste management samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goheen, S.C.; McCulloch, M.; Thomas, B.L.; Riley, R.G.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mong, G.M.; Fadeff, S.K. [eds.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Methods for Evaluating Environmental and Waste Management Samples (DOE Methods) is a resource intended to support sampling and analytical activities for the evaluation of environmental and waste management samples from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites. DOE Methods is the result of extensive cooperation from all DOE analytical laboratories. All of these laboratories have contributed key information and provided technical reviews as well as significant moral support leading to the success of this document. DOE Methods is designed to encompass methods for collecting representative samples and for determining the radioisotope activity and organic and inorganic composition of a sample. These determinations will aid in defining the type and breadth of contamination and thus determine the extent of environmental restoration or waste management actions needed, as defined by the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or others. The development of DOE Methods is supported by the Analytical Services Division of DOE. Unique methods or methods consolidated from similar procedures in the DOE Procedures Database are selected for potential inclusion in this document. Initial selection is based largely on DOE needs and procedure applicability and completeness. Methods appearing in this document are one of two types, {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes}. {open_quotes}Draft{close_quotes} methods that have been reviewed internally and show potential for eventual verification are included in this document, but they have not been reviewed externally, and their precision and bias may not be known. {open_quotes}Verified{close_quotes} methods in DOE Methods have been reviewed by volunteers from various DOE sites and private corporations. These methods have delineated measures of precision and accuracy.

  11. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-027 _INL-12-105_.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ATR from compliance with 40 CFR, Subpart ZZZZ emission standards, and to reduce the carbon footprint at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and reduce the amount of diesel...

  13. DOE Commercial Building Benchmark Models: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torcelini, P.; Deru, M.; Griffith, B.; Benne, K.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Crawley, D. B.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide a consistent baseline of comparison and save time conducting such simulations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a set of standard benchmark building models. This paper will provide an executive summary overview of these benchmark buildings, and how they can save building analysts valuable time. Fully documented and implemented to use with the EnergyPlus energy simulation program, the benchmark models are publicly available and new versions will be created to maintain compatibility with new releases of EnergyPlus. The benchmark buildings will form the basis for research on specific building technologies, energy code development, appliance standards, and measurement of progress toward DOE energy goals. Having a common starting point allows us to better share and compare research results and move forward to make more energy efficient buildings.

  14. DOE-STD-1104 Requirements Crosswalk

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09 to DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Matrix - 1 - No. Section Page Number DOE-STD-1104-2009 Requirement DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Comment Gen DOE-STD-1104-2009 was broadly...

  15. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    salt droplets at process temperature to support development of material balance and control systems in a used fuel treatment facility. In FY13, the project focused on testing a...

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE copy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    quarter to produce 5.1 gigawatts of electricity, up 46 percent from a year earlier. Companies including Google and Apple are developing solar farms to power their data...

  17. Introducing the DOE Sustainability Dashboard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us as we introduce DOE's new Sustainability Dashboard. This webinar will provide an overview and demonstration of the new Dashboard and offer an opportunity for questions.

  18. DOE F 4220-10

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6. Contract, Grant, or Other Agreement No.: (Specify Type of Instrument) New Renewal Termination (See Inst) Modification (Total to date: ) Does this award result from an...

  19. presentations | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal Gasification Magazine Solicitations FAQs Overview of DOE's C&CBTL Program (Dec 2014) The C&CBTL...

  20. receive DOE Early Career Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrological controls on carbon cycling in flood plain ecosystems into Earth System Models (ESM). "The DOE Early Career Research Award represents both a significant honor...