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Sample records for foothill vineyard euclid

  1. Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Euclid workloads. Please email consult@nersc.gov if you have any questions. Euclid Migration Guide Workload Where to Run Simple Interactive Task (Including compiling) Carver...

  2. PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11.3 available on Euclid PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. To try it: module swap pgi pgi11.3. If...

  3. PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements » PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. To try it: module swap pgi pgi/11.3. If no problems are reported, this will become the default version in one week (Tues March 22). ===================================== Michael Stewart High Performance Computing Consultant NERSC User Services Group 510-486-6648 pmstewart@lbl.gov ===================================== Subscribe via

  4. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build

  5. Vineyard Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vineyard Energy Project Place: West Tisbury, MA References: SGIC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Vineyard...

  6. Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results Leslie Eudy, Robert Prohaska, Kenneth Kelly, and Matthew Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-65274 January 2016 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications.

  7. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west.

  8. EA-1777: Lincoln Electric's Wind Energy Project in Euclid, OH

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric proposes to construct and operate a 2.5 MW single turbine wind energy project at Lincoln Electric’s World Headquarters facility located at 22800 Saint Clair Avenue, Euclid, Ohio. The wind turbine would provide 2.5 MW of renewable energy to fulfill up to ten percent (10%) of the Lincoln Electric Headquarters’ annual electricity demand and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  9. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build Addthis 1 of 12 Heirloom Design Build built this 4,840-square-foot home in Atlanta, Georgia, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 While the two-story home was designed to fit aesthetically into the historic neighborhood, energy-efficiency features will save the homeowners $1,909 a year in utility bills compared to a home

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Avenue, Atlanta, GA | Department of Energy Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16" on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump. PDF

  11. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build 1 of 12 Heirloom Design Build built this 4,840-square-foot home in Atlanta, Georgia, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 12 While the two-story home was designed to fit aesthetically into the historic neighborhood, energy-efficiency features will save the homeowners $1,909 a year in utility bills compared to a home built

  12. The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts: Optimizing the Joint Science Return from LSST, Euclid and WFIRST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, B.; Spergel, D.; Connolly, A.; Dell'antonio, I.; Frieman, J.; Gawiser, E.; Gehrels, N.; Gladney, L.; Heitmann, K.; Helou, G.; Hirata, C.; Ho, S.; Ivezic, Z.; Jarvis, M.; Kahn, S.; Kalirai, J.; Kim, A.; Lupton, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Marshall, P.; Newman, J. A.; Postman, M.; Rhodes, J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tyson, J. A.; Wood-Vesey, W. M.

    2015-02-02

    The scientific opportunity offered by the combination of data from LSST, WFIRST and Euclid goes well beyond the science enabled by any one of the data sets alone. The range in wavelength, angular resolution and redshift coverage that these missions jointly span is remarkable. With major investments in LSST and WFIRST, and partnership with ESA in Euclid, the US has an outstanding scientific opportunity to carry out a combined analysis of these data sets. It is imperative for us to seize it and, together with our European colleagues, prepare for the defining cosmological pursuit of the 21st century. The main argument for conducting a single, high-quality reference co-analysis exercise and carefully documenting the results is the complexity and subtlety of systematics that define this co-analysis. Falling back on many small efforts by different teams in selected fields and for narrow goals will be inefficient, leading to significant duplication of effort.

  13. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW, and seven properties appear to meet National Register criteria. For six of these seven sites, no audible or visual effects were predicted to result from the construction and operation of the build alternatives of Section 8B. Three areas were evaluated to determine if they could be considered rural historic landscapes: the Cosby Valley, Pittman Center, and Rocky Flats. None of these landscapes met National Register criteria for rural historic landscapes.

  14. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes. Marthas Vineyard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, Dave; Allison, Katherine; Prahl, Duncan

    2012-10-01

    This report presents a cold climate project located in West Tisbury, Massachusetts, on the island of Marthas Vineyard, that examines the relationships among very energy efficient single-family residential thermal enclosures, room-to-room temperature variations, and simplified space conditioning systems. Each of the four homes studied has a single ductless heat pump unit (DHU) located in the main living space and radiant electric resistance panels in each bedroom with individual thermostatic controls. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations in the living room due to aggressive setup and setback of the DHU may contribute to higher percentages of time where the bedroom temperatures were within +/-2F of the living room temperatures. Solar gains in the living room, door opening/closure and occupant manipulation of thermostats appear to have had a significant impact on room-to-room temperature differences, as would be expected.

  15. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.; Prahl, D.

    2012-10-01

    This report presents a cold climate project that examines the relationships among very energy efficient single-family residential thermal enclosures, room-to-room temperature variations, and simplified space conditioning systems. The project is located in West Tisbury, Massachusetts, on the island of Martha's Vineyard, and allowed for the comparison of room-to-room temperatures in four virtually identical houses that were all built to the same construction standard. The four homes each has a single ductless heat pump unit (DHU) located in the main living space and radiant electric resistance panels in each bedroom with individual thermostatic controls. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations in the living room due to aggressive setup and setback of the DHU may contribute to higher percentages of time where the bedroom temperatures were within +/-2 degrees F of the living room temperatures. Solar gains in the living room, door opening/closure and occupant manipulation of thermostats appear to have had a significant impact on room-to-room temperature differences, as would be expected.

  16. Foothills Bio Energies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carolina Zip: 28645 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Project developer in renewable energy matters, and especially in biodiesel. Coordinates: 35.91533, -81.540094 Show...

  17. East Foothills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3810508,"lon":-121.8174533,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  18. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  19. The State Energy Program Helps Promote that Bigger IS Better in Euclid, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlighting how one Ohio-based manufacturer is saving energy and money through the Energy Department's State Energy Program.

  20. Vineyard Energy Project Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    which they can help accommodate greater penetration of wind energy. Home area networks, energy management systems, direct control devices (including water heaters, air...

  1. The cretaceous source rocks in the Zagros Foothills of Iran: An example of a large size intracratonic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordenave, M.L. ); Huc, A.Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The Zagros orogenic belt of Iran is one of the world most prolific petroleum producing area. However, most of the oil production is originated from a relatively small area, the 60,000 km[sup 2] wide Dezful Embayment which contains approximately 12% of the proven oil global reserves. The distribution of the oil and gas fields results from the area extent of six identified source rock layers, their thermal history and reservoir, cap rock and trap availability. In this paper, the emphasis is three of the layers of Cretaceous sources rocks. The Garau facies was deposited during the Neocomian to Albian interval over Lurestan, Northeast Khuzestan and extends over the extreme northeast part of Fars, the Kazhdumi source rock which deposited over the Dezful Embayment, and eventually the Senonian Gurpi Formation which has marginal source rock characteristics in limited areas of Khuzestan and Northern Fars. The deposition environment of these source rock layers corresponds to semipermanent depressions, included in an overall shallow water intracratonic basin communicating with the South Tethys Ocean. These depressions became anoxic when climatic oceanographical and geological conditions were adequate, i.e., humid climate, high stand water, influxes of fine grained clastics and the existence of sills separating the depression from the open sea. Distribution maps of these source rock layers resulting from extensive field work and well control are also given. The maturation history of source rocks is reconstructed from a set of isopachs. It was found that the main contributor to the oil reserves is the Kazhdumi source rock which is associated with excellent calcareous reservoirs.

  2. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one location varies. Fracturing started in the southwest deep in the stratigraphic section during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, moving northeastward and upsection as the Colville basin filled from the west. Active fracturing is occurring today in the northeastern parts of the Colville basin, north of the northeastern Brooks thrust front. Across northern Alaska, the early deep basin fractures were probably synchronous with hydrocarbon generation. Initially, these early fractures would have been good migration pathways, but would have been destroyed where subsequently overridden by the advancing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. However, at these locations younger fracture sets related to folding and thrusting could have enhanced reservoir permeability and/or served as vertical migration pathways to overlying structural traps.

  3. File storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File storage File storage Disk Quota Change Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and...

  4. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are...

  5. EIS-0280: Proposed Clean Power from Integrated Coal/Ore Reduction Project (CPICOR) at Vineyard, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project under the Clean Coal Technology Program that would integrate the production of molten iron for steelmaking with the production of electricity.

  6. Updates and Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Status Updates and Status Current Status: Up Announcements All recent NERSC announcements affecting Euclid. Read More » Email Announcements Archive An archive of email announcements sent to NERSC users regarding Euclid. Read More » Known Problems All known current problems with Euclid. Read More » Timeline Timeline of significant Euclid events. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:40

  7. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. Read the full post Subscribe via RSS...

  8. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    posted in March 2011 PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. Read the full post Subscribe via RSS...

  9. Getting started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting started Getting started Logging In Users can log into Euclid using the Secure Shell (SSH) protocol 2 with the following command: % ssh -l username euclid.nersc.gov When you successfully log in you will land in your $HOME directory. Euclid is a one node system. All jobs that run on Euclid, e.g. compiles, edits, user jobs, etc,. run on the same node. Sample Program Code: Parallel Hello World Although Euclid was not intended for production runs of MPI codes, it is possible to run small MPI

  10. Energy Efficiency Hits from the Doors (and Windows)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our 1970's-vintage house always seemed a bit too welcoming when howling winter winds swept up Colorado's foothills.

  11. Sacramento County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florin, California Folsom, California Foothill Farms, California Galt, California Gold River, California Isleton, California La Riviera, California North Highlands,...

  12. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build Energy

    Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Fishers Circle by Amaris Homes

  13. Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software and Tools Software and Tools The table below shows the software installed on Euclid that is managed by modules. Package Category Version Module Install Date Date Made...

  14. EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Significant Impact EA-1777: Finding of No Significant Impact Lincoln Electric's Wind Energy Project in Euclid, OH DOE prepared an environmental assessment analyzing the potential...

  15. ReliOn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    E. Euclid Avenue Place: Spokane, WA Zip: 99216 Region: Pacific Northwest Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Fuel cells for backup and grid-supplement power Number of Employees:...

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Caldwell and Johnson,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Transformations Inc., Custom House, Devens, MA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

  17. Annual Postdoctoral Research and Career Symposium | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cabot Microelectronics, Chicago Council on Science and Technology, Clean Energy Trust, DuPont, Dow, Euclid TechLabs, Exxon Mobil, GE Healthcare, GE Research, Illinois Science and ...

  18. Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cell Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation Address: 26985 Lakeland Blvd. Place: Euclid, Ohio Zip: 44132 Sector: Buildings, Efficiency,...

  19. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Announcements PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. Read the full post Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date March 2011 Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:27

  20. Announcements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Announcements Announcements Viewing entries posted in March 2011 PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid March 15, 2011 by Mike Stewart PGI release 11.3 is now available on Euclid. Read the full post Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date March 2011 Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:27

  1. NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL to Play Pivotal Role in White...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    White House Initiative to Bolster America's Manufacturing Future A photo of a large scale wind turbine with foothills in the background. Experts at the National Wind Technology...

  2. Yuma County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Project Places in Yuma County, Arizona Fortuna Foothills, Arizona Gadsden, Arizona San Luis, Arizona Somerton, Arizona Tacna, Arizona Wellton, Arizona Yuma, Arizona...

  3. app_d

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Appendix D - New Information - Document 69, Foothills School of Arts and Sciences (Kaitlin Lloyd & Erika Foldyna), Boise, ID, Page 1 of 1 Document 70, Foothills School of Arts and Sciences (Katherine Reardon & Briana Schueren), Boise, ID, Page 1 of 1 D-189 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS - New Information - Document 71, Foothills School of Arts and Sciences (Ashina Sipiora & Alexandra Asbury), Boise, ID, Page 1 of 1 Document 72, Foothills School of Arts and Sciences (Andrew

  4. West Tisbury, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in West Tisbury, Massachusetts Vineyard Energy Project Smart Grid Project References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and minor civil...

  5. Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump CRADA Ed Vineyard Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ... 10% for a residential multifunction heat pump that provides space conditioning, water ...

  6. CPICORT | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Clean Power from Integrated CoalOre Reduction (CPICORT) - Project Brief PDF-178KB (Withdrawn) Geneva Steel Company, Vineyard, UT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS No Program Publications ...

  7. Known Problems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Known Problems Known Problems No Open Issues There are currently no open issues with Euclid. Read the full post Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date January 2016 Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:51

  8. Getting started

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compiles, edits, user jobs, etc,. run on the same node. Sample Program Code: Parallel Hello World Although Euclid was not intended for production runs of MPI codes, it is...

  9. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Heirloom Design Build Euclid Avenue Atlanta, GA DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary ...

  10. No Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Problems » No Open Issues No Open Issues There are currently no open issues with Euclid. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date January 2016 Last edited: 2011-03-15 10:01:46

  11. Using the ACML Math Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACML Math Library Using the ACML Math Library The AMD ACML math library is available on Euclid. This library is described at the ACML Math Library. To compile and link with it, ...

  12. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the ACML ...

  13. Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software and Tools Software and Tools The table below shows the software installed on Euclid that is managed by modules. Package Category Version Module Install Date Date Made Default Last edited: 2016-03-21 13:44:4

  14. File storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File storage File storage Disk Quota Change Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and project directories, all provided by the NERSC Global File system. Each file system serves a different purpose. File System Home Scratch Project Environment Variable Definition $HOME $SCRATCH or $GSCRATCH No environment variable /project/projectdirs/ Description Global homes file system shared by all NERSC systems except

  15. Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Programming Programming Compiling and linking programs on Euclid. Compiling Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More » Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable. Read More » Process Limits The hard and soft process limits are listed. Read More » Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:11

  16. Running jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running jobs Running jobs Overview and Basic Description Euclid is a single node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI job, type in this at the shell prompt: % mpirun -np numprocs executable_name where numprocs is the total number of MPI processes that will be executed. Interactive Usage Policy Due to the dynamic and unpredictable nature of visualization and data

  17. Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive Email Announcements Archive List: euclid Year: 2016 Select Year: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 all Select List: all users mpp edison cori jgi pdsf nug managers Retired Systems: hopper carver bassi davinci franklin jacquard pvp euclid seaborg Search Announcements Body and Title Search Nothing found. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:43

  18. Terrain and Ambient Wind Effects on the Warming Footprint of a Wind Machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcmeeking, Gavin R.; Whiteman, Charles D.; Powell, Stuart G.; Clements, Craig B.

    2002-05-20

    An experiment in a vineyard in south-central Washington is described in which a vineyard wind machine used for frost protection was turned on and off while monitoring the air temperature in the vineyard. The wind machine fan, with a hub height of 12 m, rotated around a quasi-horizontal axis that was tilted downward into the vineyard at an angle of 6 degrees. The fan also rotated around a vertical axis once every 4 minutes to protect a roughly circular area surrounding the wind machine tower. A temperature inversion of about 3.5 C occurred above the vineyard between the 3-m and hub-height levels during the experiments. The 300-m diameter warming footprint of the fan was displaced down the south-facing 1-2{sup o} slope of the vineyard when the ambient wind speed was low, showing the effect of the weak and shallow nighttime drainage flow that often occurred in the vineyard. When the ambient wind speed increased, the footprint was displaced downwind and downslope of the tower. The mean warming footprint magnitude when the fan was switched on was about 1-2 C, and the temperature excess in the footprint relative to the surroundings dissipated quickly when the fan was switched off.

  19. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    air, up to the -21C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution ...

  20. Microsoft Word - LasVegasReportCardMarch2007.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... from the Spaghetti Bowl to Foothill Drive Widening I-15 from the Spaghetti Bowl to Apex The Boulder City Bypass Widening US 95 from Craig Road to Kyle Canyon Widening I-15 from St. ...

  1. Climate Action Champions: Knoxville, TN | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Knoxville, TN Climate Action Champions: Knoxville, TN Located on the banks of the Tennessee River and in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, the City of Knoxville is a leader in protecting natural resources while promoting economic and social vitality. | Photo courtesy of the City of Knoxville. Located on the banks of the Tennessee River and in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, the City of Knoxville is a leader in protecting natural resources while promoting economic and social

  2. bbnp_bb_an_0004442_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  3. connecticut_bb_an_0003806_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  4. bbnp_bb_an_0003572_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  5. bbnp_bb_an_0003562_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3_0.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  6. bbnp_bb_an_0003809_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  7. bbnp_bb_an_0003578_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  8. bbnp_bb_an_0003566_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  9. bbnp_bb_an_0003576_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  10. bbnp_bb_an_0003580_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  11. bbnp_bb_an_0003569_pmc_dashboard_y13-q3.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Masonic Plaza 94515 Robert B & Elena B Miller B Wood Frame 1910 10911 Multi 22 404731 ... Napa County Specialty WineryVineyard Henry Rd Napa Napa 94559 4967945 39756 0 ...

  12. Advanced Rotating Heat Exchangers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D., Roth, K. W. and Brodrick,J. (2006) 'Heat transfer enhancement', ASHRAE Journal,48(4), 68-71.) Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza Performer: Ed Vineyard,...

  13. UP TO 100,000 RELIABLE STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES IN FUTURE DARK ENERGY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serjeant, S.

    2014-09-20

    The Euclid space telescope will observe ?10{sup 5} strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens events in its wide field imaging survey over around half the sky, but identifying the gravitational lenses from their observed morphologies requires solving the difficult problem of reliably separating the lensed sources from contaminant populations, such as tidal tails, as well as presenting challenges for spectroscopic follow-up redshift campaigns. Here I present alternative selection techniques for strong gravitational lenses in both Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array, exploiting the strong magnification bias present in the steep end of the H? luminosity function and the H I mass function. Around 10{sup 3} strong lensing events are detectable with this method in the Euclid wide survey. While only ?1% of the total haul of Euclid lenses, this sample has ?100% reliability, known source redshifts, high signal-to-noise, and a magnification-based selection independent of assumptions of lens morphology. With the proposed Square Kilometre Array dark energy survey, the numbers of reliable strong gravitational lenses with source redshifts can reach 10{sup 5}.

  14. AmeriFlux US-Ivo Ivotuk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ivo Ivotuk. Site Description - This site is 300 km south of Barrow and is located at the foothill of the Brooks Range and is classified as tussock sedge, dwarf-shrub, moss tundra.

  15. PDSF Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive PDSF Email Announcements Archive List: pdsf Year: 2016 Select Year: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 all Select List: all users mpp edison cori jgi pdsf nug managers Retired Systems: hopper carver bassi davinci franklin jacquard pvp euclid seaborg Search Announcements Body and Title Search Nothing found. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:07

  16. Genepool Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive Genepool Email Announcements Archive List: genepool Year: 2016 Select Year: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 all Select List: all users mpp edison cori jgi pdsf nug managers Retired Systems: hopper carver bassi davinci franklin jacquard pvp euclid seaborg Search Announcements Body and Title Search Subject Date Author [Users] App Readiness Training Today (NUG 2016) 2016-03-23 08:36:37 Jack Deslippe

  17. Running Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Memory Considerations Runtime Tuning Options Running Large Scale Jobs Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Completed Jobs How Usage Is Charged File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Hopper, Cray XE6 Carver Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013 Franklin - Retired 04/30/12 Bassi Storage & File Systems Data &

  18. Jesup Testbed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carver Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013 Franklin - Retired 04/30/12 Bassi Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support

  19. NUG Webinar Jan. 10, 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10, 2012 NUG Webinar Jan. 10, 2012 January 10, 2013 Topics Allocation Year Changeover issues NUG 2013 annual meeting (http://www.nersc.gov/users/NUG/annual-meetings/2013/) Registration Open Schedule Dinner Call for Presentations Training Schedule NERSC Achievement Awards (http://www.nersc.gov/science/nersc-hpc-achievement-awards/) NUGEX elections (http://www.nersc.gov/users/NUG/nugex-elections/2013/) Requirements Reviews and NUGEX members User Survey Opens this week Edison Update Euclid

  20. User Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting Started Configuration User Environment Programming Running Jobs File Storage Software and Tools Performance and Optimization Retirement Plans Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013 Franklin - Retired 04/30/12 Bassi Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request

  1. Using OpenMP with MPI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs Overview Interactive Jobs Batch Jobs Example Batch Scripts Using aprun Queues and Policies Monitoring Jobs Using OpenMP with MPI Memory Considerations Runtime Tuning Options Running Large Scale Jobs Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Completed Jobs How Usage Is Charged File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Hopper, Cray XE6 Carver Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired

  2. Transferring Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transferring Data to and from NERSC Yushu Yao 1 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Overview 2 * Structure of NERSC Systems and Disks * Data Transfer Nodes * Transfer Data from/to NERSC - scp/sftp - bbcp - GridFTP * Sharing Data Within NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Systems and Disks 3 System Hopper Franklin Carver Euclid Data Transfer Node PDSF Global Home ($HOME) Global Scratch ($GSCRATCH) Project Directory Local Non-shared Scratch Data transfer nodes can access most of the disks, suggested for transferring

  3. Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email Announcements Archive Email Announcements Archive List: franklin Year: 2016 Select Year: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 all Select List: all users mpp edison cori jgi pdsf nug managers Retired Systems: hopper carver bassi davinci franklin jacquard pvp euclid seaborg Search Announcements Body and Title Search Nothing found. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:5

  4. FileSys.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navigating NERSC File Systems May 3, 2011 David Turner NERSC User Services Group * Focus on user-writable file systems * Global file systems * Local file systems * Policies * Performance * Data movement * Data sharing * Platform summary * Hopper, Franklin, Carver/Magellan, Euclid, Datatrans (dtn01/dtn02) Overview * Some file systems are backed up for disaster recovery (of entire file system). * Some file systems are not backed up at all. * Restoration of individual files/directories is not

  5. Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File Storage Software and Tools Performance and Optimization Retirement Plans Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013 Franklin - Retired 04/30/12 Bassi Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status

  6. Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File Storage and I/O Software and Tools Debugging and profiling Performance and Optimization Cray XE Documentation Cluster Compatibility Mode Hopper, Cray XE6 Carver Jesup Dirac Edison Phase I Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013 Franklin - Retired 04/30/12 Bassi Storage & File Systems Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff

  7. A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Good Neighbor: Community Involvement At NREL, we are dedicated environmental stewards and are committed to making positive contributions in our community. NREL's main campus is a model for environmental protection and sustainable building practices. Photo of a volunteer at the Foothills Animal Shelter. Charitable Contributions Employees are very involved in the community, giving their time, money, and energy. As staff levels have grown, so have contributions, making NREL Jefferson County's

  8. Photos | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photos Photos Addthis Collegiate Wind Competition 1 of 124 Collegiate Wind Competition May 01, 2015- College students compete in the 2015 Collegiate Wind Competition held at NREL's National Wind Technology Center in the foothills just south of Boulder, Colorado. They built scale model wind turbines that were tested for performance in a wind tunnel at the NWTC. (Photo by Dennis Schroeder / NREL) Date taken: 2015-05-01 08:44 Collegiate Wind Competition 2 of 124 Collegiate Wind Competition May 01,

  9. Collegiate Wind Competition Photographs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photographs Collegiate Wind Competition Photographs Collegiate Wind Competition 1 of 124 Collegiate Wind Competition May 01, 2015- College students compete in the 2015 Collegiate Wind Competition held at NREL's National Wind Technology Center in the foothills just south of Boulder, Colorado. They built scale model wind turbines that were tested for performance in a wind tunnel at the NWTC. (Photo by Dennis Schroeder / NREL) Date taken: 2015-05-01 08:44 Collegiate Wind Competition 2 of 124

  10. Medical Messages

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    11 Medical Facilities With Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Cleveland Clinic Foundation Raid Dweik, M.D., FACP, F.C.C.P. Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 9500 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44195 Contact: Jessica Phone: 216-445-5763 East Tennessee Pulmonary Associates R. Hal Hughes, M.D. East Tennessee Pulmonary Associates 800 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, TN 37830-9657 Phone: 865-483-3594 Philip Harber, M.D. 7230 Medical Center Drive, Ste 300 West Hills, CA 91307 Contact:

  11. Using the ACML Math Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACML Math Library Using the ACML Math Library The AMD ACML math library is available on Euclid. This library is described at the ACML Math Library. To compile and link with it, load the ACML library and include the $ACML environment variable as part of your compile/link line: % module load acml % mpicc -o cblas cblas.c $ACML If you have the gnu compilers loaded, use the acml-gnu module instead. Last edited: 2011-04-06 13:02:19

  12. Compiling Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compiling Codes Compiling Codes Overview Open Mpi is the the only MPI library available on Euclid. This implementation of MPI-2 is described at Open MPI: Open Source High Performance Computing. The default compiler suite is from the Portland Group which is loaded by default at login, along with the PGI compiled Open MPI environment. % module list Currently Loaded Modulefiles: 1) pgi/10.8 2) openmpi/1.4.2 Basic Example Open MPI provides a convenient set of wrapper commands which you should use in

  13. CPICORT | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Clean Power from Integrated Coal/Ore Reduction (CPICORT) - Project Brief [PDF-178KB] (Withdrawn) Geneva Steel Company, Vineyard, UT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS No Program Publications available at this time. PAPERS AND PRESENTATIONS CPICORT Direct Ironmaking Process (May 1998) R. Wintrell (CPICOR Management Company), Sixth Clean Coal Technology Conference, Reno, NV. U.S. Department of Energy report CONF-980410 - VOL II. CPICORT (Sept 1995) R. Wintrell (Geneva Steel), Fourth Annual Clean Coal

  14. Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech12_vineyard_040313.pdf More Documents & Publications Brian Fricke conducts research in ORNL's Building Technologies Research & Integration Center. Low-GWP Refrigerants for Refrigeration Systems Image of

  15. Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump - 2013 Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Pump - 2013 Peer Review Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review PDF icon emrgtech07_vineyard_040213.pdf More Documents & Publications Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump - 2013 Peer Review Working Fluids Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Buildings Performance Database - 2013 BTO Peer Review

  16. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; et al

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterialmore » reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.« less

  17. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterial reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.

  18. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ?5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ? 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (?? ? 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ?10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  19. NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Defense Energy Programs A photo of the Fort Dalles Readiness Center with a small creek and new growth vegetation in front of the building and a parking lot to the left background of the creek. Progress on the Army's Road to Net Zero Energy NREL supports efficiency and renewable energy programs at nine installations An aerial photo of a large photovoltaic array on desert land with foothills and mountains in the background. Moving Fort Carson Toward Net Zero NREL is helping the Army

  20. Footprinting Technique Gives ALS Users New Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7/31/2015 Next Release Date:

    07/31/2015 Next Release Date: 0

    Foothill Transit Battery Electric Bus Demonstration Results Leslie Eudy, Robert Prohaska, Kenneth Kelly, and Matthew Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5400-65274 January 2016 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  1. Accommodations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accommodations Accommodations Los Alamos National Laboratory is situated on a mesatop on the eastern side of the Jemez Mountains, an impressive series of ancient volcanoes with extensive views. Across the valley to the east is Santa Fe, nestled in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, where sunsets turn the western slopes a vibrant red. UPDATE 3/23/16 The block of rooms at La Fonda is now full at the group rate of $99/night. Additional rooms are available at the La Posada de Santa Fe

  2. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  3. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  4. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  5. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  6. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  7. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  8. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  9. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the cellular electron transport chain. However, not all fungi are sensitive to copper toxicity. Some, called

  10. Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Formation of Metallic Copper Nanoparticles at the Soil-Root Interface Print Wednesday, 26 March 2008 00:00 The first commercial fungicide-the "Bordeaux mixture" of copper sulfate and lime-was used to fight downy mildew in French vineyards. The fungicide worked by catalyzing the production of free radicals that damage proteins and enzymes involved in cycling copper between Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states in the

  11. Substantial Contribution of Anthropogenic Air Pollution to Catastrophic Floods in Southwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Yang, Yan; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-07-20

    Extreme events such as heat waves, floods, and droughts, have become more frequent since the 1950s1-2. This is likely caused through changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols that perturb the radiative balance and alter cloud processes3-8. On 8-9 July, 2013 a catastrophic flood devastated several metropolitan areas at the foothills of the Sichuan Basin. Using a high-resolution coupled atmosphere-chemistry model, we show that this disaster was not entirely natural. Ensemble simulations robustly show that the severe anthropogenic pollution in the Sichuan Basin significantly enhanced rainfall intensity over the mountainous area northwest of the basin. The heavy air pollution (mainly black carbon) absorbs solar radiation in the lower atmosphere at the expense of surface cooling, which stabilizes the atmosphere and suppresses convection and precipitation over the basin. The enhanced moisture and moist static energy over the basin are then transported by the prevailing winds towards the mountains during daytime. As the excessive moist air that reaches the foothills at night is orographically lifted, very strong convection develops and produces extremely heavy precipitation. Reducing black carbon (BC) emissions in the basin can effectively mitigate the extreme precipitation in the mountains. Unfortunately, BC emissions have been increasing in many developing countries including China9, making them more vulnerable to enhanced disasters as reported here.

  12. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

    2012-08-22

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

  13. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basse, Tobias; Bjlde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (?(w{sub p})?(w{sub a})){sup ?1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ?CDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup ?6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2? significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1? precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1? sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non-instantaneous decoupling and finite temperature effects can be probed with 1? precision for the first time.

  14. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Ane E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ? 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ? 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  15. Accounting for baryonic effects in cosmic shear tomography: Determining a minimal set of nuisance parameters using PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eifler, Tim; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Zentner, Andrew; Hearin, Andrew; Gnedin, Nickolay

    2014-05-28

    Systematic uncertainties that have been subdominant in past large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are likely to exceed statistical uncertainties of current and future LSS data sets, potentially limiting the extraction of cosmological information. Here we present a general framework (PCA marginalization) to consistently incorporate systematic effects into a likelihood analysis. This technique naturally accounts for degeneracies between nuisance parameters and can substantially reduce the dimension of the parameter space that needs to be sampled. As a practical application, we apply PCA marginalization to account for baryonic physics as an uncertainty in cosmic shear tomography. Specifically, we use CosmoLike to run simulated likelihood analyses on three independent sets of numerical simulations, each covering a wide range of baryonic scenarios differing in cooling, star formation, and feedback mechanisms. We simulate a Stage III (Dark Energy Survey) and Stage IV (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope/Euclid) survey and find a substantial bias in cosmological constraints if baryonic physics is not accounted for. We then show that PCA marginalization (employing at most 3 to 4 nuisance parameters) removes this bias. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain robust, precise constraints on the dark energy equation of state even in the presence of large levels of systematic uncertainty in astrophysical processes. We conclude that the PCA marginalization technique is a powerful, general tool for addressing many of the challenges facing the precision cosmology program.

  16. Cosmological information in the intrinsic alignments of luminous red galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Dvorkin, Cora E-mail: cdvorkin@ias.edu

    2013-12-01

    The intrinsic alignments of galaxies are usually regarded as a contaminant to weak gravitational lensing observables. The alignment of Luminous Red Galaxies, detected unambiguously in observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, can be reproduced by the linear tidal alignment model of Catelan, Kamionkowski and Blandford (2001) on large scales. In this work, we explore the cosmological information encoded in the intrinsic alignments of red galaxies. We make forecasts for the ability of current and future spectroscopic surveys to constrain local primordial non-Gaussianity and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) in the cross-correlation function of intrinsic alignments and the galaxy density field. For the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the BAO signal in the intrinsic alignments is marginally significant with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1.8 and 2.2 with the current LOWZ and CMASS samples of galaxies, respectively, and increasing to 2.3 and 2.7 once the survey is completed. For the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument and for a spectroscopic survey following the EUCLID redshift selection function, we find signal-to-noise ratios of 12 and 15, respectively. Local type primordial non-Gaussianity, parametrized by f{sub NL} = 10, is only marginally significant in the intrinsic alignments signal with signal-to-noise ratios < 2 for the three surveys considered.

  17. A NOVEL APPROACH IN THE WEAKLY INTERACTING MASSIVE PARTICLE QUEST: CROSS-CORRELATION OF GAMMA-RAY ANISOTROPIES AND COSMIC SHEAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camera, Stefano; Fornasa, Mattia; Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco

    2013-07-01

    Both cosmic shear and cosmological gamma-ray emission stem from the presence of dark matter (DM) in the universe: DM structures are responsible for the bending of light in the weak-lensing regime and those same objects can emit gamma rays, either because they host astrophysical sources (active galactic nuclei or star-forming galaxies) or directly by DM annihilations (or decays, depending on the properties of the DM particle). Such gamma rays should therefore exhibit strong correlation with the cosmic shear signal. In this Letter, we compute the cross-correlation angular power spectrum of cosmic shear and gamma rays produced by the annihilation/decay of weakly interacting massive particle DM, as well as by astrophysical sources. We show that this observable provides novel information on the composition of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGB), since the amplitude and shape of the cross-correlation signal strongly depend on which class of sources is responsible for the gamma-ray emission. If the DM contribution to the EGB is significant (at least in a definite energy range), although compatible with current observational bounds, its strong correlation with the cosmic shear makes such signal potentially detectable by combining Fermi Large Area Telescope data with forthcoming galaxy surveys, like the Dark Energy Survey and Euclid. At the same time, the same signal would demonstrate that the weak-lensing observables are indeed due to particle DM matter and not to possible modifications of general relativity.

  18. The general relativistic instability supernova of a supermassive population III star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses ?10,000 M{sub ?} in primeval galaxies in strong ultraviolet backgrounds at z ? 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by z ? 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. However, we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 M{sub ?} can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10{sup 55} erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at z ? 20 to Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.

  19. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  20. Fast 704 MHz Ferroelectric Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Omega-P SBIR project described in this Report has as its goal the development, test, and evaluation of a fast electrically-controlled L-band tuner for BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner, that employs an electrically-controlled ferroelectric component, is to allow fast compensation to cavity resonance changes. In ERLs, there are several factors which significantly affect the amount of power required from the wall-plug to provide the RF-power level necessary for the operation. When beam loading is small, the power requirements are determined by (i) ohmic losses in cavity walls, (ii) fluctuations in amplitude and/or phase for beam currents, and (iii) microphonics. These factors typically require a substantial change in the coupling between the cavity and the feeding line, which results in an intentional broadening of the cavity bandwidth, which in turn demands a significant amount of additional RF power. If beam loading is not small, there is a variety of beam-drive phase instabilities to be managed, and microphonics will still remain an issue, so there remain requirements for additional power. Moreover ERL performance is sensitive to changes in beam arrival time, since any such change is equivalent to phase instability with its vigorous demands for additional power. In this Report, we describe the new modular coaxial tuner, with specifications suitable for the 704 MHz ERL application. The device would allow changing the RF-coupling during the cavity filling process in order to effect significant RF power savings, and also will provide rapid compensation for beam imbalance and allow for fast stabilization against phase fluctuations caused by microphonics, beam-driven instabilities, etc. The tuner is predicted to allow a reduction of about ten times in the required power from the RF source, as compared to a compensation system with narrower bandwidth. It is planned to build a 704 MHz version of the tuner, to check its underlying principles, and to make high-power tests at power densities aimed towards controlling 50 kW of average power. Steps towards this goal will be limited by, among other factors, losses in the actual ferroelectric elements in the ferroelectric assemblies. As the ferroelectric material loss tangent is reduced through efforts by the supplier Euclid TechLabs LLC, the concomitant power loss in its ferroelectric assemblies will drop, and the average power-handling capability of the Omega-P tuner will rise. It can thus be anticipated that the Phase II development project of the 704 MHz tuner will be iterative, but the pace and ultimate power-handling level of the tuner is difficult to predict at this early stage in Euclid's development program. Fortunately, since Omega-P's conceptual tuner is a simple module (nominally rated for 5 kW), so that the number of modules required in each tuner can be chosen, depending upon the cavity power level needed, plus the power for tuner losses.

  1. GAMA-LLNL Alpine Basin Special Study: Scope of Work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M J; Visser, A; Esser, B K; Moran, J E

    2011-12-12

    For this task LLNL will examine the vulnerability of drinking water supplies in foothills and higher elevation areas to climate change impacts on recharge. Recharge locations and vulnerability will be determined through examination of groundwater ages and noble gas recharge temperatures in high elevation basins. LLNL will determine whether short residence times are common in one or more subalpine basin. LLNL will measure groundwater ages, recharge temperatures, hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, major anions and carbon isotope compositions on up to 60 samples from monitoring wells and production wells in these basins. In addition, a small number of carbon isotope analyses will be performed on surface water samples. The deliverable for this task will be a technical report that provides the measured data and an interpretation of the data from one or more subalpine basins. Data interpretation will: (1) Consider climate change impacts to recharge and its impact on water quality; (2) Determine primary recharge locations and their vulnerability to climate change; and (3) Delineate the most vulnerable areas and describe the likely impacts to recharge.

  2. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic – biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Art; Senum, Gunnar I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John T.; Fast, Jerome D.; Hubbe, John M.; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore » the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions. Furthermore, linear and bi-linear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO.« less

  3. New venture opportunities in Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, M.C.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Some parts of Bolivia are at a semi-mature level of exploration. Other large regions are underdrilled; some have not been drilled at all, for example the Altiplano (early discouragement) and Northern Bolivia (remoteness, unresolved stratigraphy and, in the Northern Subandes, structural complexity). Now that more geological data are becoming available and new contracts, favorable to overseas investors, have been formulated, an exploration renewal is underway, backed by the major and many leading independent companies. Half the former and current producing fields are located in the Southern Subandes-an area where until very recently no seismic exploration had been carried out. Modern seismic techniques allied to fold-thrust models applied successfully elsewhere by overseas companies are expected to yield a stream of new fields and deep pool discoveries in this region. Conditions are also favorable for production enhancement using horizontal drilling. In the adjacent Foothills, Boomerang and Chaco fields, the relationships between trap development and migration are being understood. Improved knowledge of potential reservoir distribution (particularly Silurian reefs and Cretaceous non-marine sands) will improve drilling success in these areas. Of the higher risk areas, the Altiplano is relatively accessible and straddles potential export routes but has escaped serious exploration until now, despite the presence of seeps and large structures. Northern Bolivia is one of the least explored segments of the Subandean chain but numerous seeps and recent discoveries demonstrate hydrocarbon availability.

  4. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ¢/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  5. Cluster candidates around low-power radio galaxies at z ? 1-2 in cosmos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castignani, G.; Celotti, A.; De Zotti, G.; Chiaberge, M.; Norman, C.

    2014-09-10

    We search for high-redshift (z ?1-2) galaxy clusters using low power radio galaxies (FR I) as beacons and our newly developed Poisson probability method based on photometric redshift information and galaxy number counts. We use a sample of 32 FR Is within the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field from the Chiaberge et al. catalog. We derive a reliable subsample of 21 bona fide low luminosity radio galaxies (LLRGs) and a subsample of 11 high luminosity radio galaxies (HLRGs), on the basis of photometric redshift information and NRAO VLA Sky Survey radio fluxes. The LLRGs are selected to have 1.4 GHz rest frame luminosities lower than the fiducial FR I/FR II divide. This also allows us to estimate the comoving space density of sources with L {sub 1.4} ? 10{sup 32.3} erg s{sup 1} Hz{sup 1} at z ? 1.1, which strengthens the case for a strong cosmological evolution of these sources. In the fields of the LLRGs and HLRGs we find evidence that 14 and 8 of them reside in rich groups or galaxy clusters, respectively. Thus, overdensities are found around ?70% of the FR Is, independently of the considered subsample. This rate is in agreement with the fraction found for low redshift FR Is and it is significantly higher than that for FR IIs at all redshifts. Although our method is primarily introduced for the COSMOS survey, it may be applied to both present and future wide field surveys such as Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, LSST, and Euclid. Furthermore, cluster candidates found with our method are excellent targets for next generation space telescopes such as James Webb Space Telescope.

  6. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water SavingsTool for the Wine Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-10-15

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or the opportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack of knowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an important barrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking has demonstrated to help energy users understand energy use and the potential for energy efficiency improvement, reducing the information barrier. In California, the wine making industry is not only one of the economic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, with a considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed an integrated benchmarking and self-assessment tool for the California wine industry called ''BEST''(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery. BEST Winery enables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practice winery, accounting for differences in product mix and other characteristics of the winery. The tool enables the user to evaluate the impact of implementing energy and water efficiency measures. The tool facilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on the estimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. BEST Winery is available as a software tool in an Excel environment. This report serves as background material, documenting assumptions and information on the included energy and water efficiency measures. It also serves as a user guide for the software package.

  7. Benchmarking and Self-Assessment in the Wine Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Radspieler, Anthony; Worrell, Ernst; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-12-01

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or theopportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack ofknowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an importantbarrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking programs in the U.S. andabroad have shown to improve knowledge of the energy performance ofindustrial facilities and buildings and to fuel energy managementpractices. Benchmarking provides a fair way to compare the energyintensity of plants, while accounting for structural differences (e.g.,the mix of products produced, climate conditions) between differentfacilities. In California, the winemaking industry is not only one of theeconomic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, witha considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. LawrenceBerkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed the firstbenchmarking tool for the California wine industry called "BEST(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery". BEST Wineryenables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practicereference winery. Besides overall performance, the tool enables the userto evaluate the impact of implementing efficiency measures. The toolfacilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on theestimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. The tool willraise awareness of current energy intensities and offer an efficient wayto evaluate the impact of future efficiency measures.

  8. Building biomass into the utility fuel mix at NYSEG: System conversion and testing results for Greenidge Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, W.

    1996-12-31

    NYSEG is in the second phase of developing resources and systems for cofiring biomass with coal. In the first phase, stoker boilers were fired with biomass (typically wood waste products). Encouraged by positive results at the older stokers, NYSEG decided to develop the process for its pulverized coal boilers beginning with Greenidge Station, a 108-MW pulverized coal (PC) unit with a General Electric turbine generator and a 665,000-lb Combustion Engineering, tangentially fired boiler. Greenidge Station is in the center of New York, surrounded by farms, forests, vineyards, and orchards. The test bums at Greenidge Station demonstrated that a parallel fuel feed system can effectively provide wood products to a PC unit. Emission results were promising but inconclusive. Additional testing, for longer durations, at varied loads and with different woods needs to be conducted to clarify and establish relationships between the percent wood fired at varying moisture contents. Loads need to be varied to develop continuous emission monitor emission data that can be compared to coal-only data. Economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to further refine the equipment and systems. Refinements may include chipping and drying equipment, plus installation of fuel storage and feed systems with permanent boiler penetration. NYSEG will attempt to identify the problems associated with cofiring by direct injection, compared to cofiring a biomass/coal mixture through the existing fuel handling system. Specifically, an examination will be made of fuel size criteria and the system modifications necessary for minimal impacts on coal-fired operation.

  9. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    The Islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha’s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habitat, and potential for biofouling and foundation scouring. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, cooperating with SMAST, developed an oceanographic model to predict changes in sediment transport as a result of the proposed tidal energy project. Provincetown Center for Coastal Studies prepared background material on protected species - including whales, seals, and sea turtles - in the project area and implemented an initial tagging program to record location specific information on seals and sea turtles. HMMH communicated research plans and findings with local stakeholder groups, state and federal resource agency staff, and the ocean power industry. The information is being used to prepare environmental permit applications and obtain approvals for project construction.

  10. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  11. Biological investigations of the Sandia National Laboratories Sol se Mete Aerial Cable Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biological field survey performed on the Sandia National Laboratories Aerial Cable Facility, at the east end of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB), Bernalillo County, New Mexico. This survey was conducted late September through October, 1991. ACF occupies a 440-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service (USFS) for use by KAFB, and in turn placed under operational control of SNL by the Department of Energy (DOE). All land used by SNL for ACF is part of a 15,851-acre tract of land withdrawn by the US Forest Service. In addition, a number of different organizations use the 15,851-acre area. The project area used by SNL encompasses portions of approximately six sections (3,840 acres) of US Forest Service land located within the foothills of the west side of the Manzano Mountains (East Mesa). The biological study area is used by the KAFB, the US Department of Interior, and SNL. This area includes: (1) Sol se Mete Springs and Canyon, (2) East Anchor Access Road, (3) East Anchor Site, (4) Rocket Sled Track, (5) North Arena, (6) East Instrumentation Site and Access Road, (7) West Anchor Access Road, (8) West Anchor Site, (9) South Arena, (10) Winch Sites, (11) West Instrumentation Sites, (12) Explosive Assembly Building, (13) Control Building, (14) Lurance Canyon Road and vicinity. Although portions of approximately 960 acres of withdrawn US Forest Service land have been altered, only 700 acres have been disturbed by activities associated with ACF; approximately 2,880 acres consist of natural habitat. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative lack of human disturbance have allowed this area to remain in a more natural vegetative state relative to the condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found on ACF, as well as a comprehensive assessment of biological habitats.

  12. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  13. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  14. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  15. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and transportation that would be required if the wastes were treated off site.

  16. The Bolivian source rocks: Sub Andean Zone-Madre de Dios-Chaco

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretti, I.; Montemurro, G.; Aguilera, E.; Perez, M.; Martinez, E.Diaz

    1996-08-01

    A complete study of source rocks has been carried out in the Bolivian foothills and foreland (Sub Andean Zone, Chaco and Madre de Dios) in order to quantify the petroleum potential of the area. Besides the classical mid-Devonian source rocks (Tequeje Formation in the north, Limoncito Formation in the center and Los Monos Formation in the south), others are important: the Tomachi Formation (late Devonian) in the north and the Copacabana Formation (Upper Carboniferous-lower Permian) in the northern Sub Andean Zone. Both show an excellent potential with S{sub 2} over 50 mg HC/g and average values higher than 10 mg HC/g over few hundred meters. The Latest Cretaceous Flora Formation present locally a high potential but is very thin. Almost all the source rocks matured during the Neogene due to the subsidence in the Andean foreland and in the piggyback basins, and are thus involved on the current petroleum system. Silurian and Lower Paleozoic units also contain thick shale beds, but these source rocks were mature before the Jurassic in the south of the country. In the center, the Silurian is not nowadays overmature and may play an important role. The different zones are compared based on their Source Potential Index which indicates that the richest areas are the northern Sub Andean Zone and the Madre de Dios basin with SPI greater than 10 t/m{sup 2}. Since these two areas remain almost unexplored, these results allow us to be optimistic about the possibilities for future exploration.

  17. A cosmological exclusion plot: towards model-independent constraints on modified gravity from current and future growth rate data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taddei, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Most cosmological constraints on modified gravity are obtained assuming that the cosmic evolution was standard ΛCDM in the past and that the present matter density and power spectrum normalization are the same as in a ΛCDM model. Here we examine how the constraints change when these assumptions are lifted. We focus in particular on the parameter Y (also called G{sub eff}) that quantifies the deviation from the Poisson equation. This parameter can be estimated by comparing with the model-independent growth rate quantity fσ{sub 8}(z) obtained through redshift distortions. We reduce the model dependency in evaluating Y by marginalizing over σ{sub 8} and over the initial conditions, and by absorbing the degenerate parameter Ω{sub m,0} into Y. We use all currently available values of fσ{sub 8}(z). We find that the combination Y-circumflex =YΩ{sub m,0}, assumed constant in the observed redshift range, can be constrained only very weakly by current data, Y-circumflex =0.28{sub −0.23}{sup +0.35} at 68% c.l. We also forecast the precision of a future estimation of Y-circumflex in a Euclid-like redshift survey. We find that the future constraints will reduce substantially the uncertainty, Y-circumflex =0.30{sub −0.09}{sup +0.08} , at 68% c.l., but the relative error on Y-circumflex around the fiducial remains quite high, of the order of 30%. The main reason for these weak constraints is that Y-circumflex is strongly degenerate with the initial conditions, so that large or small values of Y-circumflex are compensated by choosing non-standard initial values of the derivative of the matter density contrast. Finally, we produce a forecast of a cosmological exclusion plot on the Yukawa strength and range parameters, which complements similar plots on laboratory scales but explores scales and epochs reachable only with large-scale galaxy surveys. We find that future data can constrain the Yukawa strength to within 3% of the Newtonian one if the range is around a few Megaparsecs. In the particular case of f(R) models, we find that the Yukawa range will be constrained to be larger than 80 Mpc/h or smaller than 2 Mpc/h (95% c.l.), regardless of the specific f(R) model.

  18. Probing non-standard gravity with the growth index: a background independent analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigerwald, Heinrich; Marinoni, Christian; Bel, Julien E-mail: jbel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the growth index of linear matter density fluctuations ?(z) provide a clue as to whether Einstein's field equations encompass gravity also on large cosmic scales, those where the expansion of the universe accelerates. We show that the information encoded in this function can be satisfactorily parameterized using a small set of coefficients ?{sub i}, in such a way that the true scaling of the growth index is recovered to better than 1% in most dark energy and dark gravity models. We find that the likelihood of current data, given this formalism and the ? Cold Dark Matter (?CDM) expansion model of Planck, is maximal for ?{sub 0} = 0.74{sup +0.44}{sub ?0.41} and ?{sub 1} = 0.01{sup +0.46}{sub ?0.46}, a measurement compatible with the ?CDM predictions (?{sub 0} = 0.545, ?{sub 1} = ?0.007). In addition, data tend to favor models predicting slightly less growth of structures than the Planck ?CDM scenario. The main aim of the paper is to provide a prescription for routinely calculating, in an analytic way, the amplitude of the growth indices ?{sub i} in relevant cosmological scenarios, and to show that these parameters naturally define a space where predictions of alternative theories of gravity can be compared against growth data in a manner which is independent from the expansion history of the cosmological background. As the standard ?-plane provides a tool to identify different expansion histories H(t) and their relation to various cosmological models, the ?-plane can thus be used to locate different growth rate histories f(t) and their relation to alternatives model of gravity. As a result, we find that the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati gravity model is rejected with a 95% confidence level. By simulating future data sets, such as those that a Euclid-like mission will provide, we also show how to tell apart ?CDM predictions from those of more extreme possibilities, such as smooth dark energy models, clustering quintessence or parameterized post-Friedmann cosmological models.

  19. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: djm70@pitt.ed, E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that sample large areas of sky (>{approx}10{sup 0}-100{sup 0}), but dominant for {approx}1 deg{sup 2} fields. We conclude by presenting a step-by-step, optimized recipe for reconstructing redshift distributions from cross-correlation information using standard correlation measurements.

  20. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a successful experiment was carried out that demonstrated suppression of multipactor in the uniform-field region of a TW DLA structure. However, in accordance with theory, the multipactor was enhanced in regions of the structure with lower values of axial magnetic field. Under Task 2, there were two two-month experimental runs at NRL that were used to characterize the performance of high power two-channel dual-mode active microwave pulse compressor configurations that used electron-beam triggered switch cavities. The pulse compressors were designed and fabricated by Omega-P, Inc. and the Russian Institute of Applied Physics and tested in the Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. These pulse compressors made use of an electron beam discharge from a cylindrical knife-edged Mo cathode coated with a CVD diamond film that was driven by a ?100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The electron beam was used to change the resonant frequency of the switch cavities in order to create the output microwave pulse. The compressor channels included a TE01 input and output section and a TE02 energy storage cavity, followed by a switch assembly that controlled the coupling between the TE01 and TE02 modes. In the initial state, the switch cavity was in resonance, the reflection from the cavity was out of phase, and the mode conversion was only ~2-3%, allowing the energy storage cavity to fill. When the electron beam was discharged into the switch cavity, the cavity was shifted out of resonance, causing the phase of the reflection to change by ~?. As a result of the change in the reflection phase, the mode coupling in the conical taper was greatly increased, and could approach ~100%, permitting the energy storage cavity to empty in one cavity round trip time of the TE02 mode to produce a high power output pulse. The second experiment runs demonstrated a 190 MW, ~20 ns compressed pulse at 25.7 gain and ~50% efficiency, using a 7.4 MW, 1 ?s drive pulse from the magnicon. The success of this experiment suggests a path to future high gain active versions of the SLED 2 pulse compressor at SLAC.

  1. Nuclear Emergency and the Atmospheric Dispersion of Nuclear Aerosols: Discussion of the Shared Nuclear Future - 13163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Mukhtar A.; Ali, Nawab; Akhter, Parveen; Khan, E.U.; Mathieson, John

    2013-07-01

    This paper has a twofold objective. One is to analyze the current status of high-level nuclear waste disposal along with presentation of practical perspectives about the environmental issues involved. Present disposal designs and concepts are analyzed on a scientific basis and modifications to existing designs are proposed from the perspective of environmental safety. Other is to understand the aerosol formation in the atmosphere for the case of the leakage from the nuclear waste containers or a nuclear accident. Radio-nuclides released from the waste will attach themselves to the existing aerosols in the atmosphere along with formation of new aerosols. Anticipating the nuclear accident when a variety of radioactive aerosols will form and exist in the atmosphere, as a simple example, measurement of naturally existing radioactive aerosols are made in the atmosphere of Islamabad and Murree. A comparison with similar measurements in 3 cities of France is provided. Measurement of radionuclides in the atmosphere, their attachment to aerosols and follow up transport mechanisms are key issues in the nuclear safety. It is studied here how {sup 7}Be concentration in the atmospheric air varies in the capital city of Islamabad and a Himalaya foothill city of Murree (Pakistan). Present results are compared with recent related published results to produce a {sup 7}Be concentration versus altitude plot up to an altitude of 4000 m (a.s.l.). Origin and variance of {sup 7}Be concentration at different altitudes is discussed in detail. The relevance of results presented here with the evaluation of implications of Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disasters has been discussed in a conclusive manner. It is the first international report of a joint collaboration/project. The project is being generalized to investigate and formulate a smooth waste storage and disposal policy. The project will address the fission and fusion waste reduction, its storage, its recycling, air, water and soil quality monitoring, and the final disposal with the major foci of dealing with related chemical, biogical, physical, geophysical, engineering, management and administration aspects. (authors)

  2. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenicbiogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2015-09-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymorethe simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ?OA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst ? values in order to probe day to day and location dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ?OA were ?O3 and ?CO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ?CO and ?Bio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic-biogenic interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ?OA in the data subset having high ?CO and high ?Bio was several-fold greater than in other subsets. Part of this difference is consistent with a synergistic interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors and part to an independent linear dependence of ?OA on precursors. Highest values of ?O3 also occur in the high ?COhigh ?Bio data set, raising the possibility that the coincidence of high concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic tracers as well as OA and O3 may be associated with high temperatures, clear skies, and poor ventilation in addition to specific interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic compounds.less

  3. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic - biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, Lawrence; Kuang, Chongai; Sedlacek, Arthur; Senum, Gunnar; Springston, Stephen; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Qi; Jayne, John; Fast, Jerome; Hubbe, John; et al

    2016-02-15

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA, plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrationsmore » are enhanced by the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein), or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, “Bio”, for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short timescales and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ΔOA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst Δ values in order to probe day-to-day and location-dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ΔOA were ΔO3 and ΔCO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~60% of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil, even though the day-to-day and spatial variability of plume OA is best described by an anthropogenic tracer, CO. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ΔCO and ΔBio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic–biogenic (A–B) interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ΔOA in the data subset having high ΔCO and high ΔBio was several-fold greater than in other subsets. Part of this difference is consistent with a synergistic interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors and part to an independent linear dependence of ΔOA on precursors. Here, the highest values of ΔO3, along with high temperatures, clear skies, and poor ventilation, also occurred in the high ΔCO–high ΔBio data set. A complicated mix of A–B interactions can result. After taking into account linear effects as predicted from low concentration data, an A–B enhancement of OA by a factor of 1.2 to 1.5 is estimated.« less

  4. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21

    Intensive quenching (IQ) process is an alternative way of hardening (quenching) steel parts through the use of highly agitated water and then still air. It was developed by IQ Technologies, Inc. (IQT) of Akron, Ohio. While conventional quenching is usually performed in environmentally unfriendly oil or water/polymer solutions, the IQ process uses highly agitated environmentally friendly water or low concentration water/mineral salt solutions. The IQ method is characterized by extremely high cooling rates of steel parts. In contrast to conventional quenching, where parts cool down to the quenchant temperature and usually have tensile or neutral residual surface stresses at the end of quenching. The IQ process is interrupted when the part core is still hot and when there are maximum compressive stresses deep into the parts, thereby providing hard, ductile, better wear resistant parts. The project goal was to advance the patented IQ process from feasibility to commercialization in the heat-treating and forging industries to reduce significantly energy consumption and environmental impact, to increase productivity and to enhance economic competitiveness of these industries as well as Steel, Metal Casting and Mining industries. To introduce successfully the IQ technology in the U.S. metal working industry, the project team has completed the following work over the course of this project: A total of 33 manufacturers of steel products provided steel parts for IQ trails. IQT conducted IQ demonstrations for 34 different steel parts. Our customers tested intensively quenched parts in actual field conditions to evaluate the product service life and performance improvement. The data obtained from the field showed the following: Service life (number of holes punched) of cold-work punches (provided by EHT customer and made of S5 shock-resisting steel) was improved by two to eight times. Aluminum extrusion dies provided by GAM and made of hot work H-13 steel outperformed the standard dies by at least 50%. Dies provided by an AST customer, made of plain carbon 1045 steel and used for pellet manufacturing outperformed the standard dies by more than 100%. Concrete crusher liner wear plates provided by an EHT customer and made of 1045 steel, had the same surface hardness as the plates made of more expensive, pre-hardened high alloy HARDOX-500 material supplied by a Swedish company and used currently by the EHT customer. The 1045 material intensively quenched wear plates are currently in the field. Concrete block molding machine wear plates provided by an IQT customer and made of 8620 steel were processed at the AST production IQ system using a 40% reduced carburization cycle. An effective case depth in the intensively quenched wear plates was the same as in the standard, oil quenched parts. Base keys provided by an EHT customer and made of 8620 steel were processed using a 40% reduced carburization cycle. The intensively quenched parts showed the same performance as standard parts. IQT introduced the IQ process in heat treat practices of three commercial heat-treating shops: Akron Steel Treating Co., Summit Heat Treating Co. and Euclid Heat Treating Co. CWRU conducted a material characterization study for a variety of steels to develop a database to support changing/modification of recognized standards for quenching steel parts. IQT conducted a series of IQ workshops, published seven technical papers and participated in ASM Heat Treating Society conference and exposition and in Furnace North America Show. IQT designed and built a fully automated new IQ system installed at the Center for Intensive Quenching. This system includes the following major components: a stand-alone 1,900-gallon IQ water system, a 24'' x 24'' atmosphere pit furnace, and an automated load transfer mechanism. IQT established a ''Center for Intensive Quenching'' at the AST facilities. The 4,000 square feet Center includes the following equipment: High-velocity single part quenching IQ unit developed and built previously under EMTEC CT-65 project. The unit is equipped w

  5. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940’s and was severely weathered. The composition of this ‘dead’ Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat fluid properties published in the original reports. This comparison allowed estimation of the ‘lost’ light hydrocarbon fractions. An Umiat 'dead' oil sample then could be physically created by adding the lost light ends to the weatherized Umiat dead oil sample. This recreated sample was recombined with solution gas to create a 'pseudo-live' Umiat oil sample which was then used for experimental PVT and phase behavior studies to determine fluid properties over the range of reservoir pressures and temperatures. The phase behavior of the ‘pseudo-live’ oil was also simulated using the Peng- Robinson equations of state (EOS). The EOS model was tuned with measured experimental data to accurately simulate the differential liberation tests in order to obtain the necessary data for reservoir simulation studies, including bubble point pressure and oil viscosity. The bubble point pressure of the reconstructed Umiat oil is 345 psi, suggesting that maintenance of reservoir pressures above that pressure will be important for the any proposed production technique. A major part of predicting how the Umiat reservoir will perform is determining the relative permeability of oil in the presence of ice. Early in the project, UAF work on samples of the Umiat reservoir indicated that there is a significant reduction in the relatively permeability of oil in the presence of ice. However, it was not clear as to why this reduction occurred or where the ice resided. To explore this further, additional experimental and theoretical work was conducted. Core flood experiments were performed on two clean Berea sandstone cores under permafrost conditions to determine the relative permeability to oil (kro) over a temperature range of 23ºC to - 10ºC and for a range of connate water salinities. Both cores showed maximum reduction in relative permeability to oil when saturated with deionized water and less reduction when saturated with saline water. This reduction in relative permeability can be explained by formation of ice crystals in the center of pores. Theoretically, the radius of ice formed in the center of the pore can be determined using the Kozeny–Carman Equation by assuming the pores and pore throats as a cube with ‘N’ identical parallel pipes embedded in it. Using the values of kro obtained from the experimental work as input to the Kozeny–Carman Equation at -10ºC, the radius of ice crystals dropped from 0.145 μm to 0.069 μm when flooding-water salinity is increased to 6467 ppm. This explains the reduction of relative permeability with decreasing salinity but does not take into consideration other effects such as variations in pore throat structure. In addition, fluids like deionized water, saline water, and antifreeze (a mixture of 60% ethylene or propylene glycol with 40% water) were tested to find the best flooding agent for frozen reservoirs. At 0ºC, 9% greater recovery was observed with antifreeze was used as a flooding agent as compared to using saline water. Antifreeze showed 48% recovery even at -10ºC, at which temperature the rest of the fluids failed to increase production. Preliminary evaluation of drilling fluids indicate that the brine-based muds caused significantly less swelling in the Umiat reservoir sands when compared to fresh-water based muds. However since freezing filtrate is another cause of formation damage, a simple water-based-mud may not a viable option. It is recommended that new fluids be tested, including different salts, brines, polymers and oil-based fluids. These fluids should be tested at low temperatures in order to determine the potential for formation damage, the fluid properties under these conditions and to ensure that the freezing point is below that of the reservoir. In order to reduce the surface footprint while accessing the maximum amount of the Lower Grandstand interval, simulations used development from 5 surface locations with a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers. There is no active aquifer support due to small peizometric head in the area and no existing gas cap, so an alternative method of pressure support is needed. Cold gas injection was used in the simulations as it is considered the most viable means of providing pressure maintenance while maintaining wellbore stability and reducing impact on the permafrost. Saline water injection may be a viable alternative, though this may have a detrimental effect on permafrost. In the short term, the results of this work are being incorporated into Linc Energy’s drilling and development plan. This project has also provided valuable information on the rock and fluid properties of low temperature reservoirs as well as the efficacy of potential production techniques for Umiat or similar shallow frozen reservoirs in the circum-Arctic.