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Sample records for foothill vineyard euclid

  1. Euclid Programming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Codes How to compile and link MPI codes on Euclid. Read More Using the ACML Math Library How to compile and link a code with the ACML library and include the ACML...

  2. Euclid File Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    File storage File storage Disk Quota Change Request Form Euclid File Systems Euclid has 3 kinds of file systems available to users: home directories, scratch directories and...

  3. Euclid Software and Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software and Tools Software and Tools The table below shows the software installed on Euclid that is managed by modules. Package Category Version Module Install Date Date Made...

  4. Running jobs on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    node system with 48 processors. It supports both multiprocessing (MPI) and multithreading programming models. Interactive Jobs All Euclid jobs are interactive. To launch an MPI...

  5. 1999 Solutions Euclid Contest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    1999 Solutions Euclid Contest (Grade12) for the Awards Canadian Mathematics Competition An activity of The Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario © 1999 Waterloo Mathematics Foundation #12;1999 Euclid Solutions 2 1. (a) If x­ ­ ­1 1 1 3 4= + , what

  6. Euclid & SKA Synergies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitching, Thomas D; Brown, Michael L; Bull, Philip; McEwen, Jason D; Oguri, Masamune; Scaramella, Roberto; Takahashi, Keitaro; Wu, Kinwah; Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years two of the largest and highest fidelity experiments conceived have been approved for construction: Euclid is an ESA M-Class mission that will map three-quarters of the extra galactic sky with Hubble Space Telescope resolution optical and NIR imaging, and NIR spectroscopy, its scientific aims (amongst others) are to create a map of the dark Universe and to determine the nature of dark energy. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) has similar scientific aims (and others) using radio wavelength observations. The two experiments are synergistic in several respects, both through the scientific objectives and through the control of systematic effects. SKA Phase-1 and Euclid will be commissioned on similar timescales offering an exciting opportunity to exploit synergies between these facilities.

  7. Euclid's Algorithm, Guass' Elimination and Buchberger's Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Euclid's Algorithm, Guass' Elimination and Buchberger's Algorithm Shaohua Zhang School of Mathematics, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250100, PRC Abstract: It is known that Euclid's algorithm, Guass' elimination and Buchberger's algorithm play important roles in algorithmic number the- ory

  8. Euclid Asteroseismology and Kuiper Belt Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gould, A; Stello, D

    2015-01-01

    Euclid, which is primarily a dark-energy/cosmology mission, may have a microlensing component, consisting of perhaps four dedicated one-month campaigns aimed at the Galactic bulge. We show that such a program would yield excellent auxilliary science, including asteroseimology detections for about 100,000 giant stars, and detection of about 1000 Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), down to 2--2.5 mag below the observed break in the KBO luminosity function at I ~26. For the 400 KBOs below the break, Euclid will measure accurate orbits, with fractional period errors <~ 2.5%.

  9. El Algoritmo de Euclides Pablo L. De Napoli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Nápoli, Pablo Luis

    El Algoritmo de Euclides Pablo L. De N´apoli Departamento de Matem´atica Facultad de Ciencias Matem´atica Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales Universidad de Buenos Aires )El Algoritmo de Euclides 25 de abril de 2014 1 / 23 #12;Parte I El algoritmo de Euclides Pablo L. De N´apoli (Departamento

  10. Algoritmo di Euclide, numeri di Fibonacci e frazioni continue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaccagnini, Alessandro

    Algoritmo di Euclide, numeri di Fibonacci e frazioni continue Alessandro Zaccagnini Sommario positivi, si descrive l'Algoritmo di Euclide e se ne fa un'analisi di complessit`a parziale, scoprendo che continue periodiche hanno valore irrazionale quadratico. 1 L'Algoritmo di Euclide Problema 1 Determinare il

  11. artha's Vineyard Shellfish Group is a public nonprofit located on Martha's Vineyard Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    M artha's Vineyard Shellfish Group is a public nonprofit located on Martha's Vineyard Island in Massachusetts. History The Group was founded over thirty years ago in order to help the six towns on the island per year of extreme heat (over 90° Fahrenheit) in Massachusetts.1 Martha's Vineyard Shellfish Group

  12. Solving the puzzle of foothill abortion in beef cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nader, Glenn A; Oliver, Mike N; Finzel, Julie; Blanchard, Myra T; Stott, Jeff L

    2014-01-01

    foothill abortion in beef cattle by Glenn A. Nader, Mike N.problem for California beef cattle causative agent. DuringCalifornia cow cooperator cattle in Lassen County in which

  13. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west.

  14. Euclid, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,Power CorpEnergy InformationMaine:Oklahoma:Euclid,

  15. Cosmology and fundamental physics with the Euclid satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Amendola; Stephen Appleby; David Bacon; Tessa Baker; Marco Baldi; Nicola Bartolo; Alain Blanchard; Camille Bonvin; Stefano Borgani; Enzo Branchini; Clare Burrage; Stefano Camera; Carmelita Carbone; Luciano Casarini; Mark Cropper; Claudia deRham; Cinzia di Porto; Anne Ealet; Pedro G. Ferreira; Fabio Finelli; Juan Garcia-Bellido; Tommaso Giannantonio; Luigi Guzzo; Alan Heavens; Lavinia Heisenberg; Catherine Heymans; Henk Hoekstra; Lukas Hollenstein; Rory Holmes; Ole Horst; Knud Jahnke; Thomas D. Kitching; Tomi Koivisto; Martin Kunz; Giuseppe La Vacca; Marisa March; Elisabetta Majerotto; Katarina Markovic; David Marsh; Federico Marulli; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; David F. Mota; Nelson Nunes; Will Percival; Valeria Pettorino; Cristiano Porciani; Claudia Quercellini; Justin Read; Massimiliano Rinaldi; Domenico Sapone; Roberto Scaramella; Constantinos Skordis; Fergus Simpson; Andy Taylor; Shaun Thomas; Roberto Trotta; Licia Verde; Filippo Vernizzi; Adrian Vollmer; Yun Wang; Jochen Weller; Tom Zlosnik

    2015-10-22

    Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.

  16. Cosmology and fundamental physics with the Euclid satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Amendola; Stephen Appleby; David Bacon; Tessa Baker; Marco Baldi; Nicola Bartolo; Alain Blanchard; Camille Bonvin; Stefano Borgani; Enzo Branchini; Clare Burrage; Stefano Camera; Carmelita Carbone; Luciano Casarini; Mark Cropper; Claudia deRham; Cinzia di Porto; Anne Ealet; Pedro G. Ferreira; Fabio Finelli; Juan Garcia-Bellido; Tommaso Giannantonio; Luigi Guzzo; Alan Heavens; Lavinia Heisenberg; Catherine Heymans; Henk Hoekstra; Lukas Hollenstein; Rory Holmes; Ole Horst; Knud Jahnke; Thomas D. Kitching; Tomi Koivisto; Martin Kunz; Giuseppe La Vacca; Marisa March; Elisabetta Majerotto; Katarina Markovic; David Marsh; Federico Marulli; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; David F. Mota; Nelson Nunes; Will Percival; Valeria Pettorino; Cristiano Porciani; Claudia Quercellini; Justin Read; Massimiliano Rinaldi; Domenico Sapone; Roberto Scaramella; Constantinos Skordis; Fergus Simpson; Andy Taylor; Shaun Thomas; Roberto Trotta; Licia Verde; Filippo Vernizzi; Adrian Vollmer; Yun Wang; Jochen Weller; Tom Zlosnik

    2012-06-06

    Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.

  17. East Foothills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills, California: Energy Resources Jump to:

  18. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Economic Contribution: Vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PROGRAM NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE #12;#12; WINE GRAPE VINEYARDS AND WINERIES Crops Research Initiative Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, project number 2011 postconsumer waste material. #12; WINE GRAPE VINEYARDS AND WINERIES: ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION ii Table

  19. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flowenergy balance near mountain-front Finite element numericalcross-section for areal mountain-slope flow 10.2 2D cross-

  20. Thrust belt architecture of the central and southern Western Foothills of Taiwan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Roa, Fernando Antonio

    2009-05-15

    A structural model of the central and southern Western Foothills Fold and Thrust Belt (WFFTB) was constructed from serial balanced cross sections. The cross sections are constrained by published surface and subsurface geologic data...

  1. Galaxy formation history through hod model from euclid mock catalogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakr, Ziad

    2015-01-01

    Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) is a model giving the average number of galaxies in a dark matter halo, function of its mass and other intrinsic properties, like distance from halo center, luminosity and redshift of its constituting galaxies. It is believed that these parameters could also be related to the galaxy history of formation. We want to investigate more this relation in order to test and better refine this model. To do that, we extract HOD indicators from EUCLID mock catalogs for different luminosity cuts and for redshifts ranges going from 0.1 formation history following the idea that galaxy evolution is the combination rather than the conflict of the two main proposed ideas nowadays: the older hierarchical mass merger driven paradigm and the recent downsizing star formation driven approach.

  2. Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Vineyard snail Cernuella virgata Michigan State University's invasive species factsheets Prepared by T. Noma, M. Colunga-Garcia, M. Brewer, J. Landis, and A. Gooch as a part of Michigan State common names Mediterranean snail, common white snail, maritime garden snail Systematic position Mollusca

  3. Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary 2009 Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    egglaying began on 13 September based on weather data from the Traverse City weather station. BasedWeekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary 2009 Summary Report Northwest Michigan WEATHER The 2009. The biggest problem this year was not a pest, but the cool and gray weather that did not provide enough heat

  4. Cusiana trend exploration, Llanos Foothills thrustbelt, Colombia: The opening of a new hydrocarbon province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, J.; Hayward, T.; Addison, F. (BP Exploration, Bogota (Colombia)); Espinosa, G. (Ecopetrol, Bogota (Colombia))

    1996-01-01

    The Llanos Foothills petroleum trend of the Eastern Cordillera in Colombia containing the giant Cusiana Field has proven to be one of the most exciting hydrocarbon provinces discovered in recent years. The Llanos Foothills trend is a fold and thrust belt with cumulative discovered reserves to date of nearly 6 billion barrels of oil equivalent. This paper summarizes the critical exploration techniques used in unlocking the potential of this major petroleum system. The first phase of exploration in the Llanos Foothills lasted from the early 1960's to the mid-70's. Several large structures defined by surface geology and seismic data were drilled. Although no major discoveries were made, evidence of a petroleum play was found. The seismic imaging and drilling technology combined with the geological understanding which was then available did not allow the full potential of the trend to be realized. In the late 1980's better data and a revised geological perception of the trend led BP, Triton and Total into active exploration, which resulted in the discovery of the Cusiana Field. The subsequent discovery of the Cupiagua, Volcanera, Florena and Pauto Sur Fields confirmed the trend as a major hydrocarbon province. The exploration programme has used a series of geological and geophysical practices and techniques which have allowed the successful exploitation of the trend. The critical success factor has been the correct application of technology in seismic acquisition and recessing and drilling techniques.

  5. Drip irrigation can effectively apply boron to San Joaquin Valley vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, William L.; Christensen, L. Peter

    2005-01-01

    1998 Cajon sandy loam (Tulare Co. ) Treatment actual boron,years of fertigation, Tulare County vineyard Bloom Treatmenttive Extension (UCCE), Tulare County; and L.P. Christensen

  6. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 11072010, Vol. 9 Understanding Vineyard Soils Robert E. White. Oxford developing and cultivating vineyards, soil properties and their variations are often not considered with a particular wine. As a hydrogeolo- gist, I find the sensitivity of wine grape expression to climatic and soil

  7. Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1 Daniel P. Mummert,2, Robertson and Rendell 1990), lower predation rates (Nilsson 1984, Purcell and others 1997, Robertson

  8. An Integrated Assessment of the Influences of Upland Thermal-Erosional Features on Landscape Structure and Function in the Foothills of the Brooks Range, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources, University of Vermont, USA B.T. Crosby, K. Krieger in foothill and mountain terrain are less well known than similar dynamics on coastal plains and peat plateaus

  9. Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-07-01

    In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW, and seven properties appear to meet National Register criteria. For six of these seven sites, no audible or visual effects were predicted to result from the construction and operation of the build alternatives of Section 8B. Three areas were evaluated to determine if they could be considered rural historic landscapes: the Cosby Valley, Pittman Center, and Rocky Flats. None of these landscapes met National Register criteria for rural historic landscapes.

  10. Euclid's Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    standing on the other is called a perpendicular to that on which it stands. An obtuse angle is an angle greater than a right angle. An acute angle is an angle less ...

  11. EXTENSION CENTER FOR COMMUNITY VITALITY Vineyards and Grapes of the North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PROGRAM NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE #12;#12; VINEYARDS: BASELINE SURVEY RESULTS i Program of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, project number 2011-51181-30850 Special Thanks at 8008768636. Printed on recycled and recyclable paper with at least 10 percent postconsumer waste material

  12. A Feasibility Study of a Wind/Hydrogen System for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    systems (SAPS). Their work specifically concentrated on non-grid connected systems that included local project have been carried out. These projects both show the technical feasibility of wind/hydrogen systems1 A Feasibility Study of a Wind/Hydrogen System for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts American Wind

  13. Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary Report for the week of June 13, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    2 Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary Report for the week of June 13, 2008 Southwest Michigan should be scouting all of your wine grapes to see if a spray is warranted. ** Adult GBM emergence has finally started to increase (see figure to the left) and is on pace to be ahead of 2006 but behind 2005

  14. The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts: Optimizing the Joint Science Return from LSST, Euclid and WFIRST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, B.; Spergel, D.; Connolly, A.; Dell'antonio, I.; Frieman, J.; Gawiser, E.; Gehrels, N.; Gladney, L.; Heitmann, K.; Helou, G.; Hirata, C.; Ho, S.; Ivezic, Z.; Jarvis, M.; Kahn, S.; Kalirai, J.; Kim, A.; Lupton, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Marshall, P.; Newman, J. A.; Postman, M.; Rhodes, J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tyson, J. A.; Wood-Vesey, W. M.

    2015-02-02

    The scientific opportunity offered by the combination of data from LSST, WFIRST and Euclid goes well beyond the science enabled by any one of the data sets alone. The range in wavelength, angular resolution and redshift coverage that these missions jointly span is remarkable. With major investments in LSST and WFIRST, and partnership with ESA in Euclid, the US has an outstanding scientific opportunity to carry out a combined analysis of these data sets. It is imperative for us to seize it and, together with our European colleagues, prepare for the defining cosmological pursuit of the 21st century. The main argument for conducting a single, high-quality reference co-analysis exercise and carefully documenting the results is the complexity and subtlety of systematics that define this co-analysis. Falling back on many small efforts by different teams in selected fields and for narrow goals will be inefficient, leading to significant duplication of effort.

  15. Differentiation and Analysis of Xylella fastidiosa Subspecies fastidiosa Cultures Isolated from a Single Texas Vineyard using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres, Cruz 1981-

    2012-11-27

    Xylella fastidiosa subspecies fastidiosa is the causative agent of Pierce’s disease of grape and has caused significant crop stress and loss in vineyards throughout Texas. While multiple techniques are available to identify subspecies of X...

  16. Estimating Finite Source Effects in Microlensing Events due to Free-Floating Planets with the Euclid Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamolli, Lindita; De Paolis, Francesco; Nucita, Achille A

    2015-01-01

    In recent years free-loating planets (FFPs) have drawn a great interest among astrophysicists. Gravitational microlensing is a unique and exclusive method for their investigation which may allow obtaining precious information about their mass and spatial distribution. The planned Euclid space-based observatory will be able to detect a substantial number of microlensing events caused by FFPs towards the Galactic bulge. Making use of a synthetic population algorithm, we investigate the possibility of detecting finite source effects in simulated microlensing events due to FFPs. We find a significant efficiency for finite source effect detection that turns out to be between 20% and 40% for a FFP power law mass function index in the range [0.9, 1.6]. For many of such events it will also be possible to measure the angular Einstein radius and therefore constrain the lens physical parameters. These kinds of observations will also offer a unique possibility to investigate the photosphere and atmosphere of Galactic bul...

  17. Compiling Codes on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    example.x example.c For C++ source code use mpiCC: % mpiCC -o example.x example.C PGI Compilers (CC++Fortran) See PGI compiler for information about this compiler. GNU Compilers...

  18. This book is compiled to provide a printer-friendly e-book for you who want to read Euclid's Elements in the original Greek language. The Greek text is borrowed from Perseus Digital Library 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beligiannis, Apostolos

    Digital Library 1 and as for the drawings I have reproduced with a geometrical drawing language named on David Joyce's Euclid's Elements Web Page 3 . At the Perseus Digital Library each word is linked. But the digitalized version, and especially the morphological tools serviced on Perseus Digital Library are protected

  19. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes. Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, Dave; Allison, Katherine; Prahl, Duncan

    2012-10-01

    This report presents a cold climate project located in West Tisbury, Massachusetts, on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, that examines the relationships among very energy efficient single-family residential thermal enclosures, room-to-room temperature variations, and simplified space conditioning systems. Each of the four homes studied has a single ductless heat pump unit (DHU) located in the main living space and radiant electric resistance panels in each bedroom with individual thermostatic controls. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations in the living room due to aggressive setup and setback of the DHU may contribute to higher percentages of time where the bedroom temperatures were within +/-2°F of the living room temperatures. Solar gains in the living room, door opening/closure and occupant manipulation of thermostats appear to have had a significant impact on room-to-room temperature differences, as would be expected.

  20. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Allison, K.; Prahl, D.

    2012-10-01

    This report presents a cold climate project that examines the relationships among very energy efficient single-family residential thermal enclosures, room-to-room temperature variations, and simplified space conditioning systems. The project is located in West Tisbury, Massachusetts, on the island of Martha's Vineyard, and allowed for the comparison of room-to-room temperatures in four virtually identical houses that were all built to the same construction standard. The four homes each has a single ductless heat pump unit (DHU) located in the main living space and radiant electric resistance panels in each bedroom with individual thermostatic controls. Results indicate that temperature fluctuations in the living room due to aggressive setup and setback of the DHU may contribute to higher percentages of time where the bedroom temperatures were within +/-2 degrees F of the living room temperatures. Solar gains in the living room, door opening/closure and occupant manipulation of thermostats appear to have had a significant impact on room-to-room temperature differences, as would be expected.

  1. Euclid Hardware and Software Configuration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and has 873 TB of disk space, with a peak IO bandwidth of 15 GBs User Environment Compilers Portland Group Fortran, C, and C++ GNU Fortran, C, and C++ Programming Models MPI...

  2. Texas Vineyard Guide. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEachern, George Ray; Stein, Larry A.; Gan, Peretz; Lipe, William N.; Stockton, L. Austin; Helmers, Sammy G.

    1982-01-01

    . 7 I 9-gauge wire Figure 2-7 The "H" end post bracing. 1/1 G> .r:. CJ .S ('II ,... Posts of concrete properly reinforced with steel rods are very durable and can be used. The number of the row should be marked on each end post. Bracing... in the ground. A #9 wire is then doubled and wound between the base of the end post and the top of the inner post. The wire is tightened by twisting with an iron or wooden rod and latching it behind the nearest post or cross member to prevent the brace wire...

  3. Foothills Bio Energies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,Pevafersa JV Jump to:Bio Energies Jump to:

  4. Foothills Energy Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood,Pevafersa JV Jump to:Bio Energies Jump

  5. Using the ACML Math Library on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of your compilelink line: % module load acml % mpicc -o cblas cblas.c ACML If you have the gnu compilers loaded, use the acml-gnu module instead. Last edited: 2011-04-06 13:02:19...

  6. Euclid and Wythoff games Aviezri S. Fraenkel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    precisely for all y in the closed integer interval [ nx , n+1x ]. For computing the g-function it thus suffices to compute the boundary points nx . (For n Z>0, nx = 1 + nx ; 0 = 1, 1 the golden section.) In this note we present two characterizations of the extremal points nx , which also reveal, incidentally

  7. Euclid - Retired 01/31/2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES October 27th,EnvironmentalEqual7/31/2016 Version No.:Contract

  8. HumanWildlife Interactions 4(1):130144, Spring 2010 Evaluation of damage by vertebrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    survey, distress call, grapes, human­wildlife conflicts, Meleagris gallopavo, vineyards, wild turkey range have resulted in conflict with human interests. Complaints include turkeys causing a nuisance in the Napa Valley and Sierra Foothills American Viticultural Areas of California. We conducted damage surveys

  9. Tustin Foothills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources JumpTuscaloosaI

  10. Catalina Foothills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°, -86.3376761° ShowEnergyCastorland,Catalina

  11. Foothill Farms, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey

  12. Fortuna Foothills, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures JumpIndiana: Energy Resources Jump

  13. Vineyard, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin,Village of Wellington, Ohio (Utility Company)Hill,

  14. Vineyard Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillage of Shiloh, OhioVillage

  15. Vineyard, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillage of Shiloh, OhioVillageCalifornia:

  16. South Euclid, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergy IncAshburnham,BoundChicagoEl Monte,Eliot,

  17. PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredEAnnouncements » PGI version 11.3

  18. Soil-landscape model helps predict potassium supply in vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T; Pettygrove, Stuart; Southard, Randal; Minoshima, Hideomi; Verdegaal, Paul S.

    2008-01-01

    for making and inter- preting soil surveys (2nd ed. ). USDA-K S, V, K Depth inches Color* moist soil Sand Silt Clay Claymineralogy† pH CEC cmol(+)/kg soil‡ Exchangeable K K

  19. Vineyard nutrient needs vary with rootstocks and soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Jean-Jacques; Anderson, Michael M; Wolpert, J A

    2008-01-01

    to the interpretation of soil analysis for potassium andA (ed. ). 1986. Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 1. Physi- cal9:154–68. Nicholas P. 2004. Soil, Irrigation and Nutrition.

  20. Vineyard Energy Project Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company)Idaho) JumpWinside, Nebraska (Utility Company)Project

  1. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    or shortly after drilling for each well. We performed one orGondola well dropped substantially as drilling progressed toft amsl. However, drilling of the peak well may have short-

  2. State and Transition Models for California's Sierra Nevada Foothill Oak-Woodlands1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George,2 Neil McDougald,3 Dennis Dudley,4 Larry Forero,5 Bill Frost,6 Jim Sullins,7 and Roger Ingram8,University of California, Davis, Dept. of Plant Sciences One Shields Avenue 1210 Plant and Environmental Sciences Bldg Davis, CA 95616-8780, email: mrgeorge@ucdavis.edu. 3 County Director/Farm Advisor, University

  3. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    ambient conductive geothermal gradient = dT/dz = constant (state conductive geothermal gradient dT/dz due to ambientthan the conductive geothermal gradient 0.0073 C/ft in

  4. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    1965) Rates of Vertical Groundwater Movement Estimated fromCrystalline Rocks. Groundwater, Vol. 2, pp. 6-12. Dettinger,horizontal and vertical groundwater flow components. Water

  5. California black rails depend on irrigation-fed wetlands in the Sierra Nevada foothills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Orien M. W.; Chen, Stephanie K.; Risk, Benjamin B.; Tecklin, Jerry; Beissinger, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Juncaceae) and willows (Salix spp. ). At each point we alsoOther sedges Rushes Salix Habitat loss and degradation are

  6. Investigation of Groundwater Flow in Foothill and Mountain regions using Heat Flow measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogg, Graham E.; Trask, James C

    2009-01-01

    depth. Heavenly Gondola well: Hydraulic tests together withReferences Tables Hydraulic parameters for wells completedthe cost of standard hydraulic methods of well/aquifer yield

  7. DOE ZERH Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the mixed-humid climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, with 2x6 16” on center walls with R-19 ocsf; basement with R-28 ccsf, R-5 rigid foam under slab; sealed attic with R-28 ocsf under roof deck; 22.8 SEER; 12.5 HSPF heat pump.

  8. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalTheof Energy hasProposals (RFP)DepartmentEnergy

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOE FederalTheofHeyeck, AEP, Sr.EnergyWA#20, #26,Avenue,

  10. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField |of EnergyDepartment of

  11. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Heirloom Design Build, Euclid Avenue, Atlanta, GA

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |Reference StationFranklinHammer and Hand

  12. DOE Tour of Zero: Euclid Avenue by Heirloom Design Build | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of Energy Facilities By E-mail:Carly Wilkins(Part 1)DOE14 KB Home

  13. In the foothills of the Southern Alps between Lake Garda and Lake Maggiore, the relations between the recent tectonic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Karl

    -medio, affioranti nell'area epicentrale del terremoto di Brescia del 25 gennaio 1222 (Intensitŕ epicentrale IX MCS

  14. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one location varies. Fracturing started in the southwest deep in the stratigraphic section during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, moving northeastward and upsection as the Colville basin filled from the west. Active fracturing is occurring today in the northeastern parts of the Colville basin, north of the northeastern Brooks thrust front. Across northern Alaska, the early deep basin fractures were probably synchronous with hydrocarbon generation. Initially, these early fractures would have been good migration pathways, but would have been destroyed where subsequently overridden by the advancing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. However, at these locations younger fracture sets related to folding and thrusting could have enhanced reservoir permeability and/or served as vertical migration pathways to overlying structural traps.

  15. Gap Analysis of the Southwestern California Region (94-4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Frank W.

    1994-01-01

    not find cropland, orchards/vineyards or urban habitats asnot find cropland, orchards/vineyards or urban habitats as

  16. arXiv:1501.03978v1[astro-ph.CO]16Jan2015 Euclid & SKA Synergies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEwen, Jason

    and to determine the nature of dark energy. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) has similar scientific aims (and between these facilities. Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array June 8-13, 2014 Giardini

  17. Converting oak woodland or savanna to vineyards may stress groundwater supply in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Asato, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    processes as root water extraction (ET c ), infiltration byprocesses as root water extraction (ET c ), infiltration byc ): Root extraction of available soil water used in plant

  18. Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary Report for the week of July 10, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    events than in any of the previous years since weather data collection began in 2000. SWMREC had a much Periods (Starting at 800 GDD base 42 from January 1) SITE 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 6 Year Avg

  19. EIS-0280: Proposed Clean Power from Integrated Coal/Ore Reduction Project (CPICOR) at Vineyard, Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential environmental and human health impacts of a proposed project under the Clean Coal Technology Program that would integrate the production of molten iron for steelmaking with the production of electricity.

  20. Irrigation of deciduous orchards and vineyards influenced by plant-soil-water relationships in individual situations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coats, W J

    2014-01-01

    surface irrigation, the labor of applying the water and thecost of the water — may be one of the important items in thewhether there is a supply of water for irrigation. “A grower

  1. Recycled water causes no salinity or toxicity issues in Napa vineyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    MST and Carneros sources, at various water application ratesNutrients in applied water* NSDNutrient Applied water acre-feet Nitrogen (as N)

  2. Quantifying overwash flux in barrier systems : an example from Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carruthers, Emily A

    2011-01-01

    Coastal barriers are particularly susceptible to the predicted effects of accelerated of sea-level rise and the potential for increased impacts of intense storms. Over centennial scales, barriers are maintained via overtopping ...

  3. Converting oak woodland or savanna to vineyards may stress groundwater supply in summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Asato, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    Applied ET o * Rain* IWR† water . . . . . . . . . . . . .associated with rain levels, soil water–holding ca- pacityR eff Irrigation water (IW) Effective rain (plus irrigation

  4. Assessment of carbon in woody plants and soil across a vineyard-woodland landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    and Opportunities. Crop Science 2010, 50(2):S109-S119.and crop rotation: A global data analysis. Soil Science

  5. Shifting Attitudes Towards Tobacco Control in Tobacco Country: Tobacco Industry Political Influence and Tobacco Policy Making in South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan BA, Sarah; Barnes, Richard L JD; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2009-01-01

    191 Lawsuit: Foothills Brewing Concern vs. City ofFront, A1. The Foothills Brewing Concern, Inc. vs. The Citycity_smoki/ 673. The Foothills Brewing Concern v. City of

  6. Effects of Weather Variables on Pedestrian Volumes in Alameda County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attaset, Vanvisa; Schneider, Robert J.; Arnold, Lindsay S.; Ragland, David R

    2010-01-01

    Telegraph Avenue  Weather Station  Oakland Foothills Oakland Foothills  Several weather variables were derivedCombined Pedestrian Count and Weather Condition Database The

  7. Woody biomass plots at Sierra Foothill Range Field Station. RichardB. Standiford o Dean R. Donaldson u Roy M. Sachs 0 Janine K. Hasey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at present. Scat- tered markets for higher value products such as paper pulp and low prices forbiomass and eucalyptus in short-rotation, intensively cul- tured (SRIC) plantations. The wood products industry, inter- ested in increasing fiber for paper manufacturing, reported 3- to 10-fold yield increases over

  8. Bravo Araby Navy Base Holtville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesquite Loveland Imperial Highline Descanso Calexico Sand Hill Navy Base Holtville Glencliff Foothills

  9. Learning From Measurements in Exponential Families Percy Liang pliang@cs.berkeley.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    ... View of Los Gatos Foothills ... avail avail avail ... size size size size ... Available July 1 ... 2

  10. Euclid's proposition III.35 says that if AB and CD are chords of a circle intersecting in a point E, then AE EB = CE ED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be the diameter passing through E. Then, a special case of the proposition is to show that AE · EB = FE · EG. In fact, it is enough to show this special case, because if AE · EB = FE · EG and if CE · ED = FE · EG, then by transitivity, AE · EB = CE · ED. Hence, we will proceed to prove that AE · EB = FE · EG. Let r be the radius

  11. Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fewings, Melanie Rinn

    2007-01-01

    The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

  12. Analysis of 2-axis pencil beam sonar microbathymetric measurements of mine burial at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotowka, Brendan Reed

    2005-01-01

    The changing state of warfare has driven the US Navy's area of operations closer to shore into littoral coastal waters. Mine Warfare has been proven as an extremely effective means of battlespace control in these waters. ...

  13. The kingdom and its subjects : charisms, language, economy, and the birth of a progressive politics in the vineyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialecki, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Reassembling individual subjects: Events and decisions inPeter 2003 Badiou: A Subject to Truth. Minneapolis:the Tropics: Objects and Subjects at the Religious Frontier.

  14. Exploring phonological areality in the circum-Andean region using a Naive Bayes Classifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, Lev David

    2013-01-01

    Santiago del Estero Quechua [qus] In several of these regions, such as the Ecuadorean foothills, the Huallaga River

  15. Training Courses: ANCIENT SPACES IN NORTH MESOPOTAMIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kepinski: "Settlement trends at the foothills of the Zagros around the case of Kunara (Upper Tanjaro river

  16. Learning from Measurements in Exponential Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    predictor p human Example: y: feat feat feat feat feat ... x: View of Los Gatos Foothills ... avail avail ... x: View of Los Gatos Foothills ... avail avail avail ... size size size size ... Available July 1 learned predictor ^p Example: y: feat feat feat feat feat ... x: View of Los Gatos Foothills ... avail

  17. An intertextual study of Euclides Da Cunha's Os serto?es, R.B. Cunninghame Graham's A Brazilian mystic, and Mario Vargas Llosa's La guerra del fin del mundo 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Sandra Sassetti Fernandes

    1990-01-01

    known) fictions inspired by Q~~m. In" rr I fin I m n de Mario Vargas Llosa: un estudio transtextual, " Marcos Leopoldo Bernucci discussed a variety of texts used by Llosa in the writing of ~Lrr~. In this study Bernucci examined the relationship... American Case Studies, " and Marcos Leopoldo Bernucci, " ' de Mario Vargas Llosa: Un estudio transtextual. " , and is suggested in Llosa's text itself by Gall's phrenology, a major theme of Hegel's P~hn~m~~nlggy. Both in regard to ~~ and La~~rr we...

  18. NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL to Play Pivotal Role in White...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    White House Initiative to Bolster America's Manufacturing Future A photo of a large scale wind turbine with foothills in the background. Experts at the National Wind Technology...

  19. High School Girls Honored for Math, Science Achievements at Sandia...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tabatha Barrington, East Union High School Suman Tripathy, Foothill High School Carmen Jimenez, Fremont High School Morgan Correia, Granada High School Megan Kristovich, Livermore...

  20. Representation of tundra vegetation by pollen in lake sediments of northern Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Feng Sheng

    Coastal Plain, Arctic Foothills, modern pollen, North Slope, palynology, paleoecology, pollen accumulation been an important objective in paleoecology (Iversen, 1952; Livingstone, 1955; Colinvaux, 1964; Ritchie

  1. Annual Postdoctoral Research and Career Symposium | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chicago Council on Science and Technology, Clean Energy Trust, Euclid TechLabs, Exxon Mobil, Illinois Science and Technology Coalition, Illinois Technology Association,...

  2. Language and Framework Support for Reviewably-Secure Software Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mettler, Adrian Matthew

    2012-01-01

    1.1.2 Programming Languages and Abstractions . . . . . . . .security properties. Languages and programming idioms thatJ. Popek. Report on the programming language Euclid. SIGPLAN

  3. blog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    announcements PGI version 11.3 available on Euclid http:www.nersc.govuserscomputational-systemsretired-systemseuclid-retired-01-31-2013updates-and-statusannouncements...

  4. Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cell Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Fuel Cell Corporation Address: 26985 Lakeland Blvd. Place: Euclid, Ohio Zip: 44132 Sector: Buildings, Efficiency,...

  5. Study Guide 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Kaufmann

    Study Guide Timeline. Euclid's five axioms (300 BC); From Proclus (400AD) belief that the fifth axiom is derivable from the first four; Saccheri (17th century): ...

  6. Magnetocaloric Refrigeration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reduce overall energy needs in new and existing buildings. Contacts DOE Technology Manager: Tony Bouza Performer: Ed Vineyard, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Learn More...

  7. LANL: CPO: Los Alamos National Laboratory Impacts and Investments...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * New Mexico History Documentary * Northern New Mexico Micro Grape Growers Cooperative * Old School Vineyard & Winery * On the Spot Mobile Detailing Service * On Top Of It...

  8. CPICORT | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Clean Power from Integrated CoalOre Reduction (CPICORT) - Project Brief PDF-178KB (Withdrawn) Geneva Steel Company, Vineyard, UT PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS No Program Publications...

  9. The effects of applied water at various fractions of measured evapotranspiration on water relations and vegetative growth of Thompson Seedless grapevines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, L. E.; Grimes, D. W.; Phene, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    ranged from 0 to 7. The irrigation pump for the rest of thethe vineyard pump was activated and an irrigation event took

  10. Directions & Parking School of Information Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Directions & Parking School of Information Studies Syracuse University ­ Hinds Hall 100 University Street will be on your right.) Take Adams Street up the hill until it dead ends into Ostrom Avenue Take a right on Ostrom Avenue Take a right on Euclid Avenue Continue on Euclid across Comstock Avenue

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF TOPOGRAPHY AND TEMPERATURE ON QUERCUS ILICIFOLIA SUCCESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    oak thickets can become widespread due to forest fires (Mouw 2000). The landscape of Martha's Vineyard fire detection and prevention programs around 1955. In the past, large scale forest fires have been a common disturbance on Martha's Vineyard. Between 1867 and 1929 there were sixteen forest fires

  12. Resistant Pest Management Newsletter A Biannual Newsletter of the Center for Integrated Plant Systems (CIPS) in Cooperation with the Insecticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    coffeae Nietner) of Tea to Commonly Used Acaricides from the Darjeeling Foothills and Plains of North of Nutrients and Systemic Acquired Resistance Elicitors on Incidence of Greening Disease in Citrus -- H

  13. Stacking-velocity inversion with borehole constraints for tilted TI media Xiaoxiang Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    important role in seismic imaging, especially near salt bodies and in active tectonic areas. Here, we salt domes and in fold- and-thrust belts such as the Canadian Foothills Isaac and Lawton, 1999; Vestrum

  14. Development, Topography, and Identity: The Dougherty Valley and the New Suburban Metropolis [Research and Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, Rene'

    2008-01-01

    Creek Coyote Creek East Alamo Creek San Cantanio Creek SanCreek Tassajara Creek West Alamo Creek C RO W C AN YO N RDzone between branches of Alamo Creek and the foothills dem-

  15. Journal of Anzmal E C O ~ O ~ Y1992,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    of lice from Neotropical birds. The data were collected in the Andean foothills of south-eastern Peru of different parasites on the same host. Host-parasite interactions are powerful arenas In this paper, we

  16. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    During the dry season of 2004–2005 we carried out field measurements of air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, a bowl-shaped urban basin in the Himalayan foothills of Nepal. We measured the trace ...

  17. Imperial Methods: Using Text Mining and Social Network Analysis to Detect Regional Strategies in the Akkadian Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brumfield, Sara

    2013-01-01

    a Modern Hunter in the Zagros Mountains. ” In L. al-Gailanithe foothills into the Zagros uplands. Near the site of TellSuen’s campaigns into the Zagros Mtns. , suggests that Tutub

  18. Motion and evolution of the Chaochou Fault, Southern Taiwan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassler, Lauren E.

    2005-11-01

    The Chaochou Fault (CCF) is both an important lithologic boundary and a significant topographic feature in the Taiwan orogenic belt. It is the geologic boundary between the Slate Belt to the east, and the Western Foothills to the west. Although...

  19. Three Forks folio, Montana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peale, A. C. (Albert Charles), 1849-1914.

    1896-01-01

    A structural model of the central and southern Western Foothills Fold and Thrust Belt (WFFTB) was constructed from serial balanced cross sections. The cross sections are constrained by published surface and subsurface geologic data...

  20. Cover of 1962 Former Students Directory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The Truck Receiving Dock 66 at the General Motors Fisher Body Division Plant in Euclid, Ohio had always been a source of constant employee complaints during the heating season. Despite management's efforts to maintain as uniform a temperature...

  1. Carver Email Announcements Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Tuesday 2012-02-03 16:30:16 David Turner New version of MATLAB on Carver and Euclid 2012-01-11 12:13:56 David Turner Reminder:...

  2. Perry Luksin | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The State Energy Program Helps Promote that Bigger IS Better in Euclid, Ohio July 25 Turkey Hill Dairy: Where Energy is Not Left Flapping in the Wind December 21 Farming Out Heat...

  3. Smaller loads reduce risk of back injuries during wine grape harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    of manual lifting tasks. Ergonomics 36(7):749-76. Waters T,back disorder risk. Ergonomics Meyers J, Miles J, Faucett J,field work: Vineyard ergonomics. J Agromed 8(1):37-52. [NRC-

  4. LONG-RUN HEALTH IMPACTS OF INCOME SHOCKS: WINE AND PHYLLOXERA IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Abhijit

    Between 1863 and 1890, phylloxera destroyed 40% of French vineyards. Using the regional variation in the timing of this shock, we identify and examine the effects on adult height, health, and life expectancy of children ...

  5. FACULTY-LED STUDY ABROAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , greenhouses, field crops, olive orchards, vineyards and a winery. WHAT WE OFFER As a study abroad venue on Urban Communities & Green Architecture, this facility uses environmentally friendly building materials, in

  6. Modeled regional climate change and California endemic oak ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    pressure from cutting for fuel, grazing, conversion of woodlands to vineyards and orchards, water resource development, competition with inva- sive grasses, and urban expansion (1). Here, we report how the regional

  7. Pushing Boundaries on Performance & Design: the ClimateMaster...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pump - Part II September 01, 2013 The ORNL R&D 100 award winning team: Van Baxter, Ed Vineyard, Jeff Munk, Anthony Gehl, Moonis Ally, Keith Rice, and Bo Shen picture with the...

  8. The effect of stratification on wind-driven, cross-shelf circulation and transport on the inner continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horwitz, Rachel Mandy

    2012-01-01

    Observations from a three-year field program on the inner shelf south of Martha's Vineyard, MA and a numerical model are used to describe the effect of stratification on inner shelf circulation, transport, and sediment ...

  9. 1 5/22/2014 Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 5/22/2014 Energy and Transportation Programs Johney Green, Jr. Building Technologies Program Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Julia Kelley Whole-Building and Community Integration Melissa Lapsa Building Equipment Research Edward Vineyard Building Energy Efficiency Technologies

  10. Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014 Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /7 Harvest Meeting of the Midwest Nut Producers Council Clarksville Research & Extension Center 2015 1 in area vineyards, in the form of collapsing shoots. The drought stress in recent weeks has exasperated

  11. 20 University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences 21University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences Connection | College of Health Sciences Connection | College of Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    Cincinnati Reds Clean Sweep Carwash Comedy Off Broadway Elk Creek Vineyards Embassy Suites Hotel Griffin Gate Marriott Resort and Spa Heaven Hill Distilleries, Inc. Heavenly Ham Homewood Suites by Hilton Lexington

  12. Low winter temperatures and a short growing season generally limit grape production to the southern half of New Hampshire. Grape production in northern New Hampshire is limited to extremely well-protected sites with short-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    , compost, peat moss or a green manure crop). Prepare the vineyard site a year ahead of planting to allow erosion. Use animal manures for soil-building if available. Apply cow or horse manures the fall before

  13. The Grape. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, R. H.; Ness, H.

    1898-01-01

    varieties were planted iD the experiment Station vineyard. This number includes also many pure species. The varieties in the vineyard were placed after their original Species, So far as possible. In nearly all cases, four vines of each variety were... 2 per cent, solution of Formaldehyde. Sixty varieties of grapes preserved in this way were exhibited at the annual meeting of the State Horticultural 'Society held at College Station, July 14, 1898. These constituted a part of an ex? hibit...

  14. News you can use Disease management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Grape IPM Update May 7 Today! 3-5PM Longcore Vineyard, Traverse City SW Wine Grape Meeting May 19 12:00PM SWMREC, Benton Harbor SW Juice Grape Pre-bloom Meeting May 20 1:30PM Kerlikowske Farms, Berrien in the four weeks we've been scouting. Most vineyards in SW Michigan should be past the danger point by now

  15. Grazing and Land Management Strategies for Hardwood Rangelands1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    operations and seasonally by migratory operations. Environ mental policy, energy and water costs may reduce and by intensifying grazing management. Pasture subdivision and increased control over grazing time and space has livestock operations. Others make use of high eleva tion public and private range and pasture or foothill

  16. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 3 (MAY-JUNE 2001); P. 904910, 7 FIGS., 3 TABLES. Velocity analysis for tilted transversely isotropic media: A physical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    are characterized by TI media with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI). In active tectonic areas, however, anisotropicTImediawithatiltedaxisofsymmetry(calledhereTTI). For example, uptilted shale layers near salt domes are expected to produce an effective TTI medium, such as the Canadian Foothills, where TI shale layers are often bent by tectonic processes and may have dips exceeding

  17. KUALI INSTRUCTIONS FOR ADDING NON-CAPITAL ASSETS On the main menu screen locate the Lookup and Maintenance box in the middle of the screen. Under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 KUALI INSTRUCTIONS FOR ADDING NON-CAPITAL ASSETS On the main menu screen locate the Lookup SCREEN) When you have entered the acquisition type code you will arrive at the main screen for the asset are as follows: Campus ­ put in your campus code (MC = main campus, FC = foothills campus etc.) Building Code

  18. ONLINE 2013 IN REVIEW Harnessing New Technologies and Methods to Advance Teaching and Learning at Stanford and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurafsky, Daniel

    foothills, on the path to the Dish. Hoover Tower and the red tile roofs of campus in the middle ground of particular learners? And we are beginning to answer these questions: Stanford faculty from all seven schools- mediated instruction. A dedicated team of Stanford engineers is collaboratively developing an open- source

  19. CSMRI Bagged Soil Disposal Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiological Instrumentation Calibration Records Appendix D Truck Manifests, Weigh Tickets, and Incoming/Outgoing Radiological Surveys Appendix E Truck Departure Record Forms Appendix F Final Radiological Surveys of Trucks (Stoller 2005b). The soil was loaded into trucks and shipped to BFI Foothills facility under the Stoller

  20. Acta Geophysica vol. 62, no. 3, June 2014, pp. 620-641

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    paper introduces the topical area of the Polish­Swiss research project FLORIST (Flood risk- derstanding and interpretation of flood risk on the northern foothills of the Tatra Mountains, in the past, present, and future. It can help solving important practical problems related to flood risk reduction

  1. Borehole stability analysis at the Coporo-1 well, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Henry

    2000-01-01

    Coporo-1 is an 18,000-ft dry hole located in the tectonically active foothills of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia. A mechanical stability analysis allowed explaining most of the drilling stability-related problems and elaborating an optimal mud...

  2. SCALE 1:1 500 000 Albers Equal Area Projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muir, Patricia

    ­Alpine Zone 11n Deschutes River Valley 11o Cold Basins 12 Snake River Plain 12a Treasure Valley 12j Unwooded Portland/Vancouver Basin 3b Willamette River and Tributaries Gallery Forest 3c Prairie Terraces 3d Valley Interior Foothills 78d Serpentine Siskiyous 78e Inland Siskiyous 78f Coastal Siskiyous 78g Klamath River

  3. Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M. Collister1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seasonal Distribution of the Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) in Southwestern Alberta Douglas M in the foothills of Alberta from 1986 to 1996. Thirty-six adult owls have been banded: 16 males, 16 females and 4. The Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa) breeds in northern and western Alberta south to Waterton Lakes National

  4. ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen, and Kathy Keane2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALLUVIAL SCRUB VEGETATION IN COASTAL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA1 Ted L. Hanes, Richard D. Friesen deposits along the coastal side of major mountains of southern California. This vegetation type is adapted coastal and desert dunes, coastal val- leys and foothills, interior mountains and desert flats. Holland

  5. 117USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. GeneticVariation in Shoot Growth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (1987) estimated that 591,000 acres, or 7 percent of the area supporting the Valley and Foothill strategies to conserve biodiversity. The research reported here addresses the genetic architecture of blue the landscape. These rules are used to define geographic seed collection zones for restoration projects. Long

  6. Identification of mantle reflections from a dense linear seismic array: Tectonic implications to the Taiwan orogeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    to the Taiwan orogeny Cheng-Horng Lin Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan Foothills to study deep crustal structures across central Taiwan, where significant mountain later phases generated by one earthquake (ML = 4.3) in eastern Taiwan and recorded by the linear seismic

  7. Subjects: Trematoda and Trematode Diseases, Part 12: Hosts: Genera M-Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.

    1969-01-01

    . arenicolor detected in the foothills of the Sierra Rica at Las Pilas, are the first documented accounts of this species from the area. During the surveys along the Rio Grande I collected R. berlandieri, B. speciosus, B. punctatus, and Rana catesbeiana...

  8. Turbidity and Total Suspended Solid Concentration Dynamics in Streamflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sediment transport in California oak woodland watersheds. Introduction California's oak woodland watershedsTurbidity and Total Suspended Solid Concentration Dynamics in Streamflow from California Oak experimental watersheds in the northern Sierra foothills and north coast oak woodlands of California. Rating

  9. Reprint from the Bulletin of the Belgian Mathematical Society Simon Stevin Lagrangian submanifolds in 3-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haizhong

    of Project Euclid (Cornell University Library), an aggregation of electronic journals. It is available online classification of the Lagrangian submanifolds in 3-dimensional complex space forms with isotropic cubic tensor. 1 Mathematics Subject Classification : Primary 53C20; Secondary 53C42. Key words and phrases : Lagrangian

  10. S. Bhunia, PhD Curriculum Vitae Page 1 of 12 Feb 1, 2015 Swarup Bhunia, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhunia, Swarup

    University 10900 Euclid Ave., 711 Glennan Building Cleveland, OH 44106-7221 Phone: +1 (216) 368-5550 Fax: +1 Sasken Communication Technologies Limited [formerly, Silicon Automation Systems, Inc. (SAS)] Bangalore nomination in Asia and South Pacific Design Automation Conf. (ASP-DAC) 2005 Semiconductor Research

  11. UP TO 100,000 RELIABLE STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENSES IN FUTURE DARK ENERGY EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serjeant, S.

    2014-09-20

    The Euclid space telescope will observe ?10{sup 5} strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens events in its wide field imaging survey over around half the sky, but identifying the gravitational lenses from their observed morphologies requires solving the difficult problem of reliably separating the lensed sources from contaminant populations, such as tidal tails, as well as presenting challenges for spectroscopic follow-up redshift campaigns. Here I present alternative selection techniques for strong gravitational lenses in both Euclid and the Square Kilometre Array, exploiting the strong magnification bias present in the steep end of the H? luminosity function and the H I mass function. Around 10{sup 3} strong lensing events are detectable with this method in the Euclid wide survey. While only ?1% of the total haul of Euclid lenses, this sample has ?100% reliability, known source redshifts, high signal-to-noise, and a magnification-based selection independent of assumptions of lens morphology. With the proposed Square Kilometre Array dark energy survey, the numbers of reliable strong gravitational lenses with source redshifts can reach 10{sup 5}.

  12. Astronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    over 10 years Many UK science areas: dark energy/matter, galactic structure, transients, solar systemAstronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony Challinor, Chris Evans, Paul O;High priority - maintain innovation Provide science for VLT, ALMA, E-ELT, SKA, GAIA, JWST, Euclid

  13. THE TETHERING ARM OF THE EGF RECEPTOR IS REQUIRED FOR NEGATIVE COOPERATIVITY AND SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Linda J.

    1 THE TETHERING ARM OF THE EGF RECEPTOR IS REQUIRED FOR NEGATIVE COOPERATIVITY AND SIGNAL receptor tethering arm Address correspondence to: Linda J. Pike, 660 South Euclid Ave., Box 8231, St. Louis in which the dimerization arm of subdomain II interacts with the tethering arm in subdomain IV. Following

  14. Comparative Studies on Feature Extraction Methods for Multispectral Remote Sensing Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    Comparative Studies on Feature Extraction Methods for Multispectral Remote Sensing Image, it is necessary to study methods regarding how to extract the main features of the image effectively to extract the most available features. These methods include the Euclid distance measurement (EDM

  15. Hoofdstuk 14 Kettingbreuken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beukers, Frits

    algoritme. Neem bijvoorbeeld 25 7 en pas het Euclidisch algoritme toe op 25 en 7, 25 = 3 · 7 + 4 7 = 1 · 4 algoritme van Euclides, a = a0b + r1 0 r1 dat het algoritme oneindig lang doorgaat, want we kunnen steeds weer n+1 = 1/{n} nemen. Aldus krijgen

  16. ADAPTIVE FILTERING FOR DETECTING MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION USING NONINVASIVE CONDUCTING POLYMER COMPOSITE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    , is the leading cause of death among firefighters in the United States [1]. The need to carry heavy equipment long) (1) (3) (1) (1) Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (2) Arcon software produces a diagnostic-friendly ECG signal and then determines the patient's heart rate. When

  17. Instituto Superior Tecnico Departamento de Matematica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannas da Silva, Ana

    vectorial; fâ??ormula de Euler, poliedros regulares Semana 6 Postulados de Euclides; coordenadas polares, cilâ?şco­tempo (3­12 Junho) Semana 13 Introduâ?şcâ?ťao a mecâ??anica geomâ??etrica e relatividade especial #12; GEOMETRIA I

  18. A, Sciendd SerltlbA m ~ -b Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    crope end vineyard^, meadow8 Pnrched and sere) the W f l baked and cracked with the heat, Vater-coureeR dried up made a whole world at thirflt. creating islands of moisture i n a vnet Bea of a r i d i t y

  19. Background & Projects Publications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Background & Projects Calendar Publications Staff Directory Links Search MAES Home | Field Stations | Station Home | Publications | FruitNet Weekly Report Northern Michigan FruitNet 2006 Weekly vineyards. Side hedging and/or topping shoots will be needed to get light and air to the fruiting zone

  20. NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

  1. a monthly publication of outreach and international affairs volume 3, issue 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    would address industry concerns. It would also help solve the problem of a lack of a qualified workforce vineyard site selection and design, cultivar and clone selection, trellis construction, plant pathology team pointed out that the town's location gives it the advantage of proximity to the majority

  2. Real Time Emulations: Foundation and Applications Azalia Mirhoseini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    vineyards, there are often several rose bushes planted throughout. The reason is not the romantic nature on the first page. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. DAC'10, June 13­18, 2010, Anaheim, California, USA. Copyright

  3. Sparse Channel Estimation for Multicarrier Underwater Acoustic Communication: From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Shengli

    channel energy is concentrated on a few delay and/or Doppler values [5], [6]. Sparse channel estimation], or Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods [10]. More recently, advances in the new field of compressive sensing data was recorded as part of the SPACE'08 experiment off the coast of Martha's Vineyard, MA, from Oct

  4. BIHAREAN BIOLOGIST 5 (1): on-first Biharean Biologist, Oradea, Romania, 2011 Article No.: 111102 http://biologie-oradea.xhost.ro/BihBiol/index.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mollov, Ivelin Aldinov

    lands and vineyards and (3) small and large urban parks and high-fruit orchards. The urban habitats: The aim of the current paper is to study the distribution of the amphibians and reptiles in the urban center, as well as to classify them according to their level of synantropy. The urban habitats occupied

  5. http://agbioresearch.msu.edu/centers/nwmihort/nwmihort_northern_michigan_fruit_net Northern Michigan FruitNet 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BMSB this week include two orchards in Berrien County, one apple and one peach, and five urban/13-14 NW Michigan Orchard & Vineyard Show Grand Traverse Resort, Acme, MI 3/4 Winery Development Pre next to field crops, or in urban and suburban areas where homeowners have reported seeing BMSB

  6. Report for the week of August 10, 2009 Southwest Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Report for the week of August 10, 2009 Southwest Michigan Final Grape IPM Evening Meeting of the Season: Weekly Vineyard IPM Scouting Summary ** The final grape IPM evening meeting of the season vines as the recent rains may have encouraged some late- emerging adults to come out. ** A small amount

  7. May 2011 Regional Fruit Grower Newsletter CALENDAR OF EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @msu.edu, 517-355-5191, x 1302 6/3 Parallel 45 "First Friday" Meeting Crane Hill Vineyards, Leelanau Co. Shoot of Elk Rapids on the southeast side of M-31 Dates: May 10, May 24, June 7, June 21 Time: 10-12 pm TRELLIS

  8. News you can use New look, new format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    . See Page 14 for full details. NW Winegrape IPM Update May 7 3-5PM Longcore Vineyard, Traverse City SW Juice Grape Pre-bloom Twilight Meeting May 20 6PM Location TBA SW Wine Grape Meeting May 19 12:00PM SWMREC PAGE 1 NEWS YOU CAN USE GROWING DEGREE DAYS PAGE 2 REGIONAL REPORTS PAGE 3 SW HAIL & FROST REPORT

  9. The Geography of Wine: Reign of Terroir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Dan

    2013-01-15

    The Geography of Wine: Reign of Terroir Rose Garden Greenhouse, Vineyard & Winery Erie, Kansas SOILS Chances of success are limited under conditions of poor soil drainage Reasons for Poor Soil Drainage: • Poor surface runoff - Slope... Database integration (mapping the numbers) Cartographic Design (web, print, or display) The Geography of Wine ...

  10. Pleistocene and Recent environments of the Central Great Plains. Edited by Wakefield Dort, Jr., and J. Knox Jones, Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1970-01-01

    , these grass­ lands occupy a region stretching from southern Canada to northern Mexico and from the foothills of the Rocky Mountains in the west to beyond the Mississippi River in the east. The natural setting of this vast area long has interested natural... is an unusual record preserved in a lava cave on the Snake River Plain of Idaho (Butler, 1968; Dort, 1968). Here, exca­ vations by archaeologists revealed a se­ quence of laminated silts that had been periodically augmented by windblown sediment...

  11. East Haddam, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills, California:

  12. East La Mirada, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to: navigation,Foothills,

  13. Mapping the Galaxy Color-Redshift Relation: Optimal Photometric Redshift Calibration Strategies for Cosmology Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masters, Daniel; Stern, Daniel; Ilbert, Olivier; Salvato, Mara; Schmidt, Samuel; Longo, Giuseppe; Rhodes, Jason; Paltani, Stephane; Mobasher, Bahram; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Coupon, Jean; Steinhardt, Charles; Speagle, Josh; Faisst, Andreas; Kalinich, Adam; Brodwin, Mark; Brescia, Massimo; Cavuoti, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Calibrating the photometric redshifts of >10^9 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where - in galaxy color space - redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and whe...

  14. Aquifer behavior with reinjection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Euclides Jose

    1967-01-01

    AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By EUCLIDES JOSE BONET Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARUM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, f967 Major Subject... Petroleum Engineering AQUIFER BEHAVIOR WITH REINJECTION A Thesis By E UC LI DES JOSE BONE T Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) May, 1967 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Thanks are due to Petroleo Brasilerio S...

  15. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daisuke Yamauchi; Keitaro Takahashi

    2015-10-06

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the precision level needed to confirm the consistency inequality even for $f_{\\rm NL}\\approx 0.9$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}\\approx 8$, though it is still hard for a single survey to confirm it when $f_{\\rm NL}\\lesssim 1.5$.

  16. Probing primordial non-Gaussianity consistency relation with galaxy surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamauchi, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    With a radio continuum galaxy survey by Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a photometric galaxy survey by Euclid and their combination, we forecast future constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity. We focus on the potential impact of local-type higher-order nonlinear parameters on the parameter estimation and particularly the confirmation of the inflationary consistency inequality. Non-standard inflationary models, such as multi-field models, introduce the scale-dependent stochastic clustering of galaxies on large scales, which is a unique probe of mechanism for generating primordial density fluctuations. Our Fisher matrix analysis indicates that a deep and wide survey provided by SKA is more advantageous to constrain $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$, while Euclid has a strong constraining power for $f_{\\rm NL}$ due to the redshift information, suggesting that the joint analysis between them are quite essential to break the degeneracy between $f_{\\rm NL}$ and $\\tau_{\\rm NL}$. The combination of full SKA and Euclid will achieve the...

  17. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; et al

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterialmore »reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.« less

  18. East Fork Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

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  19. East Granby, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  20. East Grand Rapids, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  1. East Grand St Bridge Snowmelt Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

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  2. East Greenville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  3. East Greenwich, Rhode Island: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  4. East Hampton North, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  5. East Hampton, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  8. East Hartford, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  9. East Harwich, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  10. East Hazel Crest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  11. East Hemet, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  12. East Hill-Meridian, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  13. East Islip, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. East Kansas Agri Energy | Open Energy Information

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  15. East Kingston, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. East Kingston, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  17. East Lake-Orient Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  18. East Lansing, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  19. East Longmeadow, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  20. East Los Angeles, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  1. East Marion, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  2. East McKeesport, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  3. East Merrimack, New Hampshire: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  4. East Mesa Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  5. East Middle School and Cayuga Community College Space Heating Low

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  6. East Millinocket Mill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

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  7. East Millinocket, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  8. East Montpelier, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  9. East Moriches, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  10. East Morton, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  11. East Newark, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  12. East Norriton, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  13. East Northport, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. East Nusatenngara | Open Energy Information

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  15. East Oakdale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. East Orange, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  17. East Palo Alto, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  20. East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  1. East Pleasant View, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  2. Applications of DMDs for astrophysical research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robberto, M; Jacobsen, A; Zamkotsian, F; Zerbi, F M; 10.1117/12.809542

    2009-01-01

    A long-standing problem of astrophysical research is how to simultaneously obtain spectra of thousands of sources randomly positioned in the field of view of a telescope. Digital Micromirror Devices, used as optical switches, provide a most powerful solution allowing to design a new generation of instruments with unprecedented capabilities. We illustrate the key factors (opto-mechanical, cryo-thermal, cosmic radiation environment,...) that constrain the design of DMD-based multi-object spectrographs, with particular emphasis on the IR spectroscopic channel onboard the EUCLID mission, currently considered by the European Space Agency for a 2017 launch date.

  3. Growing Grapes in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEachern, George Ray; Stein, Larry A.; Gan, Peretz; Lipe, William N.; Stockton, L. Austin; Helmers, Sammy G.

    1982-01-01

    . Petrucci. The follOwing Texas grape growers made suggestions and allowed us to use their vineyards and laborers in developing this manuscript: Dale and Penny Bettis, Bobby Cox, Paul Crosnoe, J. W. and Lucille Word, Allen and Leta Hagen, Scott Slaughter.... Helmers, Bluefford G. Hancock, Dorothy See, Ronald W. Jackson, Ann M. Cole,Jim O. Jones, Jerrold Summerlin, Mable Pearce, John A. Lipe and James Kamas. The out?of?state grape authorities who shared their work and made suggestions were Michael W. Kilby...

  4. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ?5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ? 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (?? ? 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ?10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  5. Fitting and forecasting non-linear coupled dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casas, Santiago; Baldi, Marco; Pettorino, Valeria; Vollmer, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    We consider cosmological models in which dark matter feels a fifth force mediated by the dark energy scalar field, also known as coupled dark energy. Our interest resides in estimating forecasts for future surveys like Euclid when we take into account non-linear effects, relying on new fitting functions that reproduce the non-linear matter power spectrum obtained from N-body simulations. We obtain fitting functions for models in which the dark matter-dark energy coupling is constant. Their validity is demonstrated for all available simulations in the redshift range $z=0-1.6$ and wave modes below $k=10 \\text{h/Mpc}$. These fitting formulas can be used to test the predictions of the model in the non-linear regime without the need for additional computing-intensive N-body simulations. We then use these fitting functions to perform forecasts on the constraining power that future galaxy-redshift surveys like Euclid will have on the coupling parameter, using the Fisher matrix method for galaxy clustering (GC) and w...

  6. Complementarity of Future Dark Energy Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiayu Tang; Filipe B. Abdalla; Jochen Weller

    2008-07-20

    In recent years a plethora of future surveys have been suggested to constrain the nature of dark energy. In this paper we adapt a binning approach to the equation of state factor ``w'' and discuss how future weak lensing, galaxy cluster counts, Supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation surveys constrain the equation of state at different redshifts. We analyse a few representative future surveys, namely DES, PS1, WFMOS, PS4, EUCLID, SNAP and SKA, and perform a principal component analysis for the ``w'' bins. We also employ a prior from Planck cosmic microwave background measurements on the remaining cosmological parameters. We study at which redshifts a particular survey constrains the equation of state best and how many principal components are significantly determined. We then point out which surveys would be sufficiently complementary. We find that weak lensing surveys, like EUCLID, would constrain the equation of state best and would be able to constrain of the order of three significant modes. Baryon acoustic oscillation surveys on the other hand provide a unique opportunity to probe the equation of state at relatively high redshifts.

  7. Measuring primordial non-Gaussianity through weak lensing peak counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Marian; Stefan Hilbert; Robert E. Smith; Peter Schneider; Vincent Desjacques

    2012-04-18

    We explore the possibility of detecting primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type using weak lensing peak counts. We measure the peak abundance in sets of simulated weak lensing maps corresponding to three models f_NL={0, +100, -100}. Using survey specifications similar to those of Euclid and without assuming any knowledge of the lens and source redshifts, we find the peak functions of the non-Gaussian models with f_NL=+-100 to differ by up to 15% from the Gaussian peak function at the high-mass end. For the assumed survey parameters, the probability of fitting an f_NL=0 peak function to the f_NL=+-100 peak functions is less than 0.1%. Assuming the other cosmological parameters known, f_NL can be measured with an error \\Delta f_NL ~ 13. It is therefore possible that future weak lensing surveys like Euclid and LSST may detect primordial non-Gaussianity from the abundance of peak counts, and provide complementary information to that obtained from the cosmic microwave background.

  8. Overview of the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Shaw, William J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Schmid, Beat; Ferrare, R.; Alexander, M. L.; Alexandrov, Mikhail; Alvarez, R. J.; Arnott, W. P.; Atkinson, D.; Baidar, Sunil; Banta, Robert M.; Barnard, James C.; Beranek, Josef; Berg, Larry K.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Brewer, W. A.; Cahill, John F.; Cairns, Brian; Cappa, Christopher D.; Chand, Duli; China, Swarup; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Easter, Richard C.; Erickson, Matthew H.; Fast, Jerome D.; Floerchinger, Cody; Flowers, B. A.; Fortner, Edward; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Gilles, Mary K.; Gorkowski, K.; Gustafson, William I.; Gyawali, Madhu S.; Hair, John; Hardesty, Michael; Harworth, J. W.; Herndon, Scott C.; Hiranuma, Naruki; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Jeong, H.; Jobson, Bertram T.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kleinman, L. I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Knighton, B.; Kolesar, K. R.; Kuang, Chongai; Kubatova, A.; Langford, A. O.; Laskin, Alexander; Laulainen, Nels S.; Marchbanks, R. D.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mei, F.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Nelson, Danny A.; Obland, Michael; Oetjen, Hilke; Onasch, Timothy B.; Ortega, Ivan; Ottaviani, M.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Prather, Kimberly A.; Radney, J. G.; Rogers, Ray; Sandberg, S. P.; Sedlacek, Art; Senff, Christoph; Senum, Gunar; Setyan, Ari; Shilling, John E.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Song, Chen; Springston, S. R.; Subramanian, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.; Wallace, Hoyt A.; Wang, J.; Weickmann, A. M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zelenyuk, Alla; Zhang, Qi

    2012-08-22

    Substantial uncertainties still exist in the scientific understanding of the possible interactions between urban and natural (biogenic) emissions in the production and transformation of atmospheric aerosol and the resulting impact on climate change. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) carried out in June 2010 in Central Valley, California, was a comprehensive effort designed to improve this understanding. The primary objective of the field study was to investigate the evolution of secondary organic and black carbon aerosols and their climate-related properties in the Sacramento urban plume as it was routinely transported into the forested Sierra Nevada foothills area. Urban aerosols and trace gases experienced significant physical and chemical transformations as they mixed with the reactive biogenic hydrocarbons emitted from the forest. Two heavily-instrumented ground sites - one within the Sacramento urban area and another about 40 km to the northeast in the foothills area - were set up to characterize the evolution of meteorological variables, trace gases, aerosol precursors, aerosol size, composition, and climate-related properties in freshly polluted and 'aged' urban air. On selected days, the DOE G-1 aircraft was deployed to make similar measurements upwind and across the evolving Sacramento plume in the morning and again in the afternoon. The NASA B-200 aircraft, carrying remote sensing instruments, was also deployed to characterize the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols and aerosol optical properties within and around the plume. This overview provides: a) the scientific background and motivation for the study, b) the operational and logistical information pertinent to the execution of the study, c) an overview of key observations and initial results from the aircraft and ground-based sampling platforms, and d) a roadmap of planned data analyses and focused modeling efforts that will facilitate the integration of new knowledge into improved representations of key aerosol processes in climate models.

  9. Summary of the DUNE Mission Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Refregier, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    The Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) is a wide-field imaging mission concept whose primary goal is the study of dark energy and dark matter with unprecedented precision. To this end, DUNE is optimised for weak gravitational lensing, and also uses complementary cosmolo gical probes, such as baryonic oscillations, the integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, a nd cluster counts. Immediate additional goals concern the evolution of galaxies, to be studied with groundbreaking statistics, the detailed structure of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and the demographics of Earth-mass planets. DUNE is a medium class mission consisting of a 1.2m telescope designed to carry out an all-sky survey in one visible and three NIR bands (1deg$^2$ field-of-view) which will form a unique legacy for astronomy. DUNE has been selected jointly with SPACE for an ESA Assessment phase which has led to the Euclid merged mission concept.

  10. Summary of the DUNE Mission Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Refregier; Marian Douspis; the DUNE collaboration

    2008-07-25

    The Dark UNiverse Explorer (DUNE) is a wide-field imaging mission concept whose primary goal is the study of dark energy and dark matter with unprecedented precision. To this end, DUNE is optimised for weak gravitational lensing, and also uses complementary cosmolo gical probes, such as baryonic oscillations, the integrated Sachs-Wolf effect, a nd cluster counts. Immediate additional goals concern the evolution of galaxies, to be studied with groundbreaking statistics, the detailed structure of the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, and the demographics of Earth-mass planets. DUNE is a medium class mission consisting of a 1.2m telescope designed to carry out an all-sky survey in one visible and three NIR bands (1deg$^2$ field-of-view) which will form a unique legacy for astronomy. DUNE has been selected jointly with SPACE for an ESA Assessment phase which has led to the Euclid merged mission concept.

  11. Is spacetime absolutely or just most probably Lorentzian?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharon Davidson; Ben Yellin

    2015-09-03

    An algebraic evolution equation for the lapse function $n(t)$, the result of a tenable pre-gauging of the cosmological scale factor $a(t)$, signals a non-dynamical mini-superspace. The missing ingredient, a generalized momentum enjoying canonical Dirac (rather than Poisson) brackets with $n(t)$, calls for measure scaling. Contrary to the Hartle-Hawking approach: (i) The static wave function $\\psi(a)$ is traded for an explicit time dependent $\\psi(n, t)$, (ii) The 'most classical' cosmological wave packet is dominated by the classic FLRW configuration, and (iii) The Euclid/Lorentz crossover gets quantum mechanically smeared. A correspondence with the classical/quantum 5-dim Schwarzschild-deSitter black hole is noted.

  12. Environmental Effects of Sediment Transport Alteration and Impacts on Protected Species: Edgartown Tidal Energy Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, Stephen B.; Schlezinger, David, Ph.D; Cowles, Geoff, Ph.D; Hughes, Patricia; Samimy; Roland, I.; and Terray, E, Ph.D.

    2012-12-29

    The Islands of Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket are separated from the Massachusetts mainland by Vineyard and Nantucket Sounds; water between the two islands flows through Muskeget Channel. The towns of Edgartown (on Martha�¢����s Vineyard) and Nantucket recognize that they are vulnerable to power supply interruptions due to their position at the end of the power grid, and due to sea level rise and other consequences of climate change. The tidal energy flowing through Muskeget Channel has been identified by the Electric Power Research Institute as the strongest tidal resource in Massachusetts waters. The Town of Edgartown proposes to develop an initial 5 MW (nameplate) tidal energy project in Muskeget Channel. The project will consist of 14 tidal turbines with 13 providing electricity to Edgartown and one operated by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth for research and development. Each turbine will be 90 feet long and 50 feet high. The electricity will be brought to shore by a submarine cable buried 8 feet below the seabed surface which will landfall in Edgartown either on Chappaquiddack or at Katama. Muskeget Channel is located between Martha�¢����s Vineyard and Nantucket. Its depth ranges between 40 and 160 feet in the deepest portion. It has strong currents where water is transferred between Nantucket Sound and the Atlantic Ocean continental shelf to the south. This makes it a treacherous passage for navigation. Current users of the channel are commercial and recreational fishing, and cruising boats. The US Coast Guard has indicated that the largest vessel passing through the channel is a commercial scallop dragger with a draft of about 10 feet. The tidal resource in the channel has been measured by the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth and the peak velocity flow is approximately 5 knots. The technology proposed is the helical Gorlov-type turbine positioned with a horizontal axis that is positively buoyant in the water column and held down by anchors. This is the same technology proposed by Ocean Renewable Power Company in the Western Passage and Cobscook Bay near Eastport Maine. The blades rotate in two directions capturing the tides energy both during flood and ebb tides. The turbines will be anchored to the bottom and suspended in the water column. Initial depth of the turbines is expected to be about 25 feet below the surface to avoid impacting navigation while also capturing the strongest currents. The Town of Edgartown was initially granted a Preliminary Permit by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on March 1, 2008, and has recently received a second permit valid through August 2014. The Preliminary Permit gives Edgartown the exclusive right to apply for a power generation license for power generated from the hydrokinetic energy in the water flowing in this area. Edgartown filed a Draft Pilot License Application with FERC on February 1, 2010 and an Expanded Environmental Notification Form with the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) Office at the same time. It expects to file a Final License Application in late 2013. Harris Miller Miller & Hanson (HMMH) of Burlington Massachusetts is acting as the Project Manager for the Town of Edgartown and collaborating with other partners of the project including the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth's Marine Renewable Energy Center and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center. HMMH was awarded a grant under the Department of Energy's Advanced Water Program to conduct marine science and hydrokinetic site-specific environmental studies for projects actively seeking a FERC License. HMMH, on behalf of the Town, is managing this comprehensive study of the marine environment in Muskeget Channel and potential impacts of the tidal project on indicator species and habitats. The University of Massachusetts School of Marine Science and Technology (SMAST) conducted oceanographic studies of tidal currents, tide level, benthic habit

  13. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  14. Dark energy properties from large future galaxy surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basse, Tobias; Bjćlde, Ole Eggers; Hannestad, Steen; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y. E-mail: oeb@phys.au.dk E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk

    2014-05-01

    We perform a detailed forecast on how well a Euclid-like survey will be able to constrain dark energy and neutrino parameters from a combination of its cosmic shear power spectrum, galaxy power spectrum, and cluster mass function measurements. We find that the combination of these three probes vastly improves the survey's potential to measure the time evolution of dark energy. In terms of a dark energy figure-of-merit defined as (?(w{sub p})?(w{sub a})){sup ?1}, we find a value of 690 for Euclid-like data combined with Planck-like measurements of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies in a 10-dimensional cosmological parameter space, assuming a ?CDM fiducial cosmology. For the more commonly used 7-parameter model, we find a figure-of-merit of 1900 for the same data combination. We consider also the survey's potential to measure dark energy perturbations in models wherein the dark energy is parameterised as a fluid with a nonstandard non-adiabatic sound speed, and find that in an optimistic scenario in which w{sub 0} deviates from -1 by as much as is currently observationally allowed, models with c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 10{sup ?6} and c-circumflex {sub s}{sup 2} = 1 can be distinguished from one another at more than 2? significance. We emphasise that constraints on the dark energy sound speed from cluster measurements are strongly dependent on the modelling of the cluster mass function; significantly weaker sensitivities ensue if we modify our model to include fewer features of nonlinear dark energy clustering. Finally, we find that the sum of neutrino masses can be measured with a 1? precision of 0.015 eV, even in complex cosmological models in which the dark energy equation of state varies with time. The 1? sensitivity to the effective number of relativistic species N{sub eff}{sup ml} is approximately 0.03, meaning that the small deviation of 0.046 from 3 in the standard value of N{sub eff}{sup ml} due to non-instantaneous decoupling and finite temperature effects can be probed with 1? precision for the first time.

  15. Measurements of Ammonia at Blodgett Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Littlejohn, David

    2007-04-01

    Ammonia is a reactive trace gas that is emitted in large quantities by animal agriculture and other sources in California, which subsequently forms aerosol particulate matter, potentially affecting visibility, climate, and human health. We performed initial measurements of NH{sub 3} at the Blodgett Forest Research Station (BFRS) during a 3 week study in June, 2006. The site is used for ongoing air quality research and is a relatively low-background site in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratios were quite low (< 1 to {approx}2 ppb), contrasting with typical conditions in many parts of the Central Valley. Eddy covariance measurements showed NH{sub 3} fluxes that scaled with measured NH{sub 3} mixing ratio and calculated aerodynamic deposition velocity, suggesting dry deposition is a significant loss mechanism for atmospheric NH{sub 3} at BFRS. A simple model of NH{sub 3} transport to the site supports the hypothesis that NH{sub 3} is transported from the Valley to BFRS, but deposits on vegetation during the summer. Further work is necessary to determine whether the results obtained in this study can be generalized to other seasons.

  16. Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

    2011-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the site’s training mission. In addition, the site’s blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ˘/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

  17. On geometry influence on the behavior of a quantum mechanical scalar particle with intrinsic structure in external magnetic and electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. V. Veko; K. V. Kazmerchuk; E. M. Ovsiyuk; V. V. Kisel; V. M. Red'kov

    2014-11-07

    Relativistic theory of the Cox's scalar not point-like particle with intrinsic structure is developed on the background of arbitrary curved space-time. It is shown that in the most general form, the extended Proca-like tensor first order system of equations contains non minimal interaction terms through electromagnetic tensor F_{\\alpha \\beta} and Ricci tensor R_{\\alpha \\beta}. In relativistic Cox's theory, the limiting procedure to non-relativistic approximation is performed in a special class of curved space-time models. This theory is specified in simple geometrical backgrounds: Euclid's, Lobachevsky's, and Rie\\-mann's. Wave equation for the Cox's particle is solved exactly in presence of external uniform magnetic and electric fields in the case of Minkowski space. Non-trivial additional structure of the particle modifies the frequency of a quantum oscillator arising effectively in presence if external magnetic field. Extension of these problems to the case of the hyperbolic Lobachevsky space is examined. In presence of the magnetic field, the quantum problem in radial variable has been solved exactly; the quantum motion in z-direction is described by 1-dimensional Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation in an effective potential which turns out to be too difficult for analytical treatment. In the presence of electric field, the situation is similar. The same analysis has been performed for spherical Riemann space model.

  18. Supermassive population III supernovae and the birth of the first quasars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Chen, K.-J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Xu, Hao [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Joggerst, Candace C. [XTD-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    The existence of supermassive black holes as early as z ? 7 is one of the great, unsolved problems in cosmological structure formation. One leading theory argues that they are born during catastrophic baryon collapse in z ? 15 protogalaxies that form in strong Lyman-Werner UV backgrounds. Atomic line cooling in such galaxies fragments baryons into massive clumps that are thought to directly collapse to 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M {sub ?} black holes. We have now discovered that some of these fragments can instead become supermassive stars that eventually explode as thermonuclear supernovae (SNe) with energies of ?10{sup 55} erg, the most energetic explosions in the universe. We have calculated light curves and spectra for supermassive Pop III SNe with the Los Alamos RAGE and SPECTRUM codes. We find that they will be visible in near-infrared all-sky surveys by Euclid out to z ? 10-15 and by WFIRST and WISH out to z ? 15-20, perhaps revealing the birthplaces of the first quasars.

  19. BIAS-FREE SHEAR ESTIMATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, D.; Seitz, S.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Riffeser, A., E-mail: dgruen@usm.uni-muenchen.d [University Observatory Munich, Scheinerstrasse 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    Bias due to imperfect shear calibration is the biggest obstacle when constraints on cosmological parameters are to be extracted from large area weak lensing surveys such as Pan-STARRS-3{pi}, DES, or future satellite missions like EUCLID. We demonstrate that bias present in existing shear measurement pipelines (e.g., KSB) can be almost entirely removed by means of neural networks. In this way, bias correction can depend on the properties of the individual galaxy instead of being a single global value. We present a procedure to train neural networks for shear estimation and apply this to subsets of simulated GREAT08 RealNoise data. We also show that circularization of the point-spread function (PSF) before measuring the shear reduces the scatter related to the PSF anisotropy correction and thus leads to improved measurements, particularly on low and medium signal-to-noise data. Our results are competitive with the best performers in the GREAT08 competition, especially for the medium and higher signal-to-noise sets. Expressed in terms of the quality parameter defined by GREAT08, we achieve a Q{approx} 40, 140, and 1300 without and 50, 200, and 1300 with circularization for low, medium, and high signal-to-noise data sets, respectively.

  20. Towards A Census of Earth-mass Exo-planets with Gravitational Microlensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Beaulieu; E. Kerins; S. Mao; D. Bennett; A. Cassan; S. Dieters; B. S. Gaudi; A. Gould; V. Batista; R. Bender; S. Brillant; K. Cook; C. Coutures; D. Dominis-Prester; J. Donatowicz; P. Fouqué; E. Grebel; J. Greenhill; D. Heyrovsky; K. Horne; D. Kubas; J. B. Marquette; J. Menzies; N. J. Rattenbury; I. Ribas; K. Sahu; Y. Tsapras; A. Udalski; C. Vinter

    2008-07-31

    Thirteen exo-planets have been discovered using the gravitational microlensing technique (out of which 7 have been published). These planets already demonstrate that super-Earths (with mass up to ~10 Earth masses) beyond the snow line are common and multiple planet systems are not rare. In this White Paper we introduce the basic concepts of the gravitational microlensing technique, summarise the current mode of discovery and outline future steps towards a complete census of planets including Earth-mass planets. In the near-term (over the next 5 years) we advocate a strategy of automated follow-up with existing and upgraded telescopes which will significantly increase the current planet detection efficiency. In the medium 5-10 year term, we envision an international network of wide-field 2m class telescopes to discover Earth-mass and free-floating exo-planets. In the long (10-15 year) term, we strongly advocate a space microlensing telescope which, when combined with Kepler, will provide a complete census of planets down to Earth mass at almost all separations. Such a survey could be undertaken as a science programme on Euclid, a dark energy probe with a wide-field imager which has been proposed to ESA's Cosmic Vision Programme.

  1. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ? 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ? 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  2. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Bull

    2015-09-24

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey of $\\sim 10^9$ spectroscopic galaxy redshifts would be capable of detecting a $\\sim 2\\%$ modification of the Poisson equation out to $z\\approx 2$.

  3. Cosmological tests of modified gravity: constraints on $F(R)$ theories from the galaxy clustering ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Bel; Philippe Brax; Christian Marinoni; Patrick Valageas

    2015-04-23

    The clustering ratio $\\eta$, a large-scale structure observable originally designed to constrain the shape of the power spectrum of matter density fluctuations, is shown to provide a sensitive probe of the nature of gravity in the cosmological regime. We apply this analysis to $F(R)$ theories of gravity using the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample extracted from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 7 and 10 catalogues. We find that General Relativity (GR), complemented with a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with parameters fixed by the Planck satellite, describes extremely well the clustering of galaxies up to $z\\sim 0.6$. On large cosmic scales, the absolute amplitude of deviations from GR, $|f_{R_0 }|$, is constrained to be smaller than $4.6 \\times 10^{-5}$ at the $95\\%$ confidence level. This bound makes cosmological probes of gravity almost competitive with the sensitivity of Solar System tests, although still one order of magnitude less effective than astrophysical tests. We also extrapolate our results to future large surveys like Euclid and show that the astrophysical bound will certainly remain out of reach for such a class of modified-gravity models that only differ from $\\Lambda$CDM at low redshifts.

  4. The general relativistic instability supernova of a supermassive population III star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Johnson, Jarrett L., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [XTD-PRI, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The formation of supermassive Population III stars with masses ?10,000 M{sub ?} in primeval galaxies in strong ultraviolet backgrounds at z ? 15 may be the most viable pathway to the formation of supermassive black holes by z ? 7. Most of these stars are expected to live for short times and then directly collapse to black holes, with little or no mass loss over their lives. However, we have now discovered that non-rotating primordial stars with masses close to 55,000 M{sub ?} can instead die as highly energetic thermonuclear supernovae powered by explosive helium burning, releasing up to 10{sup 55} erg, or about 10,000 times the energy of a Type Ia supernova. The explosion is triggered by the general relativistic contribution of thermal photons to gravity in the core of the star, which causes the core to contract and explosively burn. The energy release completely unbinds the star, leaving no compact remnant, and about half of the mass of the star is ejected into the early cosmos in the form of heavy elements. The explosion would be visible in the near infrared at z ? 20 to Euclid and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope, perhaps signaling the birth of supermassive black hole seeds and the first quasars.

  5. Measuring line-of-sight dependent Fourier-space clustering using FFTs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Davide; Ruggeri, Rossana; Percival, Will J

    2015-01-01

    Observed galaxy clustering exhibits local transverse statistical isotropy around the line-of-sight (LOS). The variation of the LOS across a galaxy survey complicates the measurement of the observed clustering as a function of the angle to the LOS, as Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) based on cartesian grids, cannot individually allow for this. Recent advances in methodology for calculating LOS-dependent clustering in Fourier space include the realisation that power spectrum LOS-dependent moments can be constructed from sums over galaxies, based on approximating the LOS to each pair of galaxies by the LOS to one of them. We show that we can implement this method using multiple FFTs, each measuring the LOS-weighted clustering along different axes. The N log(N) nature of FFTs means that the computational speed-up is a factor of >1000 compared with summing over galaxies. This development should be beneficial for future projects such as DESI and Euclid which will provide an order of magnitude more galaxies than curr...

  6. Extracting the late-time kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munshi, D; Dixon, K L; Coles, P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel technique to separate the late-time, post-reionization component of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) effect from the contribution to it from a (poorly understood and probably patchy) reionization history. The kSZ effect is one of the most promising probe of the {\\em missing baryons} in the Universe. We study the possibility of reconstructing it in three dimensions (3D), using future spectroscopic surveys such as the Euclid survey. By reconstructing a 3D template from galaxy density and peculiar velocity fields from spectroscopic surveys we cross-correlate the estimator against CMB maps. The resulting cross-correlation can help us to map out the kSZ contribution to CMB in 3D as a function of redshift thereby extending previous results which use tomographic reconstruction. This allows the separation of the late time effect from the contribution owing to reionization. By construction, it avoids contamination from foregrounds, primary CMB, tSZ effect as well as from star forming galaxies. Du...

  7. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bull, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey...

  8. The signature of dark energy perturbations in galaxy cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramo, L.R.; Batista, R.C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Săo Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970, Săo Paulo (Brazil); Rosenfeld, R., E-mail: abramo@fma.if.usp.br, E-mail: rbatista@fma.if.usp.br, E-mail: rosenfel@ift.unesp.br [Instituto de Física Teórica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, 01140-070, Săo Paulo (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Models of dynamical dark energy unavoidably possess fluctuations in the energy density and pressure of that new component. In this paper we estimate the impact of dark energy fluctuations on the number of galaxy clusters in the Universe using a generalization of the spherical collapse model and the Press-Schechter formalism. The observations we consider are several hypothetical Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and weak lensing (shear maps) cluster surveys, with limiting masses similar to ongoing (SPT, DES) as well as future (LSST, Euclid) surveys. Our statistical analysis is performed in a 7-dimensional cosmological parameter space using the Fisher matrix method. We find that, in some scenarios, the impact of these fluctuations is large enough that their effect could already be detected by existing instruments such as the South Pole Telescope, when priors from other standard cosmological probes are included. We also show how dark energy fluctuations can be a nuisance for constraining cosmological parameters with cluster counts, and point to a degeneracy between the parameter that describes dark energy pressure on small scales (the effective sound speed) and the parameters describing its equation of state.

  9. Wide Angle Effects in Galaxy Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2013-01-01

    Current and future galaxy surveys cover a large fraction of the entire sky with a significant redshift range, and the recent theoretical development shows that general relativistic effects are present in galaxy clustering on very large scales. This trend has renewed interest in the wide angle effect in galaxy clustering measurements, in which the distant-observer approximation is often adopted. Using the full wide-angle formula for computing the redshift-space correlation function, we show that compared to the sample variance, the deviation in the redshift-space correlation function from the simple Kaiser formula with the distant-observer approximation is negligible in the SDSS and is completely irrelevant in future galaxy surveys such as Euclid and the BigBOSS, if the theoretical prediction from the Kaiser formula is averaged over the survey volume and the non-uniform distribution of cosine angle between the line-of-sight and the pair separation directions is properly considered. We also find small correctio...

  10. Accounting for baryonic effects in cosmic shear tomography: Determining a minimal set of nuisance parameters using PCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eifler, Tim; Krause, Elisabeth; Dodelson, Scott; Zentner, Andrew; Hearin, Andrew; Gnedin, Nickolay

    2014-05-28

    Systematic uncertainties that have been subdominant in past large-scale structure (LSS) surveys are likely to exceed statistical uncertainties of current and future LSS data sets, potentially limiting the extraction of cosmological information. Here we present a general framework (PCA marginalization) to consistently incorporate systematic effects into a likelihood analysis. This technique naturally accounts for degeneracies between nuisance parameters and can substantially reduce the dimension of the parameter space that needs to be sampled. As a practical application, we apply PCA marginalization to account for baryonic physics as an uncertainty in cosmic shear tomography. Specifically, we use CosmoLike to run simulated likelihood analyses on three independent sets of numerical simulations, each covering a wide range of baryonic scenarios differing in cooling, star formation, and feedback mechanisms. We simulate a Stage III (Dark Energy Survey) and Stage IV (Large Synoptic Survey Telescope/Euclid) survey and find a substantial bias in cosmological constraints if baryonic physics is not accounted for. We then show that PCA marginalization (employing at most 3 to 4 nuisance parameters) removes this bias. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain robust, precise constraints on the dark energy equation of state even in the presence of large levels of systematic uncertainty in astrophysical processes. We conclude that the PCA marginalization technique is a powerful, general tool for addressing many of the challenges facing the precision cosmology program.

  11. CosmoDM and its application to Pan-STARRS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, S; Henderson, R; Kummel, M; Paech, K; Wetzstein, M

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmology Data Management system (CosmoDM) is an automated and flexible data management system for the processing and calibration of data from optical photometric surveys. It is designed to run on supercomputers and to minimize disk I/O to enable scaling to very high throughput during periods of reprocessing. It serves as an early prototype for one element of the ground-based processing required by the Euclid mission and will also be employed in the preparation of ground based data needed in the eROSITA X-ray all sky survey mission. CosmoDM consists of two main pipelines. The first is the single-epoch or detrending pipeline, which is used to carry out the photometric and astrometric calibration of raw exposures. The second is the co- addition pipeline, which combines the data from individual exposures into deeper coadd images and science ready catalogs. A novel feature of CosmoDM is that it uses a modified stack of As- tromatic software which can read and write tile compressed images. Since 2011, CosmoDM ...

  12. Volumetric (CUBIC) Octonion Sigma-Matrices and their Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Yakimenko

    2011-06-02

    This work rests upon the certainty that only fields of real and complex numbers, quaternions and octonions have algebras of all four arithmetical operations. Also quaternions are good to represent 3-dimensional Euclid space and 4-dimensional Minkowski space. Moreover algebra of Pauli classical sigma-matrices isomorphic to a split quaternion algebra. In this article author supposes that the hyperspace can be described with octonions and if 4-dimensional Minkowski space is a projection of the hyperspace, consequently equations for 4-dimensional space must be projections of hyperspace equations. Therefore he obtains a new object as volumetric analog of Pauli sigma-matrices for 8 (or maybe 24)-dimensional hyperspace. Also the author represents general form of a volumetric Dirac equation solution. As is well known nonassociativity is the main distinctive feature of octonions. But square matrices cannot be nonassociative. Therefore the author had to introduce cubic sigma-matrices. From another hand a volumetric object has 3 indices, as a result of it one cannot introduce multiplicative operator for cubic matrices, their projections only can be objects of the multiplicative operator. Meanwhile an uncertainty appears because of a rest index. To overcome the uncertainty one need to consider all the 3 projections of an octonion equation.

  13. BEST Winery Guidebook: Benchmarking and Energy and Water SavingsTool for the Wine Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst; Radspieler, Anthony; Healy,Patrick; Zechiel, Susanne

    2005-10-15

    Not all industrial facilities have the staff or the opportunity to perform a detailed audit of their operations. The lack of knowledge of energy efficiency opportunities provides an important barrier to improving efficiency. Benchmarking has demonstrated to help energy users understand energy use and the potential for energy efficiency improvement, reducing the information barrier. In California, the wine making industry is not only one of the economic pillars of the economy; it is also a large energy consumer, with a considerable potential for energy-efficiency improvement. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Fetzer Vineyards developed an integrated benchmarking and self-assessment tool for the California wine industry called ''BEST''(Benchmarking and Energy and water Savings Tool) Winery. BEST Winery enables a winery to compare its energy efficiency to a best practice winery, accounting for differences in product mix and other characteristics of the winery. The tool enables the user to evaluate the impact of implementing energy and water efficiency measures. The tool facilitates strategic planning of efficiency measures, based on the estimated impact of the measures, their costs and savings. BEST Winery is available as a software tool in an Excel environment. This report serves as background material, documenting assumptions and information on the included energy and water efficiency measures. It also serves as a user guide for the software package.

  14. Mitigation of two-plasmon decay in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion through the manipulation of ion-acoustic and Langmuir wave damping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Maximov, A. V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Vu, H. X. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States)] [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407 (United States); DuBois, D. F.; Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States)] [Lodestar Research Corporation, 2400 Central Avenue, P-5, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States) [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    The extended Zakharov model of the two-plasmon decay instability in an inhomogeneous plasma [D. F. DuBois et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3983 (1995); D. A. Russell and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 428 (2001)] is further generalized to include the evolution of the electron distribution function in the quasi-linear approximation [cf., e.g., K. Y. Sanbonmatsu et al. Phys. Plasmas 7, 2824 (2000); D. A. Russell et al., paper presented at the Workshop on SRS/SBS Saturation, Wente Vineyards, Livermore, CA, 2–5 April 2002]. This makes it possible to investigate anomalous absorption of laser light and hot electron production due to the two-plasmon decay instability of multiple overlapping electromagnetic waves. Scalings of hot-electron production in the (stationary) nonlinearly saturated regime relevant to recent experiments [B. Yaakobi et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 012704 (2012); D. H. Froula et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165003 (2012)] have been obtained. They indicate a sensitivity to ion-acoustic wave (IAW) damping and to the collisional absorption of Langmuir waves. Such a sensitivity might be exploited in inertial confinement fusion target design by the use of mid-Z ablators.

  15. Polluting of Winter Convective Clouds upon Transition from Ocean Inland Over Central California: Contrasting Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; Prather, Kimberly; Suski, Kaitlyn; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf

    2014-01-01

    In-situ aircraft measurements of aerosol chemical and cloud microphysical properties were conducted during the CalWater campaign in February and March 2011 over the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the coastal waters of central California. The main objective was to elucidate the impacts of aerosol properties on clouds and precipitation forming processes. In order to accomplish this, we compared contrasting cases of clouds that ingested aerosols from different sources. The results showed that clouds containing pristine oceanic air had low cloud drop concentrations and started to develop rain 500 m above their base. This occurred both over the ocean and over the Sierra Nevada, mainly in the early morning when the radiatively cooled stable continental boundary layer was decoupled from the cloud base. Supercooled rain dominated the precipitation that formed in growing convective clouds in the pristine air, up to the -21°C isotherm level. A contrasting situation was documented in the afternoon over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, when the clouds ingested high pollution aerosol concentrations produced in the Central Valley. This led to slow growth of the cloud drop effective radius with height and suppressed and even prevented the initiation of warm rain while contributing to the development of ice hydrometeors in the form of graupel. Our results show that cloud condensation and ice nuclei were the limiting factors that controlled warm rain and ice processes, respectively, while the unpolluted clouds in the same air mass produced precipitation quite efficiently. These findings provide the motivation for deeper investigations into the nature of the aerosols seeding clouds.

  16. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  17. Evolution of the Llanos Basin and the deformation of the Eastern Cordiller, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addison, F.; Cooper, M.; Hayward, A.; Howe, S. O'Leary, J. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., Santafe de Bogota (Colombia))

    1993-02-01

    The Llanos Basin is located on the flank of the Eastern Cordillera in northeast Colombia. Basin development commenced with the deposition of a synrift Triassic and Jurassic megasequence related to the separation of North and South America in the Caribbean. Basin development continued with the Cretaceous Back Arc Megasequence deposited in a back arc basin behind the Andean subduction zone. Three major sequences can be recognized corresponding to extensional pulses in the Tithonian, Albian, and the Santonian which control thickness and facies distributions. The primary reservoir in the basin is the Late Eocene Mirandor Formation which was deposited in a fluvial system which prograded from the Guyana Shield to the west-northwest. This was deposited as part of the Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence (Bartonian to Serravallian) which developed as a result of uplift onset and deformation in the Central Cordillera. This megasequence covered the Magdalena Valley the Eastern Cordillera ad the Llanos Basin. In the foothills of the Eastern Cordillera, the Mirador Formation begins to show evidence of marine influence and was probably deposited in a series of shoreface sands and offshore bar complexes in the Cordillera. The Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence includes the Eocene-Oligocene Carbonera Formation which was deposited in a low every fluvial system that was mud dominated. Within the Carbonera Formation, a series of major, grossly coarsening upward cycles can be seen which are separated by maximum flooding surfaces that approximate to time lines. These cycles correspond to the early phases of development of the Central Cordillera with each pulse being seen as an influx of coarser clastics to the basin. The deformation style in the Eastern Cordillera is a mixture of thin-skinned thrust structures and the inversion of the thick-skinned basement involved extension faults. The inversion structures include the Cuisana field, a giant oil and gas-condensate discovery.

  18. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-12-31

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  19. [A data collection program focused on hydrologic and meteorologic parameters in an Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, D.

    1992-01-01

    The hydrologic cycle of an arctic watershed is dominated by such physical elements as snow, ice, permafrost, seasonally frozen soils, wide fluctuations in surface energy balance and phase change of snow and ice to water. At Imnavait basin, snow accumulation begins in September or early October and maximum snowpack water equivalent is reached just prior to the onset of ablation in mid May. No significant mid winter melt occurs in this basin. Considerable snowfall redistribution by wind to depressions and valley bottom is evident. Spring snowmelt on the North Slope of Alaska is the dominant hydrologic event of the year.This event provides most of the moisture for use by vegetation in the spring and early summer period. The mechanisms and timing of snowmelt are important factors in predicting runoff, the migrations of birds and large mammals and the diversity of plant communities. It is important globally due to the radical and abrupt change in the surface energy balance over vast areas. We were able to explore the trends and differences in the snowmelt process along a transect from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coastal plain. Snowpack ablation was monitored at three sites. These data were analyzed along with meteorologic data at each site. The initiation of ablation was site specific being largely controlled by the complementary addition of energy from radiation and sensible heat flux. Although the research sites were only 115 km apart, the rates and mechanisms of snowmelt varied greatly. Usually, snowmelt begins at the mid-elevations in the foothills and progresses northerly toward the coast and southerly to the mountains. In the more southerly areas snowmelt progressed much faster and was more influenced by sensible heat advected from areas south of the Brooks Range. In contrast snowmelt in the more northerly areas was slower and the controlled by net radiation.

  20. Linear Perturbation constraints on Multi-coupled Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpine Piloyan; Valerio Marra; Marco Baldi; Luca Amendola

    2014-01-12

    The Multi-coupled Dark Energy (McDE) scenario has been recently proposed as a specific example of a cosmological model characterized by a non-standard physics of the dark sector of the universe that nevertheless gives an expansion history which does not significantly differ from the one of the standard $\\Lambda $CDM model. In this work, we present the first constraints on the McDE scenario obtained by comparing the predicted evolution of linear density perturbations with a large compilation of recent data sets for the growth rate $f\\sigma_{8}$, including 6dFGS, LRG, BOSS, WiggleZ and VIPERS. Confirming qualitative expectations, growth rate data provide much tighter bounds on the model parameters as compared to the extremely loose bounds that can be obtained when only the background expansion history is considered. In particular, the $95\\%$ confidence level on the coupling strength $|\\beta |$ is reduced from $|\\beta |\\leq 83$ (background constraints only) to $|\\beta |\\leq 0.88$ (background and linear perturbation constraints). We also investigate how these constraints further improve when using data from future wide-field surveys such as supernova data from LSST and growth rate data from Euclid-type missions. In this case the $95\\%$ confidence level on the coupling further reduce to $|\\beta |\\leq 0.85$. Such constraints are in any case still consistent with a scalar fifth-force of gravitational strength, and we foresee that tighter bounds might be possibly obtained from the investigation of nonlinear structure formation in McDE cosmologies.[Abridged

  1. Integral points on rational curves of the form y=(x^2+bx+c)/(x+a); a,b,c integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantine Zelator

    2013-01-02

    The subject matter of this work is the set of integral points(i.e. points with both coordinates integers) on the graphs of rational functions of the form f(x)=(x^2+bx+c)/(x+a), with a,b,c,being integers.Following the introduction, we establish Proposition1 in Section2. This proposition plays a key role in the proof of Theorem1 in Section5. Proposition1 is proved with the aid of Euclid's lemma and another well known result in number theory; see reference [1].In Sections3 and4, we focus on the special case b^2-4c=0; which implies b=2d and c=d^2, for some integer d. If d and a are distinct; then there are finitely many integral points, parametrically described in Results1 and2. Theorem1 in Sec.5 deals with the general case.Accordingly, if a^2-ab+c is not zero; there are exactly 4N distinct integral points parametrically described.Except in the cases where a^2-ab+c is a perfect square, or minus a perfect square; in which cases thare are exactly 4N-2 distinct integral points. Here N stands for the number of positive divisors, not exceeding the square root of the absolute value of a^2-ab+c. (divisors of that absolute value).The paper concludes with Th.2, which is a direct application of Th.1 in the cases where the above absolute value is 1, p, or p^2; p a prime.

  2. The focal plane instrumentation for the DUNE mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Booth; Mark Cropper; Frank Eisenhauer; Alexandre Refregier; the DUNE collaboration

    2008-07-25

    DUNE (Dark Universe Explorer) is a proposed mission to measure parameters of dark energy using weak gravitational lensing The particular challenges of both optical and infrared focal planes and the DUNE baseline solution is discussed. The DUNE visible Focal Plane Array (VFP) consists of 36 large format red-sensitive CCDs, arranged in a 9x4 array together with the associated mechanical support structure and electronics processing chains. Four additional CCDs dedicated to attitude control measurements are located at the edge of the array. All CCDs are 4096 pixel red-enhanced e2v CCD203-82 devices with square 12 $\\mu$m pixels, operating from 550-920nm. Combining four rows of CCDs provides a total exposure time of 1500s. The VFP will be used in a closed-loop system by the spacecraft, which operates in a drift scan mode, in order to synchronize the scan and readout rates. The Near Infrared (NIR) FPA consists of a 5 x 12 mosaic of 60 Hawaii 2RG detector arrays from Teledyne, NIR bandpass filters for the wavelength bands Y, J, and H, the mechanical support structure, and the detector readout and signal processing electronics. The FPA is operated at a maximum temperature of 140 K for low dark current of 0.02e$-$/s. Each sensor chip assembly has 2048 x 2048 square pixels of 18 $\\mu$m size (0.15 arcsec), sensitive in the 0.8 to 1.7 $\\mu$m wavelength range. As the spacecraft is scanning the sky, the image motion on the NIR FPA is stabilized by a de-scanning mirror during the integration time of 300 s per detector. The total integration time of 1500 seconds is split among the three NIR wavelengths bands. DUNE has been proposed to ESA's Cosmic Vision program and has been jointly selected with SPACE for an ESA Assessment Phase which has led to the joint Euclid mission concept.

  3. CLUSTER LENSING PROFILES DERIVED FROM A REDSHIFT ENHANCEMENT OF MAGNIFIED BOSS-SURVEY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupon, Jean; Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Broadhurst, Tom, E-mail: coupon@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-07-20

    We report the first detection of a redshift-depth enhancement of background galaxies magnified by foreground clusters. Using 300,000 BOSS survey galaxies with accurate spectroscopic redshifts, we measure their mean redshift depth behind four large samples of optically selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveys, totaling 5000-15,000 clusters. A clear trend of increasing mean redshift toward the cluster centers is found, averaged over each of the four cluster samples. In addition, we find similar but noisier behavior for an independent X-ray sample of 158 clusters lying in the foreground of the current BOSS sky area. By adopting the mass-richness relationships appropriate for each survey, we compare our results with theoretical predictions for each of the four SDSS cluster catalogs. The radial form of this redshift enhancement is well fitted by a richness-to-mass weighted composite Navarro-Frenk-White profile with an effective mass ranging between M{sub 200} {approx} 1.4-1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the optically detected cluster samples, and M{sub 200} {approx} 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} for the X-ray sample. This lensing detection helps to establish the credibility of these SDSS cluster surveys, and provides a normalization for their respective mass-richness relations. In the context of the upcoming bigBOSS, Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph, and EUCLID-NISP spectroscopic surveys, this method represents an independent means of deriving the masses of cluster samples for examining the cosmological evolution, and provides a relatively clean consistency check of weak-lensing measurements, free from the systematic limitations of shear calibration.

  4. A cosmological exclusion plot: Towards model-independent constraints on modified gravity from current and future growth rate data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Taddei; Luca Amendola

    2014-08-15

    Most cosmological constraints on modified gravity are obtained assuming that the cosmic evolution was standard $\\Lambda$CDM in the past and that the present matter density and power spectrum normalization are the same as in a $\\Lambda$CDM model. Here we examine how the constraints change when these assumptions are lifted. We focus in particular on the parameter $Y$ (also called $G_{\\mathrm{eff}}$) that quantifies the deviation from the Poisson equation. This parameter can be estimated by comparing with the model-independent growth rate quantity $f\\sigma_{8}(z)$ obtained through redshift distortions. We reduce the model dependency in evaluating $Y$ by marginalizing over $\\sigma_{8}$ and over the initial conditions, and by absorbing the degenerate parameter $\\Omega_{m,0}$ into $Y$. We use all currently available values of $f\\sigma_{8}(z)$. We find that the combination $\\hat{Y}=Y\\Omega_{m,0}$, assumed constant in the observed redshift range, can be constrained only very weakly by current data, $\\hat{Y}=0.28_{-0.23}^{+0.35}$ at 68\\% c.l. We also forecast the precision of a future estimation of $\\hat{Y}$ in a Euclid-like redshift survey. We find that the future constraints will reduce substantially the uncertainty, $\\hat{Y}=0.30_{-0.09}^{+0.08}$ , at 68\\% c.l., but the relative error on $\\hat{Y}$ around the fiducial remains quite high, of the order of 30\\%. The main reason for these weak constraints is that $\\hat{Y}$ is strongly degenerate with the initial conditions, so that large or small values of $\\hat{Y}$ are compensated by choosing non-standard initial values of the derivative of the matter density contrast. Finally, we produce a forecast of a cosmological exclusion plot on the Yukawa strength and range parameters, which complements similar plots on laboratory scales but explores scales and epochs reachable only with large-scale galaxy surveys. (abridged)

  5. Measuring primordial non-Gaussianity with weak-lensing surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hilbert; Laura Marian; Robert E. Smith; Vincent Desjacques

    2012-11-02

    We study the ability of future weak lensing (WL) surveys to constrain primordial non-Gaussianity of the local type. We use a large ensemble of simulated WL maps with survey specifications relevant to Euclid and LSST. The simulations assume Cold Dark Matter cosmologies that vary certain parameters around fiducial values: the non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL, the matter density parameter Omega_m, the amplitude of the matter power spectrum sigma_8, the spectral index of the primordial power spectrum n_s, and the dark-energy equation-of-state parameter w_0. We assess the sensitivity of the cosmic shear correlation functions, the third-order aperture mass statistics, and the abundance of shear peaks to these parameters. We find that each of the considered probes provides unmarginalized constraints of Delta f_NL ~ 20 on f_NL. Marginalized constraints from any individual WL probe are much weaker due to strong correlations between parameters. However, the parameter errors can be substantially reduced by combining information from different WL probes. Combining all WL probes yields the following marginal (68% confidence level) uncertainties: Delta f_NL ~ 50, Delta Omega_m ~ 0.002, Delta sigma_8 ~ 0.004, Delta n_s ~ 0.007, and Delta w_0 ~ 0.03. We examine the bias induced by neglecting f_NL on the constraints on the other parameters. We find sigma_8 and w_0 to be the most affected. Moreover, neglecting non-Gaussianity leads to a severe underestimation of the uncertainties in the other cosmological parameters.

  6. Nuclear Emergency and the Atmospheric Dispersion of Nuclear Aerosols: Discussion of the Shared Nuclear Future - 13163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Mukhtar A. [Science-Admin Coherence Cell (SACC), PINSTECH Admin Blk, PAEC, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Science-Admin Coherence Cell (SACC), PINSTECH Admin Blk, PAEC, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali, Nawab [Physics Division, Directorate of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Physics Division, Directorate of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Akhter, Parveen [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, E.U. [Department of Physics, International Islamic University (IIU), Kettle Fields, Kashmir Highways, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, International Islamic University (IIU), Kettle Fields, Kashmir Highways, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mathieson, John [International Relations, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [International Relations, Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA), Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    This paper has a twofold objective. One is to analyze the current status of high-level nuclear waste disposal along with presentation of practical perspectives about the environmental issues involved. Present disposal designs and concepts are analyzed on a scientific basis and modifications to existing designs are proposed from the perspective of environmental safety. Other is to understand the aerosol formation in the atmosphere for the case of the leakage from the nuclear waste containers or a nuclear accident. Radio-nuclides released from the waste will attach themselves to the existing aerosols in the atmosphere along with formation of new aerosols. Anticipating the nuclear accident when a variety of radioactive aerosols will form and exist in the atmosphere, as a simple example, measurement of naturally existing radioactive aerosols are made in the atmosphere of Islamabad and Murree. A comparison with similar measurements in 3 cities of France is provided. Measurement of radionuclides in the atmosphere, their attachment to aerosols and follow up transport mechanisms are key issues in the nuclear safety. It is studied here how {sup 7}Be concentration in the atmospheric air varies in the capital city of Islamabad and a Himalaya foothill city of Murree (Pakistan). Present results are compared with recent related published results to produce a {sup 7}Be concentration versus altitude plot up to an altitude of 4000 m (a.s.l.). Origin and variance of {sup 7}Be concentration at different altitudes is discussed in detail. The relevance of results presented here with the evaluation of implications of Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disasters has been discussed in a conclusive manner. It is the first international report of a joint collaboration/project. The project is being generalized to investigate and formulate a smooth waste storage and disposal policy. The project will address the fission and fusion waste reduction, its storage, its recycling, air, water and soil quality monitoring, and the final disposal with the major foci of dealing with related chemical, biogical, physical, geophysical, engineering, management and administration aspects. (authors)

  7. What do correlations tell us about anthropogenic–biogenic interactions and SOA formation in the Sacramento Plume during CARES?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kleinman, L.; Kuang, C.; Sedlacek, A.; Senum, G.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Jayne, J.; Fast, J.; Hubbe, J.; et al

    2015-09-17

    During the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) the DOE G-1 aircraft was used to sample aerosol and gas phase compounds in the Sacramento, CA plume and surrounding region. We present data from 66 plume transects obtained during 13 flights in which southwesterly winds transported the plume towards the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Plume transport occurred partly over land with high isoprene emission rates. Our objective is to empirically determine whether organic aerosol (OA) can be attributed to anthropogenic or biogenic sources, and to determine whether there is a synergistic effect whereby OA concentrations are enhanced bymore »the simultaneous presence of high concentrations of CO and either isoprene, MVK+MACR (sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein) or methanol, which are taken as tracers of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, respectively. Linear and bilinear correlations between OA, CO, and each of three biogenic tracers, "Bio", for individual plume transects indicate that most of the variance in OA over short time and distance scales can be explained by CO. For each transect and species a plume perturbation, (i.e., ?OA, defined as the difference between 90th and 10th percentiles) was defined and regressions done amongst ? values in order to probe day to day and location dependent variability. Species that predicted the largest fraction of the variance in ?OA were ?O3 and ?CO. Background OA was highly correlated with background methanol and poorly correlated with other tracers. Because background OA was ~ 60 % of peak OA in the urban plume, peak OA should be primarily biogenic and therefore non-fossil. Transects were split into subsets according to the percentile rankings of ?CO and ?Bio, similar to an approach used by Setyan et al. (2012) and Shilling et al. (2013) to determine if anthropogenic-biogenic interactions enhance OA production. As found earlier, ?OA in the data subset having high ?CO and high ?Bio was several-fold greater than in other subsets. Part of this difference is consistent with a synergistic interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic precursors and part to an independent linear dependence of ?OA on precursors. Highest values of ?O3 also occur in the high ?CO–high ?Bio data set, raising the possibility that the coincidence of high concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic tracers as well as OA and O3 may be associated with high temperatures, clear skies, and poor ventilation in addition to specific interaction between anthropogenic and biogenic compounds.« less

  8. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these two conditions provide ideal conditions for the formation of highly supercooled drizzle and rain. These results help explain the anomalously high incidences of aircraft icing at cold temperatures in U.S. west coast clouds (Bernstein et al., 2004) and highlight the need to include aerosol effects when simulating aircraft icing with cloud models. These case studies can also serve as benchmarks for explicit cloud microphysics models attempting to simulate the formation of precipitation in these types of pristine conditions.

  9. Enhanced SOA formation from mixed anthropogenic and biogenic emissions during the CARES campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilling, John E.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Alexander, M. L.; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Fortner, Edward; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, John T.; Sedlacek, Art; Setyan, Ari; Springston, S.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Zhang, Qi

    2013-02-21

    The CARES campaign was conducted during June, 2010 in the vicinity of Sacramento, California to study aerosol formation and aging in a region where anthropogenic and biogenic emissions regularly mix. Here, we describe measurements from an Aerodyne High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS), and trace gas detectors (CO, NO, NOx) deployed on the G-1 research aircraft to investigate ambient gas- and particle-phase chemical composition. AMS measurements showed that the particle phase is dominated by organic aerosol (OA) (85% on average) with smaller concentrations of sulfate (5%), nitrate (6%) and ammonium (3%) observed. PTR-MS data showed that isoprene dominated the biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations (BVOCs), with monoterpene concentrations generally below the detection limit. Using two different metrics, median OA concentrations and the slope of plots of OA vs. CO concentrations (i.e., ?OA/?CO), we contrast organic aerosol evolution on flight days with different prevailing meteorological conditions to elucidate the role of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions on OA formation. Airmasses influenced predominantly by biogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 2.9 ?g/m3 and near zero ?OA/?CO. Those influenced predominantly by anthropogenic emissions had median OA concentrations of 4.7 ?g/m3 and ?OA/?CO ratios of 35 - 44 ?g/m3ppmv. When biogenic and anthropogenic emissions mix, OA levels are dramatically enhanced with median OA concentrations of 11.4 ?g/m3 and ?OA/?CO ratios of 77 - 157 ?g/m3ppmv. Taken together, our observations show that production of OA is enhanced when anthropogenic emissions from Sacramento mix with isoprene-rich air from the foothills. A strong, non-linear dependence of SOA yield from isoprene is the mechanistic explanation for this enhancement most consistent with both the gas- and particle-phase data. If these observations are found to be robust in other seasons and in areas outside of Sacramento, regional and global aerosol modules will need to incorporate NOx-dependent SOA yields into their algorithms. Regardless of the mechanism, accurately predicting OA mass concentrations and their effect on radiation balance will require an accurate accounting of the interactions of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions.

  10. Transport and mixing patterns over Central California during the carbonaceous aerosol and radiative effects study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast J. D.; Springston S.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Berg, L. K.; Shaw, W. J.; Pekour, M.; Shrivastava, M.; Barnard, J. C.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. A.; Erickson, M.; Jobson, B. T.; Flowers, B.; Dubey, M. K.; Pierce, R. B.; Dolislager, L.; Pederson, J.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scale flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 time periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley, were relatively low. Aerosol layering in the free troposphere was observed during the morning by an airborne Lidar. WRF-Chem forecasts showed that mountain venting processes contributed to aged pollutants aloft in the valley atmosphere that are then entrained into the growing boundary layer the subsequent day.

  11. Transport and Mixing Patterns over Central California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Barnard, James C.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Erickson, Matthew H.; Jobson, Tom; Flowers, Bradley; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Springston, Stephen R.; Pirce, Bradley R.; Dolislager, Leon; Pederson, J. R.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-02-17

    We describe the synoptic and regional-scale meteorological conditions that affected the transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols in the vicinity of Sacramento, California during June 2010 when the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was conducted. The meteorological measurements collected by various instruments deployed during the campaign and the performance of the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) are both discussed. WRF-Chem was run daily during the campaign to forecast the spatial and temporal variation of carbon monoxide emitted from 20 anthropogenic source regions in California to guide aircraft sampling. The model is shown to reproduce the overall circulations and boundary-layer characteristics in the region, although errors in the upslope wind speed and boundary-layer depth contribute to differences in the observed and simulated carbon monoxide. Thermally-driven upslope flows that transported pollutants from Sacramento over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada occurred every afternoon, except during three periods when the passage of mid-tropospheric troughs disrupted the regional-scales flow patterns. The meteorological conditions after the passage of the third trough were the most favorable for photochemistry and likely formation of secondary organic aerosols. Meteorological measurements and model forecasts indicate that the Sacramento pollutant plume was likely transported over a downwind site that collected trace gas and aerosol measurements during 23 periods; however, direct transport occurred during only eight of these periods. The model also showed that emissions from the San Francisco Bay area transported by intrusions of marine air contributed a large fraction of the carbon monoxide in the vicinity of Sacramento, suggesting that this source likely affects local chemistry. Contributions from other sources of pollutants, such as those in the Sacramento Valley and San Joaquin Valley, were relatively low. Aerosol layering in the free troposphere was observed during the morning by an airborne Lidar; WRF-Chem forecasts showed that mountain venting processes contributed to aged pollutants aloft in the valley atmosphere which then can be entrained into the growing boundary layer the subsequent day.

  12. Probing non-standard gravity with the growth index: a background independent analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steigerwald, Heinrich; Marinoni, Christian; Bel, Julien E-mail: jbel@cpt.univ-mrs.fr

    2014-05-01

    Measurements of the growth index of linear matter density fluctuations ?(z) provide a clue as to whether Einstein's field equations encompass gravity also on large cosmic scales, those where the expansion of the universe accelerates. We show that the information encoded in this function can be satisfactorily parameterized using a small set of coefficients ?{sub i}, in such a way that the true scaling of the growth index is recovered to better than 1% in most dark energy and dark gravity models. We find that the likelihood of current data, given this formalism and the ? Cold Dark Matter (?CDM) expansion model of Planck, is maximal for ?{sub 0} = 0.74{sup +0.44}{sub ?0.41} and ?{sub 1} = 0.01{sup +0.46}{sub ?0.46}, a measurement compatible with the ?CDM predictions (?{sub 0} = 0.545, ?{sub 1} = ?0.007). In addition, data tend to favor models predicting slightly less growth of structures than the Planck ?CDM scenario. The main aim of the paper is to provide a prescription for routinely calculating, in an analytic way, the amplitude of the growth indices ?{sub i} in relevant cosmological scenarios, and to show that these parameters naturally define a space where predictions of alternative theories of gravity can be compared against growth data in a manner which is independent from the expansion history of the cosmological background. As the standard ?-plane provides a tool to identify different expansion histories H(t) and their relation to various cosmological models, the ?-plane can thus be used to locate different growth rate histories f(t) and their relation to alternatives model of gravity. As a result, we find that the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati gravity model is rejected with a 95% confidence level. By simulating future data sets, such as those that a Euclid-like mission will provide, we also show how to tell apart ?CDM predictions from those of more extreme possibilities, such as smooth dark energy models, clustering quintessence or parameterized post-Friedmann cosmological models.

  13. The Rational Number n/p as a sum of two unit fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantine Zelator

    2012-02-29

    In a 2011 paper published in the journal "Asian Journal of Algebra"(see reference[1]), the authors consider, among other equations,the diophantine equations 2xy=n(x+y) and 3xy=n(x+y). For the first equation, with n being an odd positive integer, they give the solution x=(n+1)/2, y=n(n+1)/2. For the second equation they present the particular solution, x=(n+1)/3,y=n(n+1)/3, where is n is a positive integer congruent to 2modulo3. If in the above equations we assume n to be prime, then these two equations become special cases of the diophantine equation, nxy=p(x+y) (1), with p being a prime and n a positive integer greater than or equal to 2. This 2-variable symmetric diophantine equation is the subject matter of this article; with the added condition that the intager n is not divisible by the prime p. Observe that this equation can be written in fraction form: n/p= 1/x + 1/y(See [2] for more details) In this work we prove the following result, Theorem1(stated on page2 of this paper):Let p be a prime, n a positive integer at least2, and not divisible by p. Then, 1)If n=2 and p is an odd prime, equation (1) has exactly three distinct positive integer solutions:x=p, y=p ; x=p(p+1)/2, y=(p+1)/2 ; x=(p+1)/2, y=p(p+1)/2 2)If n is greater than or equal to 3, and n is a divisor of p+1. Then equation (1) has exactly two distinct solutions: x=p(p+1)/n, y=(p+1)/n ; x=(p+1)/n, y=p(p+1)/n 3) if n is not a divisor of p+1. Then equation (1) has no positive integer solution. The proof of this result is elementary, and only uses Euclid's Lemma from number theory,and basic divisor arguments(such that if a prime divides a product of two integers; it must divide at least one of them).

  14. RECONSTRUCTING REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTIONS WITH CROSS-CORRELATIONS: TESTS AND AN OPTIMIZED RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A., E-mail: djm70@pitt.ed, E-mail: janewman@pitt.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)

    2010-09-20

    Many of the cosmological tests to be performed by planned dark energy experiments will require extremely well-characterized photometric redshift measurements. Current estimates for cosmic shear are that the true mean redshift of the objects in each photo-z bin must be known to better than 0.002(1 + z), and the width of the bin must be known to {approx}0.003(1 + z) if errors in cosmological measurements are not to be degraded significantly. A conventional approach is to calibrate these photometric redshifts with large sets of spectroscopic redshifts. However, at the depths probed by Stage III surveys (such as DES), let alone Stage IV (LSST, JDEM, and Euclid), existing large redshift samples have all been highly (25%-60%) incomplete, with a strong dependence of success rate on both redshift and galaxy properties. A powerful alternative approach is to exploit the clustering of galaxies to perform photometric redshift calibrations. Measuring the two-point angular cross-correlation between objects in some photometric redshift bin and objects with known spectroscopic redshift, as a function of the spectroscopic z, allows the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample to be reconstructed in detail, even if it includes objects too faint for spectroscopy or if spectroscopic samples are highly incomplete. We test this technique using mock DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift survey light cones constructed from the Millennium Simulation semi-analytic galaxy catalogs. From this realistic test, which incorporates the effects of galaxy bias evolution and cosmic variance, we find that the true redshift distribution of a photometric sample can, in fact, be determined accurately with cross-correlation techniques. We also compare the empirical error in the reconstruction of redshift distributions to previous analytic predictions, finding that additional components must be included in error budgets to match the simulation results. This extra error contribution is small for surveys that sample large areas of sky (>{approx}10{sup 0}-100{sup 0}), but dominant for {approx}1 deg{sup 2} fields. We conclude by presenting a step-by-step, optimized recipe for reconstructing redshift distributions from cross-correlation information using standard correlation measurements.

  15. Final Report on "Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gold, Steven H.

    2013-10-13

    This is the final report on the research program ?Development and Testing of Advanced Accelerator Structures and Technologies at 11.424 GHz,? which was carried out by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) under Interagency Agreement DE?AI02?01ER41170 with the Department of Energy. The period covered by this report is 15 July 2010 ? 14 July 2013. The program included two principal tasks. Task 1 involved a study of the key physics issues related to the use of high gradient dielectric-loaded accelerating (DLA) structures in rf linear accelerators and was carried out in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Euclid Techlabs LLC. Task 2 involved a study of high power active microwave pulse compressors and was carried out in collaboration with Omega-P, Inc. and the Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod. The studies under Task 1 were focused on rf-induced multipactor and breakdown in externally driven DLA structures at the 200-ns timescale. Suppression of multipactor and breakdown are essential to the practical application of dielectric structures in rf linear accelerators. The structures that were studied were developed by ANL and Euclid Techlabs and their performance was evaluated at high power in the X-band Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. Three structures were designed, fabricated, and tested, and the results analyzed in the first two years of the program: a clamped quartz traveling-wave (TW) structure, a externally copper-coated TW structure, and an externally copper-coated dielectric standing-wave (SW) structure. These structures showed that rf breakdown could be largely eliminated by eliminating dielectric joints in the structures, but that the multipactor loading was omnipresent. In the third year of the program, the focus of the program was on multipactor suppression using a strong applied axial magnetic field, as proposed by Chang et al. [C. Chang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 063304 (2011).], and a successful experiment was carried out that demonstrated suppression of multipactor in the uniform-field region of a TW DLA structure. However, in accordance with theory, the multipactor was enhanced in regions of the structure with lower values of axial magnetic field. Under Task 2, there were two two-month experimental runs at NRL that were used to characterize the performance of high power two-channel dual-mode active microwave pulse compressor configurations that used electron-beam triggered switch cavities. The pulse compressors were designed and fabricated by Omega-P, Inc. and the Russian Institute of Applied Physics and tested in the Magnicon Laboratory at NRL. These pulse compressors made use of an electron beam discharge from a cylindrical knife-edged Mo cathode coated with a CVD diamond film that was driven by a ?100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The electron beam was used to change the resonant frequency of the switch cavities in order to create the output microwave pulse. The compressor channels included a TE01 input and output section and a TE02 energy storage cavity, followed by a switch assembly that controlled the coupling between the TE01 and TE02 modes. In the initial state, the switch cavity was in resonance, the reflection from the cavity was out of phase, and the mode conversion was only ~2-3%, allowing the energy storage cavity to fill. When the electron beam was discharged into the switch cavity, the cavity was shifted out of resonance, causing the phase of the reflection to change by ~?. As a result of the change in the reflection phase, the mode coupling in the conical taper was greatly increased, and could approach ~100%, permitting the energy storage cavity to empty in one cavity round trip time of the TE02 mode to produce a high power output pulse. The second experiment runs demonstrated a 190 MW, ~20 ns compressed pulse at 25.7 gain and ~50% efficiency, using a 7.4 MW, 1 ?s drive pulse from the magnicon. The success of this experiment suggests a path to future high gain active versions of the SLED 2 pulse compressor at SLAC.

  16. Characterization of submicron particles influenced by mixed biogenic and anthropogenic emissions using high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry: results from CARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyan, Ari; Zhang, Qi; Merkel, M.; Knighton, Walter B.; Sun, Y.; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Herndon, Scott C.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berg, Larry K.; Wiedensohler, A.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Subramanian, R.

    2012-09-11

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) took place in the Sacramento Valley of California in summer 2010. We present results obtained at Cool, CA, the T1 site of the project ({approx}40 km downwind of urban emissions from Sacramento), where we deployed an Aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) in parallel with complementary instrumentation to characterize the sources and processes of submicron particles (PM1). Cool is located at the foothill of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, where intense biogenic emissions are periodically mixed with urban outflow transported by daytime southwesterly winds from the Sacramento metropolitan area. The particle mass loading was low (3.0 {micro}gm{sup -3} on average) and dominated by organics (80% of the PM1 mass) followed by sulfate (9.9 %). Organics and sulfate appeared to be externally mixed, as suggested by their different time series (r2 = 0.13) and size distributions. Sulfate showed a bimodal distribution with a droplet mode peaking at {approx}400nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter (Dva), and a condensation mode at {approx}150 nm, while organics generally displayed a broad distribution in 60-600nm (Dva). New particle formation and growth events were observed almost every day, emphasizing the roles of organics and sulfate in new particle growth, especially that of organics. The organic aerosol (OA) had a nominal formula of C{sub 1}H{sub 1.38}N{sub 0.004}O{sub 0.44}, thus an average organic mass-to-carbon (OM/OC) ratio of 1.70. Two different oxygenated OA (OOA, 90% of total OA mass) and a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, 10 %) were identified by Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the high resolution mass spectra. The more oxidized MO-OOA (O/C = 0.54) corresponded to secondary OA (SOA) primarily influenced by biogenic emissions, while the less oxidized LO-OOA (O/C = 0.42) corresponded to SOA associated with urban transport. The HOA factor corresponded to primary emissions mainly due to local traffic. Twenty three periods of urban plumes from T0 (Sacramento) to T1 (Cool) were identified using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem). The average PM1 mass loading was much higher in urban plumes (3.9 {micro}gm{sup -3}) than in air masses dominated by biogenic SOA (1.8 {micro}gm{sup -3}). The change in OA mass relative to CO ({Delta}OA/{Delta}CO) varied in the range of 5-196 {micro}gm{sup -3} ppm{sup -1}, reflecting large variability in SOA production. The highest {Delta}OA/{Delta}CO were reached when urban plumes arrived at Cool in the presence of a high concentration of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs=isoprene+monoterpenes+2-methyl-3-buten-2- ol [MBO]+methyl chavicol). This ratio, which was 77 {micro}gm{sup -3} ppm{sup -1} on average when BVOCs > 2 ppb, is much higher than when urban plumes arrived in a low biogenic VOCs environment (28 {micro}gm{sup -3} ppm{sup -1} when BVOCs < 0.7 ppb) or during other periods dominated by biogenic SOA (40 {micro}gm{sup -3} ppm{sup -1}). The results from this study demon10 strate that SOA formation is enhanced when anthropogenic emissions interact with biogenic precursors.

  17. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940’s and was severely weathered. The composition of this ‘dead’ Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat