Sample records for foot household member

  1. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households Photo of a row of townhomes. Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades...

  2. Weigh-in-motion scale with foot alignment features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abercrombie, Robert Knox; Richardson, Gregory David; Scudiere, Matthew Bligh

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pad is disclosed for use in a weighing system for weighing a load. The pad includes a weighing platform, load cells, and foot members. Improvements to the pad reduce or substantially eliminate rotation of one or more of the corner foot members. A flexible foot strap disposed between the corner foot members reduces rotation of the respective foot members about vertical axes through the corner foot members and couples the corner foot members such that rotation of one corner foot member results in substantially the same amount of rotation of the other corner foot member. In a strapless variant one or more fasteners prevents substantially all rotation of a foot member. In a diagonal variant, a foot strap extends between a corner foot member and the weighing platform to reduce rotation of the foot member about a vertical axis through the corner foot member.

  3. Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings Members Michael J.

  4. A study conducted on laterally loaded cylindrical footings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Kenneth Joseph

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY CONDUCTED ON LATERALLY LOADED CYLINDRICAL FOOTINGS A Thesis by Kenneth Joseph Koch Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree oi MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968... Major Subject Civil Engineering A STUDY CONDUCTED ON LATERALLY LOADED CYLINDRICAL FOOTINGS A Thesis by Kenneth Joseph Koch Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (M ber) May 1968...

  5. Evaluation of the Franz System Foot Control in a simulated adaptive tracking task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raab, Charles

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE FRANZ SYSTEM FOOT CONTROL IN A SIMULATED ADAPTIVE TRACKING TASK A Thesis by CHARLES RAAB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EVALUATION OF THE FRANZ SYSTEM FOOT CONTROL IN A SIMULATED ADAPTIVE TRACKING TASK A Thesis by CHARLES RAAB Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Com ttee) (Member) (Member...

  6. Elastomeric member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  7. Elastomeric member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  8. Household Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion of household products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    over a larger area and releases them into the air. Pouring hazardous liquids on the ground can poisonHousehold Hazardous Waste Household hazardous waste is the discarded, unused, or leftover portion should be considered hazardous. You cannot treat hazardous wastes like other kinds of garbage

  9. Keeping Household Records.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Keep these while you own the ve the vehicle is stolen, the title is evidence of ship. Church records Baptismal and confirmat tificates are acceptable evidence of your bi when obtaining a delayed birth certificate. may be kept in home files. re..., allergies, diseases and immunizations for 4 all family members. Also record place and date of birth, doctors, medications and blood type. Insurance pblicies Keep these at home for con- venient referral about your coverage. Tax returns Keep...

  10. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1...

  11. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HOW MANY HYBRID HOUSEHOLDS IN THE CALIFORNIA NEW CAR MARKET?average 2.43 cars per household, then the hybrid householdnumber of multi-car households that fit our hybrid household

  12. Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

  13. Essays on microeconomics of the household

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wahhaj, Zaki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These essays are concerned with the problem of cooperation among individuals in a household and among households in a community under lack of commitment. The first chapter provides a theoretical investigation of consumption ...

  14. Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid financial and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rice inventory credit in Madagascar : diversity of rural household strategies around an hybrid been offering an innovative individual rice inventory credit to its members since 1993. Starting from the acknowledgement that the inventory credit is a hybrid product, which involves a mix of in kind and in cash flows

  15. Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Garcia, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Families in early Ptolemaic Egypt. In The Hellenistic world:granary models, and domestic economy in ancient Egypt. InThe archaeology and art of ancient Egypt: Essays in Honor of

  16. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household

  17. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a. Household6a.

  18. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household

  19. char_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25, 20123 (Million13) I5a.8a. Household9a.

  20. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001

  1. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 20012a.

  2. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,

  3. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.

  4. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households,4a.5a.

  5. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household

  6. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a. Household1a.

  7. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S.20010a.a. Household

  8. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household

  9. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million8a. Household9a.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanet, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  American household carbon footprint. ” Ecological and  limitations) of carbon footprint estimates toward of the art in carbon footprint analyses for California, 

  11. ORSSAB Members | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Read Bio Claire RowcliffeRead Bio Mary Smalling Member Read Bio Wanda Smith Member Read Bio Coralie (Corkie) Staley Member Read Bio Scott Stout Member...

  12. Evolving Patterns of Household Computer Use: 1999-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatesh, Alladi; Dunkle, Debora E.; Wortman, Amanda

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 14. Education/Learning: household type, education, andeducation/learning activities: household type, education,related work and learning are specific to certain types of

  13. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  14. The World Distribution of Household Wealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. B. (1993). ‘The Distribution of Wealth in Canada’.Estimating the World Distribution of Household Wealth’.Tide: Changes in the Distribution of Wealth in the US, 1989-

  15. Household gasoline demand in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing rapid growth in U.S. gasoline consumption threatens to exacerbate environmental and congestion problems. We use flexible semiparametric and nonparametric methods to guide analysis of household gasoline consumption, ...

  16. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  17. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  18. Household batteries: Evaluation of collection methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeberger, D.A.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While it is difficult to prove that a specific material is causing contamination in a landfill, tests have been conducted at waste-to-energy facilities that indicate that household batteries contribute significant amounts of heavy metals to both air emissions and ash residue. Hennepin County, MN, used a dual approach for developing and implementing a special household battery collection. Alternative collection methods were examined; test collections were conducted. The second phase examined operating and disposal policy issues. This report describes the results of the grant project, moving from a broad examination of the construction and content of batteries, to a description of the pilot collection programs, and ending with a discussion of variables affecting the cost and operation of a comprehensive battery collection program. Three out-of-state companies (PA, NY) were found that accept spent batteries; difficulties in reclaiming household batteries are discussed.

  19. A Multi Agent-Based Framework for Simulating Household PHEV Distribution and Electric Distribution Network Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Xiaohui [ORNL] [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Hoe Kyoung [ORNL] [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation of household attributes such as income, travel distance, age, household member, and education for different residential areas may generate different market penetration rates for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV). Residential areas with higher PHEV ownership could increase peak electric demand locally and require utilities to upgrade the electric distribution infrastructure even though the capacity of the regional power grid is under-utilized. Estimating the future PHEV ownership distribution at the residential household level can help us understand the impact of PHEV fleet on power line congestion, transformer overload and other unforeseen problems at the local residential distribution network level. It can also help utilities manage the timing of recharging demand to maximize load factors and utilization of existing distribution resources. This paper presents a multi agent-based simulation framework for 1) modeling spatial distribution of PHEV ownership at local residential household level, 2) discovering PHEV hot zones where PHEV ownership may quickly increase in the near future, and 3) estimating the impacts of the increasing PHEV ownership on the local electric distribution network with different charging strategies. In this paper, we use Knox County, TN as a case study to show the simulation results of the agent-based model (ABM) framework. However, the framework can be easily applied to other local areas in the US.

  20. Combustion Group Group members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

  1. Combustion Group Group members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy § New combustion and energy-conversion concepts #12;Introduction Combustion research thrusts Combustion Dynamics and Flame-Stabilization Research objectives § Obtain fundamental understanding of combustion

  2. Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traits Affecting Household Livestock Marketing Decisions in Rural Kenya Katherine L. Baldwin community of Central Kenya, we regressed household offtake rate of both cattle and smallstock against in Kenya. Because pastoralist economies depend almost exclusively upon livestock production, most recent

  3. Essays on household decision making in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, James W. (James Wesley)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation contains three essays on household decision making in the areas of education and health in developing countries. The first chapter explores intra-household decision making in the context of conditional ...

  4. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  5. Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Design and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System PhD. project Dissertation Anders Risum and Control of Household CHP Fuel Cell System" Anders R. Korsgaard, M.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, e-mail: ark for micro combined heat and power (CHP) systems for local households. Several components in the PEM fuel

  6. Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    Demographic Patterns and Household Saving in China Chadwick C. Curtis University of Richmond the aggregate household saving rate. We focus on China because it is experiencing an historic demographic transition and has had a massive increase in household saving. We conduct a quantitative investigation using

  7. Poverty and Productivity in Female-Headed Households in Zimbabwe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Krishnan, Pramila

    A household survey conducted in rural Zimbabwe in 2001 is used to compare the position of de facto and de jure female-headed households to those with a male head. These households are characterised by different forms of poverty that impinge...

  8. THE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy-using devices in the average U.S. household that used over 4,700 kWh of electricity, natural gas-using devices to energy price, household income, and the cost of these devices. This analysis findsTHE DESIRE TO ACQUIRE: FORECASTING THE EVOLUTION OF HOUSEHOLD ENERGY SERVICES by Steven Groves BASc

  9. GreenFoot Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrl Jump to:GreenFoot Technologies

  10. SmallFoot LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation SlimSlough Heat andSmallFoot LLC Jump

  11. Brad Foote Gear Works | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind- GeradoraBorealBrad Foote Gear

  12. Members | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to EnergyDepartment ofMarginalPaul D. Jablonski National EnergyMemberMembers

  13. A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    's goal is to investigate the weekly per capita indoor water use of three households in Davis, CaliforniaA Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Maisie Borg, Orion Edwards & Sarah Kimpel Abstract Over the past several decades

  14. Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.4

  15. Table HC6.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.41 Home

  16. Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.41

  17. Table HC6.2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.412

  18. Table HC6.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.4124

  19. Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.41245

  20. Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0 Home7.412457

  1. Table HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipal shale gas:14:9a.0

  2. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptemberAssessments |FossilThisDepartmentDepartment ofThe

  3. Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million0 Home

  4. Table HC6.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million0 Home1

  5. Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million0 Home12

  6. Table HC6.2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million0

  7. Table HC6.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million04 Space

  8. Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million04

  9. Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million047

  10. Table HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17questionnairesU.S. Weekly Download:Stocks by3a.7 Million047HC6.9

  11. Isolation and characterization of microsatellite loci from blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faircloth, Brant C.; Ramos, Alejandra; Drummond, Hugh; Gowaty, Patricia Adair

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parasitism and extra-pair paternity in blue- footed boobies.Microsatellites Á SSRs Á Blue-footed booby Á Sula nebouxii Ámicrosatellite loci from blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii)

  12. The Household Market for Electric Vehicles: Testing the Hybrid Household Hypothesis--A Reflively Designed Survey of New-car-buying, Multi-vehicle California Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Thomas; Kurani, Kenneth

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by electric and hybrid vehicles", SAE Technical Papers No.household response to hybrid vehicles. Finally, we suggestas electric or hybrid vehicles. Transitions in choices of

  13. A Universal AnkleFoot Prosthesis Emulator for Human Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven H.

    A Universal Ankle­Foot Prosthesis Emulator for Human Locomotion Experiments Joshua M. Caputo of functions. Here we describe a robotic ankle­foot prosthesis system that enables rapid exploration of a wide-board motor and con- trol hardware, a flexible Bowden cable tether, and a lightweight instrumented prosthesis

  14. Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitti, Metin

    Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing Dept -- This paper proposes two different nanomolding methods to fabricate synthetic gecko foot-hair nanostructures a nano-pore membrane as a template. These templates are molded with silicone rubber, polyimide

  15. Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2012 The Jaipur Foot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    for the Jaipur Foot and in compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard Foot in compliance with ISO Standard 10328. Approach Gathered customer needs from sponsor Established target specifications from customer needs into measurable metrics Reviewed ISO Standard 10328

  16. Planipes: Mobile Foot Pressure Analysis Samuel Pfaffen, Philipp Sommer, Christian Stocker, Roger Wattenhofer, and Samuel Welten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planipes: Mobile Foot Pressure Analysis Samuel Pfaffen, Philipp Sommer, Christian Stocker, Roger, sommer, chstocke, wattenhofer, welten}@tik.ee.ethz.ch Abstract Analyzing foot pressure is helpful

  17. Distributed Explosive-Driven Six-foot Diameter by Two-Hundred Foot Long Shock Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VIGIL, MANUEL G.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The blast parameters for the 6-foot diameter by 200-foot long, explosively driven shock tube are presented in this report. The purpose, main characteristics, and blast simulation capabilities of this PETN Primacord, explosively driven facility are included. Experimental data are presented for air and Sulfurhexaflouride (SF6) test gases with initial pressures between 0.5 to 12.1 psia (ambient). Experimental data are presented and include shock wave time of amval at various test stations, flow duration, static or side-on overpressure, and stagnation or head-on overpressure. The blast parameters calculated from the above measured parameters and presented in this report include shock wave velocity, shock strength, shock Mach number, flow Mach Number, reflected pressure, dynamic pressure, particle velocity, density, and temperature. Graphical data for the above parameters are included. Algorithms and least squares fit equations are also included.

  18. Environmental Management Advisory Board Members | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Member Read Bio David W. Swindle, Jr. EMAB Board Member Read Bio Robert J. Thompson EMAB Board Member Read Bio Lenn Vincent EMAB Board Member Read Bio Waste...

  19. Cryogenic support member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemann, Ralph C. (Downers Grove, IL); Gonczy, John D. (Oak Lawn, IL); Nicol, Thomas H. (Aurora, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  20. Academy Member Annual Update Report 1Academy Member Update Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Academy Member Annual Update Report 1Academy Member Update Report The annual update report is an important activity associated with active membership in the Academy. These reports are due annually@lsuhsc.edu or call 504-568-2140 if you have other questions. Why an annual report? As an Academy member

  1. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. Call Slides and Discussion Summary More...

  2. California Household Transportation Survey - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from more than 42,500 households via multiple data-collection methods, including computer-assisted telephone interviewing, online and mail surveys, wearable and in-vehicle...

  3. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimring, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neighborhood Program GETS – Green Energy Training ServicesGJGEI – Green Jobs, Green Energy Initiative CEWO – Cleanincome households. The Green Energy Training Services (GETS)

  4. assessing household solid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: Water End?Use Energy Efficiency Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Assessment of Household Carbon Footprint...

  5. Regional patterns of U.S. household carbon emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pizer, William; Sanchirico, James N.; Batz, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIA), Residential Energy Consumption Survey (http://gasoline is EIA Household vehicle energy use survey (http://survey is 1994 not 1993 (labeled with an *). The EIA

  6. Putting People's Common Sense into Knowledge Bases of Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    , and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems Group Department of Informatics Technische Universität München {kunzel,tenorth,beetz}@in.tum.de Abstract. Unlike people, household robots cannot rely

  7. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  8. achieve household waste: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website www.wellwater.bse.vt.edu. unknown authors 30 The...

  9. Chamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan-Miller, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutralization on Heavy-Ion-Fusion Chamber Transport," to beChamber transport of "foot" pulses for heavy-ion fusion W.chamber-transport effectiveness is the fraction of enclosed beam ions

  10. Powered Ankle–Foot Prosthesis Improves Walking Metabolic Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au, Samuel K.

    At moderate to fast walking speeds, the human ankle provides net positive work at high-mechanical-power output to propel the body upward and forward during the stance period. On the contrary, conventional ankle-foot ...

  11. The effect of foot conditions on constrained standing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlow, Jessica Marie

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to find any differences in physiological effects, subjective rankings, or discomfort with respect to foot conditions in constrained standing. Eight healthy subjects, four female and four male, stood using four different...

  12. Mag-Foot: a steel bridge inspection robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asada, Harry

    A legged robot that moves across a steel structure is developed for steel bridge inspection. Powerful permanent magnets imbedded in each foot allow the robot to hang from a steel ceiling powerlessly. Although the magnets ...

  13. ankle foot orthoses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

  14. ankle foot orthosis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

  15. Melt containment member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  16. On future household structure Department of Computer Science and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lřw, Erik

    of the population, such as household size, health or disability status, region of residence, labour market status household forecast helps policy makers, planners, and other forecast users in the fields of housing, energy size. A similar method could be applied to obtain probabilistic forecasts for other divisions

  17. Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    v Women, Work and Household Electrification in Rural India We must not believe, certainly electrification in rural India, the answer, it seems, would clearly point in a particular direction. On the one, that in the event of full electrification at the household level, rural women stand to be most affected in terms

  18. Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steininger, Karl W.

    . Emissions from passenger transport, households'electricity and heat consumption are growing rapidly despite demand analysis for electricity (e.g. Larsen and Nesbakken, 2004; Holtedahl and Joutz, 2004Modelling the Energy Demand of Households in a Combined Top Down/Bottom Up Approach Kurt Kratena

  19. Rediness Review Team Member Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MEMBER TRAINING Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Michael Hillman DOE HQ - HSS Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Dan M. Stover, PE Technical And Professional Services, Inc....

  20. Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Ph 61 2 6125 5905 Andrew.blakers@anu.edu.au Web: http

  1. Householder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 1721, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    for discussions. This year's symposium is held at Peebles Hotel Hydro in the small town of Peebles (populationHouseholder Symposium on Numerical Linear Algebra June 17­21, 2002 Peebles Hotel Hydro, Scotland

  2. Who counts? how the state (re)creates households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walther, Carol Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    different data sources, I produce five different indices to determine settlement patterns of same-sex households in various geographic areas. Secondly, drawing on variables operationalized as cultural schema and resources, I identify characteristics...

  3. acute household accidental: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 27...

  4. aa household alkaline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system will help keep your water safe. For more information, visit the Virginia Household Water Quality Program website at www.wellwater.bse. vt.edu. unknown authors 26...

  5. Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

  6. Design and evaluation of a cantilever beam-type prosthetic foot for Indian persons with amputations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olesnavage, Kathryn M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to design a low cost, high performance prosthetic foot in collaboration with Bhagwan Mahaveer Viklang Sahayata Samiti (BMVSS), in Jaipur, India. In order to be adopted, the foot must cost less than ...

  7. Effects of different restrained foot positions on hand force exertion capability-implications for microgravity operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalen, Scott Allan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was conducted to determine restrained foot positions that increase hand force exertion capability (HFEC) over that available under the existing restrained foot position utilized by NASA astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA...

  8. Ventilation Behavior and Household Characteristics in NewCalifornia Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Sherman, Max H.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey was conducted to determine occupant use of windows and mechanical ventilation devices; barriers that inhibit their use; satisfaction with indoor air quality (IAQ); and the relationship between these factors. A questionnaire was mailed to a stratified random sample of 4,972 single-family detached homes built in 2003, and 1,448 responses were received. A convenience sample of 230 houses known to have mechanical ventilation systems resulted in another 67 completed interviews. Some results are: (1) Many houses are under-ventilated: depending on season, only 10-50% of houses meet the standard recommendation of 0.35 air changes per hour. (2) Local exhaust fans are under-utilized. For instance, about 30% of households rarely or never use their bathroom fan. (3) More than 95% of households report that indoor air quality is ''very'' or ''somewhat'' acceptable, although about 1/3 of households also report dustiness, dry air, or stagnant or humid air. (4) Except households where people cook several hours per week, there is no evidence that households with significant indoor pollutant sources get more ventilation. (5) Except households containing asthmatics, there is no evidence that health issues motivate ventilation behavior. (6) Security and energy saving are the two main reasons people close windows or keep them closed.

  9. Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimers-Arias, Carlos Alberto

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Housing Diversity and Consolidation in Low-Income Colonias: Patterns of House Form and Household Arrangements in Colonias of the US-Mexico Border. (August 2009) Carlos Alberto Reimers-Arias, B.Arch., Universidad Sim?n Bol?var; M.Arch., Mc... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Andrew D. Seidel Robin F. Abrams Committee Members, Marlynn L. May Robert B. Warden Head of Department, Glen T. Mills August 2009 Major Subject: Architecture iii ABSTRACT...

  10. Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Walking Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Walking Economy by Samuel Kwok-Wai Au LIBRARIES #12;#12;Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Walking Economy by Samuel in walking. This objective of this thesis is to evaluate the hypothesis that a powered ankle- foot prosthesis

  11. Load tests on five large spread footings on sand and evaluation of prediction methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbens, Robert Melvin

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the engineering profession's lack of trust in the use of spread footings. For this study, five spread footings with sizes ranging from I to 3 m square were load tested to 150 mm of penetration. The footings were all constructed and tested in a similar manner...

  12. Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Membership in the Consortium is open to municipalities, utilities, and energy efficiency organizations, with participation at various levels from other interested parties.

  13. Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings

  14. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  15. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E. [and others

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. New York Household Travel Patterns: A Comparison Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1969, the U. S. Department of Transportation began collecting detailed data on personal travel to address various transportation planning issues. These issues range from assessing transportation investment programs to developing new technologies to alleviate congestion. This 1969 survey was the birth of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. Longer-distance travel was collected in 1977 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and collected both daily and longer-distance trips in one survey. In addition to the number of sample households that the national NPTS/NHTS survey allotted to New York State (NYS), the state procured an additional sample of households in both the 1995 and 2001 surveys. In the 1995 survey, NYS procured an addition sample of more than 9,000 households, increasing the final NY NPTS sample size to a total of 11,004 households. Again in 2001, NYS procured 12,000 additional sample households, increasing the final New York NHTS sample size to a total of 13,423 households with usable data. These additional sample households allowed NYS to address transportation planning issues pertinent to geographic areas significantly smaller than for what the national NPTS and NHTS data are intended. Specifically, these larger sample sizes enable detailed analysis of twelve individual Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Furthermore, they allowed NYS to address trends in travel behavior over time. In this report, travel data for the entire NYS were compared to those of the rest of the country with respect to personal travel behavior and key travel determinants. The influence of New York City (NYC) data on the comparisons of the state of New York to the rest of the country was also examined. Moreover, the analysis examined the relationship between population density and travel patterns, and the similarities and differences among New York MPOs. The 1995 and 2001 survey data make it possible to examine and identify travel trends over time. This report does not address, however, the causes of the differences and/or trends.

  17. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  18. Joseph M. Juran Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardeman, Stephen B.

    Joseph M. Juran I E 361 Fall 2002 Team Members: Dragui Nestorovic Gonzalo Rodriguez Monica Kroh Jaroslav Sebek #12;Introduction Joseph M. Juran has led a life of success and accomplishments. Using his. Background Joseph M. Juran was born in Brailia, Romania, during December of 1904. When Joseph was five years

  19. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    increased by 47%. The number of workers per household has changed the least of the statistics shown here. There has been a decline in the number of persons per household from...

  20. Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Cheree L.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose...

  1. Rebound Effect in Energy Efficient Appliance Adopting Households 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Jacob Matthew

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses data from smart meter technology to estimate the occurrence of energy rebound, a “substitution” and “income’ effect where the price-per-use of an appliance falls relative to its energy efficiency. This causes households to have more...

  2. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  3. Microcredit Program Participation and Household Food Security in Rural Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    and per capita calorie consumption, reduces the incidence of food poverty and the prevalence the impact of participation status on different measures of food insecurity -- household calorie consumption and consumption (Dercon and Krishnan, 2000; Dostie et al., 2002; Khandker et al., 2012). Income from non

  4. Effects of household dynamics on resource consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    influence per capita consumption7,8 and thus biodiversity through, for example, consumption of wood for fuel, and resultant higher per capita resource con- sumption in smaller households15­19 pose serious challenges on resource consumption and biodiversity Jianguo Liu*, Gretchen C. Daily, Paul R. Ehrlich & Gary W. Luck

  5. The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    The residential landscape: fluxes of elements and the role of household decisions Cinzia Fissore biogeochemical cycling of elements through residential household landscapes to evaluate the importance of annual 55108, USA #12;Introduction The household landscape represents a key feature in the residential areas

  6. Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Shihchieh

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tempsonics Transducer? Channels ? Hgdraulic Actuator I rB I :: Mud Tank::. : Guide Rod- Clamp? ? Ram ? Load Transducer ~ Model Footing Detailed Sketch of B Figure 2. Schematic (Side View) of Displacement Controlled Test Set-up. second... generalized bearing capacity factor, versus Z/B. Typical results are presented in Figures 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20. Plots of all analyzed test data are presented in Appendix I. 41 5 G 4 V/S = IKS V/B = OPS 0 0 Figure 16. Analyzed Data for 1-inch...

  7. A study conducted on laterally loaded cylindrical footings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Kenneth Joseph

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies have also been used to analyze the resistance (g) to overturning. R. C. Rutledge developed a nomograph that can be used to find the depth of embedment necessary to withstand applied loads. The chart is based on the results of a series of full... as compared to the diameters of concrete footings of comparable depth. Full-scale test results have also been reported by F. E. Behn( and by Nelson, Nahoney and Fryrear 10) Theory by Reese L. C. Reese studied the ultimate resistance againsr. a rigid (11...

  8. Prediction of sinkage depth of footings on soft marine sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Shihchieh

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    91. 0 91. 0 91. 2 90. 9 90. 9 90. 9 90. 4 90. 6 90. 3 90. 8 91. 5 91. 4 91. 0 91. 3 Su was determined by a miniature vane rotating at 0. 0143 radians per second 30 Table 4. Soil Properties for 4-inch Diameter Footing Tests V/B Dia.... 7 0. 008 105. 7 34. 7 90. 9 103. 9 40. 0 91. 3 * Su was determined by a miniature vane rotating at 0. 0143 radians per second. one of these tests is shown in Figure 12. In comparison to the dead weight test results (Figure 13), the load versus...

  9. Member Benefits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & GasTechnicalMeeting with EarthJustice RegardingMember Benefits

  10. The Effect of Marketing Messages, Liquidity Constraints, and Household Bargaining on Willingness to Pay for a Nontraditional Cook-stove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltramo, Theresa; Levine, David I; Blalock, Garrick

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rural households are on average poorer than urban counterparts and have low rates of electrification-

  11. Dual Predictive Control of Electrically Stimulated Muscle using Biofeedback for Drop Foot Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    artificially generate action potential in the place of central nervous system (CNS) for inducing muscle) is one of the solutions for drop foot correction. Conventional ES systems deliver prede- fined to adequately dorsiflex or lift the foot. It is associated with a variety of conditions such as stroke, spinal

  12. Tube foot preservation in the Devonian crinoid Codiacrinus from the Lower Devonian Hunsruck Slate, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammer, Thomas

    Tube foot preservation in the Devonian crinoid Codiacrinus from the Lower Devonian Hunsruck Slate.W. 2013: Tube foot preservation in the Devonian crinoid Codiacrinus from the Lower Devonian Hunsruck Slate Follmann from the Lower Devonian Hunsruck Slate of Germany. This is the first definitive proof of tube feet

  13. An Ankle-Foot Emulation System for the Study of Human Walking Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    and a prosthesis is one of the main obstacles in the development of a biomimetic ankle-foot prosthesis that the emulator may provide a more natural gait than a conventional passive prosthesis. Index Terms ­ Below-knee prosthesis, biomechanics, force control, biomimetic, ankle-foot emulator I. INTRODUCTION Although

  14. An Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Emulator with Control of Plantarflexion and Inversion-Eversion Torques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven H.

    An Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Emulator with Control of Plantarflexion and Inversion-Eversion Torques-foot prosthesis with two independently-actuated toes that are coordinated to provide plantarflexion and inversion prosthesis features. A similar morphology may be effective for autonomous devices. I. INTRODUCTION Robotic

  15. Development of a three-dimensional finite element model of a horse's foot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanft, Joseph Thomas

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The horse's foot, defined as the hoof wall and all the structures within it, is subjected to intense load-bearing and energy-absorbing demands. The foot is actually a complex assembly of components that deform as they support loads and absorb energy...

  16. Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    Nanomolding Based Fabrication of Synthetic Gecko Foot-Hairs Metin Sitti and Ronald S. Fearing Dept- This paper proposes two different nanomolding methods to fabricate synthetic gecko foot-hair nanostructures a nano-pore membrane as a template. These templates are molded with silicone rubber, polyamide

  17. Faculty Member Complete the Paid Parental Leave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Faculty Member Complete the Paid Parental Leave (PPL) Request Form Human Resources Evaluate determination notice to the employee with copies to the department Enroll faculty member in the PPL Leave Plan and endorse the faculty member's PPL Request Form Review contingency planning and forward supporting rationale

  18. IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine52 1070-9932/08/$25.002008 IEEE SEPTEMBER 2008 Ankle-Foot Prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    -Foot Prosthesis T he loss of a limb is a major disability. Unfortunately, today's prosthetic technol- ogy prosthesis [15], [19], [20]. With current actuator technology, it is challenging to build an ankle-foot prosthesis that matches the size and weight of the human ankle-foot complex but still provides sufficient

  19. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRAC.'' In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an unseated'' configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type Q'' septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using LabView'' software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  20. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, ``TRAC.`` In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an ``unseated`` configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type ``Q`` septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using ``LabView`` software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  1. Pollak and Wachter on the Household Production Function Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, William A.

    1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ith commodity. As Pollak and Wachter have observed, much of the appeal of the commodity shadow-price approach lies in its ability to use functions having known neoclassical properties. However, Pollak and Wachter maintain that, if the constraint 7r(P...). But the commodity shadow prices 7r(P, Z) do depend upon Z whenever house- hold production exhibits jointness, which Pollak and Wachter maintain is inherently characteristic of household production processes. Hence 1 Pollack and Wachter have considered...

  2. Essays on Price Dynamics, Welfare Analysis, Household Food Insecurity in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magana Lemus, David

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher and more volatile food prices, as reported in recent years, have consequences on household welfare and potentially on public policy. Analysis of agricultural commodities price dynamics, welfare ...

  3. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    household GDP is corrected for Purchase Power Parity (PPP).The PPP factor adjusts currency market exchange rates (MER)20% for countries with average PPP adjusted incomes below $

  4. Testing Electric Vehicle Demand in "Hybrid Households" Using a Reflexive Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurani, Kenneth S.; Turrentine, Thomas; Sperling, Daniel

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast to a hybrid vehicle whichcombines multipleor 180 mile hybrid electric vehicle. Natural gas vehicles (1994) "Demand Electric Vehicles in Hybrid for Households:

  5. Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in geographic location, socioeconomics and household income.

  6. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  7. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than...

  8. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, S; Berube, A; Deakin, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in 10 Household Automobile Ownership Rates:hauseltoldr lacking automobiles were mmit like! ) to be leftWithout 3 Access to an Automobile. Top Ten Metropolitan

  9. Interagency Energy Management Task Force Members

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Energy Management Task Force is led by the Federal Energy Management Program director. Members include energy and sustainability managers from federal agencies.

  10. Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE, and Weizhen Mao, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Weizhen

    nodes with much larger permanent storage (e.g., flash memory) and more battery power can be deployed-by-hop relay of other sensor nodes, the problem of limited storage, com- munication capacity, and battery power1 Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE

  11. Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Samuel K. Au, Hugh Herr, Jeff Weber, and Ernesto C. Martinez-Villalpando

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis for the Improvement of Amputee Ambulation Samuel K. Au, Hugh Herr, control scheme, and clinical evaluation of a novel, motorized ankle-foot prosthesis, called MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis. Unlike a conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prosthesis, this prosthesis can

  12. Powered ankle-foot prosthesis for the improvement of amputee walking economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Au, Samuel Kwok-Wai

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The human ankle provides a significant amount of net positive work during the stance period of walking, especially at moderate to fast walking speeds. On the contrary, conventional ankle-foot prostheses are completely ...

  13. Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez Villalpando, Ernesto Carlos

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercially available ankle-foot prostheses are passive when in contact with the ground surface, and thus, their mechanical properties remain fixed across different terrains and walking speeds. The passive nature of these ...

  14. Informing Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Prescription through Haptic Emulation of Candidate Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven H.

    Informing Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Prescription through Haptic Emulation of Candidate Devices Joshua M using a haptic prosthesis emulator while their walking performance is quantitatively assessed and results are distilled to inform device prescription. In this emulator system, prosthesis behavior

  15. Control of a Powered Ankle–Foot Prosthesis Based on a Neuromuscular Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Hartmut

    Control schemes for powered ankle-foot prostheses rely upon fixed torque-ankle state relationships obtained from measurements of intact humans walking at target speeds and across known terrains. Although effective at their ...

  16. A neuromuscular-model based control strategy for powered ankle-foot prostheses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eilenberg, Michael Frederick

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the development of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis, it is desirable to provide the prosthesis with the ability to exhibit human-like dynamics. A simple method for achieving this goal involves trajectory tracking, where ...

  17. asian foot-and-mouth disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

  18. attenuated foot-and-mouth disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

  19. assess foot-and-mouth disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: Modelling the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus F Moutou B Durand CNEVA, Laboratoire Central-and-mouth disease is an economically important viral...

  20. Improving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recommen- dations on how to reduce the overall energy consumption of the household. In this paper, we build Descriptors H.4 [Information Systems Applications]: Miscellaneous 1. INTRODUCTION The energy sectorImproving Device-level Electricity Consumption Breakdowns in Private Households Using ON/OFF Events

  1. Changing household behaviors to curb climate change: How hard can it be? Shahzeen Z. Attaria,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    efforts to reduce household energy consumption. As part of a recent national survey on public perceptions: E-mail: shahzeen.attari@gmail.com #12;The residential sector contributes over 20% of energy reduce household energy consumption by nearly 30%. Examples include tuning up the car twice a year

  2. Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be made from any carbonaceous feedstock, including natural gas, coal, or biomass, using establishedDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

  3. UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diallo, Ibrahima

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE By © 2013 IBRAHIMA DIALLO Submitted to the graduate degree program in Economics and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... version of the following dissertation: UNCOVERING BASIC WANTS USING THE ROTTERDAM AND AIDS MODELS: THE US HOUSEHOLD ENERGY CONSUMPTION CASE ________________________________ (Chairperson) William A. Barnett Date...

  4. Frequency and longitudinal trends of household care product use Rebecca E. Moran a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    SUPERB Indoor environment d-limonene a b s t r a c t The use of household cleaning products and air infiltrating to the indoor environment to form potentially toxic secondary pollutants. Although realistic, frequencies of use of eight types of household cleaning products and air fresheners and the performance

  5. Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Robert T.

    Deforestation and Cattle Ranching in the Brazilian Amazon: External Capital and Household Processes decomposes recent deforestation in four study areas in the Brazilian Amazon into components associated deforestation with respect to the proximate causes of their farming systems, and the household drivers

  6. Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Timothy Lee

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................................................................................................... 47 7 Significance Levels of Variables in Each Model......................................... 49 A-1 Example of Household Data File Format (Laredo) ..................................... 60 A...-2 Example of Household Data File Format Codes (Laredo) .......................... 62 A-3 Example of Person Data File Format (Laredo)............................................ 63 A-4 Example...

  7. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  8. Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Passive sampling methods to determine household and personal care product use DEBORAH H. BENNETTa, cleaning products, passive sampling, SUPERB, longitudinal. Introduction Personal care and household care products, such as cleaning products and pesticides, are frequently used in most house- holds although

  9. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation's aftermath concerned the size and composition of the area's populations that lacked access to an automobile for all U.S. metropolitan areas that reside in a household without access to an automobile. Finally, we

  10. Household- and Market-Level Perspectives on the Peter Pan Peanut Butter Recall Using Nielsen Homescan Panel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhtavoryan, Rafael

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Using household level scanner data for 2006, 2007, and 2008, this dissertation consists of four studies, which present household- and market-level analyses of food safety issues concerning the 2007 Peter Pan recall on the demand for peanut butter...

  11. "Certainly the Proper Business of Woman": Household and Estate Management Techniques of Eighteenth-Century French Noblewomen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utech, Sally

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This project explores the legal, economic, and social aspects of household and estate management in eighteenth-century France. It investigates two paradoxes surrounding noblewomen and household management. The first involves ...

  12. Modeling household adoption of earthquake hazard adjustments: a longitudinal panel study of Southern California and Western Washington residents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlikatti, Sudha S

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research, aimed at advancing the theory of environmental hazard adjustment processes by contrasting households from three cities in a high seismic hazard area with households from three other cities in a moderate ...

  13. Load Component Database of Household Appliances and Small Office Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Xie, YuLong; Huang, Zhenyu; Puyleart, Francis; Yang, Steve

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the development of a load component database for household appliances and office equipment. To develop more accurate load models at both transmission and distribution level, a better understanding on the individual behaviors of home appliances and office equipment under power system voltage and frequency variations becomes more and more critical. Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has begun a series of voltage and frequency tests against home appliances and office equipments since 2005. Since 2006, Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has collaborated with BPA personnel and developed a load component database based on these appliance testing results to facilitate the load model validation work for the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). In this paper, the testing procedure and testing results are first presented. The load model parameters are then derived and grouped. Recommendations are given for aggregating the individual appliance models to feeder level, the models of which are used for distribution and transmission level studies.

  14. Spatial Distribution of U.S. Household Carbon Footprints Reveals Suburbanization Undermines Greenhouse Gas Benefits of Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    with predominantly coal-fired electricity.10 Income, household size, and social factors have been shown to affect

  15. Minnesota Member Lists the Twin Cities' First Energy Fit Certified...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    upgraded the 1,774-square-foot house, built in 1952, with a high-efficiency furnace and water heater, attic insulation, and energy-efficient lighting to earn the program's Energy...

  16. Patterns of Stove Usage after Introduction of an Advanced Cookstove: The Long-Term Application of Household Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT: Household air pollution generated from solid fuel use for cooking is one of the leading risk% of households rely on solid fuelsincluding wood, dung, grass, coal, and crop residues for cooking.1 The 2010 of Household Sensors Ajay Pillarisetti,*, Mayur Vaswani, Darby Jack,§ Kalpana Balakrishnan, Michael N. Bates

  17. STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE OF DEGRADED REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Miller, C.A.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.

    2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a study to evaluate, in probabilistic terms, the effects of age-related degradation on the structural performance of reinforced concrete members at nuclear power plants. The paper focuses on degradation of reinforced concrete flexural members and shear walls due to the loss of steel reinforcing area and loss of concrete area (cracking/spalling). Loss of steel area is typically caused by corrosion while cracking and spalling can be caused by corrosion of reinforcing steel, freeze-thaw, or aggressive chemical attack. Structural performance in the presence of uncertainties is depicted by a fragility (or conditional probability of failure). The effects of degradation on the fragility of reinforced concrete members are calculated to assess the potential significance of various levels of degradation. The fragility modeling procedures applied to degraded concrete members can be used to assess the effects of degradation on plant risk and can lead to the development of probability-based degradation acceptance limits.

  18. Elastomeric member for energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI); Chute, Richard (Birmingham, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16), disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, transition end sections, and is attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). During manufacture, woven wire mesh sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle. Each sleeve (26, 28) contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween.

  19. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  20. Experimental study on hydrodynamic forces acting on an oscillating column with circular footing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshino, Kunihiro; Sato, Hiroshi [Ministry of Transport, Mitaka (Japan). Ship Research Inst.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the in-line and lift forces acting on an oscillating column with circular footing. Forced surging tests were carried out using a column with circular footing of which ratio of diameter was varied from 1.25 to 2.5. The in-line and lift force have been measured concerning both the whole model and the parts of column and footing. The drag coefficients, inertia coefficients, coefficients of root-mean-square values of the in-line force and lift force coefficients in the range of Keulegan Carpenter number from 5 to 30 have been obtained. Those results have been compared with that of a straight finite length circular cylinder.

  1. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the next 20-30 years as China builds large quantity ofof power generation in China from 0.230 in 2003 to 0.164 kgHousehold Appliances in China Jiang Lin Environmental Energy

  2. 34 Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household, growing up in north-west Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 34 Length of track 1 hour 12 minutes Title of track Pauline Kristiansen – life in the household...

  3. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with three or more vehicles grew from 2% in 1960 to nearly 20% in 2010. Before 1990, the most common number of vehicles per household was one, but since 1990, the most...

  4. Monitoring effective use of household water treatment and safe storage technologies in Ethiopia and Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Matthew M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household water treatment and storage (HWTS) technologies dissemination is beginning to scale-up to reach the almost 900 million people without access to an improved water supply (WHO/UNICEF/JMP, 2008). Without well-informed ...

  5. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Household Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.

    1997-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Household wastewater treatment systems (septic systems) can contaminate ground water unless they are properly designed, constructed and maintained. This publication describes various kinds of systems and guides the homeowner in assessing...

  6. Distributional Impacts of Carbon Pricing: A General Equilibrium Approach with Micro-Data for Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausch, Sebastian

    Many policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions have at their core efforts to put a price on carbon emissions. Carbon pricing impacts households both by raising the cost of carbon intensive products and by changing factor ...

  7. Household water treatment and safe storage options for Northern Region Ghana : consumer preference and relative cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Vanessa (Vanessa Layton)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products are available in Northern Region Ghana which have the potential to significantly improve local drinking water quality. However, to date, the region has ...

  8. MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    MODELING/GIS, RISK ASSESSMENT, ECONOMIC IMPACT Household Model of Chagas Disease Vectors (Hemiptera vectors (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) of the causative parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida bitten by infected insect vectors. There are 130 species in the subfamily Triatominae (Hemiptera

  9. Reconstituting Lives: Somali Women's Efforts to Reformulate Household and Community Values in Kansas City, Missouri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippi-Franz, Melissa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research addresses what Somali women living in Kansas City, Missouri do to assist their households and communities to come to terms with the consequences of forced migration. Women's contributions to wellbeing are found ...

  10. Towards Practical and Grounded Knowledge Representation Systems for Autonomous Household Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Moritz Tenorth, Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous Systems, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen {tenorth, beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract-- Mobile household robots need much knowledge about objects, places

  11. Multi-functional foot use during running in the zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Li; S. Tonia Hsieh; Daniel I. Goldman

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A diversity of animals that run on solid, level, flat, non-slip surfaces appear to bounce on their legs; elastic elements in the limbs can store and return energy during each step. The mechanics and energetics of running in natural terrain, particularly on surfaces that can yield and flow under stress, is less understood. The zebra-tailed lizard (Callisaurus draconoides), a small desert generalist with a large, elongate, tendinous hind foot, runs rapidly across a variety of natural substrates. We use high speed video to obtain detailed three-dimensional running kinematics on solid and granular surfaces to reveal how leg, foot, and substrate mechanics contribute to its high locomotor performance. Running at ~10 body length/s (~1 m/s), the center of mass oscillates like a spring-mass system on both substrates, with only 15% reduction in stride length on the granular surface. On the solid surface, a strut-spring model of the hind limb reveals that the hind foot saves about 40% of the mechanical work needed per step, significant for the lizard's small size. On the granular surface, a penetration force model and hypothesized subsurface foot rotation indicates that the hind foot paddles through fluidized granular medium, and that the energy lost per step during irreversible deformation of the substrate does not differ from the reduction in the mechanical energy of the center of mass. The upper hind leg muscles must perform three times as much mechanical work on the granular surface as on the solid surface to compensate for the greater energy lost within the foot and to the substrate.

  12. The effects of cash cropping on household expediture patterns in rural Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Fred Ken

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the hypotheses tested from the general problem statement is in order. The first hypothesis tested was that the average total expenditure for both commercial and send. -subsistence households are the same. Given that total expenditures are regarded as a proxy.... , University of Zambia at Lusaka Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Carl E. Shafer The aims of the study are to determine significant differences in the patterns and levels of expenditure by semi-subsistence and commercial farm households in rural Kenya...

  13. The Determinants of Homeonwership in Presence of Shocks Experienced by Mexican Households

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Cabrera, Jesus Antonio 1977-

    2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of a death of household head. Death changes the economic and social face of a family, but the effect is usually less widespread than natural disasters. Juarez Torres (2010) examines the household capacity to recovery from shocks based... DEDICATION To my Lord, for showing me patience and love. To my wife, Miriam Juarez Torres, because your amazing love enlighten my road. Thank you for each prayer and words you gave me. To my kids, Emilio Lopez Juarez and Lilian Helena Lopez Juarez...

  14. Household income pooling and the demand for food: does family financial structure matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perusquia Corres, Ernesto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2006 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics HOUSEHOLD INCOME POOLING AND THE DEMAND FOR FOOD: DOES FAMILY FINANCIAL STRUCTURE MATTER? A Dissertation by ERNESTO PERUSQUIA CORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  15. A study of the design criteria for drilled-and-belled footings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Clark Thomas

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED?AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis Clark Thomas Lehmann Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964... Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED-AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis By Clark Thomas Lehmann Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommittee Head ep tment Nay, 1964 4 0 0 N F 5 O ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  16. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 25, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2009 51 Powered AnkleFoot Prosthesis Improves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS, VOL. 25, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2009 51 Powered Ankle­Foot Prosthesis, we evaluate the hypothesis that a powered ankle­foot prosthesis, capa- ble of providing human to a conventional passive-elastic prosthesis. To test the hypothesis, a powered prosthesis is built that comprises

  17. Wireless Technology in Industrial Networks Andreas Willig, Member, IEEE, Kirsten Matheus, Member, IEEE, Adam Wolisz, Senior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    of existing wireless technologies for this specific field of applications, and iii) the creation of hybrid1 Wireless Technology in Industrial Networks Andreas Willig, Member, IEEE, Kirsten Matheus, Member), pp. 1130-1151 Abstract With the success of wireless technologies in consumer electronics, standard

  18. E cient Retiming of Large Circuits Naresh Maheshwari, Student Member, IEEE, and Sachin Sapatnekar, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    , Member, IEEE Abstract| Retiming, introduced by Leiserson and Saxe, is a powerful transformation1 E cient Retiming of Large Circuits Naresh Maheshwari, Student Member, IEEE, and Sachin Sapatnekar not capable of handling large circuits in a reasonable time. This work de nes the relationship be- tween

  19. Color Imaging for Multimedia GAURAV SHARMA, MEMBER, IEEE, MICHAEL J. VRHEL, MEMBER, IEEE, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Gaurav

    Color Imaging for Multimedia GAURAV SHARMA, MEMBER, IEEE, MICHAEL J. VRHEL, MEMBER, IEEE, AND H. JOEL TRUSSELL, FELLOW, IEEE To a significant degree, multimedia applications derive their effectiveness-based multimedia systems have grown from their humble beginnings into systems that truly allow the integration

  20. Security Games for Vehicular Networks Tansu Alpcan, Member, IEEE, and Sonja Buchegger, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Ray

    . The effectiveness of the security game solutions is evaluated numerically using realistic simulation data obtainedSecurity Games for Vehicular Networks Tansu Alpcan, Member, IEEE, and Sonja Buchegger, Member, IEEE Abstract--Vehicular networks (VANETs) can be used to improve transportation security, reliability

  1. Overview of CFC replacement issues for household refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vineyard, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Roke, L. [Fisher and Paykel, Auckland (New Zealand); Hallett, F. [Frigidaire, Washington, DC (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the famous ozone depletion theory of Rowland and Molina claimed that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) diffuse into the stratosphere where they are broken down by photolysis to release chlorine atoms that catalytically destroy ozone. Although the understanding of the science is still imperfect, there is little doubt that CFCs play a major role in the Antarctic ozone hole phenomenon and the decline in ozone observed in the rest of the world. Another issue that has become increasingly important is the potential of CFCs to change the earth`s temperature and to modify the climate. While the main impact in global warming is made by increased concentrations of carbon dioxide, CFCs and other trace gases also contribute to this effect. In an effort to respond to the global environmental threat, a CFC protocol was adopted during a diplomatic conference in Montreal. This document, known as the Montreal Protocol, was ratified in 1988 and put into effect on January 1, 1989. In accordance with Article 6 of the Montreal Protocol, the countries that signed the agreement shall periodically assess the control measures provided for in the Protocol. As part of that assessment process, household refrigeration was investigated to determine the status of CFC-12 replacements. The conclusion was that much progress has been made towards finding a suitable replacement. Compressors designed for HFC-134a have efficiencies comparable to those for CFC-12 and acceptable reliability tests have been obtained with ester lubricants. In addition, other replacements such as R-152a and refrigerant mixtures exist, but will require more study. Cycle options, such as the Stirling cycle, may be viable, but are further out in the future. The impact of new refrigerants is expected to result in elimination of CFC-12 consumption in developed countries by 1997 and in developing countries by 2005.

  2. Texas 4-H Member Achievement Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepley, Toby

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Member Achievement Plan (M.A.P.) provides 4-Hers with forms and journal pages to help them plan their 4-H projects, set goals and evaluate their accomplishments. Using this will help teach record-keeping skills. It is part of the new "For...

  3. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  4. Who are the members of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    are the members of your research team? The outcomes of clinical research affect much of adult who may not be ableMatch.org Opportunities for research volunteers The NIH Clinical Center Volunteers FirstNews and Information from the NIH Clinical Research Volunteer Program Winter 2011 Dr. John I. Gallin, CC director (second, from left

  5. Balfour Library Guide Members of other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balfour Library Guide for Members of other Departments in the University (e.g. postgraduate, post times 3 Out of hours access 3 Contact details 3 Library facilities 3 Computers 3 Use of laptops, using LibrarySearch 6 Classification of books in the Balfour Library 6 Loan periods 7 Registration

  6. Elastomeric member and method of manufacture therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  7. Service Members Aim High-- for Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Service members are helping reduce our dependency on oil, and saving taxpayers' money, with their energy-saving efforts. Operation Change Out has cut $26.3 million in total energy costs and helped prevent more than 396 lbs. of carbon dioxide.

  8. IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: LightFoot PhD A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV Overhead Lines with Non-Ideal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Alan

    IMPEE PhD Opportunity Project title: LightFoot PhD ­ A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV.swingler@hw.ac.uk Abstract LightFoot PhD ­ A PhD Investigation Lightning Protection of HV Overhead Lines with Non-Ideal Tower Footing Resistance funded by SSE. The LightFoot PhD project takes a fresh approach at adding

  9. Driving Low-Power Wearable Systems with an Adaptively-Controlled Foot-Strike Scavenging Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    as a means to scavenge energy from foot-strikes and power wearable systems. While they exhibit large energy densities, DEs must be closely controlled to maximize the energy they transduce. Towards this end, we propose a DE micro-generator array configuration that enhances transduc- tion efficiency, and the use

  10. Flat-Foot Dynamic Walking via Human-Inspired Controller Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Wenlong

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a torque control scheme unifying feedback PD control and feed-forward impedance control to realize human-inspired walking on a novel planar footed bipedal robot: AMBER2. It starts with high fidelity modeling of the robot...

  11. A study of factors affecting foot movement time in a braking maneuver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berman, Andrea Helene

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of foot movement time (MT) in an actual braking maneuver and in a stationary vehicle was investigated regarding the effects of age and gender of the driver and nature of the stimulus to which the driver was responding. ANOVAs showed...

  12. The high-foot implosion campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurricane, O. A., E-mail: hurricane1@llnl.gov; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kervin, P.; Pape, S. Le; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); and others

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The “High-Foot” platform manipulates the laser pulse-shape coming from the National Ignition Facility laser to create an indirect drive 3-shock implosion that is significantly more robust against instability growth involving the ablator and also modestly reduces implosion convergence ratio. This strategy gives up on theoretical high-gain in an inertial confinement fusion implosion in order to obtain better control of the implosion and bring experimental performance in-line with calculated performance, yet keeps the absolute capsule performance relatively high. In this paper, we will cover the various experimental and theoretical motivations for the high-foot drive as well as cover the experimental results that have come out of the high-foot experimental campaign. At the time of this writing, the high-foot implosion has demonstrated record total deuterium-tritium yields (9.3×10{sup 15}) with low levels of inferred mix, excellent agreement with implosion simulations, fuel energy gains exceeding unity, and evidence for the “bootstrapping” associated with alpha-particle self-heating.

  13. Managed Lane Choices by Carpools Comprised of Family Members Compared to Non-family Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pannu, Mandeep S.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Turnbull Head of Department, Mark Burris December 2009 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Managed Lane Choices by Carpools Comprised of Family Members Compared to Non- Family Members. (December 2009) Mandeep Singh Pannu, B..., Maryland; Boston; Minneapolis; New Jersey Turnpike; New York City; Portland; Ottawa, Ontario; Memphis; Nashville; Dallas; Northern Virginia; Norfolk/Virginia Beach; Seattle; Houston; and numerous California counties (HOV Systems Manual, 1998; Stockton...

  14. Housing deficits as a frame for housing policy: Demographic change, economic crisis and household formation in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monkkonen, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    states passion for social housing. Vanguard Nigeria. Asianto help expand access to housing in Indonesia. Manila: PressThe transformation of housing and household structures in

  15. Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

  16. Development of the household sample for furnace and boilerlife-cycle cost analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Franco, Victor; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, Jim

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential household space heating energy use comprises close to half of all residential energy consumption. Currently, average space heating use by household is 43.9 Mbtu for a year. An average, however, does not reflect regional variation in heating practices, energy costs, or fuel type. Indeed, a national average does not capture regional or consumer group cost impacts from changing efficiency levels of heating equipment. The US Department of Energy sets energy standards for residential appliances in, what is called, a rulemaking process. The residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking process investigates the costs and benefits of possible updates to the current minimum efficiency regulations. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) selected the sample used in the residential furnace and boiler efficiency rulemaking from publically available data representing United States residences. The sample represents 107 million households in the country. The data sample provides the household energy consumption and energy price inputs to the life-cycle cost analysis segment of the furnace and boiler rulemaking. This paper describes the choice of criteria to select the sample of houses used in the rulemaking process. The process of data extraction is detailed in the appendices and is easily duplicated. The life-cycle cost is calculated in two ways with a household marginal energy price and a national average energy price. The LCC results show that using an national average energy price produces higher LCC savings but does not reflect regional differences in energy price.

  17. Approaches to Creating and Controlling Motion in MRI Gregory S. Fischer, Member, IEEE, Gregory Cole, Student Member, IEEE and Hao Su, Student Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camesano, Terri

    Approaches to Creating and Controlling Motion in MRI Gregory S. Fischer, Member, IEEE, Gregory Cole, Student Member, IEEE and Hao Su, Student Member, IEEE Abstract-- Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can is complicated by factors including: the high magnetic field strength, the requirement that such devices should

  18. On the Capacity of k-MPR Wireless Networks Ming-Fei Guo, Member, IEEE, Xinbing Wang, Member, IEEE, Min-You Wu, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    1 On the Capacity of k-MPR Wireless Networks Ming-Fei Guo, Member, IEEE, Xinbing Wang, Member, IEEE, Min-You Wu, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The capacity of wireless ad hoc networks is mainly the capacity of 2-D wireless networks wherein each node can decode at most k simultaneous transmis- sions

  19. University of California, Davis Institutional Review Board Committee Members IRB Number or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    ; Alternate Member D Scientific A; D Brian Gallay PhD, MD Scientific Affiliated Member A; Alternate Member D

  20. NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Program: Extending Energy Efficiency Financing To Underserved Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York legislature passed the Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY) Act in 2009. Administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), GJGNY programs provide New Yorkers with access to free or low-cost energy assessments,1 energy upgrade services,2 low-cost financing, and training for various 'green-collar' careers. Launched in November 2010, GJGNY's residential initiative is notable for its use of novel underwriting criteria to expand access to energy efficiency financing for households seeking to participate in New York's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program.3 The GJGNY financing program is a valuable test of whether alternatives to credit scores can be used to responsibly expand credit opportunities for households that do not qualify for traditional lending products and, in doing so, enable more households to make energy efficiency upgrades.

  1. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o J0

  2. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o J01

  3. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o J012

  4. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o

  5. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o4

  6. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o45

  7. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o456

  8. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1 U.S. Department of Energygasoline4 Space2.9 Home72 Home8* j o n p o4569

  9. Theme 1 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth'sConnect,LLCStartup America1 Members

  10. Theme 2 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth'sConnect,LLCStartup America1 Members2

  11. Theme 3 Members | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in the Earth'sConnect,LLCStartup America1 Members23

  12. Cumberland Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWing County,Electric Coop,Cumberland Elec Member

  13. Comparative Cost Analysis of Alternative Animal Tracing Strategies Directed Toward Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Looney, John C.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the industry impact of a hypothetical Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the Texas High Plains using alternative animal tracing levels. To accomplish this objective, an epidemiological disease...

  14. Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger; BOUCQ, Elise; MADRE, Jean-Loup; HIVERT, Laurent.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Long Term Dynamics of Inequalities between French Households concerning Automobile COLLET, Roger TERM DYNAMICS OF INEQUALITIES BETWEEN FRENCH HOUSEHOLDS CONCERNING AUTOMOBILE Roger Collet, INRETS of automobile. As the curves representing car ownership (number of cars per adult) and car use (annual mileage

  15. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  16. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dovichi, Norman J. (Edmonton, CA); Zhang, Jian Z. (Edmonton, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  17. Development of the Robotic Touch foot Sensor for 2D walking Robot, for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hunwoo

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the Robotic Touch foot Sensor for 2D walking Robot, for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion By HUNWOO LEE Submitted to the graduate degree program in Mechanical Engineering and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... ________________________________ Professor Robert Umholtz Date Defended: June 5, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for HUNWOO LEE certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: Development of the Robotic Touch Foot Sensor for 2D Walking Robot...

  18. Networking Call for Residential Network Members Peer Exchange...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Networking Call for Residential Network Members Peer Exchange Call Networking Call for Residential Network Members Peer Exchange Call March 12, 2015 12:30PM to 2:0...

  19. NEJC Board Member Receives 2015 National Planning Excellence Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Environmental Justice Conference, Inc. Board of Directors Member Receives American Planning Association 2015 National Planning Excellence Award

  20. NOAA Committee Memberships, 2004-2008 Eddie N. Bernard, Member, NOAA Tsunami Program Team, 2005-present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Koehn, Member, NOAA Science, Technology, and Infusion Program Team, 2003-2005 Mark P. Koehn, Member

  1. Assessing the Interaction between Real Estate and Equity in Households Portfolio Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that households taking positions in one asset (home or stock) encounter a positive position in the other asset considering their stock market participation and home tenure choices. There is already a huge body of literature on housing status (own/rent) decisions and many contributions doc- umented the low stock market

  2. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past years the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed an econometric model that predicts appliance ownership at the household level based on macroeconomic variables such as household income (corrected for purchase power parity), electrification, urbanization and climate variables. Hundreds of data points from around the world were collected in order to understand trends in acquisition of new appliances by households, especially in developing countries. The appliances covered by this model are refrigerators, lighting fixtures, air conditioners, washing machines and televisions. The approach followed allows the modeler to construct a bottom-up analysis based at the end use and the household level. It captures the appliance uptake and the saturation effect which will affect the energy demand growth in the residential sector. With this approach, the modeler can also account for stock changes in technology and efficiency as a function of time. This serves two important functions with regard to evaluation of the impact of energy efficiency policies. First, it provides insight into which end uses will be responsible for the largest share of demand growth, and therefore should be policy priorities. Second, it provides a characterization of the rate at which policies affecting new equipment penetrate the appliance stock. Over the past 3 years, this method has been used to support the development of energy demand forecasts at the country, region or global level.

  3. Finding the creatures of habit; Clustering households based on their flexibility in using electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    electricity Ian Dent, Uwe Aickelin and Tom Rodden School of Computer Science University of Nottingham, UK, AB15 8QH tony.craig@hutton.ac.uk ABSTRACT Changes in the UK electricity market, particularly to change households' electricity usage patterns for the benefit of the overall sys- tem. Users show

  4. Applications of demand analysis for the dairy industry using household scanner data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockton, Matthew C.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of the represented cities. 9 Table 2. Percent of Households by Region Region Percent East 20.3 West 20.0 South 34.3 Central 25.3 The scanner information was collected by date of purchase and included only those panelist that purchased...

  5. Journal: Ecological Applications1 Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus fluxes in household ecosystems in the3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    with several29 components of household activities including air and motor vehicle travel, food consumption,30 home energy use, landscape, pets, and paper and plastic use for 360 owner-occupied, stand-alone31 vehicle transportation, together with home energy use, accounted for 85% of total C33 consumption

  6. Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 30 (2002) 815­826 Evaluating the health benefits of transitions in household energy School of Public Policy and Energy and Resources Group (ERG), 310 Barrows Hall, University of California in disease from a range of interventions, including changes in energy technology (stove or fuel) and cooking

  7. DETERMINANTS OF HOUSEHOLD PARTICIPATION IN WATER SOURCE MANAGEMENT: ACHEFER, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , ETHIOPIA A Thesis Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Cornell University In Partial in Ethiopia are among the lowest in Sub-Saharan Africa. While governmental and non- governmental organizations out involving 16 water supply systems and 160 households within Achefer area, in Amhara, Ethiopia

  8. HOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the dynamic variation in wholesale energy costs. This can be accomplished by letting retail prices varyHOUSEHOLD RESPONSE TO DYNAMIC PRICING OF ELECTRICITY A SURVEY OF SEVENTEEN PRICING EXPERIMENTS Ahmad Faruqui and Sanem Sergici1 November 13, 2008 Since the energy crisis disrupted markets

  9. Reforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Catherine Waddams Price

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    final energy prices (though those of monopoly inputs such as transmission and distribution remainReforming Household Energy Markets: Some Welfare Effects in the United Kingdom by Catherine Waddams Price Centre for Competition and Regulation and School of Management University of East Anglia, UK

  10. Derived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    a greater frequency of shortages in exchange for reduced water bills Howe and Smith 1994 . Relatively little, investments in water supply reliability enhancement can alter the frequency of all shortage levels soDerived Willingness-to-Pay for Household Water Use with Price and Probabilistic Supply Roberto

  11. Household Vehicle Ownership by Vehicle Type: Application of a Multivariate Negative Binomial Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    related to household size, income, population density (of zone of residence), and vehicle prices 1970's and early 1980's. Continual improvements in computation power permit more rigorous statistical to new energy issues and a focus on global warming policies, renewed consideration should be given

  12. Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are domestic load profiles stable over time? An attempt to identify target households for demand Bamberg, Germany Email: thorsten.staake@uni-bamberg.de Abstract--Elaborating demand side management future demand side will largely depend on an automatic control of larger loads, it is also widely agreed

  13. Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , energy management, smart home, energy efficiency, thermostat strategy, heating setback Corresponding, a heating control system may require some time to heat a home to a comfortable temperature after itsPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

  14. Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin Muller and Michael Beetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cremers, Daniel

    Towards a Plan Library for Household Robots Armin M¨uller and Michael Beetz Intelligent Autonomous {muellear,beetz}@cs.tum.edu Abstract This paper describes the structure for a plan library of a ser- vice (M¨uller, Kirsch, & Beetz 2007). This paper is about writing general, robust default plans

  15. THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    205 CHAPTER 11 THE HOUSEHOLD AS SECURITY: STRATEGIES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRANTS IN CHINA C. Cindy Fan and lack of economic opportunities on their own. Agriculture faces an uncertain future, so do peasant work in urban industries and services, the sectors of the Chinese economy characterized by poorly paid

  16. EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    EVOLUTION OF THE HOUSEHOLD VEHICLE FLEET: ANTICIPATING FLEET COMPOSITION, PHEV ADOPTION AND GHG evolution, vehicle ownership, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), climate change policy, stated preference, opinion survey, microsimulation ABSTRACT In todays world of volatile fuel prices and climate

  17. Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo

    Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE Blind system identification (BSI) is a fundamental signal processing technology aimed applications such as mobile communications, speech reverberation cancellation, and blind image restoration

  18. Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiencyof Household Appliances in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    China is already the second's largest energy consumer in the world after the United States, and its demand for energy is expected to continue to grow rapidly in the foreseeable future, due to its fast economic growth and its low level of energy use per capita. From 2001 to 2005, the growth rate of energy consumption in China has exceeded the growth rate of its economy (NBS, 2006), raising serious concerns about the consequences of such energy use on local environment and global climate. It is widely expected that China is likely to overtake the US in energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the first half of the 21st century. Therefore, there is considerable interest in the international community in searching for options that may help China slow down its growth in energy consumption and GHG emissions through improving energy efficiency and adopting more environmentally friendly fuel supplies such as renewable energy. This study examines the energy saving potential of three major residential energy end uses: household refrigeration, air-conditioning, and water heating. China is already the largest consumer market in the world for household appliances, and increasingly the global production base for consumer appliances. Sales of household refrigerators, room air-conditioners, and water heaters are growing rapidly due to rising incomes and booming housing market. At the same time, the energy use of Chinese appliances is relatively inefficient compared to similar products in the developed economies. Therefore, the potential for energy savings through improving appliance efficiency is substantial. This study focuses particularly on the impact of more stringent energy efficiency standards for household appliances, given that such policies are found to be very effective in improving the efficiency of household appliances, and are well established both in China and around world (CLASP, 2006).

  19. S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Richard

    S U P P L E M E N T A R T I C L E Determinants of Household Costs Associated With Childhood households. We used survey data from sites in Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan to estimate the costs borne by households due to childhood diarrhea, including direct medical costs, direct nonmedical costs

  20. Dual mode fuel injector with one piece needle valve member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Keith E. (Peoria, IL); Hinrichsen, Michael H. (Goodfield, IL); Buckman, Colby (Bellville, MI)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively by inner and outer needle value members. The homogenous charged nozzle outlet set is defined by an outer needle value member that is moveably positioned in an injector body, which defines the conventional nozzle outlet set. The inner needle valve member is positioned in the outer needle valve member. The outer needle valve member is a piece component that includes at least one external guide surface, an external value surface and an internal valve seat.

  1. Mixed mode fuel injector with individually moveable needle valve members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stewart, Chris; Chockley, Scott A.; Ibrahim, Daniel R.; Lawrence, Keith; Tomaseki, Jay; Azam, Junru H.; Tian, Steven Ye; Shafer, Scott F.

    2004-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set controlled respectively, by first and second needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position while the other needle valve member remains stationary for a homogeneous charge injection event. The former needle valve member stays stationary while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. One of the needle valve members is at least partially positioned in the other needle valve member. Thus, the injector can perform homogeneous charge injection events, conventional injection events, or even a mixed mode having both types of injection events in a single engine cycle.

  2. 1 Member Raoul Adamchak University of California Davis Agriculture Lecture 2 Member Jeffrey Amthor US DOE, Climate and Environmental Sceiences Div Agriculture Room A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corr Archer Daniels Midland Co. Energy Lecture 3 Member Matthew Frome Solazyme Energy Room B 4 Member

  3. Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography of the Foot in Critical Limb Ischemia: A New Dimension in Revascularization Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jens, Sjoerd, E-mail: s.jens@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands); Lucatelli, Pierleone, E-mail: pierleone.lucatelli@gmail.com ['Sapienza' University of Rome, Vascular and Interventional Radiology Unit, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Koelemay, Mark J. W., E-mail: m.j.koelemaij@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A., E-mail: h.a.marquering@amc.uva.nl; Reekers, Jim A., E-mail: j.a.reekers@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Netherlands)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the additional value of three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA) of the foot compared with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). Technique. For 3DRA, the C-arm was placed in the propeller position with the foot in an isocentric position. The patient's unaffected foot was positioned in a footrest outside the field of view. For correct timing of 3DRA, the delay from contrast injection in the popliteal artery at the level of knee joint to complete pedal arterial enhancement was assessed using DSA. With this delay, 3DRA was started after injection of 15 ml contrast. Imaging of the 3DRA could directly be reconstructed and visualized.Materials and MethodsPatients undergoing 3DRA of the foot were prospectively registered. DSA and 3DRA images were scored separately for arterial patency and presence of collaterals. Treatment strategies were proposed based on DSA with and without the availability of 3DRA. Results. Eleven patients underwent 3DRA of the foot. One 3DRA was not included because the acquisition was focused on the heel instead of the entire foot. Diagnostic quality of 3DRA was good in all ten patients. 3DRA compared with DSA showed additional patent arteries in six patients, patent plantar arch in three patients, and collaterals between the pedal arteries in five patients. Additional information from 3DRA resulted in a change of treatment strategy in six patients. Conclusion, 3DRA of the foot contains valuable additional real-time information to better guide peripheral vascular interventions in patients with CLI and nonhealing tissue lesions.

  4. Impact of a 1,000-foot thermal mixing zone on the steam electric power industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal discharge requirements for power plants using once-through cooling systems are based on state water quality standards for temperatures that must be met outside of designated mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones. This study evaluates the impact of limiting the extent of thermal mixing zones to no more than 1,000 feet from the discharge point. Data were collected from 79 steam electric plants. Of the plants currently using once-through cooling systems, 74% could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone. Of this total, 68% would retrofit cooling towers, and 6% would retrofit diffusers. The estimated nationwide capital cost for retrofitting plants that could not meet current thermal standards at the edge of a 1,000-foot mixing zone is $21.4 billion. Conversion of a plant from once-through cooling to cooling towers or addition of diffusers would result in a lower energy output from that plant. For the affected plants, the total estimated replacement cost would be $370 to $590 million per year. Some power companies would have to construct new generating capacity to meet the increased energy demand. The estimated nationwide cost of this additional capacity would be $1.2 to $4.8 billion. In addition to the direct costs associated with compliance with a 1,000-foot mixing zone limit, other secondary environmental impacts would also occur. Generation of the additional power needed would increase carbon dioxide emissions by an estimated 8.3 million tons per year. In addition, conversion from once-through cooling systems to cooling towers at affected plants would result in increased evaporation of about 2.7 million gallons of water per minute nationwide.

  5. Foot Drop after Ethanol Embolization of Calf Vascular Malformation: A Lesson on Nerve Injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tay, Vincent Khwee-Soon, E-mail: vincentkstay@gmail.com [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery (Singapore); Mohan, P. Chandra, E-mail: chandra.mohan@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore); Liew, Wendy Kein Meng, E-mail: wendy.liew.km@kkh.com.sg [KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Department of Paediatrics (Neurology Service) (Singapore); Mahadev, Arjandas, E-mail: arjandas.mahadev@kkh.com.sg [KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery (Singapore); Tay, Kiang Hiong, E-mail: tay.kiang.hiong@sgh.com.sg [Singapore General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol is often used in sclerotherapy to treat vascular malformations. Nerve injury is a known complication of this procedure. However, the management of this complication is not well described in literature. This case describes a 10-year-old boy with a slow flow vascular malformation in the right calf who underwent transarterial ethanol embolization following prior unsuccessful direct percutaneous sclerotherapy. The development of a dense foot drop that subsequently recovered is described, and the management of this uncommon but distressful complication is discussed.

  6. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet)4. U.S. Vehicle FuelFoot,

  7. Unmet Housing Rehabilitation and Household Goods Needs in Texas During Katrina-Rita, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, Dayna

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    and household 7 goods. Differences in housing needs per confounding variables will be analyzed according to adjusted Census data by county for size. The data will be analyzed using SAS? and mapped using ARC GIS?. Hypothesis 1: Unmet housing renovation... of the variation in housing variables by geographical location overall and per disaster phase. The analyses were conducted using Excel and SAS. The mapping was done using ArcGIS and ArcInfo. 17 CHAPTER III RESULTS There were a...

  8. Testing and evaluation of grout repaired tubular members 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunn, John Mansfield

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Failed Weld Seam page 64 65 66 69 73 74 80 82 31 Ideahzed Tubular Dented Member for the Taby, Zhou, and the Parsanejad Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . 92 32 Dent Geometry for the Elhnas Method 96 33 Experimental Ultimate Capamty vs P... commonly used to repiur damaged tubular members. These include 1 ) welding a sleeve around the outside of the member in the location of the damage, 2 ) applying an externally grouted clamp, and 3 ) applying internal grout Ideally, the repair method...

  9. Development of program implementation, evaluation, and selection tools for household water treatment and safe storage systems in developing countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baffrey, Robert Michael Nuval, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past six years, the MIT Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering's Master of Engineering program has undertaken various projects involved with the design and implementation of a wide range of household ...

  10. An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relevance An estimated one of every six households (16.2 percent) in Texas lives in poverty. Research has shown that individuals who live in poverty have dietary intakes that are not in agreement

  11. adult family members: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: APPLICATION PACKAGE for Family Members 1 ACICISStudy Indonesia These guidelines contain information ONLY: ARRIVAL DATES ARE INFLEXIBLE. YOU MAY NOT...

  12. acylase family members: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: APPLICATION PACKAGE for Family Members 1 ACICISStudy Indonesia These guidelines contain information ONLY: ARRIVAL DATES ARE INFLEXIBLE. YOU MAY NOT...

  13. Approved Members of the Indian Country Energy And Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs...

  14. White House Meeting Honors New Superior Energy Performance Members...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Superior Energy Performance (SEP) members 3M Company, Cummins Inc., General Dynamics OTS, Nissan, Schneider Electric, and Volvo Group North America from industry, and the...

  15. auxiliary unit members: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    auxiliary microphones. This paper presents two approaches to compensate 183 Joseph M. Juran Team Members Mathematics Websites Summary: old his father left Romania and came to...

  16. California Member Connects Solar Adoption With Upgrades | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Residential Network member Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) in California are helping solar companies realize that partnering with local energy efficiency programs can help...

  17. GreenTouch Consortium Passes 50-Member Milestone, Adds Seven...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will define them. The new members are: CommScopeAndrew - United States Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory - United States Korea Advanced...

  18. Petrogenesis of Valle Grande Member Rhyolites, Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Valle Grande Member Rhyolites, Valles Caldera, New Mexico- Implications for Evolution of the Jemez Mountains Magmatic System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  19. Multiplexed Molecular Assays for Rapid Rule-Out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenhoff, R; Naraghi-Arani, P; Thissen, J; Olivas, J; Carillo, C; Chinn, C; Rasmussen, M; Messenger, S; Suer, L; Smith, S M; Tammero, L; Vitalis, E; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; Hindson, B J; Hietala, S; Crossley, B; Mcbride, M

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A nucleic acid-based multiplexed assay was developed that combines detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with rule-out assays for two other foreign animal diseases and four domestic animal diseases that cause vesicular or ulcerative lesions indistinguishable from FMDV infection in cattle, sheep and swine. The FMDV 'look-alike' diagnostic assay panel contains five PCR and twelve reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) signatures for a total of seventeen simultaneous PCR amplifications for seven diseases plus incorporating four internal assay controls. It was developed and optimized to amplify both DNA and RNA viruses simultaneously in a single tube and employs Luminex{trademark} liquid array technology. Assay development including selection of appropriate controls, a comparison of signature performance in single and multiplex testing against target nucleic acids, as well of limits of detection for each of the individual signatures is presented. While this assay is a prototype and by no means a comprehensive test for FMDV 'look-alike' viruses, an assay of this type is envisioned to have benefit to a laboratory network in routine surveillance and possibly for post-outbreak proof of freedom from foot-and-mouth disease.

  20. Proceedings of the 2007 IEEE 10th International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, June 12-15, Noordwijk, The Netherlands Biomechanical Design of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    -15, Noordwijk, The Netherlands Biomechanical Design of a Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis Samuel K. Au, Jeff Weber, and Hugh Herr Abstract-Although the potential benefits of a powered ankle- foot prosthesis have been well documented, no one has suc- cessfully developed and verified that such a prosthesis can improve amputee gait

  1. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture desired benefits? The members of Colorado's Forestry Advisory Board have presented this question, Colorado Forestry Advisory Board #12;2003 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests 1 2003 Report

  2. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: April 6, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: April 6, 2005 The 2004 Report on the Health types that characterize Colora- do's unique landscapes. As members of the Colorado Forestry Advisory will motivate and inform your involvement. Sincerely, Nancy M. Fishering Chairperson, Colorado Forestry Advisory

  3. The 2014 SPECTRA Program Employer, Coach, Mentor or Community Member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    1 The 2014 SPECTRA Program Employer, Coach, Mentor or Community Member Recommendation Form #2 To the applicant Please complete the top section of this form and submit it to your employer, coach, mentor: _________________________________________________________________ Name of Employer, Coach, Mentor or Community Member completing this form

  4. UC Davis Personnel Policies for Staff Members Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Resources & Risk Management. Note 6--Distribution. Personnel Policies for Staff Members is a public documentUC Davis Personnel Policies for Staff Members Introduction Date: 6/3/02 Supersedes: New Responsible Department: Human Resources Source Document: UC Introduction 1 of 1 Note 1--Employment by Statute. A public

  5. Foot & Mouth Disease & Ulcerative/Vesicular Rule-outs: Challenges Encountered in Recent Outbreaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hullinger, P

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting bovidae (cattle, zebus, domestic buffaloes, yaks), sheep, goats, swine, all wild ruminants and suidae. Camelidae (camels, dromedaries, llamas, vicunas) have low susceptibility. Foot and mouth disease is caused by a RNS virus of the family Picornaviridae, genus Aphthovirus. There are seven immunologically distinct serotypes: A, O, C, SAT1, SAT2, SAT3, Asia 1. Foot and mouth disease causes significant economic loss both to countries who manage it as an endemic disease (with or without vaccination), as well as those FMD free countries which may become infected. The mortality rate is low in adult animals, but often higher in young due to myocarditis. Foot and mouth disease is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America (sporadic outbreaks in free areas). The Office of International Epizootics (OIE), also referred to the World Organization for Animal Health maintains an official list of free countries and zones.1 The OIE Terrestrial Code (Chapter 2.2.10) provides detailed information on the categories of freedom that can be allocated to a country as well as guidelines for the surveillance for foot and mouth disease (Appendix 3.8.7). In short, countries may be completely free of FMD, free with vaccination or infected with foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV). Source of FMDV include incubating and clinically affected animals with virus present in breath, saliva, faeces, urine, milk and semen. In experimental settings virus has been detected in milk several days before the onset of clinical signs2. Additional sources of virus are meat and by-products in which pH has remained above 6.0 as well as persistently infected carrier animals. Carrier animals may include cattle and water buffalo; convalescent animals and exposed vaccinates (virus persists in the oropharynx for up to 30 months in cattle or longer in buffalo, 9 months in sheep). Pigs do not become carriers. It has been shown that the African Cape buffalo are the major maintenance host of SAT serotypes. FMDV transmission can occur by either direct or indirect contact. Indirect transmission can occur via contaminated animate vectors (humans, etc.), inanimate vectors (vehicles, implements) or airborne transmission. Indirect disease transmission via animate or inanimate vectors can play a major role in disease transmission. Good biosecurity can significantly reduce this type of transmission. Airborne transmission is often debated and is known to be serotype and species specific as well as require specific environmental conditions to occur. Airborne transmission is favored in temperate zones and has been postulated to occur over distances of up to 60 km overland and 300 km by sea. Foot and mouth disease virus is an unenveloped virus which is preserved by refrigeration and freezing and progressively inactivated by temperatures above 50 C. FMDV is highly sensitive to pH change and is inactivated by pH < 6.0 or > 9.0. There are many disinfectants which are effective against FMDV including sodium hydroxide (2%), sodium carbonate (4%), and citric acid (0.2%). FMDV is resistant to iodophores, quaternary ammonium compounds, hypochlorite and phenol, especially in the presence of organic matter. The virus can survive in lymph nodes and bone marrow at neutral pH, but is destroyed in muscle when is pH < 6.0 i.e. after rigor mortis. FMDV can persist in contaminated feed/commodities and the environment for over to 1 month, depending on the temperature and pH conditions. The incubation period for FMD is 2-14 days. Animals transition through latent (infected but not infectious), subclinically infected (infectious but lacking clinical signs) clinically infected and recovered disease states. In cattle clinical signs include pyrexia, reluctance to eat, bruxism, drooling, lameness, treading or stamping of the feet and decreased milk production. Most clinical signs are related to the development and subsequent rupturing of vesicles at the coronary band and in the oral cavity. V

  6. Survey of Reactive Power Planning Methods Wenjuan Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, Leon M. Tolbert, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Survey of Reactive Power Planning Methods Wenjuan Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, Leon M. Tolbert, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract Reactive power planning (RPP) involves optimal allocation and determination to solve the RPP problem. Index Terms -- reactive power planning, reactive power optimization, optimal

  7. Clinical Education Award This award will be given to a member or members of the graduating class who

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Clinical Education Award This award will be given to a member or members of the graduating class who demonstrate(s) superior clinical abilities. More than one student may qualify for this award this award must show excellence in clinical education based on all of the following accomplishments

  8. Energy-Aware MPEG-4 FGS Streaming Kihwan Choi, Member IEEE, Kwanho Kim, Member IEEE, and Massoud Pedram, Fellow IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Energy-Aware MPEG-4 FGS Streaming Kihwan Choi, Member IEEE, Kwanho Kim, Member IEEE, and Massoud Pedram, Fellow IEEE Abstract -- In this paper, we propose an energy-aware MPEG-4 FGS video streaming 20% communication energy reduction at the client by making the MPEG-4 FGS streamer energy-aware

  9. On-Road Vehicle Detection: A Review Zehang Sun, Member, IEEE, George Bebis, Member, IEEE, and Ronald Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebis, George

    On-Road Vehicle Detection: A Review Zehang Sun, Member, IEEE, George Bebis, Member, IEEE about driving environments, and possible collision with other vehicles has attracted a lot of attention lately. In these systems, robust and reliable vehicle detection is a critical step. This paper presents

  10. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doležalová, Markéta, E-mail: mdolezalova@email.cz [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Benešová, Libuše [Institute for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Benatska 2, 128 01 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Závodská, Anita [School of Adult and Continuing Education, Barry University, 8001 SW 36th Street, Suite #1, Davie, FL 33328 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. • The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. • The physicochemical characteristics were determined. • The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. • The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories – urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Union’s solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  11. Smart infrastructure for carbon foot print analysis of Electric Vehicles V Suresh, G Hill, Prof P T Blythe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Smart infrastructure for carbon foot print analysis of Electric Vehicles V Suresh, G Hill, Prof P T Blythe Abstract-- Electric powered vehicles use energy stored in some form of battery for the vehicle of electric vehicles through on-road testing, user led trials and the analysis of the data collected from

  12. Method for brazing together planar and nonplanar metal members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammersand, Fred G. (East Petersburg, PA); Witkowski, Anthony J. (Lancaster, PA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a method and apparatus for brazing two metal members together, at least one of which is nonplanar, in a brazing furnace using a substantially pure brazing material. The method comprises the steps of utilizing a brazing fixture to hold the two metal members in tangential relation to one another along a portion of each member so that a cavity is formed adjacent to the contacting portions. A braze material is then positioned within the cavity. The braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material are then placed in a brazing furnace. A heat shield is then placed over the braze fixture, the metal members, and the braze material to shield the braze material from direct furnace radiation. The furnace temperature is linearly increased at a rate of about 180.degree. C. per hour until a temperature of 350.degree. C. is achieved. Heat is transferred by conduction from the metal members to the braze material to cause the braze material to melt. Some material from the metal members slowly diffuses into the braze material forming a braze joint. The furnace is rapidly cooled to room temperature using nitrogen gas. The brazed assemblies made according to this method are superior to assemblies formed by heliarc welding.

  13. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the piedmont. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 16 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Piedmont. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,753 trees sampled in the Piedmont and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  14. Fuel economy testing of six 40-foot transit buses. Final report Aug 82-Mar 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, G.A.; Nelson, S.R.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of life-cycle cost analyses in transit bus procurement is recognized by the industry and has been a Congressional requirement for grantees. This report documents a program of fuel economy testing of six standard 40-foot buses. The main purpose of this series of tests is to assist transit authorities and bus suppliers by providing accurate comparable fuel consumption data on transit buses produced by different manufacturers. Six buses were selected by the manufacturers and supplied for testing by six transit properties directly from revenue service. This report makes the data available to the industry for discretionary use in estimating life-cycle costs. A list of bus manufacturers and the supplying transit system is provided.

  15. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / TexasA4. U.S. Vehicles

  16. The Impact of Carbon Control on Low-Income Household Electricity and Gasoline Expenditures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenberg, Joel Fred [ORNL

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In July of 2007 The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its impact analysis of 'The Climate Stewardship And Innovation Act of 2007,' known as S.280. This legislation, cosponsored by Senators Joseph Lieberman and John McCain, was designed to significantly cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions over time through a 'cap-and-trade' system, briefly described below, that would gradually but extensively reduce such emissions over many decades. S.280 is one of several proposals that have emerged in recent years to come to grips with the nation's role in causing human-induced global climate change. EIA produced an analysis of this proposal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) to generate price projections for electricity and gasoline under the proposed cap-and-trade system. Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated those price projections into a data base derived from the EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for 2001 and the EIA public use files from the National Household Transportation Survey (NHTS) for 2001 to develop a preliminary assessment of impact of these types of policies on low-income consumers. ORNL will analyze the impacts of other specific proposals as EIA makes its projections for them available. The EIA price projections for electricity and gasoline under the S.280 climate change proposal, integrated with RECS and NHTS for 2001, help identify the potential effects on household electric bills and gasoline expenditures, which represent S.280's two largest direct impacts on low-income household budgets in the proposed legislation. The analysis may prove useful in understanding the needs and remedies for the distributive impacts of such policies and how these may vary based on patterns of location, housing and vehicle stock, and energy usage.

  17. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the ``normal`` municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan`s programs. Focusing on the Plan`s household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  18. Evaluation program effectiveness of household hazardous waste collection: The Seattle-King County experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seattle-King County Hazardous Waste Management Plan provides the framework for an intensive effort to keep Household Hazardous and Small Quantity Generator (SQG) wastes from entering the normal'' municipal waste streams. The Plan sets ambitious goals for diverting thousands of tons of hazardous wastes from being thrown, poured or dumped in the municipal waste stream. During the first five years, over $30 millon will be spent for a variety of HHW and SQG programs. The Plan incorporates a wide range of elements, including education, collection, and compliance components. Many of the hazardous waste education and collection programs have been developed in response to the Plan, so their effectiveness is still undetermined. A key component of the Plan is program evaluation. This report provides descriptions of two evaluation methods used to establish baselines for assessing the effectiveness of the Hazardous Waste Management Plan's programs. Focusing on the Plan's household hazardous waste programs, the findings of the baseline evaluations are discussed and conclusions are made. A general population survey, conducted through telephone interviews, was designed to assess changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of area residents. Characterization of the solid waste stream was used to identify the hazardous constituents contributed to municipal solid waste by households. Monitoring changes in the amount of hazardous materials present in the waste stream was used to indicate whether or not Program strategies are influencing disposal behaviors. Comparing the data gathered by these two evaluation methods provided a unique opportunity to cross-check the findings and validate that change, if any, has occurred. From the comparisons, the report draws a number of conclusions.

  19. Means to flexibly attach lens frames to temple members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Harry D. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a band hinge for flexibly connecting the temple member to the lens frame thereby preventing damage from inadvertent pressure or cyclic wear. A distinguishing feature of the invention is the use of a band hinge that holds together the temple member and the lens frame without the use of a pin or screw hinging mechanism. The invention allows for a high degree of freedom of movement for the temple member with respect to the lens frame which will prevent most forms of damages to the glasses from these types of events.

  20. WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljřvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 Křbenhavn Ř (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljřvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljřvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

  1. Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture As Chairperson of Colorado's newly created Forestry Advisory Board, I would like to thank you for taking the time

  2. Team 2 Inspection Josh Goss Team chair member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Team 2 Inspection Josh Goss ­ Team chair member Capasso, Golovchenko, and Stubbs Lab We were very intensity of these light sources while configured in a typical experimental setup? Many thanks! Team 2 #12;

  3. Agricultural Engineering and Socio-Economics Division Field Contents Member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    Agricultural Engineering and Socio-Economics Division Field Contents Member Environmental, H. Professor TADA,A.Associate Professor Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering for Agricultural for agricultural land and rural areas including bountiful beautiful nature; Geotechnical and environmental

  4. DOE appoints four new members to advisory board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has appointed four new members to its Environmental Management advisory board in Oak Ridge. Leon Baker, Richard Burroughs, Terri Likens and Ed Trujillo were introduced during the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board’s February meeting.

  5. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  6. Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members Dianne P. O'Leary http O'Leary. Copyright Dianne P. O'Leary, 1999 Version 1: June 1999 1 Picture Yourself: You are male

  7. Members' attainment of National FFA leadership and personal growth precepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Misty Jean

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEMBERS' ATTAINMENT OF NATIONAL FFA LEADERSHIP AND PERSONAL GROWTH PRECEPTS A Thesis by MISTY JEAN AMBROSE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2002 Major Subject: Agricultural Education MEMBERS% ATTAINMENT OF NATIONAL FFA LEADERSHIP AND PERSONAL GROWTH PRECEPTS A Thesis by MISTY JEAN AMBROSE Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

  8. Experience with improved charcoal and wood stoves for households and institutions in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts at promoting more fuel-efficient charcoal stoves to replace traditional charcoal stoves in Kenya offer some lessons for the dissemination of appropriate technologies. This paper looks at the market-based approach which has made the Kenyan charcoal stoves project a success. Trends in woodfuels (wood and charcoal) consumption in Kenya are identified; the traditional technology for charcoal combustion and the upgraded traditional technologies are described; production achievement and the dissemination and promotion strategy used are examined; and a financial and economic analysis is performed with social, health and environmental effects assessed. Other ways to achieve a more favourable balance between woodfuels consumption and supply are then discussed looking at more efficient charcoal kilns and household woodstoves, improved institutional stoves and increased wood production. The replication potential of the Kenya experiment in other countries is also explored. The lessons learnt from the the Kenya experience concern the relationship between technology, choice and delivery systems as they interact with, economic, institutional, and policy factors. In this case, the design work accepted the traditional technology as a starting point which helped ensure widespread acceptance by households. The potential desirability of relying on local artisans to manufacture consumer durables using existing private sector channels to market these goods is also shown. It also highlights the importance of going beyond a laissez-faire approach and supporting training, demonstration, and publicity to faciliate the workings of the private sector. In the Kenyan case, technology choice was relatively unsubsidized and left ot the preferences of consumers.

  9. Measuring Pb bioavailability from household dusts using an in vitro model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, D.P.; McLaughlin, M.J.; Naidu, R.; Smith, L.H.; Maynard, E.J.; Calder, I.C.

    1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite an extensive cleanup program in the Port Pirie region, South Australia, the levels of lead (Pb) in blood of children have been found to exceed the level of concern (10 {micro}g/dL). The ingestion of household dust is a major pathway for elevated blood lead by children in the community. Significant differences in levels of Pb in blood in children were observed in various localities around the smelter. In this study an in vitro test was assessed as one method for determining the bioavailability of Pb in household dust and for predicting levels of Pb in blood of children. The solubility of Pb in the dust decreased significantly as pH of the in vitro mixture increased. Correlation studies with average blood Pb levels of children in the corresponding area and in vitro measures of Pb bioavailability found that the best relationship was with total dust Pb. A significant positive relationship was also found with Pb concentrations determined in the in vitro test at pH 3.0. This suggested that for these dust samples, which all had a similar environmental matrix, the use of the in vitro test was not a better indicator of blood Pb levels in children compared with a total Pb analysis.

  10. A Method for Modeling Household Occupant Behavior to Simulate Residential Energy Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Brandon J [ORNL] [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a statistical method for modeling the behavior of household occupants to estimate residential energy consumption. Using data gathered by the U.S. Census Bureau in the American Time Use Survey (ATUS), actions carried out by survey respondents are categorized into ten distinct activities. These activities are defined to correspond to the major energy consuming loads commonly found within the residential sector. Next, time varying minute resolution Markov chain based statistical models of different occupant types are developed. Using these behavioral models, individual occupants are simulated to show how an occupant interacts with the major residential energy consuming loads throughout the day. From these simulations, the minimum number of occupants, and consequently the minimum number of multiple occupant households, needing to be simulated to produce a statistically accurate representation of aggregate residential behavior can be determined. Finally, future work will involve the use of these occupant models along side residential load models to produce a high-resolution energy consumption profile and estimate the potential for demand response from residential loads.

  11. Recovery and separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.E.; Jody, B.J.; Poykala, J.A. Jr.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Arman, B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop a cost- effective and environmentally acceptable process for the separation of high-value plastics from discarded household appliances. The process under development has separated individual high purity (greater than 99.5%) acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and high- impact polystyrene (HIPS) from commingled plastics generated by appliance-shredding and metal-recovery operations. The process consists of size-reduction steps for the commingled plastics, followed by a series of gravity-separation techniques to separate plastic materials of different densities. Individual plastics of similar densities, such as ABS and HIPS, are further separated by using a chemical solution. By controlling the surface tension, the density, and the temperature of the chemical solution we are able to selectively float/separate plastics that have different surface energies. This separation technique has proven to be highly effective in recovering high-purity plastics materials from discarded household appliances. A conceptual design of a continuous process to recover high-value plastics from discarded appliances is also discussed. In addition to plastics separation research, Argonne National Laboratory is conducting research to develop cost-effective techniques for improving the mechanical properties of plastics recovered from appliances.

  12. Cost-effective Resource Provisioning for MapReduce in a Balaji Palanisamy, Member, IEEE, Aameek Singh, Member, IEEE Ling Liu, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ling

    some slack. By effectively multiplexing the available cloud resources among the jobs based on the job1 Cost-effective Resource Provisioning for MapReduce in a Cloud Balaji Palanisamy, Member, IEEE, unlike existing services that require customers to decide the resources to be used for the jobs, Cura

  13. On Fast Transmission Topology Control Heuristics Pablo A. Ruiz, Member, IEEE, Justin M. Foster, Student Member, IEEE, Aleksandr Rudkevich, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramanis, Michael

    flow, renewable integra- tion. I. INTRODUCTION TRADITIONALLY, power system operational decision making1 On Fast Transmission Topology Control Heuristics Pablo A. Ruiz, Member, IEEE, Justin M. Foster the OPF problem accordingly. This paper discusses the inclusion of tractable dynamic transmission topol

  14. On the Power Management of Simultaneous Multithreading Ahmed Youssef, Student Member, IEEE, Mohamed Zahran, Senior Member, IEEE, Mohab Anis, Member, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahran, Mohamed M.

    1 On the Power Management of Simultaneous Multithreading Processors Ahmed Youssef, Student Member various workloads to assess their effectiveness in leakage power management. Results show that the dynamic to be re-assessed. There has been a large body of work in power-management and temperature aware computing

  15. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

  16. Master Gardener Advisory Committee Members Ed Thralls Advisor Extension Agent ed.thralls@ocfl.net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Master Gardener Advisory Committee Members 2014 Ed Thralls Advisor Extension Agent ed.thralls@ocfl.net@me.com Pam Paisley Member Master Gardener pppaisley@earthlink.net Dailey Smith Member Master Gardener pirate45@gmail.com Regina Dunay Member Master Gardener dunayr@earthlink.net Jennifer Helvenston Member

  17. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation ManagementMobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  18. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  19. Evaluation of Multiplexed Foot-and-Mouth Disease Nonstructural Protein Antibody Assay Against Standardized Bovine Serum Panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, J; Parida, S; Clavijo, A

    2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid array technology has previously been used to show proof-of-principle of a multiplexed non structural protein serological assay to differentiate foot-and-mouth infected and vaccinated animals. The current multiplexed assay consists of synthetically produced peptide signatures 3A, 3B and 3D and recombinant protein signature 3ABC in combination with four controls. To determine diagnostic specificity of each signature in the multiplex, the assay was evaluated against a naive population (n = 104) and a vaccinated population (n = 94). Subsequently, the multiplexed assay was assessed using a panel of bovine sera generated by the World Reference Laboratory for foot-and-mouth disease in Pirbright, UK. This sera panel has been used to assess the performance of other singleplex ELISA-based non-structural protein antibody assays. The 3ABC signature in the multiplexed assay showed comparative performance to a commercially available non-structural protein 3ABC ELISA (Cedi test{reg_sign}) and additional information pertaining to the relative diagnostic sensitivity of each signature in the multiplex is acquired in one experiment. The encouraging results of the evaluation of the multiplexed assay against a panel of diagnostically relevant samples promotes further assay development and optimization to generate an assay for routine use in foot-and-mouth disease surveillance.

  20. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Callahan, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000315498916); Hurricane, O. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hinkel, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Park, H. -S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Barrios Garcia, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000291875667); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerjan, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000251686845); Dewald, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dittrich, T. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edwards, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000184045131); Hamza, A. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Kritcher, A. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000341604479); Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000288550378); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Salmonson, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Springer, P. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Field, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fittinghoff, D. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frenje, J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grim, G. P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Merrill, F. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nagel, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000277686819); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v???. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v???) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  1. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By increasing the velocity in “high foot” implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), andmore »the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity (v), we find that for shots with primary yield >1e15 neutrons, the total yield ~ v???. This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating ( ~v???) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.« less

  2. Simulation and analysis of the plutonium shipping container subject to 30-foot drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, C.; Gupta, N.K.; Gromada, R.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The shipping container 5320 is a shipping package for radioactive materials. In order to maintain the component in this packaging within the sub-critical state when subjected to any kind of Hypothetical Accident conditions (HAC), this Type B packaging is designed with various impact limiters. The present study is to examine the energy absorbing capacity of the impact limiter design of this container subjected to a 30-foot drop onto a flat unyielding horizontal surface in each of the three critical dropping orientations. This paper presents the results of a three dimensional nonlinear dynamic impact analysis. This analysis shows the deformed configuration of the container caused by the impact and also determines the effects of different stress wave paths in three distinct drops on the stress states in the critical component. The solution to the problem was obtained using the ABAQUS (explicit) finite element computer code. The nonlinearity of this analysis involves large structural deformation, elasto-plastic materials with strain hardening as well as multiple contact interfaces. Three drop orientations were studied, namely, top down impact, bottom down impact and side impact. Results will be compared against actual drop test data.

  3. Modeling Estimated Personnel Needs for a Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, K; Hullinger, P

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) is a highly infectious and contagious viral disease affecting cloven-hoofed livestock that was last detected in the United States (US) in 1929. The prevalence of FMD in other countries, as well as the current potential for this virus to be used as a form of agroterrorism, has made preparations for a potential FMD outbreak a national priority. To assist in the evaluation of national preparedness, all 50 states were surveyed via e-mail, telephone and web search to obtain emergency response plans for FMD or for foreign animal diseases in general. Information from 33 states was obtained and analyzed for estimates of personnel resources needed to respond to an outbreak. These estimates were consolidated and enhanced to create a tool that could be used by individual states to better understand the personnel that would be needed to complete various tasks over time during an outbreak response. The estimates were then coupled, post-processing, to the output from FMD outbreaks simulated in California using the Multiscale Epidemiological/Economic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) model at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to estimate the personnel resource demands, by task, over the course of an outbreak response.

  4. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  5. An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Kimberly; Dale, Larry; Fujita, K. Sydny

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our study of the price elasticity of demand for home appliances, including refrigerators, clothes washers, and dishwashers. In the context of increasingly stringent appliance standards, we are interested in what kind of impact the increased manufacturing costs caused by higher efficiency requirements will have on appliance sales. We begin with a review of existing economics literature describing the impact of economic variables on the sale of durable goods.We then describe the market for home appliances and changes in this market over the past 20 years, performing regression analysis on the shipments of home appliances and relevant economic variables including changes to operating cost and household income. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the demand for home appliances is price inelastic.

  6. Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part of the total energy consumed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    consumption and for about 50% of the total electricity consumption [1]. Therefore it is important to explore one of them. The interviewees preferred receiving electricity consumption feedback from a bill, a web1 Abstract--Numerous studies have shown that households' consumption is an important part

  7. Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in energy consumption. Patterns of Consumption--Historic Trends Electricity & Gas We'll start with historicChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages analysis of consumption patterns of different commodities in the U.S. shed light on the consumption

  8. Water availability at farm household level a case study in the Nyando district in South-Western Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water availability at farm household level ­ a case study in the Nyando district in South of Crop Production Ecology Uppsala 2011 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences #12;2 Water: Women collecting water in a well, Onjiko, Kenya. Photo: Erika Näslund Keywords: Water availability

  9. The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty in Democratic Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    The value of bushmeat and other wild foods to rural households living in extreme poverty between poverty and the use of wild foods, namely bushmeat, fish and wild plants, within a Congolese poverty (income below US$1 per capita per day). Our analyses indicate that wild foods play a small role

  10. Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Equipments A Danish Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Workshop on Demand Response, Ballerup, 7. February 2006 www.risoe.dk Curtailment of Household Frame · 189 Respondents · Power consumption: 5000 ­ 6000 kWh per year · No electrical heating · Products hours 3 hours 3 hours Question 9 Question 10 Question 13 Price(DKK/kWh) 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Response

  11. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  12. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings Members Michael J.Members

  13. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings Members MichaelMembers

  14. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings MembersMembers Nuclear

  15. 2001: PUBLICATIONS WITH IRAM STAFF MEMBERS AS (CO-)AUTHORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RadioAstronomie Millimétrique, Institut de (IRAM)

    2001: PUBLICATIONS WITH IRAM STAFF MEMBERS AS (CO-)AUTHORS 877. SEARCH FOR NH3 ICE IN COLD DUST ENVELOPES AROUND YSO's E. Dartois, L. d'Hendecourt 2001, A&A 365, 144 878. DISKS AND OUTFLOWS AROUND-Franco, F. Palla 2001, A&A 366, 873 879. SiO EMISSION FROM A HUGE, DETACHED SHELL IN IRC+10420 A. Castro

  16. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members Appendix A 53

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    51 Appendix A Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members #12;#12;Appendix A 53 B. John Garrick, Ph.D., P.E. Chairman Dr. B. John Garrick was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review, on the U.S. Nuclear Regula- tory Commission's Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste. His areas of expertise

  17. U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix A Appendix A U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Members Jared L. Cohon, Ph.D.; Chairman On June 29, 1995, President Bill Clinton appointed Jared Cohon to the Nuclear Waste Technical, and Asia and on energy facil ity siting, including nuclear waste shipping and storage. In addition to his

  18. Fully Affiliated Members Aero/Astro Austin DiOrio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Fully Affiliated Members Aero/Astro Austin DiOrio Alpha Phi OmegaAPO Nicole Gagnier ARA Richard) Daniel Chavas East Campus Juliana Wu Eastgate Elliot Greenblatt Economics Dept. Kyle Greenberg Edgerton Center Chaithanya Bandi Parsons Benzhang Zhao Phi Beta Epsilon Daniel Ronde Phi Kappa Sigma (Skullhouse

  19. TEAM AWARDS TEAM SUBMITTED BY ENDORSEMENT DATE AWARDED # OF MEMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    TEAM AWARDS TEAM SUBMITTED BY ENDORSEMENT DATE AWARDED # OF MEMBERS Neuromuscular Team Deborah Feigenbaum ALS Association & Patients 9/17/2007 9 Affirmative Action Production Team Carolyn Lyle Susan Whetstone & Brian Eaton 4/17/2007 4 Labor & Delivery Team Samtha Angelini & Gwyn Muscillo Ellen Leone & Joan

  20. Team Member Guide http://walkacrosstexas.tamu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Team Member Guide http://walkacrosstexas.tamu.edu #12;2 Updated September 2012. Educational will be appointed as the Site Manager for Walk Across Texas. The Site Manager will find Team Captains. The Team Captains then recruit seven people for their team. Once teams of eight are formed, a AKick-Off@ event marks

  1. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Curriculum Vitae for Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karczmarek, Joanna

    THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Curriculum Vitae for Faculty Members Date: May 5. 2009 Initials-1980 University of British Columbia M Sc Physics 1980-1982 University of British Columbia Ph D Physics 1982 The University of British Columbia Study Leave 07/2007-06/2008 8. TEACHING (a) Areas of special interest

  2. Hybrid FRP/Concrete Structural Members and Sami Rizkalla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with differentfiber orientations partially and/or totallyfilled with concrete. Hollow FRP and steel tubes were testedHybrid FRP/Concrete Structural Members Amir Fam1 and Sami Rizkalla 2 Department of Civil, highway overhead sign structures and bridges. The experimental program included testing to failure tubes

  3. Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume David P. Philipp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume David P. Philipp Appointed to Board: 1999. Claussen, and D. P. Philipp. Effect of population size structure on reproductive investment of male bluegill. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 17: 516-524. 1997 Philipp, D. P., C. A. Toline, D

  4. Modal Analysis of Continuous Structrual System with Tapered Cantilevered Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yoon Mo

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CONVENTIONAL CONTINUOUS SYSTEM ............ 9 2.1. Transverse Vibration in Conventional Continuous System Model .................... 9 2.2. Equation of Motion for Flexural Member .......................................................... 9 2.3 Boundary.......................................... 19 2.6 Conclusion ........................................................................................................ 20 3. MODAL ANALYSIS OF DISCRETIZED CONTINUOUS SYSTEM ............... 21 3.1. Transverse Vibration in Discretized Continuous...

  5. Dean's Leadership Circle 2011-2012 Annual Member Pledge Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Kyle

    Dean's Leadership Circle 2011-2012 Annual Member Pledge Form For more information, contact Sandra Findly, Senior Director of Development Dean's Leadership Circle Fund 3048 Appeal Code: B1S40 MPAA Building, Suite 210, Irvine, CA 92697-3130 ­ Phone 949-824-8865 ­ Secure Fax 949-824-8866 ­ Email DeansLeadership

  6. Dean's Leadership Circle 2010-2011 Member Pledge Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Dean's Leadership Circle 2010-2011 Member Pledge Form For more information, contact: SECURE FAX LINE: 949-824-8866 MPAA Building, Suite 210 Sandra Findly, Director, Dean's Leadership Circle Irvine, CA 92697-3130 (949) 824-8865 ­ DeansLeadershipCircle@uci.edu www.merage.uci.edu/go/DLC DLC Fund 3048

  7. AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    AQU 04 Portable Algae Flow Cytometer Team Members · David Caron, Faculty · Han-Chieh Chang · Yu-Chong Tai, Faculty, PI* * Primary Contact Overview The portable algae flow cytometer is a project that aims to expedite research in algae biology using microfluid-based and state-of-the-art detection

  8. Work and Energy Simulation Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    Work and Energy Simulation Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names://phet.colorado.edu, in a browser and click on the Go to the simulations button. Open Work, Energy, and Power on the left. This lab uses three of the simulations on this page, Masses and Springs, Energy Skate Park, and The Ramp. I

  9. Change of Dissertation Adviser or Reading Committee Member Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Change of Dissertation Adviser or Reading Committee Member Stanford University Please address approval for a change of dissertation adviser, the addition or deletion of a doctoral dissertation reading of the dissertation. Policy: The reading committee must conform to University regulations at the time of degree

  10. Prescription Drug List --To be used by members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    Prescription Program Drug List -- To be used by members (both National Accounts and Local Group), who have a tiered drug plan. Anthem Blue Cross prescription drug benefits include medications available on the Anthem Drug List. Our prescription drug benefits can offer potential savings when your

  11. Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Accessibility of Computer Science: A Reflection for Faculty Members Dianne P. O'Leary \\Lambda June. This document benefitted from helpful advice and references from Nora Sleumer and Timothy O'Leary. Copyright Dianne P. O'Leary, 1999 Version 1: June 1999 1 Picture Yourself: You are male, almost 20 years old, naive

  12. Supplemental Material of "Collaborative Mobile Sheng Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, Jie Wu, Fellow, IEEE, and Sanglu Lu, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jie

    by induction on M. When M = 1 or M = 2, we can prove SolelyCharge is optimal using a similar method1 Supplemental Material of "Collaborative Mobile Charging" Sheng Zhang, Student Member, IEEE, Jie a sufficiently large WSN (X, Y, B, T) and a charging model (P, c, v, 1, 2), which satisfy conditions K1K2K3

  13. Standards-enabled Smart Grid for the Future Valeriy Vyatkin, Senior Member, IEEE, Gulnara Zhabelova, non-member,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulieru, Mihaela

    1 Standards-enabled Smart Grid for the Future EnergyWeb Valeriy Vyatkin, Senior Member, IEEE for the Smart Grid is proposed which combines two recently developed industrial standards. The utility network that can be created using interoperable Smart Grid devices. Using Matlab-based simulation environment we

  14. EXIT Charts for Turbo Trellis Coded Modulation Hangjun Chen, Student Member, IEEE, and Alexander Haimovich, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    EXIT Charts for Turbo Trellis Coded Modulation Hangjun Chen, Student Member, IEEE, and Alexander information transfer charts (EXIT) method to the analysis of the convergence of turbo codes to turbo trellis can be used as a tool in the design of TTCM. Index Terms-- Turbo trellis coded modulation, convergence

  15. Intentional Islanded Operation of Converter Fed Microgrids Charles K. Sao, Student Member, IEEE, and Peter W. Lehn, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    . INTRODUCTION Many new distributed power sources, such as wind turbine generators and fuel cells, do is determined by the reactive power balance. Such steady state relations have been identified in the literature, and Peter W. Lehn, Member, IEEE Abstract-- This paper develops a dynamic model of a converter fed is- landed

  16. Committees (present) Member of the national Topteam on Energy, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Member of the review committee CAREM nuclear reactor design, National Atomic Energy Commission Argentina

  17. Finally, the Academy has ac-cepted eleven new members, for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finally, the Academy has ac- cepted eleven new members, for a total of 73 members. Please see of educators. If you are not already an Academy member, please consider submitting your application. A review of member- ship categories is on page 2 of this Academy Bulletin. Complete de- tails are on the Academy

  18. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Kezik, Julie M., E-mail: julie.colburn@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Hill, Melissa E., E-mail: melissa.hill@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tsai, Eling, E-mail: tsai.umiami@gmail.com [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)] [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Li, De-Wei, E-mail: DeWei.Li@ct.gov [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Valley Laboratory, 153 Cook Hill Road, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States); Leaderer, Brian P., E-mail: brian.leaderer@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma morbidity monitored during the subsequent month. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children exposed and sensitized to Penicillium, Der p, Fel d, Can f risk increased asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These children might benefit from targeted intervention strategies.

  19. Method for making an elastomeric member with end pieces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI); McNinch, Jr., Joseph H. (Livonia, MI); Nowell, Gregory C. (Livonia, MI)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A molding process for molding an elongated elastomeric member (60) with wire mesh sleeves (16) bonded to the ends (14). A molding preform (10) of elastomeric material is positioned within a seamless mold cylinder (26), and the open ends of the wire mesh sleeves (16) are mounted to end plug assemblies (30) slidably received into the mold cylinder (26) and positioned against the ends (14) of the preform (10). A specialized profile is formed into surfaces (44) of the respective end plug assemblies (30) and by heating of the mold (26), the ends (14) of the elastomeric preform (10) are molded to the profile, as well as bonded to the reinforcing wire mesh sleeves (16). Vacuum is applied to the interior of the mold to draw outgassing vapors through relief spaces therethrough. The completed elastomeric member (60) is removed from the mold cylinder (26) by stretching, the consequent reduction in diameter enabling ready separation from the mold cylinder (26) and removal thereof.

  20. Turbine blade squealer tip rail with fence members

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Little, David A

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine blade includes an airfoil, a blade tip section, a squealer tip rail, and a plurality of chordally spaced fence members. The blade tip section includes a blade tip floor located at an end of the airfoil distal from the root. The blade tip floor includes a pressure side and a suction side joined together at chordally spaced apart leading and trailing edges of the airfoil. The squealer tip rail extends radially outwardly from the blade tip floor adjacent to the suction side and extends from a first location adjacent to the airfoil trailing edge to a second location adjacent to the airfoil leading edge. The fence members are located between the airfoil leading and trailing edges and extend radially outwardly from the blade tip floor and axially from the squealer tip rail toward the pressure side.

  1. Cyclooctanoid Natural Products Synthesis of eight-membered ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Cyclooctanoid Natural Products Synthesis of eight-membered ring containing terpenoids Chris Henry Stoltz Group Literature Presentation June 15th, 2008 147 Noyes, 8:00 PM O O H H H plagiospirolide E Group Literature Group Meeting 2 April 2007 HO H OH O Br H O H O H OH OH H H O OH O O H O OH H OHH O O H

  2. Evaluation of compression members with non-ideal end conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek, David Leslie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f/ cr effective connection restraint (k-in/rad), modulus of elasticity (ksi), yield stress of steel (ksi), ratio of stiffness (non-dimensional), moment of inertia about axis of buckling (in4), effective length factor (non-dimensional), length... of compression member (in), plastic moment capacity of the column (k-in), critical buckling load (kips) rotational stiffness of connection (k-in/rad), end restraint parameter (non-dimensional), buckling load parameter (non-dimensional), approximate function...

  3. Status of not-in-kind refrigeration technologies for household space conditioning, water heating and food refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a review of the next generation not-in-kind technologies to replace conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology for household applications. Such technologies are sought to provide energy savings or other environmental benefits for space conditioning, water heating and refrigeration for domestic use. These alternative technologies include: thermoacoustic refrigeration, thermoelectric refrigeration, thermotunneling, magnetic refrigeration, Stirling cycle refrigeration, pulse tube refrigeration, Malone cycle refrigeration, absorption refrigeration, adsorption refrigeration, and compressor driven metal hydride heat pumps. Furthermore, heat pump water heating and integrated heat pump systems are also discussed due to their significant energy saving potential for water heating and space conditioning in households. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Both thermoelectric and magnetic technologies look relatively attractive due to recent developments in the materials and prototypes being manufactured.

  4. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  5. LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

  6. Influence of assumptions about household waste composition in waste management LCAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in waste composition of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematically changed waste composition in a constructed waste management system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste composition important for the results of accounting LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust results for comparative LCA. - Abstract: This article takes a detailed look at an uncertainty factor in waste management LCA that has not been widely discussed previously, namely the uncertainty in waste composition. Waste composition is influenced by many factors; it can vary from year to year, seasonally, and with location, for example. The data publicly available at a municipal level can be highly aggregated and sometimes incomplete, and performing composition analysis is technically challenging. Uncertainty is therefore always present in waste composition. This article performs uncertainty analysis on a systematically modified waste composition using a constructed waste management system. In addition the environmental impacts of several waste management strategies are compared when applied to five different cities. We thus discuss the effect of uncertainty in both accounting LCA and comparative LCA. We found the waste composition to be important for the total environmental impact of the system, especially for the global warming, nutrient enrichment and human toxicity via water impact categories.

  7. Secondary organic aerosol from ozone-initiated reactions with terpene-rich household products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Beverly; Coleman, Beverly K.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Destaillats, Hugo; Nazaroff, William W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyzed secondary organic aerosol (SOA) data from a series of small-chamber experiments in which terpene-rich vapors from household products were combined with ozone under conditions analogous to product use indoors. Reagents were introduced into a continuously ventilated 198 L chamber at steady rates. Consistently, at the time of ozone introduction, nucleation occurred exhibiting behavior similar to atmospheric events. The initial nucleation burst and growth was followed by a period in which approximately stable particle levels were established reflecting a balance between new particle formation, condensational growth, and removal by ventilation. Airborne particles were measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, 10 to 400 nm) in every experiment and with an optical particle counter (OPC, 0.1 to 2.0 ?m) in a subset. Parameters for a three-mode lognormal fit to the size distribution at steady state were determined for each experiment. Increasing the supply ozone level increased the steady-state mass concentration and yield of SOA from each product tested. Decreasing the air-exchange rate increased the yield. The steady-state fine-particle mass concentration (PM1.1) ranged from 10 to> 300 mu g m-3 and yields ranged from 5percent to 37percent. Steady-state nucleation rates and SOA mass formation rates were on the order of 10 cm-3 s-1 and 10 mu g m-3 min-1, respectively.

  8. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R., E-mail: ray.jacobsen@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Buysse, J., E-mail: j.buysse@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Gellynck, X., E-mail: xavier.gellynck@ugent.be [Department of Agricultural Economics, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  9. The economics of US greenhouse gas emissions reduction policy : assessing distributional effects across households and the 50 United States using a recursive dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE) model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Look, Wesley Allen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The political economy of US climate policy has revolved around state- and district- level distributional economics, and to a lesser extent household-level distribution questions. Many politicians and analysts have suggested ...

  10. Collection and representation of GIS data to aid household water treatment and safe storage technology implementation in the northern region of Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanCalcar, Jenny E. (Jenny Elizabeth)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, a start-up social business called Pure Home Water (PHW) was begun in Ghana to promote and sell household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) technologies. The original aim of the company was to offer a variety ...

  11. Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:“Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Managementtechnology-management, and strategic-marketing lenses to the problem of commercializing H 2 FCVs, other EDVs, and other Mobile

  12. Simulation of household in-home and transportation energy use : an integrated behavioral model for estimating energy consumption at the neighborhood scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Feifei, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Household in-home activities and out-of-home transportation are two major sources of urban energy consumption. In light of China's rapid urbanization and income growth, changing lifestyles and consumer patterns - evident ...

  13. A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Assumptions and Analysis in EPRI EA-3409, "Householdby the Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. ("EPRI").Neither EPRI, members of EPRI, nor Lawrence Berkeley

  14. A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the anaerobic) and the use of biofertiliser (digestate) from anaerobic treatment as substitution of chemical fertilisers used in an incineration alternative. Net impact related to GWP from the management chain varies from a contribution of 2.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if incineration is utilised, to an avoidance of 5.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if choosing anaerobic digestion and using produced biogas as car fuel. Impacts are often dependent on processes allocated far from the control of local decision-makers, indicating the importance of a holistic approach and extended collaboration between agents in the waste management chain.

  15. Energy conversion device with support member having pore channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Routkevitch, Dmitri [Longmont, CO; Wind, Rikard A [Johnstown, CO

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy devices such as energy conversion devices and energy storage devices and methods for the manufacture of such devices. The devices include a support member having an array of pore channels having a small average pore channel diameter and having a pore channel length. Material layers that may include energy conversion materials and conductive materials are coaxially disposed within the pore channels to form material rods having a relatively small cross-section and a relatively long length. By varying the structure of the materials in the pore channels, various energy devices can be fabricated, such as photovoltaic (PV) devices, radiation detectors, capacitors, batteries and the like.

  16. Central Georgia El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpenadd: China DatangCentral El tricaCentral Georgia El Member

  17. Niobrara Valley El Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNewNingguoNiobrara Valley El Member Corp

  18. South River Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingaporeSonixInformation ParkRiver Elec Member Corp Jump

  19. Joe Wheeler Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou New Energy Co LtdJinzhouJoe Wheeler Elec Member Corp

  20. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings Members Michael

  1. Members | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRod Eggert ImageMeetings Members

  2. Members | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDispositionMechanicalAboutMembers Home >

  3. United Rural Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAG JumpEuropeUnited Rural Elec Member

  4. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-State Electric Member Corp Jump to: navigation,

  5. New York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs New York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs Photo of a group of five people standing, looking at the camera....

  6. ORSSAB Member Greg Paulus Served His Country, Helped People with Disabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORSSAB member Greg Paulus is a Top Gun. He earned that distinction flying F4 fighters for the Air Force.

  7. 164 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NEURAL SYSTEMS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING, VOL. 18, NO. 2, APRIL 2010 Control of a Powered AnkleFoot Prosthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Hartmut

    Control of a Powered Ankle­Foot Prosthesis Based on a Neuromuscular Model Michael F. Eilenberg, Hartmut the difficulties of explicit terrain sensing. Specifically, the energy provided by the prosthesis was directly--Neuromuscular model, powered prosthesis, pros- thesis control, terrain adaptation. I. INTRODUCTION TODAY

  8. The potential role of wildlife in the spread and control of foot and mouth disease in an extensive livestock management system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Highfield, Linda

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral infection that affects all Artiodactyls (cloven-hoofed) species. The United States has been free of FMD since 1929, and the entire population of cloven-hoofed species is therefore susceptible...

  9. 31320-2014-EN Member states -Service contract -Prior Information Notice -Not applicable 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    OJ/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice - Not applicable 1/2 29/01/2014 S20 http://ted.europa.eu/TED Member states - Service contract - Prior Information/S S20 29/01/2014 31320-2014-EN Member states - Service contract - Prior Information Notice

  10. Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition Family FMLA protections because of a need for leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition to submit a medical certification issued by the health care provider of the covered family member

  11. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the upper coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 11 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Upper Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 521 trees sampled in the Upper Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  12. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Appalachian area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 20 species and 8 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Appalachian Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,670 trees sampled in the Appalachian Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  13. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Gulf and Atlantic coastal plain. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 14 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 2,728 trees sampled in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plain and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  14. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Arkansas area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 9 species and 9 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Arkansas Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 1,417 trees sampled in the Arkansas Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination woth total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on d.b.h. in combination with height to a 7-inch d.o.b. top for softwoods and height to a 9-inch d.o.b. top for hardwoods.

  15. Stem cubic-foot volume tables for tree species in the Delta area. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, A.; Souter, R.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steamwood cubic-foot volume inside bark tables are presented for 13 species and 6 species groups based on equations used to estimate timber sale volumes on national forests in the Delta Area. Tables are based on form class measurement data for 990 trees sampled in the Delta Area and taper data collected across the South. A series of tables is presented for each species based on diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) in combination with total height and height to a 4-inch diameter outside bark (d.o.b.) top. Volume tables are also presented based on diameter outside of the bark (d.o.b.) in combination with height with to a 9-inch d.o.b. top.

  16. An investigation of buckling of compression members having initial curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Raymond Coy

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be solved as p &2EI Por= AL2 ~ Eq. 4 This equation is Euler's equation as it is known today, and in this form 1t is used as the basis for many column design formula. A discussion of the various forms of this equation may be found in any good book... distribution procedure are tabulated below. Member P (klps) kL SL/EI EI/1" S Sb 8, Sd BC CD 234 4. 74 W. 8064 2. 50 - 2. 02 -2. 02 0 4 0000 3, 75 15 F 00 15 F 00 15. 00 0 0 4. 0000 3, 33 13, 33 13. 00 13, 33 CF 585 5. 30 -3. 769 5. 00 -18. S6 -18. 86...

  17. Section 8 Termination of a Tenured Faculty Member and Procedures for Termination of a Tenured Faculty Member for Adequate Cause4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The appointment of a tenured faculty member may be terminated because of: (a) resignation; (b) retirement; (c be made early enough to obviate embarrassment or inconvenience to UTHSC. Faculty members who wish's Appointment Due to Retirement Policies and procedures governing retirement, including disability retirement

  18. Linking Household Food Inventories with Dietary Recalls to Examine the Association between Nutrient Availability and Dietary Intake among Mexican-origin Children who Reside in Texas Border Region Colonias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, Jennifer Becker

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between household food inventories (HFI) and dietary recalls among Mexican-origin children (ages 6-11 years old) who reside in Texas border region colonias. Household food availability is a...

  19. " Million U.S. Housing Units"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"Number of Households With --" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"1 Member","2...

  20. Estimating the impact of the 'digital switchover' on disposal of WEEE at household waste recycling centres in England

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongondo, F.O. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D., E-mail: idw@soton.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Keynes, S. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Lanchester Building, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Hampshire County Council (HCC) as a case study, this paper evaluates and discusses the estimated impacts of the so-called digital switchover (DSO) (scheduled for 2012 in Hampshire) on Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs) in England and the UK. Two public surveys of Hampshire residents were used to collect data on their preparedness for and awareness of the switchover and its implications. The survey also sought to establish the quantities of televisions (TVs) and TV related devices that are ready for the DSO. The quantities of TV and related devices that are likely to be disposed via HCC's collection network have been established and compared to the County's current handling capacities for waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE). Best and worst case potential net disposal scenarios have been established and the latter compared to Government projections. In addition, the potential environmental, logistical, financial and legal impacts of the WEEE arising as a consequence of the switchover have been identified and discussed. The results indicate that the majority of TVs both in Hampshire and the UK are digital ready and that awareness of the switchover is high. In contrast, most recording devices in Hampshire are not ready for the DSO. Awareness of the timeframe of the event remains modest however and about half of Hampshire households were not aware that TV recording devices will be affected by the switchover. A significant proportion of waste TVs and related equipment would be taken to HWRCs in contrast to smaller items such as remote controls that would more likely be disposed with normal household waste. Projected figures for the DSO year show that if Hampshire maintained its current collection capacity for WEEE it would experience a handling shortfall of around {approx}100 K for TVs and recording devices, respectively. The most important finding of the study is that the UK Government may have substantially underestimated the quantities of TV and related devices that will be disposed during the switchover. The potential impacts for local and national WEEE management have been discussed. The paper concludes by making recommendations to address identified issues.

  1. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  2. Worker Safety and Security Teams Team Member Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, Cindy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Worker Safety and Security Teams (WSSTs) are an effective way to promote safe workplaces. While WSSTs have a variety of structures and roles, they have one thing in common - employees and management collaborate to find ways to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on the job. The benefits for all concerned are obvious in that employees have a safe place to work, employers save money on lost work time and workers compensation costs, and everyone returns home safe and healthy each day. A successful WSST will have the support and wholehearted participation of management and employees. LANL has a WSST at the institutional level (IWSST) and at all directorates and many divisions. The WSSTs are part of LANL's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). The WSSTs meet at least monthly and follow an agenda covering topics such as safety shares, behavior based safety (BBS) observations, upcoming events or activities, issues, etc. A WSST can effectively influence safety programs and provide recommendations to managers, who have the resources and authority to implement changes in the workplace. WSSTs are effective because they combine the knowledge, expertise, perspective, enthusiasm, and effort of a variety of employees with diverse backgrounds. Those with experience in a specific job or work area know what the hazards or potential hazards are, and generally have ideas how to go about controlling them. Those who are less familiar with a job or area play a vital role too, by seeing what others may have overlooked or taken for granted. This booklet will cover the structure and operations of WSSTs, what needs to be done in order to be effective and successful, and how you can help, whether you're a WSST member or not.

  3. Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven Hermann, Rainer Reich, Michael Schafers, and Klaus Hinrichs, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinrichs, Klaus

    Multimodal Vessel Visualization of Mouse Aorta PET/CT Scans Timo Ropinski, Member, IEEE, Sven present a visualization system for the visual analysis of PET/CT scans of aortic arches of mice

  4. Text-Alternative Version: MSSLC Member Case Studies- LED Street Lighting Programs Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "MSSLC Member Case Studies - LED Street Lighting Programs" webcast, held May 8, 2013.

  5. First waste-to-energy power station put into operation in Vietnam has successfully produced electricity from household and industrial waste as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    electricity from household and industrial waste as a newly-generated power supply has come online, its average cost per watt would be about half the price of electricity produced by other plants with the national electricity grid. On Wednesday, August 3, the Ho Chi Minh City Urban Environment Management

  6. Economic Impacts of Potential Foot and Mouth Disease Agro-terrorism in the United States: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL] [ORNL; Rose, Adam [University of Southern California, Los Angeles] [University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Bumsoo, Lee [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus has high agro-terrorism potential because it is contagious, can be easily transmitted via inanimate objects and can be spread by wind. An outbreak of FMD in developed countries results in massive slaughtering of animals (for disease control) and disruptions in meat supply chains and trade, with potentially large economic losses. Although the United States has been FMD-free since 1929, the potential of FMD as a deliberate terrorist weapon calls for estimates of the physical and economic damage that could result from an outbreak. This paper estimates the economic impacts of three alternative scenarios of potential FMD attacks using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the US economy. The three scenarios range from a small outbreak successfully contained within a state to a large multi-state attack resulting in slaughtering of 30 percent of the national livestock. Overall, the value of total output losses in our simulations range between $37 billion (0.15% of 2006 baseline economic output) and $228 billion (0.92%). Major impacts stem from the supply constraint on livestock due to massive animal slaughtering. As expected, the economic losses are heavily concentrated in agriculture and food manufacturing sectors, with losses ranging from $23 billion to $61 billion in the two industries.

  7. Committees per September 1, 2014 Member of the national advisory council for science, technology and innovation (AWTI) (August 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    committee CAREM nuclear reactor design, National Atomic Energy Commission Argentina (2011) · Member

  8. Condom attitudes, perceived vulnerability, and sexual risk behaviors of young Latino male urban street gang members: Implications for HIV prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, RA; Lee, S-J; Stover, GN; Barkley Jr, TW

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    78, Esbensen, F. , & Huizinga, D. (1993). Gangs, drugs, andgang members (Esbensen & Huizinga, 1993; Harper & Robinson,

  9. MEMBERS OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORLD PETROLEUM ASSESSMENT 2000 TEAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Chapter LS MEMBERS OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORLD PETROLEUM ASSESSMENT 2000 TEAM in U Energy Assessment Team Go to Table of Contents Go to index map #12;LS-2 MEMBERS OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY WORLD PETROLEUM ASSESSMENT 2000 TEAM Project Chief

  10. TEAM MEMBERS INSPECTED LAB Oct 2014 Suhare Adam Greg Silverberg Cruft Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSPECTION TEAM TEAM CHAIR MEMBER TEAM MEMBERS INSPECTED LAB LOCATIONS LAB SAFETY OFFICERS TEAM 1 Oct 2014 Suhare Adam Greg Silverberg Cruft Lab Hau (Eric Brandin) Electronics Shop (Al Takeda) TEAM 2/Tamas Szalay) Capasso (Alan She) Stubbs (Peter Doherty) TEAM 3 Nov 2014 Mike Gerhardt Zach Gault Paul Loschak

  11. 04/2013 J-1 Suspension and Termination of Faculty Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    04/2013 J-1 Appendix J Suspension and Termination of Faculty Members I. Introduction From time to time, a faculty member may be accused of conduct that may warrant suspension or termination term of appointment has engaged in conduct that may warrant suspension or termination, the appropriate

  12. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Maria Weimer, M.D. Academy Fellow Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology Department of Neurology School of Medicine Email with another Academy member of interactive cases that can be used with a variety of learners in a small group

  13. TIP Proposal Preparation Kit Exhibit 4. The NIST-1022A Form, "Other Joint Venture Members".

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    TIP Proposal Preparation Kit 2010 61 Exhibit 4. The NIST-1022A Form, "Other Joint Venture Members to identify specific information on each joint venture member (exclud- ing the organization submitting in the organization to be contacted regarding technical portion of the proposal), and Congressional District (home

  14. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, David Marchant (Oviedo, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Orlando, FL); Zolyomi, Wendel (Lawrenceville, GA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  15. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688 760,877 951,322 1,381,127byFormsConsumption 1994 4

  16. LIKELY MEMBERS OF THE {beta} PICTORIS AND AB DORADUS MOVING GROUPS IN THE NORTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlieder, Joshua E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Simon, Michal, E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results from follow-up of targets in the northern hemisphere {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving group candidate list of Schlieder et al. We obtained high-resolution, near-infrared spectra of 27 candidate members to measure their radial velocities and confirm consistent group kinematics. We identify 15 candidates with consistent predicted and measured radial velocities, perform analyses of their six-dimensional (UVWXYZ) Galactic kinematics, and compare to known group member distributions. Based on these analyses, we propose that seven {beta} Pic and eight AB Dor candidates are likely new group members. Four of the likely new {beta} Pic stars are binaries, one a double-lined spectroscopic system. Three of the proposed AB Dor stars are binaries. Counting all binary components, we propose 22 likely members of these young, moving groups. The majority of the proposed members are M2 to M5 dwarfs, the earliest being of type K2. We also present preliminary parameters for the two new spectroscopic binaries identified in the data, the proposed {beta} Pic member and a rejected {beta} Pic candidate. Our candidate selection and follow-up has thus far identified more than 40 low-mass, likely members of these two moving groups. These stars provide a new sample of nearby, young targets for studies of local star formation, disks and exoplanets via direct imaging, and astrophysics in the low-mass regime.

  17. Performance Evaluation of A Household Refrigerator Using Cuo Nanoparticle Lubricant Mixture and Various Other Compressor Oils with Different Condenser Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreejith. K

    Abstract:- The objective of this paper was to study the performance of household refrigerator having both air and water-cooled condenser, with 0.06 % mass fraction CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture and different types of compressor oils. The experiment was done using HFC134a as the refrigerant, CuO nanoparticles, Polyol-ester oil (POE) oil which is used as the conventional lubricant in the household refrigerator and SUNISO 3GS mineral oil as the lubricant alternatively. The result indicates that the refrigerator performance had improved while using CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture. The performance was also improved when HFC134a/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system was used instead of HFC134a/POE oil system and there was also an enhancement when water-cooled condenser was used instead of the conventional air-cooled condenser on all load conditions. The HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system works normally and safely in the refrigerator. HFC134a/CuO/SUNISO 3GS mineral oil system reduced the energy consumption between 12 % and 19 % when compared with the HFC134a/POE oil system and between 9 % and 14 % while working with water-cooled condenser on various load conditions. There was also an enhancement in coefficient of performance (COP) when CuO nanoparticle-lubricant mixture was used instead of POE oil as the lubricant. The water cooled heat exchanger was designed and the system was modified by retrofitting it, along with the conventional air-cooled condenser by making a bypass line and thus the system can be utilized as a waste heat recovery unit. Experimental result shows that about 200 litres of hot water at a temperature of about 58şC over a day can be generated. Techno economic analysis shows that the installation cost and running cost of the waste heat recovery system for a day is much lower than that of a conventional

  18. Childhood lead poisoning near abandoned lead mining and smelting areas: A case study of two affected households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moehr, A.D. (Jasper County Health Dept., Webb City, MO (United States)); Roberts, D.W.; Phillips, P.E.; Evans, R.G.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, 1990 the Missouri Dept. of Health entered a contract with the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to conduct an exposure study at the Jasper County, Missouri Superfund Site. The primary concern was exposure to elevated levels of lead and cadmium resulting from previous mining of lead and zinc in the area. Several individuals were found to have elevated lead levels and this article is a case study of two households where children with elevated levels resided. Due to the lowering of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standard for a level of concern in childhood lead poisoning from 25 [mu]g/dl to 10 [mu]g/dl, many environmental heath personnel may be requested to evaluate exposure routes and give advice regarding risk reduction to families who reside in areas not previously thought to be problematic. Accomplishing this risk reduction may require passage of local ordinances requiring lead abatement, additional training of field personnel, and cooperative work with other public and governmental entities.

  19. Characterizing Walk Trips in communities by Using Data from 2009 National Household Travel Survey, American Community Survey, and Other Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [Macrosys] [Macrosys; Wilson, Daniel W [ORNL] [ORNL; Murakami, Elaine [FHWA USDOT] [FHWA USDOT

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-motorized travel (i.e. walking and bicycling) are of increasing interest to the transportation profession, especially in context with energy consumption, reducing vehicular congestion, urban development patterns, and promotion of healthier life styles. This research project aimed to identify factors impacting the amount of travel for both walk and bike trips at the Census block group or tract level, using several public and private data sources. The key survey of travel behavior is the 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) which had over 87,000 walk trips for persons 16 and over, and over 6000 bike trips for persons 16 and over. The NHTS, in conjunction with the Census Bureau s American Community Survey, street density measures using Census Bureau TIGER, WalkScore , Nielsen Claritas employment estimates, and several other sources were used for this study. Stepwise Logistic Regression modeling techniques as well as Discriminant Analysis were applied using the integrated data set. While the models performed reasonably well for walk trips, travel by bike was abandoned due to sparseness of data. This paper discusses data sources utilized and modeling processes conducted under this study. It also presents a summary of findings and addresses data challenges and lesson-learned from this research effort.

  20. Indoor Secondary Pollutants from Household Product Emissions inthe Presence of Ozone: A Bench-Scale Chamber Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Lunden, Melissa M.; Singer, Brett C.; Coleman,Beverly K.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Weschler, Charles J.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ozone-driven chemistry is a major source of indoor secondary pollutants of health concern. This study investigates secondary air pollutants formed from reactions between constituents of household products and ozone. Gas-phase product emissions were introduced along with ozone at constant rates into a 198-L Teflon-lined reaction chamber. Gas-phase concentrations of reactive terpenoids and oxidation products were measured. Formaldehyde was a predominant oxidation byproduct for the three studied products, with yields under most conditions of 20-30% with respect to ozone consumed. Acetaldehyde, acetone, glycolaldehyde, formic acid and acetic acid were each also detected for two or three of the products. Immediately upon mixing of reactants, a scanning mobility particle sizer detected particle nucleation events that were followed by a significant degree of ultrafine particle growth. The production of secondary gaseous pollutants and particles depended primarily on the ozone level and was influenced by other parameters such as the air-exchange rate. Hydroxyl radical concentrations in the range 0.04-200 x 10{sup 5} molecules cm{sup -3} were measured. OH concentrations were observed to vary strongly with residual ozone level in the chamber, which was in the range 1-25 ppb, as is consistent with expectations from a simplified kinetic model. In a separate test, we exposed the dry residue of two products to ozone in the chamber and observed the formation of gas-phase and particle-phase secondary oxidation products.

  1. PWM Regenerative Rectifiers: State of the Art J. Rodriguez, Senior Member, IEEE, J. Dixon, J. Espinoza, Member, IEEE, and P. Lezana.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    frequency. The simplest line-commutated converters use diodes to trans- form the electrical energy from AC. Espinoza, Member, IEEE, and P. Lezana. Abstract-- New regulations impose more stringent limits to current with low switching frequency (line commutated) and other circuits which operate with high switching

  2. Semi-Blind Cancellation of IQ-Imbalances Matthias Hesse, Student Member, IEEE, Marko Mailand, Student Member, IEEE, Hans-Joachim Jentschel,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-Blind Cancellation of IQ-Imbalances Matthias Hesse, Student Member, IEEE, Marko Mailand iterative blind source separation (IBSS) as well as information about the modulation scheme used (hence the term semi-blind). The novelty of our approach lies in the fact that we match the nonlinearity involved

  3. A Gas-Actuated Anthropomorphic Transhumeral Prosthesis Kevin B. Fite, Member, IEEE, Thomas J. Withrow, Keith W. Wait, and Michael Goldfarb, Member,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Gas-Actuated Anthropomorphic Transhumeral Prosthesis Kevin B. Fite, Member, IEEE, Thomas J of an anthropomorphic 21 degree-of-freedom, 9 degree-of-actuation arm prosthesis for use by transhumeral amputees to obtain a self-powered dexterous prosthesis in which all of the requisite power, actuation, and sensing

  4. Smart Grid The New and Improved Power Grid: A Survey Xi Fang, Student Member, IEEE, Satyajayant Misra, Member, IEEE, Guoliang Xue, Fellow, IEEE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Satyajayant

    Smart Grid ­ The New and Improved Power Grid: A Survey Xi Fang, Student Member, IEEE, Satyajayant--The Smart Grid, regarded as the next generation power grid, uses two-way flows of electricity the literature till 2011 on the enabling technologies for the Smart Grid. We explore three major systems, namely

  5. Nonlinear Observer Design for Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud, Student Member, IEEE, M. J. Hossain, Member, IEEE, and H. R. Pota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Nonlinear Observer Design for Interconnected Power Systems M. A. Mahmud, Student Member, IEEE, M. J design method for interconnected power systems. The concepts of nonlinear coordinate transformation, Lie derivative, and relative degree are used to design the observer for power systems. In this proposed design

  6. CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark,' Associate Member, ASCE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark of natural materials, including peats. organic silts, highly sensitive clays, shales, as well as granular this statement and credit Mesri and Castro (1987) for reporting a C)Cc range of 0.02-0.10 for peats. Ac tually

  7. CASAS: A Smart Home in a Box Diane J. Cook, IEEE Fellow, Aaron S. Crandall, IEEE Member, Brian L. Thomas, IEEE Member,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    CASAS: A Smart Home in a Box Diane J. Cook, IEEE Fellow, Aaron S. Crandall, IEEE Member, Brian L,acrandal,bthomas,ckn}@eecs.wsu.edu Abstract. While the potential benefits of smart home technology are widely recognized, a lightweight design is needed for the benefits to be realized at a large scale. We introduce the CASAS "smart home in a box

  8. Member Case Studies: LED Street Lighting Programs in Algona (IA), Asheville (NC), and Boston (MA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This May 8, 2013 webcast featured presentations from DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium member cities about their experiences with LED street lighting. Presenters John Bilsten of...

  9. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  10. Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improved age control on early Homo fossils from the upper Burgi Member at Koobi Fora, Kenya in Areas 105 and 131 on the Karari Ridge in the eastern Turkana Basin (Kenya). We identify the base

  11. A fracture-based approach to understanding debonding in FRP bonded structural members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GüneĹŸ , OÄŸ uz, 1971-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) members. The experimental program for RC beams involves qualitative and quantitative observation of the changes in the debonding behavior and load capacity of the beams with various configurations of shear and/or ...

  12. A novel engineering tool for thermal analysis of structural members in natural fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Hong; Welch, Stephen

    of semi-empirical methods and detailed numerical heat transfer approaches, in order to give solutions of sufficient accuracy for structural members in a generalised fashion, the novel methodology has been developed as an essentially 1D heat transfer model...

  13. Development of an engineering methodology for thermal analysis of protected structural members in fire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Hong; Welch, Stephen

    In order to overcome the limitations of existing methodologies for thermal analysis of protected structural members in fire, a novel CFD-based methodology has been developed. This is a generalised quasi- 3D approach with ...

  14. Chemistry Research Projects Available to Undergraduates Consult Individual Faculty Members' Web Sites for More Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    . · Applications to solar energy conversion or electrocatalysis. · Design and synthesis of mixedmetal and photochemical energy storage. · Particular emphasis is placed on probing the propertiesChemistry Research Projects Available to Undergraduates Consult Individual Faculty Members' Web

  15. Collective guilt for harming future ingroup members: The case of American identity and global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Mark Allen

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    members on willingness to engage in behaviors that mitigate global warming. An experimental study extended these results by showing similar effects for actual behavior and pro-environmental attitudes. A final experiment extended the other studies...

  16. Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Upper Cretaceous, Spindle field, Denver Basin, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helsley, Robert James

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1985 Major Subject: Geology TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, UPPER CRETACEOUS, SPINDLE FIELD, DENVER BASIN, COLORADO A Thesis by ROBERT JAMES HELSLEY Approved as to style and content by: R. R. Berg...

  17. An investigation of torsional design procedures applied to lightweight concrete members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Richard Bertrand

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF TORSIONAL DESIGN PROCEDURES APPLIED TO LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE MEMBERS A Thesis By Richard Bertrand Tanner Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January f96Z Major Subject: Civil Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF TORSIONAL DESIGN PROCEDURES APPLIED TO LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE MEMBERS A Thesis By Richard Bertrand Tanner Approved as to style and content...

  18. The transfer of training and skills by Texas State 4-H Council members: A qualitative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Jacklyn Antoinette

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE TRANSFER OF TRAINING AND SKILLS BY TEXAS STATE 4-H COUNCIL MEMBERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY A Dissertation by JACKLYN ANTOINETTE BRUCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003 Major Subject: Agricultural Education THE TRANSFER OF TRAINING AND SKILLS BY TEXAS STATE 4-H COUNCIL MEMBERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY A Dissertation by JACKLYN ANTOINETTE BRUCE...

  19. Trace fossils of Fort Hays Limestone Member of Niobrara Chalk (Upper Cretaceous), west-central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, R. W.

    1970-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS ARTICLE 53 (CRETACEOUS 2) TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo... Figures, 10 Plates, 4 Tables TRACE FOSSILS OF FORT HAYS LIMESTONE MEMBER OF NIOBRARA CHALK (UPPER CRETACEOUS), WEST-CENTRAL KANSAS' ROBERT W. FREY University of Georgia Marine Institute, Sapelo Island, Georgia CONTENTS PAGE PAGE ABSTRACT 5 Thalassinoides...

  20. Abstract: With power market deregulation, member companies cooperate to share one whole grid system and try to achieve their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Abstract: With power market deregulation, member companies cooperate to share one whole grid, in a deregulated environment, no single company owns the whole system. There are multiple member companies who must

  1. foote-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., December 8,John Wagoner,, 2012Temperature

  2. Council Resolution concerning the admission of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan as Associate Member State at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Council Resolution concerning the admission of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan as Associate Member State at CERN

  3. New MAFAC Member from Hawaii Appointed (April 22, 2013) Acting Secretary of Commerce Rebecca Blank has appointed John Corbin of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in tropical island and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) aquaculture. He is a member of the American

  4. Sedimentary and faunal analysis of a marginal marine section, the Stone City Member (middle eocene), Crockett Formation, Burleson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelms, Katherine Currier

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    partial fulf1llment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subiect: Geology SEDIMENTARY AND FAUNAL ANALYSIS OF A MARGINAL MARINE SECTION, THE STONE CITY MEMBER (MIDDLE EOCENE), CROCKETT FORMATION, BURLESON COUNTY..., TEXAS A Thesis by KATHERINE CURRIER NELMS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman Cemmittek Head of par ment Member Member December 1979 ABSTRACT SEDIMENTARY AND FAUNAL ANALYSIS OF A MARGINAL MARINE SECTION, THE STONE CITY MEMBER (MIDDLE...

  5. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Average Fuel OilKerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per...

  6. Surface--micromachined rotatable member having a low-contact-area hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, M. Steven (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface-micromachined rotatable member formed on a substrate and a method for manufacturing thereof are disclosed. The surface-micromachined rotatable member, which can be a gear or a rotary stage, has a central hub, and an annulus connected to the central hub by an overarching bridge. The hub includes a stationary axle support attached to the substrate and surrounding an axle. The axle is retained within the axle support with an air-gap spacing therebetween of generally 0.3 .mu.m or less. The rotatable member can be formed by alternately depositing and patterning layers of a semiconductor (e.g. polysilicon or a silicon-germanium alloy) and a sacrificial material and then removing the sacrificial material, at least in part. The present invention has applications for forming micromechanical or microelectromechanical devices requiring lower actuation forces, and providing improved reliability.

  7. Surface-micromachined rotatable member having a low-contact-area hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Krygowski, Thomas W.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface-micromachined rotatable member formed on a substrate and a method for manufacturing thereof are disclosed. The surface-micromachined rotatable member, which can be a gear or a rotary stage, has a central hub, and an annulus connected to the central hub by an overarching bridge. The hub includes a stationary axle support attached to the substrate and surrounding an axle. The axle is retained within the axle support with an air-gap spacing therebetween of generally 0.3 .mu.m or less. The rotatable member can be formed by alternately depositing and patterning layers of a semiconductor (e.g. polysilicon or a silicon-germanium alloy) and a sacrificial material and then removing the sacrificial material, at least in part. The present invention has applications for forming micromechanical or microelectromechanical devices requiring lower actuation forces, and providing improved reliability.

  8. Ultrasonic thickness measurements on corroded steel members: a statistical analysis of error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konen, Keith Forman

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Journal of Structural Engineering, ASCE. This study is the first phase of a joint industry project (JIP) that is funded by the Mineral Management Service of the Department of the Interior, Shell Deepwater Development, Inc. , and Mobil Technology Company... to the numbering system used in the 1989 JIP. Note that not all members were used in this particular study. TABLE 5. 1. Description of specimens Member 10 15 16 Diameter (in) 12. 75 12. 50 12. 75 20. 00 16. 00 14. 00 14. 00 Wall Thickness (in) 0...

  9. Diagenesis of the Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Spindle field, Weld County, Colorado 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Phillip Dean

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIAGENESIS OF THE TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, SPINDLE FIELD, WELD COUNTY, COLORADO A Thesis PHILLIP DEAN HAYS Submitted to the Gradute College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Geology DIAGNESIS OF THE TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE ~ SP INDLE F I ELD ~ WELD COUNTY ~ COLORADO A Thesis by PHILLIP DEAN HAYS Approved as to style and content by: -, ~jD Thomas T...

  10. Diagenesis of the Terry sandstone member of the Pierre Shale, Spindle field, Weld County, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Phillip Dean

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DIAGENESIS OF THE TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE, SPINDLE FIELD, WELD COUNTY, COLORADO A Thesis PHILLIP DEAN HAYS Submitted to the Gradute College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Geology DIAGNESIS OF THE TERRY SANDSTONE MEMBER OF THE PIERRE SHALE ~ SP INDLE F I ELD ~ WELD COUNTY ~ COLORADO A Thesis by PHILLIP DEAN HAYS Approved as to style and content by: -, ~jD Thomas T...

  11. Automatically Identifying Groups Based on Content and Collective Behavioral Patterns of Group Members

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Engel, David W.; Bell, Eric B.; Piatt, Andrew W.; Dowson, Scott T.; Cowell, Andrew J.

    2011-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Online communities, or groups, have largely been defined based on links, page rank, and eigenvalues. In this paper we explore identifying abstract groups, groups where member's interests and online footprints are similar but they are not necessarily connected to one another explicitly. We use a combination of structural information and content information from posts and their comments to build a footprint for groups. We find that these variables do a good job at identifying groups, placing members within a group, and help determine the appropriate granularity for group boundaries.

  12. Keeping Household Records. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Linda

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transactiwl or enable you to GtbgCk MI others' * prove your ownership of property e define your fegal and financial rights ease management of your home and financi fairs Many papers could and should be di Don't become a junk collector, but don't th... valuable papers either. Know what family r keep where and why. Papers to Keep in Your Home File Certain important papers and records need to refer to or update often are best kept Store them in a &%, convenient @ace. A home business center will help...

  13. Managing Household Ant Pests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    can tolerate the stings, but some people are very sensitive to fire ant venom and must seek medical attention. Foraging workers may enter a house in search of food, moisture or nesting sites, particularly during hot, dry periods or during floods... System become queen ants in new colonies. They may choose indoor nesting sites if suitable ones are not available outdoors. When she ?nds a nesting site, the queen loses her wings and begins to lay eggs, which hatch into legless, grub-like larvae...

  14. Essays on household finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferman, Bruno

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays. The first chapter studies whether credit demand is sensitive to interest rates, to the prominence of interest rate disclosure, and to nudges. Consumer credit regulations usually ...

  15. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FYHousehold Magnets

  16. Diagnostic evaluation of a multiplexed RT-PCR microsphere array assay for the detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus and look-alike disease viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hindson, B J; Reid, S M; Baker, B R; Ebert, K; Ferris, N P; Bentley Tammero, L F; Lenhoff, R J; Naraghi-Arani, P; Vitalis, E A; Slezak, T R; Hullinger, P J; King, D P

    2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput multiplexed assay was developed for the differential laboratory diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) from viruses which cause clinically similar diseases of livestock. This assay simultaneously screens for five RNA and two DNA viruses using multiplexed reverse transcription PCR (mRT-PCR) amplification coupled with a microsphere hybridization array and flow-cytometric detection. Two of the seventeen primer-probe sets included in this multiplex assay were adopted from previously characterized real-time RT-PCR (rRT-PCR) assays for FMDV. The diagnostic accuracy of the mRT-PCR was evaluated using 287 field samples, including 248 (true positive n= 213, true negative n=34) from suspect cases of foot-and-mouth disease collected from 65 countries between 1965 and 2006 and 39 true negative samples collected from healthy animals. The mRT-PCR assay results were compared with two singleplex rRT-PCR assays, using virus isolation with antigen-ELISA as the reference method. The diagnostic sensitivity of the mRT-PCR assay for FMDV was 93.9% [95% C.I. 89.8-96.4%], compared to 98.1% [95% C.I. 95.3-99.3%] for the two singleplex rRT-PCR assays used in combination. In addition, the assay could reliably differentiate between FMDV and other vesicular viruses such as swine vesicular disease virus and vesicular exanthema of swine virus. Interestingly, the mRT-PCR detected parapoxvirus (n=2) and bovine viral diarrhea virus (n=2) in clinical samples, demonstrating the screening potential of this mRT-PCR assay to identify viruses in FMDV-negative material not previously recognized using focused single-target rRT-PCR assays.

  17. Instrument effects in polarized infrared images Joseph A. Shaw, MEMBER SPIE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Instrument effects in polarized infrared images Joseph A. Shaw, MEMBER SPIE NOAA Environmental and fric- tional heating of the polarizer mount. Our model shows that the two surfaces of a wire uncertainties less than 1%. Subject terms: infrared polarization; thermal imaging; remote sensing. Optica

  18. A NonFunctional Approach to System Integrity Simon N. Foley, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Simon

    , Protocols, Reliability, Software verification and validation, System analysis and design. I. INTRODUCTION1 A Non­Functional Approach to System Integrity Simon N. Foley, Member, IEEE Abstract effectiveness is justified more on the basis of experience and ``best practice'', rather than on any common

  19. Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Poison hemlock, Conium maculatum, (Figure 1) is a member of the plant family Apiaceae, which, cilantro, chervil, fen- nel, anise, dill, and caraway. It is a tall, invasive, highly poisonous weed that is sometimes mistaken for one of its crop relatives. Poison hemlock was introduced from Europe as an ornamental

  20. Incorporation of Multi-Member Substructure Capabilities in FAST for Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, H.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Sewell, D.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool widely used for analyzing onshore and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent modifications made to FAST to enable the examination of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multi-member support structures (which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters).; This paper addresses the methods used for incorporating the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic loading on multi-member structures in FAST through its hydronamic loading module, HydroDyn. Modeling of the hydrodynamic loads was accomplished through the incorporation of Morison and buoyancy loads on the support structures. Issues addressed include how to model loads at the joints of intersecting members and on tapered and tilted members of the support structure. Three example structures are modeled to test and verify the solutions generated by the modifications to HydroDyn, including a monopile, tripod, and jacket structure. Verification is achieved through comparison of the results to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-derived solution using the commercial software tool STAR-CCM+.

  1. Eos,Vol. 85, No. 46, 16 November 2004 use among European Union (EU) member

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Eos,Vol. 85, No. 46, 16 November 2004 use among European Union (EU) member states applications of the atlas contents should have no problem doing so. The price of the atlas is a hefty $310 the substantial amount of information contained within the atlas,the price represents a good value,and university

  2. Environmental Policy The Royal College of Art educates 850 students and employs 350 members of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    . It recognises responsibilities to reduce the environmental impact of its activities and is committed to improve! Environmental Policy The Royal College of Art educates 850 students and employs 350 members exceeding environmental legislative and other requirements. · Preventing pollution by managing and reducing

  3. Layers for Effective Volume Rendering Sundaresan Raman, Oleg Mishchenko, and Roger Crawfis, Member, IEEE Computer Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Layers for Effective Volume Rendering Sundaresan Raman, Oleg Mishchenko, and Roger Crawfis, Member, IEEE Computer Society Abstract--A multi-layer volume rendering framework is presented. The final image is obtained by compositing a number of renderings, each being represented as a separate layer. This layer

  4. TRANSFORMING THE EUROPEAN ENERGY SYSTEM: MEMBER STATES' PROSPECTS WITHIN THE EU FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and energy policy; National Renewable Action Plans (NREAPs); environmental federalism; mitigation scenarios energies in the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans (NREAPs) (EEA, 2012). In 2011, the EuropeanTRANSFORMING THE EUROPEAN ENERGY SYSTEM: MEMBER STATES' PROSPECTS WITHIN THE EU FRAMEWORK BRIGITTE

  5. *Staff Member Last Update: 9/17/13 Art Education, Studio Foundations AEF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    *Staff Member Last Update: 9/17/13 KEY: Art Education, Studio Foundations AEF Art History AH;Last Updated 9/17/13 COMPUTER COMMITTEE/ VISUAL RESOURCE CTR Committee Elects Chair Thom Houser, Chair Geha Nell Andrew Alex Murawski #12;Last Updated 9/17/13 PORTFOLIO REVIEW Appointed by Area Chairs Asen

  6. THE LOWEST-MASS MEMBER OF THE {beta} PICTORIS MOVING GROUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L., E-mail: erice@amnh.or [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectral and kinematic evidence that 2MASS J06085283-2753583 (M8.5{gamma}) is a member of the {beta} Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG, age {approx}12 Myr), making it the latest-type known member of this young, nearby association. We confirm low-gravity spectral morphology at both medium and high resolutions in the near-infrared. We present new radial velocity and proper motion measurements, and use these to calculate galactic location and space motion consistent with other high-probability members of the BPMG. The predicted mass range consistent with the object's effective temperature, surface gravity, spectral type, and age is 15-35 M {sub Jup}, placing 2MASS 0608-27 well within the brown dwarf mass regime. 2MASS J06085283-2753583 is thus confidently added to the short list of very low mass, intermediate age benchmark objects that inform ongoing searches for the lowest-mass members of nearby young associations.

  7. LEAF Outreach Team Members Needed! Description: The Office of Sustainability seeks an intern to support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    LEAF Outreach Team Members Needed! Description: The Office of Sustainability seeks an intern to support the implementation of the LEAF Outreach Team at the University of Maryland. LEAF is an acronym Outreach Team. You'll be working with a dedicated and knowledgeable team working to effect positive change

  8. MEMORANDUM 2013/14-17 To: Members of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodić, Aleksandar

    MEMORANDUM 2013/14-17 To: Members of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering Chairs of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) for a second five-year term beginning July 1, 2014. Jun of Materials Science and Engineering Professor Uwe Erb, Department of Materials Science and Engineering

  9. CONTAM 01 MultiScale Soil Sensor Network in Support of Groundwater Quality Team Members

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    California at Los Angeles, University of

    CONTAM 01 MultiScale Soil Sensor Network in Support of Groundwater Quality Protection Team Members of the ongoing CENS investigation into reclaimed wastewater infiltration into shallow soils and groundwater recharge. Groundwater resources are typically over-drafted during dry periods in arid and semi

  10. Make anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health care -- from doctors to dollars You should have the power to select your doctors, find the best prices on what you pay for health care services and choose how you get your health care informationMake anthem.com your 24/7 resource for health plan information Anthem members: Currently registered

  11. A Nominal Filter for Web Search Snippets: Using the Web to Identify Members of Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, William

    A Nominal Filter for Web Search Snippets: Using the Web to Identify Members of Latin America. This paper presents efforts aimed at using Natural Language Engineering (NLE) techniques to solve of three Latin American countries: Uruguay, Argentina and Colombia. An NLE system is under construction

  12. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION: A VIEW OF LARGE CONTRACTORS1 T. Michael Toole, Member, ASCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toole, T. Michael

    page 1 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION: A VIEW OF LARGE CONTRACTORS1 T. Michael Toole, Member of technological innovations is whether diffusion is driven more by technology-push than by demand-pull mechanisms is to broaden the perspective on information technology (IT) innovation presented here at the congress

  13. Sam Houston State University A Member of The Texas State University System

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    Short, Jon W.

    Sam Houston State University A Member of The Texas State University System Information Resources FO-IR-02 SHSU Web Accessibility Sam Houston State University is committed to making all official, academic for images aiding users who listen to the content of the site by using a screen reader, rather than reading

  14. MEMORANDUM 2013/14-11 To: Members of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

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    Prodić, Aleksandar

    MEMORANDUM 2013/14-11 To: Members of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Chairs and Industrial Engineering I am very pleased to announce the re-appointment of Professor Jean Zu as Chair of the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering (MIE) for a second five-year term beginning July 1, 2014

  15. Date: April 18, 2011 To: All current and future members of the Retirement Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Date: April 18, 2011 To: All current and future members of the Retirement Plan From: Betsy Springer of this month and in early May. The dates of these sessions will be provided soon. Summary Analysis of the Carleton University Retirement Plan ("the Plan") shows that Carleton University ("the University") faces

  16. Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    -ahead market, real-time market, demand side management, multi-stage stochastic optimization, closed1 Optimal Demand Bidding for Time-Shiftable Loads Hamed Mohsenian-Rad, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract and enhancing demand response and peak-load shaving programs. In this paper, we seek to answer the following

  17. Updated 11/08/2014 COURT AND COURT MEMBERS' REGISTER OF INTERESTS 2013/14

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    Painter, Kevin

    appointments Other - Mitra Energy - Mitra Energy Mr Andrew Milligan Head of Global Strategy Standard Life - Pension trustee Director Molson Coors Brewing Company UK Executive team member to Wealth International TD-Principal Heriot-Watt University Occasional consulting work, mostly for the EPSRC and Technology Strategy Board

  18. Single-Electron Devices and Their Applications KONSTANTIN K. LIKHAREV, MEMBER, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Single-Electron Devices and Their Applications KONSTANTIN K. LIKHAREV, MEMBER, IEEE Invited Paper The goal of this paper is to review in brief the basic physics of single-electron devices, as well. Several other applications of analog single-electron devices in unique scientific instrumentation

  19. Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association Members' Agricultral Vulnerability Perceptions and Preparedness

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    Allen, Patrick

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    (HSPD-9, 2004). Since it was determined that veterinarians are perceived to be the most reliable and trustworthy source of information by TSCRA members, local opinion leaders, such as veterinarians, should engage in train-the-trainer programs to ensure a...

  20. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Erin M. Dugan, Ph.D., LPC-S, RPT/S Academy Fellow Assistant Professor Department of Rehabilitation Counseling School/9/10 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Educational Leadership and Service Teaching

  1. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Sylvia Davis, Ph.D. Academy Master Teacher Professor and Director Department of Communication Disorders School of Allied meetings. Last Update: 8/9/10 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Curriculum

  2. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Rachel Trommelen Academy Associate Assistant Professor Department of Physical Therapy School of Allied Health Email: rtromm also love to travel. Last Update: 6/12/12 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio

  3. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Judith Gentry, A.P.R.N., M.S.N, O.C.N. C.N.E Academy Fellow Assistant Professor of Department of Baccalaureate Program School in Academy Portfolio Teaching Curriculum Development, Instructional Design and Assessment of Student

  4. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile John Paige, M.D. Academy Master Teacher Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery Department of Surgery School of Medicine/education projects. Last Update: 5/12/10 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Curriculum

  5. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Murtuza Ali, M.D. Academy Fellow Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine Department of Medicine School of Medicine Email from my involvement in the Academy. Last Update: 6/18/12 Educational Domains Represented in Academy

  6. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Rachel Dawkins, M.D., FAAP Academy Fellow Assistant Professor Department of Pediatrics School of Medicine Email: rdawki-academic life, I serve as the chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics' Section on Young Physicians as well

  7. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Rodolfo E. Begue, M.D. Academy Master Teacher Chief Department of Pediatrics School of Medicine Email: rbegue medicine. Last Update: 8/12/10 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Advising

  8. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Stacey L Holman, M.D. Academy Associate Associate Professor-Clinical Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology School of Medicine: 7/05/12 Educational Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Curriculum Development

  9. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile T. Kirk Nelson, Ph.D. Academy Fellow Instructor Department of Physical Therapy School of Allied Health Professions Email: tnelso committee of the Academy for the SAHP and served on the original executive council when the Academy

  10. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Kristopher Kaliebe, M.D. Academy Fellow Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry School of Medicine Email: kkalie and will see what these tools become. Last Update: 10/22/08 Educational Domains Represented in Academy

  11. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Guido DeJesus, M.D. Academy Fellow Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine Department of Medicine School of Medicine Email Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Advising and Mentoring Teaching/Education Expertise DxR review

  12. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Kathryn E. Kerdolff, MLIS, AHIP Academy Master Teacher Reference Librarian Department of Library School of Medicine Email' conferences SGEA and IAMSE. Kathy was the principal investigator for one of the 2008-2009 Academy EEG grants

  13. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Angela C. Johnson, M.D. Academy Fellow Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine Department of Internal Medicine School incorporated into the practice of medicine. Last Update: 5/5/10 Educational Domains Represented in Academy

  14. LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile

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    LSUHSC-NO Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship Member Profile Najy Masri, M.D. Academy Fellow Assistant Professor Department of Internal Medicine School of Medicine Email: nmasri Domains Represented in Academy Portfolio Teaching Advising and Mentoring Educational Leadership

  15. Prototyping a Residential Gateway Using Xilinx ISE S. W. Song, senior member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, William

    Prototyping a Residential Gateway Using Xilinx ISE S. W. Song, senior member, IEEE Department jzheng@uoguelph.ca, wgardner@cis.uoguelph.ca Abstract This paper presents a residential gateway (RG for broadband residential multiservices based on a SONET over DWDM (Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing

  16. Osher at UC San Diego Affiliate Members How To Access the Osher Online Video Library

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    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Osher at UC San Diego ­ Affiliate Members How To Access the Osher Online Video Library 1. Upon will look like: #12;NEXT: in order to access the Osher Video Library, you must create a password Online Video Library: 1. Visit http://olli.ucsd.edu. On the left-hand side, CLICK ON "Videos": #12

  17. Original: June, 2008 Procedure for the Election Staff Senate Members Revision: June, 2013

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    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Senate holds regular elections each spring to fill vacant seats. Details regarding eligibility, terms Senate will confirm with ITC the EEO categories (Classified Professional, Technical Members Revision: June, 2013 2.2. The timeframe will be developed in conjunction with ITC per

  18. Page 1 of 19 Modelling of Reinforced Concrete Flexural Members Strengthened with Near-1

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    beams strengthened with various Near-Surface Mounted9 (NSM) Fibre-Reinforced Polymers (FRPPage 1 of 19 Modelling of Reinforced Concrete Flexural Members Strengthened with Near-1 Surface, flexure, glass,27 modeling, near-surface mounted, rebars, reinforced concrete beam, sheets, static,28

  19. Had my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land

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    Rhode Island, University of

    to find out. Hated to spend the money, but it gave me peace of mind. " " " We're protecting our family. We for more help. Some labs will do the sampling for you, right at your home. 4. After you collect your waterHad my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land for generations. Never had a problem

  20. July 18, 2014 Dear members of the McMaster community,

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    Haykin, Simon

    by Shahid Naeem, Energy Management and Sustainability Engineer, Facility Services. Shahid, reportingJuly 18, 2014 Dear members of the McMaster community, McMaster's Office of Sustainability has undergone reorganization and has been developed into two distinct areas: campus operational sustainability