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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Biological hydrogen production by anaerobic digestion of food waste and sewage sludge treated using various pretreatment technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to enhance the efficiency of anaerobic co-digestion with sewage sludge using pretreatment technologies and food waste. We studied the effects of various pretreatment methods (thermal...

Seungjin Kim; Kwangkeun Choi; Jong-Oh Kim; Jinwook Chung

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and/or other wastes such as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT: Farms that once spread only manures are now also applying sewage biosolids (sludge) and streamwater concentrations in most cases. (KEY TERMS: nonpoint source pollution; sludge; waste such as food processing wastes and sewage biosolids (sludge). A concurrent trend in agriculture is the con

Walter, M.Todd

3

State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

5

Utilizing New Binder Materials for Green Building has Zero Waste by Recycling Slag and Sewage Sludge Ash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

binding material to save energy and to produce new innovative zero materials waste . The current research aims to investigate new binder materials as alternative of Portland cement. Alkali activated slag (AAS) blended with sewage sludge ash (SSA...

Zeedan, S. R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Treatability study of industrial waste using sanitary sewage to supply nutrients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ferguson, B. S. , U. S. Merchant Marine Academy Co-Chairmen of Advisory Conmittee: Dr. Harold W. Wolf Dr. Tom D. Reynolds Industrial wastewaters in many instances do not contain suffi- cient nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus to permit effective... and phosphorus, which adds to the cost. Sanitary sewage contains these nutrients and, if mixed in proper proportions with petrochemical industrial waste- waters requiring added nutrients, could satisfy the nutrient demand and reduce treatment cost. A limited...

Ferguson, James Ritchie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

Food waste within food supply chains: quantification and potential for change to 2050  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...potential for food waste reduction Interviewees...potential for food waste reduction. In developing...skills and knowledge, storage, transport and distribution...Kader 2005). For long-term sustainability...approaches to food waste reduction include...labelling and food storage also have food waste...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

least two seconds. ” The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of the resource associated with biomethane from food waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper assesses the resource of biomethane produced from food waste at a state level in the EU. The resource is dependent on the quantity of food waste available for anaerobic digestion and the specific methane yield from food waste. The specific method of undertaking biomethane potential (BMP) tests was shown to be crucial. BMP tests were carried out at different scales (5 L and 0.5 L) with different sources of inoculum, for both wet and dried substrate samples. The upper bound BMP results for source segregated canteen food waste gave specific methane yields of between 467 and 529 L CH4 per kg volatile solids added. The higher results were associated with acclimatised inoculum and wet samples of food waste. The potential renewable resource of biomethane from food waste is shown to be equivalent to 2.8% of energy in transport in Ireland; this is significant as it surpasses the resource associated with electrifying 10% of the private car fleet in Ireland, which is currently the preferred option for renewable energy in transport in the country. However for this resource to be realised within the EU, source segregation of food waste must be effected. According to the Animal By-Products Regulations, digestate from source segregated food waste may be applied to agricultural land post anaerobic digestion. Digestate from food waste derived from a mixed waste source may not be applied to agricultural land. Thus biomethane from food waste is predicated on source segregation of food waste.

James D. Browne; Jerry D. Murphy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SEWAGE: Algae at Work  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SEWAGE: Algae at Work ... Taking their cue from the successful use of bacteria to rid sewage of biodegradable wastes, engineers at the University of Kansas and Trans Union Corp. have a process that uses algae to remove inorganic nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon compounds from secondary treatment plant effluent. ... Though it has long been known that algae feed on inorganic wastes, the phenomenon had not been thought to hold much promise for sewage treatment. ...

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site) How can I recycle food waste on-site? Recycling to be recycled. While this is better than sending waste to landfill, there is a more sustainable way to recycle and parks. See examples of Tidy Planet's customers recycling on-site: www.tidyplanet.co.uk/our-news Short

Melham, Tom

12

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 2011 CHPIndustrial Distributed Energy R&D Portfolio Review - Summary Report Biogas Opportunities Roadmap...

13

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane gas that is burned to generate electricity. The Energy Department is helping to fund the development of integrated biorefineries, industrial centers dedicated to converting plant material into biofuels and other products. To commemorate National Energy Action Month, we're featuring some scarily

14

Evaluation of food waste disposal options by LCC analysis from the perspective of global warming: Jungnang case, South Korea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Various food waste disposal options were evaluated from the perspective of global warming. > Costs of the options were compared by the methodology of life cycle assessment and life cycle cost analysis. > Carbon price and valuable by-products were used for analyzing environmental credits. > The benefit-cost ratio of wet feeding scenario was the highest. - Abstract: The costs associated with eight food waste disposal options, dry feeding, wet feeding, composting, anaerobic digestion, co-digestion with sewage sludge, food waste disposer, incineration, and landfilling, were evaluated in the perspective of global warming and energy and/or resource recovery. An expanded system boundary was employed to compare by-products. Life cycle cost was analyzed through the entire disposal process, which included discharge, separate collection, transportation, treatment, and final disposal stages, all of which were included in the system boundary. Costs and benefits were estimated by an avoided impact. Environmental benefits of each system per 1 tonne of food waste management were estimated using carbon prices resulting from CO{sub 2} reduction by avoided impact, as well as the prices of by-products such as animal feed, compost, and electricity. We found that the cost of landfilling was the lowest, followed by co-digestion. The benefits of wet feeding systems were the highest and landfilling the lowest.

Kim, Mi-Hyung, E-mail: mhkim9@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yul-Eum, E-mail: yesong0724@dongguk.edu [Department of Philosophy, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, Pil-Dong 3-Ga, Jung-Gu, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Han-Byul, E-mail: kuackyang@ssu.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Sangdo-Ro 369, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Wk, E-mail: kimjw@snu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Planning, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim-Dong, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sun-Jin, E-mail: sjhwang@khu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Center for Environmental Studies, Kyung Hee University, Seocheon-Dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep Setting #12;Why Recycle? Recycling saves resources Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees! Recycling saves energy Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for 3 hours! Recycling is easy There are 4 waste categories here at UM

Awtar, Shorya

16

Prevention of Food-Processing Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...beans 99.8 99.8 Corn on the cob 46.0...green beans, and corn on the cob. Tests...starch and glu by new, wet processing of wheat...food exist.) Dry milling and air classification...con-ventional wheat-milling equipment. rom Two...from the conventional wet process and the proposed...

Sam R. Hoover

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases...

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste and sewage sludge using multi-solid fluidized bed combustion technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the recovery of energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage sludge (DSS) simultaneously by using Battelle's multi-solid fluidized-bed combustion (MS-FBC) technology. The concept was to recover energy as high and low pressure steam, simultaneously. High pressure steam would be generated from flue gas using a conventional tubular boiler. Low pressure steam would be generated by direct contact drying of DSS (as 4% solids) with hot sand in a fluidized bed that is an integral part of the MS-FBC process. It was proposed that high pressure steam could be used for district heating or electricity generation. The low pressure steam could be used for close proximity building heat. Alternatively, low pressure steam could be used to heat wastewater in a sewage treatment plant to enhance sedimentation and biological activity that would provide a captive market for this part of the recovered energy. The direct contact drying or tubeless steam generation eliminates fouling problems that are common during heat exchange with DSS. The MS-FBC process was originally developed for coal and was chosen for this investigation because its combustion rate is about three times that of conventional fluidized beds and it was projected to have the flexibility needed for accomplishing tubeless steam generation. The results of the investigation show that the MS-FBC process concept for the co-utilization of MSW and DSS is technically feasible and that the thermal efficiency of the process is 76 to 82% based on experiments conducted in a 70 to 85 lb/h pilot plant and calculations on three conceptual cases.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM waste (FW) and their mixture (MW) in batch digesters was evaluated under mesophilic conditions. BW waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor the total carbohydrate reduction efficiency and volatile fatty acid production dramatically decreased when acidogenic HRT was wastewater as feedstock.

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - areca-a food waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

greeted staff and took... the cafeteria to find out if it can be used to generate biogas or for compost. They separated food waste from... other garbage and measured an...

22

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

wisconsin's vanishing waters tech transfer success stories reducing food waste College of Agricultural & Life Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wisconsin's vanishing waters · tech transfer success stories · reducing food waste College to grow potatoes that serves as a model for other crops and leading cutting-edge research on biofuels

Balser, Teri C.

24

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste heat recovery, and food industry wastes from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and processing of fruits and vegetables. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer, and uses in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste is also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Food processing waste treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment used in the treatment of food processing wastes. Specific food industries include meatpacking, fruits and vegetables, seafood, and poultry. Processes and equipment used in the dairy industry are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Food processing waste treatment. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment used in the treatment of food processing wastes. Specific food industries include meatpacking, fruits and vegetables, seafood, and poultry. Processes and equipment used in the dairy industry are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Sewage Sludge, Pros & Cons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage Sludge, Pros & Cons ... Efficient Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorbents Obtained by Pyrolysis of Sewage Sludge Derived Fertilizer Modified with Spent Mineral Oil ... Efficient Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorbents Obtained by Pyrolysis of Sewage Sludge Derived Fertilizer Modified with Spent Mineral Oil ...

Rebecca Renner

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Biomethane production from food waste and organic residues.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Irish Research Council for Science Engineering and Technology (Enterprise Partnership Scheme (EPS)) Accepted Version Anaerobic digestion (AD) of biodegradable waste is an environmentally and economically… (more)

Browne, James D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008. “Utilization of sewage sludge in EU application of old2007. “Cost evaluation of sludge treatment options andwastewater treatment plant sludge treating leather tanning

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Thermal characteristics of the combustion process of biomass and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of two kinds of biomass and sewage sludge was studied. The biomass fuels were wood biomass (pellets) and agriculture biomass (oat). The sewage sludge came from waste water treatment plant. The biomass

Aneta Magdziarz; Ma?gorzata Wilk

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Waste disposal and treatment in the food processing industry. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. References discuss waste heat recovery and examine treatment of wastes resulting from meat and seafood processing, dairy and beverage production, and fruit and vegetable processing. The citations explore conversion of the treated waste to fertilizer and for use in animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, and composting. The recovery and recycling of usable chemicals from the food waste are also covered. Food packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Recycling for small island tourism developments: Food waste composting at Sandals Emerald Bay, Exuma, Bahamas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ability for small islands to meet sustainability goals is exacerbated by the costs of transporting goods on, and then, wastes off the islands. At small scales, recycling can be prohibitive and complicated by labor costs; the need to profitably recycle and manage solid waste output from tourism is complicated by scale and available technologies. A multi-year study documents the amount of solid waste generated on Great Exuma (Exuma), The Commonwealth of The Bahamas since 2010 with one year of benchmarking, then limited recycling of food waste generation by an all-inclusive resort, Sandals Emerald Bay (SEB). For the island of Exuma, the rapid increase in the rate of accumulation of solid waste associated with a large destination resort has led to an increase in pests such as rats and flies, along with an increased occurrence of fires associated with unburied solid waste. Solid waste has accumulated faster than the island solid waste management can absorb. SEB kitchen and hotel operations contributes an estimated 36% of all solid waste generated on the island, about 1752 t11 The Commonwealth of The Bahamas uses US units of weight and volume, thus Exuma solid waste records are maintained in pounds and tons, but SI units (e.g. tonnes, liters) are given in this paper. Pounds and tons are also used in outreach material. out of a total of 4841 t generated on the island in 2013 (exclusive of vegetation waste). Based on 4 weeks of benchmarking, 48.5% of all the waste coming out of the SEB resort is compostable, organic waste, but waste composition varies widely over time. Exuma Waste Management (EWM) and Recycle Exuma (RE), both privately-held Bahamian businesses, worked for one year (2012–2013) with SEB resort to implement a benchmarking and pilot recycling project to meet Earth Check green resort certification requirements. This paper outlines the costs and resources required for food waste recycling and some barriers to implementing more effective solid waste management for the tourism industry on small islands.

Kathleen Sullivan Sealey; Jarrell Smith

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Environmental impacts of different food waste resource technologies and the effects of energy mix  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The environmental impacts of food waste management strategies and the effects of energy mix were evaluated using a life cycle assessment model, EASEWASTE. Three different strategies involving landfill, composting and combined digestion and composting as core technologies were investigated. The results indicate that the landfilling of food waste has an obvious impact on global warming, although the power recovery from landfill gas counteracts some of this. Food waste composting causes serious acidification (68.0 PE) and nutrient enrichment (76.9 PE) because of NH3 and SO2 emissions during decomposition. Using compost on farmland, which can marginally reduce global warming (?1.7 PE), acidification (?0.8 PE), and ecotoxicity and human toxicity through fertilizer substitution, also leads to nutrient enrichment as neutralization of emissions from N loss (27.6 PE) and substitution (?12.8 PE). A combined digestion and composting technology lessens the effects of acidification (?12.2 PE), nutrient enrichment (?5.7 PE), and global warming (?7.9 PE) mainly because energy is recovered efficiently, which decreases emissions including SO2, Hg, NOx, and fossil CO2 during normal energy production. The change of energy mix by introducing more clean energy, which has marginal effects on the performance of composting strategy, results in apparently more loading to acidification and nutrient enrichment in the other two strategies. These are mainly because the recovered energy can avoid fewer emissions than before due to the lower background values in power generation. These results provide quantitative evidence for technical selection and pollution control in food waste management.

Yan Zhao; Wenjing Deng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Food Losses and Waste in China and Their Implication for Water and Land  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Such losses also imply that 26 ± 11 million hectares of land were used in vain, equivalent to the total arable land of Mexico. ... The fact remains that all food produced, regardless if it is eaten, lost, wasted, and converted, has consumed water, energy, occupied land, and contributed to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ... Following rapid economic development new policies and reforms to open China to the global market, living standards have improved in recent years. ...

Junguo Liu; Jan Lundqvist; Josh Weinberg; Josephine Gustafsson

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

37

Review of comparative LCAs of food waste management systems - Current status and potential improvements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHG-emissions from different treatment alternatives vary largely in 25 reviewed comparative LCAs of bio-waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System-boundary settings often vary largely in reviewed studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Existing LCA guidelines give varying recommendations in relation to several key issues. - Abstract: Twenty-five comparative cycle assessments (LCAs) addressing food waste treatment were reviewed, including the treatment alternatives landfill, thermal treatment, compost (small and large scale) and anaerobic digestion. The global warming potential related to these treatment alternatives varies largely amongst the studies. Large differences in relation to setting of system boundaries, methodological choices and variations in used input data were seen between the studies. Also, a number of internal contradictions were identified, many times resulting in biased comparisons between alternatives. Thus, noticed differences in global warming potential are not found to be a result of actual differences in the environmental impacts from studied systems, but rather to differences in the performance of the study. A number of key issues with high impact on the overall global warming potential from different treatment alternatives for food waste were identified through the use of one-way sensitivity analyses in relation to a previously performed LCA of food waste management. Assumptions related to characteristics in treated waste, losses and emissions of carbon, nutrients and other compounds during the collection, storage and pretreatment, potential energy recovery through combustion, emissions from composting, emissions from storage and land use of bio-fertilizers and chemical fertilizers and eco-profiles of substituted goods were all identified as highly relevant for the outcomes of this type of comparisons. As the use of LCA in this area is likely to increase in coming years, it is highly relevant to establish more detailed guidelines within this field in order to increase both the general quality in assessments as well as the potentials for cross-study comparisons.

Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Chemical Centre, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, Chemical Centre, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effect of lipase addition on hydrolysis and biomethane production of Chinese food waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The lipase obtained from Aspergillums niger was applied to promote the hydrolysis of food waste for achieving high biomethane production. Two strategies of lipase additions were investigated. One (Group A) was to pre-treat food waste to pre-decompose lipid to fatty acids before anaerobic digestion, and another one (Group B) was to add lipase to anaerobic digester directly to degrade lipid inside digester. The lipase was used at the concentrations of 0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.0% (w/v). The results showed that Group A achieved higher biomethane production, TS and VS reductions than those of Group B. At 0.5% lipase concentration, Group A obtained experimental biomethane yield of 500.1 mL/g VSadd, 4.97%-26.50% higher than that of Group B. The maximum Bd of 73.8% was also achieved in Group A. Therefore, lipase pre-treatment strategy is recommended. This might provide one of alternatives for efficient biomethane production from food waste and mitigating environmental impact associated.

Ying Meng; Sang Li; Hairong Yuan; Dexun Zou; Yanping Liu; Baoning Zhu; Xiujin Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flash pyrolysis of sewage sludge ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ... Influence of the Pyrolysis Temperature on Sewage Sludge Product Distribution, Bio-Oil, and Char Properties ...

Jan Piskorz; Donald S. Scott; Ian B. Westerberg

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

Bernstad, A., E-mail: Anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University (Sweden)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effect of Cd-Enriched Sewage Sludge on Plant Growth, Nutrients and Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Soil–Plant System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from waste-activated sludge, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J, 60:505-utilization of sewage sludge. A twenty-year study atCd-enriched sewage sludge (SS) and diammonium phosphate (

Rusan, Munir Mohammad; Athamneh, Bayan Mahmoud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Waste disposal and treatment in the food-processing industry. March 1985-October 1989 (Citations from the Biobusiness data base). Report for March 1985-October 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning waste treatment and disposal in the food-processing industry. Methods, equipment, and technology are considered. Specific areas include waste-heat recovery, meat processing, seafood processing, dairy wastes, beverage industry, fruits and vegetables, and other food-industry wastes. Waste utilization includes animal feeds, combustion for energy production, biogas production, conversion to fertilizer, composting, and recovery and recycling of usable chemicals. Food-packaging recycling is considered in a related bibliography. (Contains 169 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of a novel process for converting food waste to ethanol and co-products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Waste-to-ethanol conversion is a promising technology to provide renewable transportation fuel while mitigating feedstock risks and land use conflicts. It also has the potential to reduce environmental impacts from waste management such as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that contribute to climate change. This paper analyzes the life cycle GHG emissions associated with a novel process for the conversion of food processing waste into ethanol (EtOH) and the co-products of compost and animal feed. Data are based on a pilot plant co-fermenting retail food waste with a sugary industrial wastewater, using a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process at room temperature with a grinding pretreatment. The process produced 295 L EtOH/dry t feedstock. Lifecycle GHG emissions associated with the ethanol production process were 1458 gCO2e/L EtOH. When the impact of avoided landfill emissions from diverting food waste to use as feedstock are considered, the process results in net negative GHG emissions and approximately 500% improvement relative to corn ethanol or gasoline production. This finding illustrates how feedstock and alternative waste disposal options have important implications in life cycle GHG results for waste-to-energy pathways.

Jacqueline Ebner; Callie Babbitt; Martin Winer; Brian Hilton; Anahita Williamson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition is 6-percent coal/petcoke/animal meal mix, 16-sawdust Coal, plastic, and tires Tires Petcoke, plastic, andwaste oil Petcoke, sunflower shells, and waste oil Tire

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry- Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry, given by Aditya Kumar of GE Global Research, at the U.S. DOE Industrial Distributed Energy Portfolio Review Meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 1-2, 2011.

46

Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for Food and Beverage Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Food and beverage plants inherently consume a large quantity of water and generate a high volume of wastewater rich in organic content. On one hand, water discharge regulations are getting more stringent over the time, necessitating the use of different technologies to reduce the amount of wastewater and improve the effluent water quality. On the other hand, growing energy and water costs are driving the plants to extract and reuse valuable energy and water from the wastewater stream. An integrated waste-tovalue system uses a combination of anaerobic digester (AD), reciprocating gas engine/boiler, membrane bioreactor (MBR), and reverse osmosis (RO) to recover valuable energy as heat and/or electricity as well as purify the water for reuse. While individual anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors are being used in increasing numbers, there is a growing need to integrate them together in a waste-to-value system for enhanced energy and water recovery. However, currently operation of these systems relies heavily on the plant operator to perform periodic sampling and off-line lab analysis to monitor the system performance, detect any abnormal condition due to variations in the wastewater and decide on appropriate remedial action needed. This leads to a conservative design and operation of these systems to avoid any potential upsets that can destabilize the system.

Shi, Ruijie

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Heterogeneous catalyst-assisted thermochemical conversion of food waste biomass into 5-hydroxymethylfurfural  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel thermochemical conversion route has been developed that yields 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from food waste biomass (FWB) in the presence of a heterogeneous catalysts (zirconium phosphate (ZrP)). The ZrP catalyst was prepared by precipitation followed by calcination at 400 (ZrP-400) and 600 °C (ZrP-600) and was characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS, N2 sorption and NH3-TPD. The optimized reaction conditions were identified to maximize HMF yield by varying the type of catalyst, the catalyst loading and the reaction time. The highest HMF yield achieved was 4.3%. On average 33% higher yield for ZrP-600 was obtained compared to that for ZrP-400, which might be due to higher number of acid sites on ZrP-600. The ZrP catalyst was easily regenerated by thermal treatment and showed stable activity upon its reuse. Preliminary calculations of the “minimum selling price” of HMF suggest that it is economically attractive to make this industrially-relevant chemical from FWB.

Ganesh K. Parshetti; Maria Stefanie Suryadharma; Thi Phuong Thuy Pham; Russell Mahmood; Rajasekhar Balasubramanian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A comprehensive microbial insight into two-stage anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microbial community structures were assessed in a two-stage anaerobic digestion system treating food waste-recycling wastewater. The reactors were operated for 390 d at 10 different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) ranging from 25 to 4 d. Stable operation was achieved with the overall chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 73.0–85.9% at organic loading rate of up to 35.6 g COD/L·d. Performance of the acidogenic reactors, however, changed significantly during operation. This change coincided with transition of the bacterial community from one dominated by Aeriscardovia- and Lactobacillus amylovorus-related species to one dominated by Lactobacillus acetotolerans- and Lactobacillus kefiri-like organisms. In methanogenic reactors, the microbial community structures also changed at this stage along with the shift from Methanoculleus- to Methanosarcina-like organisms. This trend was confirmed by the non-metric multidimensional scaling joint plot of microbial shifts along with performance parameters. These results indicated that the overall process performance was relatively stable compared to the dynamic changes in the microbial structures and the acidogenic performance.

Seung Gu Shin; Gyuseong Han; Juntaek Lim; Changsoo Lee; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Growth condition and bacterial community for maximum hydrolysis of suspended organic materials in anaerobic digestion of food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the effects of changing pH (5–7) and temperature (T..., 40–60 °C) on the efficiencies of bacterial hydrolysis of suspended organic matter (SOM) in wastewater from food waste recycling (FWR) and...

Man Deok Kim; Minkyung Song; Minho Jo…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sludge to land. Fourthly, sewage sludge is only one of several types of organic waste now being produced1 I N F O R M A T I O N N O T E Use of Sewage Sludges and Composts in Forestry J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 saw a large national research campaign to investigate the potential benefits of using sewage sludges

51

Food-processing waste treatment. January 1976-January 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1976-January 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment utilized in the treatment of food-processing wastes. Specific food industries include meatpacking, fruit and vegetable, seafood, and poultry. Processes and equipment used in the dairy industry are also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 185 citations, 11 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland. Sewage sludge (also known as biosolids) is not sewage, but rather is one of the final products of treated sewage at a sewage (wastewater) treatment plant. Sewage sludge is the fine particulate matter remaining after treatment which breaks down organic matter and destroys disease organisms in sewage. A SSU Permit is required for any person who collects,

53

A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the anaerobic) and the use of biofertiliser (digestate) from anaerobic treatment as substitution of chemical fertilisers used in an incineration alternative. Net impact related to GWP from the management chain varies from a contribution of 2.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if incineration is utilised, to an avoidance of 5.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if choosing anaerobic digestion and using produced biogas as car fuel. Impacts are often dependent on processes allocated far from the control of local decision-makers, indicating the importance of a holistic approach and extended collaboration between agents in the waste management chain.

Bernstad, A., E-mail: anna.bernstad@chemeng.lth.se [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Cour Jansen, J. la [Department of Chemical Engineering, Box 124, Faculty of Engineering (LTH), Lund University, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Temporal variation in methanogen communities of four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanogen communities were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing in four different full-scale anaerobic digesters treating food waste-recycling wastewater. Seasonal samples were collected for 2 years, and 24 samples were available for microbial analysis from a plug flow thermophilic (PT) digester, a continuously-stirred tank thermophilic (CT) digester, an upflow anerobic sludge blanket mesophilic (UM) digester, and a continuously-stirred tank mesophilic (CM) digester. Methanoculleus, Methanobacterium, Methanothermobacter, and Methanosaeta were revealed to be key methanogens in full-scale anaerobic digestion process treating food waste-recycling wastewater. In the PT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (96.8%). In the CT digester, Methanoculleus was dominant (95.4%) during the first year of operation, but the dominant genus was shifted to Methanothermobacter (98.5%) due to pH increase. In the UM digester, Methanosaeta was dominant (87.2%). In the CM digester, Methanoculleus was constantly dominant (74.8%) except during CM5 when Methanosaeta was dominant (62.6%) due to the low residual acetate concentration (0.1 g/L).

Joonyeob Lee; Byungchul Hwang; Taewoan Koo; Seung Gu Shin; Woong Kim; Seokhwan Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Replacing fish meal by food waste in feed pellets to culture lower trophic level fish containing acceptable levels of organochlorine pesticides: Health risk assessments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study used food waste (collected from local hotels and restaurants) feed pellets in polyculture of low-trophic level fish [bighead (Aristichtys nobilis), grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus), and mud carp (Cirrhina molitorella)] aiming at producing safe and quality products for local consumption. The results indicated that grass carp (hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) risk assessments based on digestible concentrations are commonly regarded as a more accurate method. The results of health risk assessments based on raw and digestible concentrations showed that the fish fed with food waste feed pellets were safe for consumption from the OCP perspective.

Zhang Cheng; Wing-Yin Mo; Yu-Bon Man; Xiang-Ping Nie; Kai-Bing Li; Ming-Hung Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/spills and subsequent clean up costs ($20,000) Sewage Sludge Volume Reduction 234,000 Radioactive Waste $910,000 $193,400 $716,600 60,000 gallons of radioactive STP liquid waste could have been disposed of through,000) Digital Imaging System Substitution 282 Hazardous Waste / Radioactive Waste / Industrial Waste $25,000 $25

57

Application of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Forest and Degraded Land  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes research done over a decade at the Savannah River Site and elsewhere in the South evaluating the benefits of land application of municipal wastes. Studies have demonstrated that degraded lands, ranging from borrow pits to mine spoils can be successfully revegetated using a mixture of composed municipal sewage sludge and other amendments. The studies have demonstrated a practical approach to land application and restoration.

D.H. Marx, C. R. Berry, and P. P. Kormanik

1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Waste-heat mariculture of striped bass for population enhancement and food production. Final report on Phase 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological and economic data were obtained to determine whether the culture of striped bass (Morona saxatilis) in power plant thermal effluent could be a cost-effective means of utilizing an otherwise wasted energy resource to provide additional supplies of high-quality seafood. Experiments were conducted to provide some of the data necessary to predict tank-carrying capacity, food-conversion efficiency, and water flow requirements for striped bass cultured at high density in future commercial-scale operations. Computer models were developed for several modes of operation of a theoretical commercial production facility, and return-on-investment calculations were made which indicated that substantial profits are possible. At these sites, no heating or pumping of water would be required, and an annual return-on-operating costs of 103% was estimated.

Van Olst, J.C.; Carlberg, J.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Purdue extension Food Entrepreneurship Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pesticides and fertilizers, including sewage sludge, and with- out adding synthetic ingredients. Foods cannot agent in the state of Indiana. Certifica- tion applications for farmers, livestock producers, and food agricultural products do not need to be certified. However, land The sample cereal boxes above illustrate

60

Waste-Water Treatment: The Tide Is Turning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...combine to form water. The resins...by waste-water treatment standards. In electrodialysis, an electric...human use. Electrodialysis and reverse...brackish waste water, and these...problem in sewage treatment. The cost...

Robert W. Holcomb

1970-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Secondary Sewage Treatment Versus Ocean Outfalls: An Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the energy balance, the system...Secondary Sewage Treatment Versus Ocean...treatment of wastewater is unneeded...secondary sewage treatment plants are estimated...secondary sewage treatment biologically...organic matter in wastewater. This action...

Charles B. Officer; John H. Ryther

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reducing food losses by intelligent food logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1006 62 Theme Issue Intelligent food logistics: decrease waste and improve quality...Reducing food losses by intelligent food logistics Reiner Jedermann 1 Mike Nicometo 2 Ismail...Bremen Research Cluster for Dynamics in Logistics (LogDynamics), Bremen, Germany One...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Gille-STPA 35 1 Sewage on San Diego Beaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

outflow pipe? (3) When plans were first made to address the heavy metals in Tijuana pollution on where sewage ends up? (2) One big issue for understanding sewage treatment has to do with heavy metals't dioxin or heavy metal a problem when Tijuana sewage is mixed with San Diego sewage in the Point Loma

Gille, Sarah T.

66

ENZYMES AND MICROORGANISMS IN FOOD INDUSTRY WASTE PROCESSING AND CONVERSION TO USEFUL PRODUCTS: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the Symposium on Enzymes in the Food Processingowned rights. Title: Enzymes and Mi Conversi on isms i A I sis not harves Potential for enzyme Given conversion can usea

Carroad, P.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Biomethane production by anaerobic digestion of organic waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological process that takes place naturally when bacteria break down organic matter in environments with or without oxygen. Controlled anaerobic digestion of organic waste in enclosed landfill will generate methane. Almost any organic material can be processed with AD, including waste paper and cardboard (of a grade that is too low to recycle because of food contamination), grass clippings, leftover food, industrial effluents, sewage and animal waste. AD produces biogas which is comprised of around 60% methane (CH4) and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2). This biogas can be used to generate heat or electricity and/or can be used as a vehicular fuel. If the intended use is for power generation the biogas must be scrubbed to remove a number of impurities. After conditioning the biogas can be used for onsite power generation, to heat homes or can be added to the national natural gas grid. In recent years several research groups have shown the possibility of upgrading the biogas for biomethane production [1]. This study will show the feasibility of integrating anaerobic digestion plant with onsite polymeric membrane purification system for conditioned biomethane production.

A. Molino; F. Nanna; Y. Ding; B. Bikson; G. Braccio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Green Dining Internship Opportunities: Fall 2013 Are you passionate about composting? Waste reduction? Local and sustainable food?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Dining Internship Opportunities: Fall 2013 Are you passionate about composting? Waste UMD students? Then, we are looking for you! UMD Dining Services Green Dining is seeking two interns to assist with the Green Dining Program. Learn more about Green Dining here: http

Hill, Wendell T.

69

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fresh Food Online Supermarket Development Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The preservation of fresh food is difficult, so the problems of food safety and the waste of it are very serious. The development of Fresh food online supermarkets will contribute to solve the problem. On the basis of describing the concept, scope and ... Keywords: Cold Chain Logistics, Food Safety, Fresh Food, Internet, Online Supermarket, SWOT

Xie Xiang, Liu Jiashi, Guan Zhongliang, Ke Xinsheng

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

On-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-site Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-403, and Individual Homeowner & Small Community Wastewa- ter Treatment & Disposal Options, VCE publication 448-406. Figure 1. Many ruralOn-Site Sewage Treatment Alternatives C. Zipper,Extension specialist and associate professor

Liskiewicz, Maciej

73

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

Carlson, L.W.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic waste water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovery Jun Wei LIM... waste. Keywords Anaerobic digestion; food waste; brown water; biogas; co-digestion INTRODUCTION... of brown water and food ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique,...

75

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic wastes synthesis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

food waste: Current status, problems and an alternative product Summary: alternative to biogas generation. The volatile fatty acids (VFA) produced from food waste in a...

76

Biodiesel production from Stauntonia chinensis seed oil (waste from food processing): Heterogeneous catalysis by modified calcite, biodiesel purification, and fuel properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present research, the potential of Stauntonia chinensis (SC) seed oil obtained from processing waste was investigated for the first time as biodiesel feedstock, including physicochemical properties of the oil, the heterogeneous catalysis process, purification, and fuel properties. A 29.37 ± 0.64 wt.% of oil content and 2.41 mg KOH/g of acid value was found. Under the optimised reaction conditions in the presence of modified calcite, an 88.02% of yield and a 98.90 wt.% of FAME content were achieved. According to EN 14124 (2012), SC biodiesel exhibited superior fuel properties compared to the most of other feedstock oils since it had an ideal fatty acid composition (low Cn:0 (8.06 wt.%), high Cn:1 (80.16 wt.%), and low Cn:2,3 (8.45 wt.%)). It was absolutely vital that the use of SC seed oil as a biodiesel feedstock would not compete with its use in food. In summary, SC seed oil should be recommended as a promising feedstock for biodiesel.

Rui Wang; Lili Sun; Xiaolin Xie; Lizhi Ma; Zhigang Liu; Xiaoyan Liu; Ning Ji; Guofang Xie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains a minimum of 245 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Model calibration and validation for OFMSW and sewage sludge co-digestion reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Disintegration is the limiting step of the anaerobic co-digestion process. > Disintegration kinetic constant does not depend on the waste particle size. > Disintegration kinetic constant depends only on the waste nature and composition. > The model calibration can be performed on organic waste of any particle size. - Abstract: A mathematical model has recently been proposed by the authors to simulate the biochemical processes that prevail in a co-digestion reactor fed with sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This model is based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 of the International Water Association, which has been extended to include the co-digestion processes, using surface-based kinetics to model the organic waste disintegration and conversion to carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. When organic waste solids are present in the reactor influent, the disintegration process is the rate-limiting step of the overall co-digestion process. The main advantage of the proposed modeling approach is that the kinetic constant of such a process does not depend on the waste particle size distribution (PSD) and rather depends only on the nature and composition of the waste particles. The model calibration aimed to assess the kinetic constant of the disintegration process can therefore be conducted using organic waste samples of any PSD, and the resulting value will be suitable for all the organic wastes of the same nature as the investigated samples, independently of their PSD. This assumption was proven in this study by biomethane potential experiments that were conducted on organic waste samples with different particle sizes. The results of these experiments were used to calibrate and validate the mathematical model, resulting in a good agreement between the simulated and observed data for any investigated particle size of the solid waste. This study confirms the strength of the proposed model and calibration procedure, which can thus be used to assess the treatment efficiency and predict the methane production of full-scale digesters.

Esposito, G., E-mail: giovanni.esposito@unicas.it [Department of Mechanics, Structures and Environmental Engineering, University of Cassino, via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Frunzo, L., E-mail: luigi.frunzo@unina.it [Department of Mathematics and Applications Renato Caccioppoli, University of Naples Federico II, via Cintia, Monte S. Angelo, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Panico, A., E-mail: anpanico@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy); Pirozzi, F., E-mail: francesco.pirozzi@unina.it [Department of Hydraulic, Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, via Claudio 21, 80125 Naples (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Regional Water, Sewage, and Solid Waste Districts (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In some instances, smaller communities and rural areas with wells and septic systems either may not have the ability to build the necessary infrastructure or they cannot afford the cost of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Waste utilization as an energy source: Municipal wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of municipal wastes as an energy source. Articles discuss energy derived from incineration/combustion, refuse-derived fuels, co-firing municipal waste and standard fuels, landfill gas production, sewage combustion, and other waste-to-energy technologies. Citations address economics and efficiencies of various schemes to utilize municipal waste products as energy sources. (Contains a minimum of 130 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dispersal of Aspergillus fumigatus from Sewage Sludge Compost Piles Subjected to Mechanical Agitation in Open Air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recorded separately where possible; isolations and identifications were made for only...reflected as the model assumes (also, resuspension of these deposited particles would be...Microbial aerosols from food-proc- essing waste spray fields. J. Water Pollut. Control...

Patricia D. Millner; David A. Bassett; Paul B. Marsh

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the permitting siting, bonding, installation, establishment, construction, modification, and operation of any facility that generates, processes, recycles and/or disposes of sewage

84

Removal of hydrogen sulphide on sewage sludge/industrial sludge based carbonaceous adsorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorbents were prepared for sewage sludge, waste oil sludge and metal oil sludge. On the materials obtained dynamic adsorption of H2S was measured. The initial and exhausted adsorbents were characterised using sorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis, and XRF, XRD and surface pH measurements. The adsorbents have high capacity for H2S (10% wt) The high volume of mesopores contributes significantly to reactive adsorption and provides space to store sulphur as the oxidation product. The highly dispersed mineral-like phase formed during pyrolysis provides basicity and catalytic centres for hydrogen sulphide dissociation and its oxidation to sulphur.

Teresa J. Bandosz

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative sewage sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: spreading machines. Key words: Spreading technology, environmental performances, LCA, sewage sludge... of sewage sludge spreading scenarios involving different types of...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sewage sludge Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: spreading machines. Key words: Spreading technology, environmental performances, LCA, sewage sludge... of sewage sludge spreading scenarios involving different types of...

87

Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of seedlings of Lironden- d ~tl' 'f, L. d C fl d, L. g t tt screened compost (224 metric tons/ha) made from degested sewage sludge and woodchips. However, Kirkham and Emino (50) found with increasing rates of liquid sewage sludge (50 ml...

Schlutt, Edward Frederick

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures: the cysticercosis threat Jacques appears to be one of the major pathological threats when sewage sludge is used to fertilise cattle highly prevalent) and Asia (Taenia saginata-like are prevalent). The processing of sludge and the delay

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

89

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

90

Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2nd Annual Upper Midwest Food, Fuel and Fiber Network Tour Aug. 31 ­ Sept. 2, 2010 #12;Tuesday, fuel, and fiber research. 8:15 p.m. Adjourn to University Plaza Hotel www.uphwl.com #12;Wednesday.m. Controlled Sub-Surface Drainage Dr. Eileen Kladivko, Department of Agronomy 2:00 p.m. Algae Wheel (Sewage

91

Study of Performance of Heat Pump Usage in Sewage Treatment and Fouling Impact on System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A heat pump using disposed sewage as a heat source to heat raw sewage is presented to solve the problem that sewage temperature is low in sewage biologic treatment in cold region. According to the status of one medicine factory in Harbin, China...

Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.; Na, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues.

Seggiani, Maurizia, E-mail: m.seggiani@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Puccini, Monica, E-mail: m.puccini@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raggio, Giovanni, E-mail: g.raggio@tiscali.it [Italprogetti Engineering SPA, Lungarno Pacinotti, 59/A, 56020 San Romano (Pisa) (Italy); Vitolo, Sandra, E-mail: s.vitolo@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

To be published in Waste Management (2010) Bodnan et al. MINERALOGY AND PORE WATER CHEMISTRY OF A BOILER ASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or for burning relatively homogeneous wastes such as sewage sludge (Van de Velden et al., 2008, Toledo et alTo be published in Waste Management (2010) ­ Bodénan et al. MINERALOGY AND PORE WATER CHEMISTRY a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large

Boyer, Edmond

94

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

95

A reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The motivation for this work was to define the reburning potential of sewage sludge (SS) gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was .....

Sebastian Werle

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sandis irradiator for dried sewage solids. Final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses of the hazards associated with the operation of the Sandia irradiator for dried sewage solids, as well as methods and design considerations to minimize these hazards, are presented in accordance with DOE directives.

Morris, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Overland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and nature of faecal waste applications to land in the UK is briefly reviewed, with data presented on both livestock slurry and manure, and human sewage sludge. Particular emphasis is placed on factors influencingOverland flow transport of pathogens from agricultural land receiving faecal wastes S.F. Tyrrel1

Quinton, John

100

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The long-term and the short-term at a cropping municipal sewage sludge disposal facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Raleigh, NC, chose land application of municipal sewage sludge as a means of reducing pollution to the Neuse River. The Neuse River Waste Water Treatment Plant (NRWWTP) is located in the Piedmont Province of North Carolina. The soils at the facility are derived largely from the Rolesville Granite. Sewage sludge is applied to over 640 acres of cropland, owned in fee or leased. In making the policy decision for use of the sludge land application method 20 or so years ago, the City had to evaluate the potential for heavy metal accumulation in the soils and plants as well as the potential for ground-water contamination from the nitrate-nitrogen. The city also had to make a policy decision about limiting the discharge of heavy metals to the sewer system. Study of data from monitoring wells demonstrate that well position is a key in determining whether or not nitrate-nitrogen contamination is detected. Data from a three-year study suggest that nitrate-nitrogen moves fairly rapidly t the water table, although significant buildup in nitrogen-nitrogen may take a number of years. Evidence exists suggesting that the time between application of sewage sludge and an increase of nitrate-nitrogen at the water table may be on the order of nine months to a year. It is apparent that in the case of municipal sewage sludge application one can anticipate some nitrate-nitrogen buildup and that the public policy on drinking water standards must recognize this fact.

Welby, C.W. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Enhanced photodegradation of pentachlorophenol in a soil washing system under solar irradiation with TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel remediation method for soil contaminated with hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants (HCAPs) was developed using TiO2 nanorods combined with municipal sewage sludge in surfactant solution. The target contaminant washed into surfactant solution from polluted soil can be rapidly removed under natural sunlight irradiation. The photocatalyst synthesized by TiO2 combined with municipal sewage sludge by a hydrothermal process shows excellent ability in this situation. The TiO2 nanorods appear on the surface of municipal sewage sludge, which offers a new way of solving waste municipal sewage sludge disposal problem and of producing high-activity photocatalyst. The nanocomposite was characterized by SEM, X-ray diffraction, and UV–Vis DRS. Results showed that the new nanocomposite was better than the original TiO2 catalyst. Using the proposed method in this study, the target contaminant can be removed by up to 97% after 30 min of irradiation in natural sunlight, whereas the surfactant loss was only 27%.

Zeyu Zhou; Yaxin Zhang; Hongtao Wang; Tan Chen; Wenjing Lu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Experimental Research of the Oxygen-Enriched Combustion of Sewage Sludge and Coal in CFB  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage sludge is the by-products of sewage treatment, and it is a fuel of high moisture, high ash and low caloric. Oxygen-enriched combustion technology is one of the new and clean coal combustion technologies...

S. W. Xin; X. F. Lu; H. Z. Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Use of nutrients of sewage sludge in the initial development of Copaifera langsdorffii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the 20 t ha -1 of sludge rate. Figure 1: CopaibaSupl. K) and sewage sludge doses (2.5, 5, 10, 15 e 20 t ha -dm Fe Mn Zn Table 2: Sewage sludge chemical characteristics.

Sampaio, Thalita Fernanda; Guerrini, Iraê Amaral; Croce, Ciro; de Toledo, Maria Angélica; Morales, Marina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced sewage treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , of confirm, the health of an on-lot sewage system. PSMA On-lot Wastewater Treatment Inspection Vs... F 168On-lot Sewage Disposal Resources Available Through the...

106

Water/Wastewater Engineering Report (Storm Sewer/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation-M1 Model)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In some cities, the municipal sewer system collects both storm water and sanitary sewage in the same pipes. During dry weather these sewers carry all the sanitary sewage to the wastewater treatment plant for treatment. However, when rainstorms...

Liu, Z.; Brumbelow, K.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pantex Sewage Reservoir (TX.03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 77 FUSRAP considered sites for which few, if any records are available in their respective site files to provide an historical account of past operations and their relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. Reviews of contact lists, accountable station lists, health and safety records and other documentation of the period do not provide sufficient information to warrant further search of historical records for information on these sites. These site files remain "open" to

108

Impacts on groundwater due to land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was designed to demonstrate the potential benefits of utilizing sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and fertilizer on Sassafras sandy loam soil. Aerobically digested, liquid sewage sludge was applied to the soil at rates of 0, 22.4, and 44.8 Mg of dry solids/ha for three consecutive years between 1978 and 1981. Groundwater, soil, and crop contamination levels were monitored to establish the maximum sewage solids loading rate that could be applied without causing environmental deterioration. The results indicate that application of 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha of sludge is the upper limit to ensure protection of the groundwater quality on the site studied. Application rates at or slightly below 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha are sufficient for providing plant nutrients for the dent corn and rye cropping system utilized in the study.

Higgins, A.J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Waste treatment by reverse osmosis and membrane processing. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of reverse osmosis and membrane processing in sewage and industrial waste treatment. Citations discuss ultrafiltration, industrial water reuse, hazardous waste treatment, municipal wastes, and materials recovery. Waste reduction and recycling in electroplating, metal finishing, and circuit board manufacturing are considered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

113

Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404.

Grady, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Chen, Guang Jiong (Fayetteville, AR)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Bioconversion of waste biomass to useful products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for converting waste biomass to useful products by gasifying the biomass to produce synthesis gas and converting the synthesis gas substrate to one or more useful products. The present invention is directed to the conversion of biomass wastes including municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, plastic, tires, agricultural residues and the like, as well as coal, to useful products such as hydrogen, ethanol and acetic acid. The overall process includes the steps of gasifying the waste biomass to produce raw synthesis gas, cooling the synthesis gas, converting the synthesis gas to the desired product or products using anaerobic bioconversion, and then recovering the product or products. In accordance with a particular embodiment of the present invention, waste biomass is converted to synthesis gas containing carbon monoxide and, then, the carbon monoxide is converted to hydrogen by an anaerobic microorganism ERIH2, Bacillus smithii ATCC No. 55404. 82 figs.

Grady, J.L.; Chen, G.J.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mixed Waste Management Facility FSS Well Data Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth Quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1994, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. No constituent exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Purification of domestic sewage by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage management is posing serious techno-economic problems in cities, particularly in developing countries. A new technology, sewage purification by water-hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), is a possible solution. This paper studied the suitability and effectiveness of water-hyacinth in treating domestic sewage. A 28-day experiment was performed under a controlled environment of a screen-house subjected to natural conditions. Several parameters were measured and analysed, including the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), faecal coliform count, nitrate and phosphate contents, pH value, heavy metals, turbidity, odour and colour at intervals of seven days. Laboratory analyses indicated that the water-hyacinth culture drastically reduced the faecal coliforms by about 80%. BOD dropped from 900 to 460 mg litre?1. COD was reduced from 1,424 to 766 mg litre?1 while the nitrogen content increased by about 77.5% and the phosphorus content rose by 63.3%. The pH value fell slightly from 8.58 to 7.81. The initial pungent odour of the raw sewage gradually disappeared during the purification period while the deep yellowish colour turned almost colourless in the final effluent sample. The sludge from the culture was rich and applicable as a bio-fertiliser. After comparison with the World Health Organisation Stream Standards, it was determined that the final effluent from water-hyacinth could be used for irrigation and fishing activities, or recycled to a flowing stream for other uses except for drinking purposes.

G.A. Alade; S.O. Ojoawo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nutrients without resulting in damage to the tree stand. Soil pH will be affected by the application or increase pH · Most immobilise metal contamination · Act as slow release fertiliser (nitrogen and phosphorus NOTE 6 PAGE 2 Applications of sewage sludges and composts Forestry Tree growth on nutrient

120

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2)...

122

Changes in Soil Physical Properties Due to Organic Waste Applications: A Review1 R. KHALEEL, K. R. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. REDDY, AND M. R. OVERCASH2 ABSTRACT Land application of organic wastes such as animal manure, munici- pal wastes, and sewage sludge could alter the soil physical properties. Repeated substantial). Several investiga- tors, in monitoring runoff water quality from small plot-sized land application areas

Florida, University of

123

Simulation of substrate degradation in composting of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To simulate the substrate degradation kinetics of the composting process, this paper develops a mathematical model with a first-order reaction assumption and heat/mass balance equations. A pilot-scale composting test with a mixture of sewage sludge and wheat straw was conducted in an insulated reactor. The BVS (biodegradable volatile solids) degradation process, matrix mass, MC (moisture content), DM (dry matter) and VS (volatile solid) were simulated numerically by the model and experimental data. The numerical simulation offered a method for simulating k (the first-order rate constant) and estimating k{sub 20} (the first-order rate constant at 20 {sup o}C). After comparison with experimental values, the relative error of the simulation value of the mass of the compost at maturity was 0.22%, MC 2.9%, DM 4.9% and VS 5.2%, which mean that the simulation is a good fit. The k of sewage sludge was simulated, and k{sub 20}, k{sub 20s} (first-order rate coefficient of slow fraction of BVS at 20 {sup o}C) of the sewage sludge were estimated as 0.082 and 0.015 d{sup -1}, respectively.

Zhang Jun [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao Ding, E-mail: gaod@igsnrr.ac.c [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Chen Tongbin; Zheng Guodi; Chen Jun; Ma Chuang; Guo Songlin [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Du Wei [Beijing GreenTech Environmental Engineering Company, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

403 403 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288403 Varnish cache server UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) Dataset Summary Description Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels. These data were used to produce Tables 7.1 to 7.3 in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2010 (available: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/dukes/348-dukes-2...).

125

Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Soil and Cassava Plant on Sewage Sludge Dump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JM. (1989). Assessment of sludge regulation assumptions: AMunicipal Wasteland and Sludge on Land. Univ. of California,1998). Effects of sewage sludge pre-treatment on microbial

Igbozuruike, Chris Washington Ifeanyi Mr.; Opara-Nadi, Achilihu Oliver Prof; Okorie, Ikechukwu Kennedy DR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic granular sewage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from... -lot sewage systems concern the soil. For the soil to properly renovate the treatment tank's effluent, two Source: Boyer, Elizabeth W. - School of Forest Resources,...

127

FOOD AND DRINK REGULATIONS Serving hot food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

legislation. · The food must be prepared and cooked off site. Preparing food implies any form of preparation

O'Mahony, Donal E.

128

Effect of treated-sewage contamination upon bacterial energy charge, adenine nucleotides, and DNA content in a sandy aquifer on Cape Cod.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) | Water Resources Division, U...effects Massachusetts Sewage Water Microbiology georef;1995036952...plumes DNA eutrophication ground water Massachusetts Plantae pollution remediation sewage thallophytes United...

D W Metge; M H Brooks; R L Smith; R W Harvey

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Soil solution chemistry of sewage-sludge incinerator ash and phosphate fertilizer amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of the soil provides useful information on the feasibility of amending agricultural land with municipal and industrial waste, because the soil solution is the medium for most soil chemical reactions, the mobile phase in soils, and the medium for mineral adsorption by plant roots. The soil solutions studies in this research were from plots in a 4-yr field experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of the trace metals and P in sewage-sludge incinerator ash. Treatments compared ash with equivalent P rates from triple-superphosphate fertilizer and a control receiving no P application. Ash and phosphate fertilizer were applied annually at rates of 35, 70, and 140 kg citrate-soluble P ha{sup -1}. Cumulative ash applications during 4 yr amounted to 3.6, 7.2, and 14.4 Mg ash ha{sup -1}. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation-immiscible liquid displacement using a fluorocarbon displacing agent. Following chemical analysis, a chemical speciation model was used to determine possible solubility-controlling minerals for trace metals and P, and correlations between solution composition and plant uptake were analyzed. 37 refs., 5 tabs.

Bierman, P.M.; Rosen, C.J.; Bloom, P.R.; Nater, E.A. [Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Preference of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, for plants grown in sewage sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since passage of the Clean Water Act in the 1970s, disposal of the millions of tonnes of sewage sludge generated annually has become a major concern of municipalities throughout the United States. With the range of other disposal options having narrowed in recent years, application of sludge to land is increasingly viewed as a practical and economical means to recycle this waste material. However, sludges from large cities with industries may be contaminated with various toxic chemicals, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), other organic chemicals, such as pesticides, and heavy metals. Sludge application to land thus has the potential adversely to affect biota and the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. The authors previously demonstrated marked reductions in fecundity and survival of green peach aphids, Myzus persicae, on collard plants, Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, growing in soil treated with chemically contaminated sludge as compared to aphids on plants growing either in soil treated with uncontaminated sludge of soil conventionally fertilized. Reduced plant growth and increased restlessness in aphids in the contaminated sludge treatment were also observed. The purpose of the present study was to examine more closely the influence of sludge contaminants on aphid settling behavior as indicated by differential preference of M. persicae for leaves of its collard host grown under different soil conditions.

Culliney, T.W.; Pimentel, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Talking Trash: Oral Histories of Food In/Security from the Margins of a Dumpster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of production, trade, consumption, and waste policy. This research raises inquiries into the gender, racial, and class dynamics of food policy, informal food economies, common pool resource usage, and embodied histories of public health and sanitation. Topically...

Vaughn, Rachel Ann

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Analysis of Energy and Soft Dirt in an Urban Untreated Sewage Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When using urban untreated sewage as a cool and heat source of heat pump, it is unavoidable to form soft dirt. Based on the method of exergy, an analysis is given of the impact the dirt growth of a tube-shell sewage heat exchanger will have...

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

135

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

Walter, M.Todd

136

Modelling the fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) during the municipal sewage treatment process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are an important source to the environment for many chemicals of concern (COCs). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are one such group of COCs of present day concern for which studies on fate and transport during the ... Keywords: chemical fate and transport, mass balance model, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, risk assessment, sewage treatment, water and wastewater management

Kerry N. McPhedran; Rajesh Seth

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge Patryk Oleszczuk a,b, , Sarah E. Hale a , Johannes Lehmann c , Gerard Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Bioavailability Sewage sludge a b s t r a c t The aim of the research of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge. Two different biochars (MSB and PMW) and two ACs

Lehmann, Johannes

139

Holiday Foods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 28 2 2trJ 29 29 2" ~ .____./ 30 30 30 30 30 HOLIDAY FOODS Frances L. Reasonover and Mary K. Sweeten* The flavor , color, temperature and texture of foods enhance holiday occasions. However, in addition to attractiveness and taste... and almond extract. Serves 75 to 100. APRICOT PUNCH 2 large cans of apricots put through a sieve, or 2 large cans apricot nectar 4 cups orange juice 2 cups lemon juice 1 quart ginger ale 1 1/2 gallons lime or orange sherbet Sweetener may be added...

Reasonover, Frances L.; Sweeten, Mary K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Case Study- The Challenge: Improving Sewage Pump System Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study looks at how Trumbull, Connecticut increased the energy and operating efficiency of its Reservoir Avenue sewage pump station. With the help of ITT Flygt Corporation, the town altered the existing pump system by adding a smaller pump and modifying the system control scheme. The changes reduced annual electricity consumption by almost 44 percent, or nearly 31,900 kWh, saving more than $2,600 per year. The $12,000 project had a simple payback of 4.6 years.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

143

Energy aspects of solid waste management: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eighteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference entitled ``Energy Aspects of Solid Waste Management`` was held in Chicago, Illinois on October 29--30, 1990. The conference program was developed by a planning committee that drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. Within this framework, the committee identified a number of key topic areas surrounding solid waste management in Illinois which were the focus of the conference. These issues included: review of the main components of the solid waste cycle in the Midwest and what the relative impact of waste reduction, recycling, incineration and land disposal might be on Illinois` and the Midwest`s solid waste management program. Investigation of special programs in the Midwest dealing with sewage sludge, combustion residuals and medical/infectious wastes. Review of the status of existing landfills in Illinois and the Midwest and an examination of the current plans for siting of new land disposal systems. Review of the status of incinerators and waste-to-energy systems in Illinois and the Midwest, as well as an update on activities to maximize methane production from landfills in the Midwest.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Prevention of Food-Processing Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...continuously. Minor amounts of water lost by evaporation...re-placed. Because the water recycled from the resin...soapstock, and the water evap-orated in drying...the United States. Electrodialysis has been in com-mercial...processes constitute a treatment problem. Liquid whey...

Sam R. Hoover

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Pyrolysis, combustion and gasification characteristics of miscanthus and sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energetic conversion of biomass into syngas is considered as reliable energy source. In this context, biomass (miscanthus) and sewage sludge have been investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer and mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of samples and identified the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1100 °C under combustion and gasification conditions. The TG and DTA results were discussed in argon, oxygen, steam and steam blended gas atmospheres. Different stages of pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples have been examined. It was shown that the combustion and gasification of char were occurred in two different temperature zones. The DTA–MS profile of the sample gives information on combustion and gasification process of the samples (ignition, peak combustion and burnout temperatures) and gases released (H2, O2, CO and CO2). The results showed that the different processes were mainly dependent on temperature. The evolution of the gas species was consistent with the weight loss of the samples during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification process. The effect of the ambiences during pyrolysis, combustion and gasification of the samples were reported. The appropriate temperature range to the sludge and miscanthus gasification was evaluated. The kinetic parameters of the biomass and sewage sludge were estimated for TGA using two models based on first-order reactions with distributed activation energies. The presence of ash in the biomass char was more influential during the gasification process.

Kandasamy Jayaraman; Iskender Gökalp

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Air port Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operation Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230/320 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 230 consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; while CAU 320 consists of CAS 22-99-01, Strainer Box. These CAUs are referred to as CAU 230/320 or the Sewage Lagoons Site. The Sewage Lagoons Site also includes an Imhoff tank, sludge bed, and associated buried sewer piping. Located in Area 22, the site was used between 1951 to 1958 for disposal of sanitary sewage effluent from the historic Camp Desert Rock Facility at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada. Based on site history, the contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), and radionuclides. Vertical migration is estimated to be less than 12 feet below ground surface, and lateral migration is limited to the soil immediately adjacent to or within areas of concern. The proposed investigation will involve a combination of field screening for VOCs and TPH using the direct-push method and excavation using a backhoe to gather soil samples for analysis. Gamma spectroscopy will also be conducted for waste management purposes. Sampling locations will be biased to suspected worst-case areas including the nearby sludge bed, sewage lagoon inlet(s) and outlet(s), disturbed soil surrounding the lagoons, surface drainage channel south of the lagoons, and the area near the Imhoff tank. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

US DOE/Nevada Operations Office

1999-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Future of Science: Food and Water for Life  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...agricultural and economic development in Africa. FOOD VERSUS FUEL There is ongoing debate in many scientific circles as well as...perennial grasses and woody species, cellulosic waste, and algae. Tilman and colleagues have argued that expanding the production...

Nancy A. Eckardt; Eleonora Cominelli; Massimo Galbiati; Chiara Tonelli

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

150

Moose Food  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

151

LCA Food 2012—towards sustainable food systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production, transformation, distribution and consumption of food and drink contribute strongly to human prosperity and health. However, the food and agriculture sector also causes major environmental impacts....

Hayo M. G. van der Werf; Michael S. Corson…

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A reclamation approach for mined prime farmland by adding organic wastes and lime to the subsoil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface mined prime farmland may be reclaimed by adding organic wastes and lime to subsoil thus improving conditions in root zone. In this study, sewage sludge, poultry manure, horse bedding, and lime were applied to subsoil (15-30 cm) during reclamation. Soil properties and plant growth were measured over two years. All organic amendments tended to lower the subsoil bulk density and increase organic matter and total nitrogen. Liming raised exchangeable calcium, slightly increased pH, but decreased exchangeable magnesium and potassium. Corn ear-leaf and forage tissue nitrogen, yields, and nitrogen removal increased in treatments amended with sewage sludge and poultry manure, but not horse bedding. Subsoil application of sewage sludge or poultry manure seems like a promising method in the reclamation of surface mined prime farmland based on the improvements observed in the root zone environment.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Waste-gas C02 feeds algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Waste-gas C02 feeds algae ... The new scheme calls for algae found growing on highly alkaline shallow ponds in Central Africa to metabolize carbon dioxide in waste gases to produce highprotein food. ... IFF has been studying the blue-green algae since the beginning of 1963. ...

1966-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

155

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a “nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

157

Application of dried anaerobic digested sewage sludge as phenol biosorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Untreated anaerobically digested sewage sludge was used for the first time as a biosorbent for removing phenol from aqueous solution. Results showed that adsorption capacity was influenced by the pH of the aqueous solution with an observed maximum phenol removal at pH around 6-8. The adsorption equilibrium of phenolic compounds was obtained after almost two hours with an adsorption of approximately 90% of the phenolic compounds. A sorbent concentration of 1.8 g/L was found to insure the best removal percentage and the best sorbent capacity. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models have provided reasonable fittings for the data of phenol adsorption. The experimental data fitted the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The values of change in Gibbs free energy (?G°), enthalpy (?H°) and entropy (?S°) were calculated. The thermodynamic study of adsorption process showed that the process was exothermic in nature.

Alaa H. Hawari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Controlled waste-oil biodegradation at existing drying beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Facility to determine if sludge drying beds at a sewage treatment plant could be used as controlled waste oil biodegradation plots has been completed. A greenhouse-like enclosure would be constructed over three 9.1 meter by 21.3 meter beds to allow for year-round use, and any waste oil runoff would be collected by existing leachate piping. It has been determined that this proposed facility could dispose of existing radioactive waste oil generation (7200 liters/year) from the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP); however, it would be inadequate to handle radioactive waste oils from the new Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) as well. The study reviewed nuclear criticality constraints, biodegradation technology, and the capital cost for an enclosed biodegradation facility.

Hary, L.F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fate of Triclosan and Triclosan-Methyl in Sewage TreatmentPlants and Surface Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fate of triclosan in diverse stages of two sewage treatment ... two-stage biologic (activated sludge) process removed triclosan more efficiently than the STP with a ... not very effective. The elimination rat...

Kai Bester

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Case Study - The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

pump to the sewage pumping system, the city reduced the station's annual energy consumption by 36,096 kWh, or more than 15 percent, which resulted in annual savings of 2,960....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Proper Sanitization of Sewage Sludge: a Critical Issue for a Sustainable Society  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly benefit the recycling of sewage sludge back...implementation in municipal wastewater treatment facilities...Response of bacteria in wastewater sludge to moisture...for hygienic nutrient recycling. Bioresour. Technol...regrowth of bacteria in wastewater sludge. Appl. Environ...

Veronica Arthurson

2008-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sewage sludge ash as an alternative low-cost oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, novel low-cost oxygen carriers containing Fe2O3 are evaluated for use in chemical looping combustion. Sewage sludge ashes and reference samples were...2...) fuel and a solid fuel (hard coal) were t...

Ewelina Ksepko

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

College of Agricultural Sciences Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

College of Agricultural Sciences · Agricultural Research and Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Sludge in Pennsylvania Effects of Biosolids on Soil and Crop Quality ENVIRONME NTAL· ISSUES land application of biosolids represents a beneficial reuse alternative to landfill disposal

Kaye, Jason P.

164

Effect of a sewage plant in the distribution of organochlorine residues in the Diyala River, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a continuation of the National Pesticide Monitoring Program in Iraq, this work was carried out to study ... from the lower part of Diyala river, Iraq, where a large sewage treatment plant is...

Muthanna A. Al-Omar; Behla H. Al-Ogaily; Dhia A. Shebl

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, Third quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1992, the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were sampled for analyses required each quarter or annually by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for base-neutral/acid semivolatile constituents. None of the analytical results exceeded standards.

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Case Study- The Challenge: Saving Energy at a Sewage Lift Station Through Pump System Modifications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study explores how the City of Milford, Connecticut saved energy at the Welches Point sewage lift station. By adding a small booster pump to the sewage pumping system, the city reduced the station's annual energy consumption by 36,096 kWh, or more than 15 percent, which resulted in annual savings of $2,960. With a total implementation cost of $16,000, the project yielded a simple payback of 5.4 years.

168

UM Waste Management Services 763-5539, www.recycle.umich.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOOD WASTE ONLY! UM Waste Management Services 763-5539, www.recycle.umich.edu YES Potatoes or RicePlain Potatoes or RicePlain Potatoes or RicePlain Potatoes or RicePlain Potatoes or Rice

Awtar, Shorya

169

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

170

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

171

Safe Home Food Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

Van Laanen, Peggy

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Guidance for writing permits for the use or disposal of sewage sludge. Draft report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) directs the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to develop regulations containing guidelines for the use and disposal of sewage sludge. On February 19th, 1993, EPA published final regulations at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 as the culmination of a major effort to develop technical standards in response to Section 405(d). These regulations govern three sewage sludge use and disposal practices: land application, surface disposal, and incineration. A key element in EPA's implementation of the Part 503 regulations is educating Agency and State personnel about these new requirements. Although the regulations are generally directly enforceable against all persons involved in the use and disposal of sewage sludge, they will also be implemented through permits issued to treatment works treating domestic sewage as defined in 40 CFR 122.22. Thus, the primary focus of the manual is to assist permit writers in incorporating the Part 503 requirements into permits; it serves as an update to the Guidance for Writing Case-by-Case Permit Conditions for Municipal Sewage Sludge (PB91-145508/HDM).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Crop and soil responses to sewage sludge applied to reclaimed prime farmland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improvements in reclamation of surface mined prime farmland may be obtained by adding sewage sludge to topsoil and subsoil. This prime farmland reclamation study was done in western Kentucky. The experiment was conducted to investigate effects of the sludge amendment to topsoil and subsoil on soil and crop responses. The experiment showed, in most cases at highest application rates, that the sludge addition significantly increased the soil organic matter, total N content, and available P levels. However, water holding capacity, CEC, and exchangeable cations were not significantly affected. Higher microbial populations and activates were also obtained. The wheat biomass, tiller number, tissue N, grain N, grain yield, and N removal in grain were well correlated with application rates of sewage sludge. Corn also responded positively to additions of sewage sludge. The corn ear-leaf N concentration, grain yield, and grain N removal increased with application rates of sewage sludge. Experiments indicated that topsoil and subsoil sewage sludge addition was beneficial practices in terms of increasing crop yield and improving some soil properties.

Zhai, Qiang; Barnhisel, R.I. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Influence of sewage sludge from sludge beds of Ulan-Ude on the soil properties and the yield and quality of potatoes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of sewage sludge from sludge beds of the city of Ulan-Ude ... was studied. It was shown that sewage sludge could be used both separately (15 t...

E. P. Pakhnenko; A. V. Ermakov; L. L. Ubugunov

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Mixed Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1994, nine constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults, and the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Chloroethene (vinyl chloride), copper, 1,1-dichloroethylene, lead, mercury, nonvolatile beta, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in one Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) well. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Holiday Food Drive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

180

BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sources. The second type is obtained from the treatment of industrial wastewater or partly from industrial wastewater

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

Acid dye removal from industrial wastewater by adsorption on treated sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigated the suitability of sewage sludge for the removal of Acid Blue 93 industrial wastewater. Washed sewage sludge (WS) and sludge activated carbon (AS) were used as adsorbents. The effect of pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and adsorption temperature was studied. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption were analysed by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second order, intra-particle diffusion and Bangham models were used to describe the adsorption kinetics. The results reveal that adsorption using AS show better results (removal 96.57%) than WS, while both adsorptions depended on pH, contact time and adsorbent dose.

M.N. Rashed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Technical support document for the surface disposal of sewage sludge. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the surface disposal of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in sewage sludge placed on surface disposal sites. The management practices associated with surface disposal are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through surface disposal are discussed.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Sewage sludge application effects on runoff water quality in a semiarid grassland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the concerns of land application of sewage sludge (also referred to as biosolids) to rangeland is its effect on the amount and quality of runoff water. In this study, we applied three treatments consisting of 0, 22, and 41 Mg ha{sup -1} of municipal sewage sludge to Larim gravelly sandy loam (Ustollic Argiustoll) and Altvan sandy loam (Aridic Argiustoll) soils in paired plots on two slope gradients (8 and 15%). We used a one-time application of simulated rainfall for 30 min at a rate of 100 mm h{sup -1} and collected and analyzed the runoff. Results are described. 22 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Harris-Pierce, R.L.; Redente, E.F.; Barbarick, K.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Technical support document for land application of sewage sludge. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) final regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land applied sewage sludge. The management practices associated with land application are outlined and the different pathways by which contaminants reach highly-exposed individuals (HEIs) through land application are discussed.

Jones, A.; Beyer, L.; Rookwood, M.; Pacenka, J.; Bergin, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The effect of sewage sludge on the physical properties of lignite overburden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 47:770-775. 24. Ryan, J. A. , 0. E. Keeney, and L. M. Walsh. 1973. Nitrogen transformation and availability of an anaerobically digested sewage sludge in soil. J. Environ. Qual. 2:489-492. 32 25. Soppec, W. E. , and S. Kerr. 1981. Revegetation... if water is to penetrate downward. A study using raw and digested sewage sludge added to a Beltsville silt loam soil at 5% by weight resulted in an increase in percent water stable aggregates with the addition of sludge (Epstein, 1975). After 175 days...

Cocke, Catherine Lynn

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Food Science and Nutrition Department of Food Science and Nutrition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and food service segments of the food industry. Other ca- reer options include positions with federalFood Science and Nutrition Department of Food Science and Nutrition Institute for Food Safety of Food Science and Nutrition (FdSN) at the School of Applied Technology and the Institute for Food Safety

Heller, Barbara

188

carleton.ca Food Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

); food safety (contaminants, food poisoning); and the sensory properties of food (taste, appearancecarleton.ca Food Science and Nutrition #12;The production and distribution of food is one on the effective processing, storage and handling of food. The field of food science integrates and applies

Dawson, Jeff W.

189

Data Collection for HWIR: Section 10 - Farm Food Chain  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DATA COLLECTION FOR THE DATA COLLECTION FOR THE HAZARDOUS WASTE IDENTIFICATION RULE SECTION 10.0 FARM FOOD CHAIN AND TERRESTRIAL FOODWEB DATA Work Assignment Managers Stephen M. Kroner and Technical Direction: David A. Cozzie U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 Prepared by: Center for Environmental Analysis Research Triangle Institute 3040 Cornwallis Road Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 Under Contract No. 68-W-98-085 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 October 1999 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS A number of individuals have been involved with the database development in support of the aquatic food web module. David Cozzie and Stephen Kroner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Solid Waste, provided overall technical direction and review

190

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Collaborative housing and environmental efficiency: the case of food preparation and consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In theory, food handling in collaborative housing systems could have a number of environmental advantages compared with households and food service institutions. This paper explores to what extent some of these theoretical advantages are realised in two collaborative housing units in a major Swedish city. Food-related energy use and waste flows were measured and compared with results from food service institutions and some data relevant for households. Results show that energy use for cooking decreases in collaborative houses compared with households but energy use for food storage increases. Plate and food preparation wastes are low in the studied collaborative houses but food leftovers may be abundant. The latter result depends on how the dining system is organised. A bottleneck for improving the environmental efficiency in collaborative housing is the static view of apartment design held by many architects and real estate owners. Another bottleneck may be the unwillingness of households to make advance commitments to daily dining.

Annika Carlsson-Kanyama

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Food Sales | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Building Type Food Sales Definition Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. Sub Categories grocery store or food market, gas station with a convenience...

193

Safer Food with Irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication answers questions about food irradiation and how it helps prevent foodborne illnesses. Included are explanations of how irradiation works and its benefits. Irradiation is a safe method of preserving food quality and ensuring its...

Thompson, Britta; Vestal, Andy; Van Laanen, Peggy

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

196

Alteration of a Salt Marsh Bacterial Community by Fertilization with Sewage Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OF SEWAGE SLUDGE ON MARSH BACTERIA 923 35. Meany, R., I. Valiela, and...ofpollutants in American salt marshes, p. 357-366. In B. Gopal, R. E. Turner, R...limitation in salt marsh vegetation, p. 547-563. In R. J. Reimold and W...

Nancy V. Hamlett

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN, C. G. McKiel ABSTRACT: The nitrogen removal abilities of recirculating sand filter/rock tank (RSF) systems and conventional septic tank/soil absorption trench systems were compared in a field laboratory

Gold, Art

198

Sedimentary coprostanol as an index of sewage addition in Santa Monica Basin, southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sediment cores from Santa Monica Basin and effluent from two major municipal wastewater dischargers in southern California were analyzed for sterols. Specifically the fecal sterols, coprostanols (coprostanol and epicoprostanol), were quantitated to determine the degree of sewage addition to the sediment. Although coprostanols are distributed throughout the Santa Monica Basin sediments in association with fine particles, some stations contain elevated levels, either due to their proximity to the outfalls or because of preferential advection of fine-grained sediments into their location where anoxicity aids in better preservation. The progressive seaward decline of coprostanols relative to total sterols from the outfalls represents dilution of sewage by biogenic sterols. The ratios of coprostanols to dinosterol appears to be a better indicator of the degree of sewage addition. A rapid increase in content of coprostanols from about 1935 coincides with the start of offshore wastewater discharge by JWPCP, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts on Palos Verdes Shelf. It is estimated that wastewater treatment plants release into southern California Bight 260 metric tons/yr of fecal sterols and 5 {times} 10{sup 4} metric tons/yr of sewage carbon.

Venkatesan, M.I.; Kaplan, I.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

Heavy metal balances of an Italian soil as affected by sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applications of sewage sludge and Bordeaux mixture (Bm) (a mixture of copper sulfate and lime) add heavy metals to the soil. At an experimental farm in the Cremona district (Italy), the authors measured current heavy metal contents in soil and their removal via harvested products. They also measured heavy metal adsorption by soil from this farm. With these data, projections were made of the long-term development of heavy metal (Cd, Cu, and Zn) contents in soil, crop removal, and leaching at different application rates of sewage sludge and Bm. These projections were compared with existing quality standards of the European Union (EU) and Italy with regard to soil and groundwater. The calculations reveal that the permitted annual application rates of sewage sludge and Bm are likely to result in exceedance of groundwater and soil standards. Sewage sludge applications, complying with the Italian legal limits, may pose problems for Cd, Cu, and Zn within 30, 70, and 100 yr, respectively. Furthermore, severe Cu pollution of integrated and especially organic (Bm only) vineyards is unavoidable with the currently allowed application rates of Bm. The results suggest that the current Italian soil protection policy as well as the EU policy are not conducive of a sustainable heavy metal management in agroecosystems.

Moolenaar, S.W. [Wageningen Agricultural Univ. (Netherlands); Beltrami, P. [Univ. Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Piacenza (Italy)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Organic contaminants in sewage sludge (biosolids) and their significance for agricultural recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemical industry was banned...a direct impact of POPs on...led to a new PNECsoil...possible impacts on soil...and, while emissions of chemicals...Document guidelines. For soil...agreement-risk reduction for nonylphenol...chemical supply industry and downstream...pollutants in German sewage sludges...Huyard 2001 Impact du futur...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

203

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Four Simple Food Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information and Seafood Hotline: 1-888-SAFE FOOD Partnership for Food Safety Education Web Site www. August, 2004 Separate: Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from other foods in your grocery shopping not eat refrigerated smoked seafood unless it is contained in a cooked dish

Garfunkel, Eric

205

Syngas Production by Thermochemical Gasification of Carbonaceous Waste Materials in a 150 kWth Packed-Bed Solar Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbonaceous feedstocks experimentally investigated included coal,(9-11) petcoke,(12, 13) cellulose,(14, 15) biochar,(11, 16) and waste materials such as scrap tire chips and powders, dried sewage sludge, industrial sludges, and fluff. ... reactor for the steam-gasification of petcoke, carried out in a high-flux solar furnace. ... A petcoke-water slurry was continuously injected into a solar cavity-receiver to create a vortex flow directly exposed to concd. ...

Christian Wieckert; Albert Obrist; Peter von Zedtwitz; Gilles Maag; Aldo Steinfeld

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Food Safety and Technology Food Safety and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food Safety and Technology Food Safety and Technology Institute for Food Safety and Health IIT Program Manager: Renee McBrien The Institute for Food Safety and Health (IFSH), with IIT faculty, U ground for individuals seeking graduate edu- cation in food safety and technology and food process

Heller, Barbara

207

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

208

Land application of sewage sludge: A guide for land appliers on the requirements of the federal standards for the use or disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated a regulation at 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 503 to ensure that sewage sludge is used or disposed of in a way that protects human health and the environment. Part 503 imposes requirements for the land application, surface disposal, and incineration of sewage sludge. The manual focuses on land application, providing guidance to land appliers of sewage sludge. The purpose of the document is to provide the land applier with sufficient guidance to comply fully with all applicable Part 503 requirements. The guidance is structured to first provide a general understanding of the Rule and its underlying principles, including definitions of sewage sludge, land application, and an explanation of who under the Rule is considered a land applier.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Electropositive Filter Membrane as an Alternative for the Elimination of PCR Inhibitors from Sewage and Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...additional sample purification methods. Contamination of drinking water, recreational...additional DNA and RNA purification methods unnecessary...MATERIALS AND METHODS Water samples. Raw...genetics isolation & purification Sewage virology Water Pollution

A. P. S. Queiroz; F. M. Santos; A. Sassaroli; C. M. Hársi; T. A. Monezi; D. U. Mehnert

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

211

Because people with limited resources are often challenged to find food that is healthy, safe and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Because people with limited resources are often challenged to find food that is healthy, safe and affordable. People with limited resources often run short of food at the end of the month. university and employer. Printed on recycled and recyclable paper with at least 10 percent postconsumer waste material

Netoff, Theoden

212

World food and agriculture: Outlook for the medium and longer term  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...waste and nonfood uses at the household level, e.g., food fed to pets...the former U.S.S.R., Japan, Australia, New Zealand...other than Argentina, 33 to Japan and Israel, and 6 to the area...Agriculture Developing Countries Energy Intake Food Supply Humans Nutritional...

Nikos Alexandratos

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

214

Temporary Food Service  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Food Service The SLAC Caf, auditorium and visitor center have been closed and will be replaced with a new Science and User Support Building (SUSB). During this construction...

215

Land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge: technical support document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical background and justification for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed regulation (40 CFR Part 503) covering the land application and distribution and marketing of sewage sludge. The document summarizes current practices in land application and presents data supporting the risk-assessment methodology used to derive human health and environmental risk-based limits for contaminants in land-applied sewage sludge. The underlying assumptions of the methodology, embodied in a series of computer models, are discussed, and the risk-based contaminant limits derived by the models are presented. The three management practices associated with land application are outlined, and the twelve different pathways by which contaminants reach most-exposed individuals through land application are discussed.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Survivorship of meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, from sewage sludge-treated fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term field study was begun in 1977 at Miami University to evaluate the effects of land application of sewage sludge on experimental old-field communities. The effects of sludge application on toxic metal concentrations in meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) organs during the first two years of the study have been reported. During the first two years of sludge application, no detrimental effects were observed in vole survivorship as a result of sludge treatment.

Maly, M.S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Comparative LCA of sewage sludge valorisation as both fuel and raw material substitute in clinker production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment to evaluate the environmental impact of urban sewage sludge use as alternative fuel or raw material in clinker production was carried out. In order to quantify in detail the overall environmental impact of both scenarios, the sewage sludge treatment process and the transport to cement facilities for both alternatives were considered. The substitution ratio of fuel (petcoke) and raw material (limestone) was fixed between 5 and 15% according to the cement production plant limitations. Both scenarios show CO2 savings when compared to the clinker production without substitution. The mid-point and end-point analysis were favourable to the fuel substitution with savings ranging from 3 to 7% compared to the raw material substitution and also to base case without substitution. The influence of the amount of sewage sludge used for both scenarios indicates that fuel substitution reduced the CO2 emissions when the amount of substitution is increased, while other mid-point and end-point categories were proportionally favourable to the fuel substitution scenario. Additionally, the influence of the substituted material characteristics showed that low heating value (fuel substitution) and CaO addition in lime stabilized sludge (raw material substitution) are critical parameters in terms of environmental impact in clinker production. The fuel substitution represents a significant environmental improvement compared to the raw material substitution scenario and clinker production without substitution.

Cesar Valderrama; Ricard Granados; Jose Luis Cortina; Carles M. Gasol; Manel Guillem; Alejandro Josa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Dioxins and furans formation in pilot incineration tests of sewage sludge spiked with organic chlorine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The factors affecting polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) formation were studied in sewage sludge incineration tests carried out on a demonstrative plant. The plant includes a circulating fluidised bed furnace (FBF) and a rotary kiln furnace (RKF), operating alternatively. During the tests sewage sludge was spiked with chlorinated hydrocarbons and the operating parameters of the afterburning chamber were varied. PCDD/F were sampled in each test before the bag filter, thus collecting the above contaminants before abatement systems. From the tests it appeared that PCDD/F were always produced in more abundance in the tests carried out by FBF than by RKF. The higher PCDD/F concentrations in the tests by FBF were reached when sewage sludge was spiked with a high dosage of a surrogate organic mixture of chlorinated hydrocarbons and when the afterburning chamber was used only as transit equipment with the burner off. The distribution of the different PCDD/F homologues was compared. \\{P5CDFs\\} were generally the prevalent fraction, with very few exceptions for the tests by RKF at high temperature of the afterburning chamber. As for FBF tests, it was found that the PCDD/F homologue profile depends on the afterburning chamber temperature.

Giuseppe Mininni; Andrea Sbrilli; Ettore Guerriero; Mauro Rotatori

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Economics of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), tire derived fuel (TDF), sewage sludge and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of three power plants rated at 250 MWe, 150 MWe and 4 MWe were developed. The 4 MWe facility was chosen to represent a distributed power source for a remote location and designated to co-fire coal with MSW, TDF and sewage sludge while producing electricity for a small town. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant and costs determined including capital costs, operating costs and cost of electricity. With the PFBCs operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Since PFBCs have not been tested co-firing wastes, other critical performance factors were addressed and recommendations were provided for resolving potential technical issues. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center; DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

222

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

223

Learning Outcomes Food Science & Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the long-term sustainability of Oregon's food processing industry · Provide service to the professionLearning Outcomes Food Science & Technology Oregon State University The Department's Learning of the Department of Food Science & Technology at Oregon State University is to serve food technologists, food

Escher, Christine

224

Food price volatility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of commodity price changes in energy and metals as well as for foods...commodities, in particular corn, sugar and vegetable oils...smaller in food markets than in energy and metals markets, reflecting...insignificant fall grains (%) maize (corn) 19.3 19.4 19.2 1.02...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

226

Summer Food Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMMER FOOD SAFETY SUMMER FOOD SAFETY Year after year, we hear and read the same advice: Handle food carefully in the summer because foodborne illness -- also known as "food poisoning" -- is more prevalent in warmer weather. Do foodborne illnesses increase during the summer months? If so, why? Yes, foodborne illnesses do increase during the summer, and the answer appears to be twofold. First, there are the natural causes. Bacteria are present throughout the environment in soil, air, water, and in the bodies of people and animals. These microorganisms grow faster in the warm summer months. Most foodborne bacteria grow fastest at temperatures from 90 to 110 °F. Bacteria also need moisture to flourish, and summer weather is often hot and humid. Given the right circumstances, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply on food to large numbers.

227

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

228

Waste Hoist  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

229

Environmental Poisons in Our Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that Environmental Poisons in Our Food comparison looks likeEnvironmental Poisons in Our Food. Chicago: PNB Publishers,what is Environmental Poisons in Our Food? It is more than a

Kaag, Cindy

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Food Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Definition Buildings used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Sub Categories fast food, restaurant or cafeteria References EIA CBECS Building...

232

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

233

Sandia National Laboratories: 2011's Second Zero Waste Lunch Event  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2011's Second Zero Waste Lunch Event 2011's Second Zero Waste Lunch Event June 22, 2011 zero waste station Zero Waste Station In collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories' New Mexico catering crew from Sodexo and composting vendor Soilutions, Pollution Prevention (P2) led a successful "Zero Waste" Lunch Event at Hardin Field during the Student Internship Program's summer welcome event. Replacing the forest of trash cans that usually appear at picnic events, three stations were strategically arranged to divert as much waste from the food portion of the event as possible. P2 personnel were positioned at the collection bin stations to educate and assist participants with the important, but much more involved disposal process. Beyond basic recycling of aluminum cans and plastic bottles, P2 worked with

234

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Comparing urban solid waste recycling from the viewpoint of urban metabolism based on physical input-output model: A case of Suzhou in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impacts of solid waste recycling on Suzhou's urban metabolism in 2015 are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical levels of reusing scrap tires and food wastes should be improved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary wastes from reusing food wastes and sludge should be concerned. - Abstract: Investigating impacts of urban solid waste recycling on urban metabolism contributes to sustainable urban solid waste management and urban sustainability. Using a physical input-output model and scenario analysis, urban metabolism of Suzhou in 2015 is predicted and impacts of four categories of solid waste recycling on urban metabolism are illustrated: scrap tire recycling, food waste recycling, fly ash recycling and sludge recycling. Sludge recycling has positive effects on reducing all material flows. Thus, sludge recycling for biogas is regarded as an accepted method. Moreover, technical levels of scrap tire recycling and food waste recycling should be improved to produce positive effects on reducing more material flows. Fly ash recycling for cement production has negative effects on reducing all material flows except solid wastes. Thus, other fly ash utilization methods should be exploited. In addition, the utilization and treatment of secondary wastes from food waste recycling and sludge recycling should be concerned.

Liang Sai, E-mail: liangsai09@gmail.com [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhang Tianzhu, E-mail: zhangtz@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

237

The global food supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cure-alls include land reforms, crash programs in education...initiated somewhat earlier, Mexico moved from a substantial...principal sources of food energy for the world's population...essential agricultural reforms. If the population problem...

J G Harrar

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

The Development of a Guideline on the Sampling/Testing of Innovative/Alternative Disposal Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies for Sewage Treatment and Disposal Principle Investigators Calvin P. C. Poon #12;Problem will be built in rural areas of Rhode Island. Many of the installations are the newly innovative will be specifically Most I/A ISDS technologies claim better treatment of the sewage which leads to their claim

Rhode Island, University of

239

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh, Falmouth, MA on Heavy Metals and Microbial N-Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Adding Sewage Sludge and Urea-Phosphate Fertilizers to the Great Sippewissett Salt Marsh in sludge form. Metals were not found to inhibit nitrification nor denitrification. Neither fertilizer nor, microbes, nitrogen cycle, sewage sludge, urea phosphate fertilizer, heavy metals INTRODUCTION Pollution

Vallino, Joseph J.

240

Banat's Journal of Biotechnology, 2014, 9, doi: 10.7904/20684738V(9)86 Transfert heavy metal sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sewage sludge as fertilizer from soil to ray grass Najla Lassoued(1), Mohamed Naceur Khelil(2), Saloua de physiologie, Université de Lausanne-CHUV, Lausanne, Suisse. Abstract. The land application of sewage sludge reveals a significant increase in the dray matter production of Ray Grass. In equivalent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Waste?to?Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

244

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

245

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

247

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Household solid waste characteristics and management in Chittagong, Bangladesh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is a multidimensional challenge faced by urban authorities, especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. We investigated per capita waste generation by residents, its composition, and the households' attitudes towards waste management at Rahman Nagar Residential Area, Chittagong, Bangladesh. The study involved a structured questionnaire and encompassed 75 households from five different socioeconomic groups (SEGs): low (LSEG), lower middle (LMSEG), middle (MSEG), upper middle (UMSEG) and high (HSEG). Wastes, collected from all of the groups of households, were segregated and weighed. Waste generation was 1.3 kg/household/day and 0.25 kg/person/day. Household solid waste (HSW) was comprised of nine categories of wastes with vegetable/food waste being the largest component (62%). Vegetable/food waste generation increased from the HSEG (47%) to the LSEG (88%). By weight, 66% of the waste was compostable in nature. The generation of HSW was positively correlated with family size (r{sub xy} = 0.236, p < 0.05), education level (r{sub xy} = 0.244, p < 0.05) and monthly income (r{sub xy} = 0.671, p < 0.01) of the households. Municipal authorities are usually the responsible agencies for solid waste collection and disposal, but the magnitude of the problem is well beyond the ability of any municipal government to tackle. Hence dwellers were found to take the service from the local waste management initiative. Of the respondents, an impressive 44% were willing to pay US$0.3 to US$0.4 per month to waste collectors and it is recommended that service charge be based on the volume of waste generated by households. Almost a quarter (22.7%) of the respondents preferred 12-1 pm as the time period for their waste to be collected. This study adequately shows that household solid waste can be converted from burden to resource through segregation at the source, since people are aware of their role in this direction provided a mechanism to assist them in this pursuit exists and the burden is distributed according to the amount of waste generated.

Sujauddin, Mohammad [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mohammad.sujauddin@gmail.com; Huda, S.M.S. [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Hoque, A.T.M. Rafiqul [Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences, Chittagong University, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh); Laboratory of Ecology and Systematics (Plant Ecophysiology Section), Faculty of Science, Biology Division, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Challenges facing food engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Food engineering (FE) was identified as a promising field in the mid-20th century. In the succeeding years, demand for food engineers in industry has continued unabated, but the field, in an academic sense, has not quite lived up to its potential. Yet, the coming challenges of the 21st century offer many opportunities for persons with FE training. This article is based on a plenary session held during the Conference of Food Engineering 2012, in Leesburg, Virginia, USA, and consists of a compilation of opinions of the authors. In order to develop further, FE needs to shed its historical mindset, and embrace a broader vision of its scope to include product, internal human and industrial processes, equipment, package and sensor/automation engineering. Training in FE could be vital to helping address issues such as water availability and quality, health and wellness, food safety, energy and sustainability. A number of 21st century developments will drive this change, including world population growth and aging; the digital universe, “big data” and informatics; personalization, food, health and wellness; food security, environment, sustainability and social responsibility; and the innovation ecosystem (open innovation and partnerships). Food engineering education will also have to change to keep pace with the extraordinary expansion of knowledge, the availability of virtual tools, diminishing funding and laboratory resources, and the possibility of creating partnerships between industry and academia. Studying inner transport phenomena, utilization of new techniques, such as micro processing for modeling and simulation of the digestion system, bioavailability, satiety, DNA predisposition, and nutrigenomics offer unique opportunities. The case of FE in UK and Europe are addressed, where consortia involving different industries have been able to partner to focus on problems with a common scientific theme to leverage their efforts. Finally, the experience of one food company in hiring food engineers as well as chemical engineers is highlighted, together with their interview processes and criteria. While this represents a collection of the opinions of the individual authors, it is hoped that the discussion stimulates a more wide-ranging conversation about FE to enable it to develop further into the 21st century.

I. Sam Saguy; R. Paul Singh; Tim Johnson; Peter J. Fryer; Sudhir K. Sastry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Forest land application of sewage sludge on the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, a sewage sludge application study was initiated on the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the effects of sludge additions on nutrient cycling processes in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest ecosystems and to determine whether or not such additions beneficially enhance forest productivity. Sewage sludge, either as a liquid anaerobic sludge at 0, 402, or 804 kg N/ha (360 and 720 lb/ac) containing approximately 7% N (oven dry) or a solid aerobic material at 632 kg N/ha (560 lb/ac) with approximately 1.3% N (oven dry), was applied to 1-, 3-, 8-, and 28-year-old loblolly pine stands on sandy and clayey upper coastal plain soils. A total of 525,000 gallons of liquid sludge and 560 tons of solid sludge was applied on 11.6 hectares (28.7 acres) of loblolly pine forest plots. Sludge additions were monitored to determine availability and movement so that potential impacts could be evaluated on water quality, nutrient and heavy metal cycling, soil and forest floor, understory vegetation, tree foliage, stand growth, biomass production, and wood quality. This study concluded that using liquid sludge at rates of 400 kg N/ha or less as a silvicultural treatment to fertilize pulp and sawtimber loblolly pine stands resulted in increased forest productivity without environmental or wood quality degradation. Application recommendations for stand age and loading rates for management purposes are addressed.

Davis, C.E. (comp.)

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

An assessment of methyl mercury and volatile mercury in land-applied sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations covering the land-application of municipal sewage sludge. These regulations established maximum pollutant concentrations and were based upon a risk assessment of human exposure. Mercury, assumed to be inorganic and non-volatile, was one pollutant evaluated. From April, 1995 through February, 1996, the authors studied the species of mercury contaminating municipal sludge applied to land, and the potential for volatilization of mercury from land-applied sludge. Methyl mercury was found at 0.1% of total mercury concentrations and was emitted from land-applied sludge to the atmosphere. Elemental mercury (Hg) was formed in land-applied sludge via the reduction of oxidized mercury and was also emitted to the atmosphere. Hg emission from land-applied sludge was significantly elevated over background soil emission. Methyl mercury is more toxic and more highly bioaccumulated than inorganic mercury, and warrants assessment considering these special criteria. Additionally, mercury emission from sludge-amended soil may lead to the contamination of other environmental media with significant concentrations of the metal. Although these pathways were not evaluated in the regulatory risk assessment, they are an important consideration for evaluating the risks from mercury in land-applied sludge. This presentation will summarize the results of a re-assessment of US EPA regulations regarding the land-application of municipal sewage sludge using data on methyl mercury toxicity and mercury transport in the atmosphere.

Carpi, A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lindberg, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Impacts of nitrogen on forests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 directed EPA to establish standards for use and disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in non-agricultural ecosystems. Ecological risk assessments rarely focus on nutrients as stressors. The nutrient components of municipal sewage sludge may impact tree community composition, growth and production, habitat and forage quality for wildlife, and nutrient cycling. The focus here is on three forest ecosystems: northwestern Douglas-fir forest (Pack Forest, WA), southeastern loblolly pine plantation (Athens, GA), and eastern deciduous forest (Hubbard Brook, NH). A model called LINKAGES has been developed at ORNL to examine the relationships between nitrogen cycling and long-term forest stand dynamics, limited by climate and soil water status. Plant-available nitrogen from biosolids is added in several application scenarios and compared to the no-amendment case. All changes are noted, even if they may be viewed as benefits rather than risks. Model outputs include: above-ground biomass, individual species biomass, net above-ground production, leaf litter, evapotranspiration, available nitrogen, and dead trunks. The changes in plant community composition and production are dependent on the rate, frequency, and duration of sludge application and on the age of the stand at the time of application. Model outputs are compared to empirical studies of forests where biosolids have been applied.

Efroymson, R.A.; Tharp, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Sample, B.E.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

255

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

256

Analyzing Food Safety Cultures: A Means to Improve Food Safety in the Catering Sector .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Food safety is one of the most pertinent issues in the food service industry. Food borne illness and food poisoning can be lethal and can… (more)

Ghezzi, Sara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Madaffald som en ressource; Food waste as a resource.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Projekttitel: Madaffald som en ressource Dette projekt analyserer, hvordan madaffald kan anvendes effektivt og bæredygtigt til energiproduktion i Danmark. Analysen tager udgangspunkt i ekspertinterviews, teorier… (more)

Spanggaard, Mira Juhl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Food for the Family.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Baking or steam­ ing potatoes with the skin on wastes none of the small amount of protein or mineral matter and so far as is known does not greatly affect the' potency of Vitamine C. When potatoes are available in only small amounts, it is undoubtedly wi... that if she plans thoughtfully and buys wisely, she will often be able to serve better meals with a smaller outlay of money. Further­ more, she will learn to utilize all that is bought so that there will be a minimum waste. Then home-making is a science...

Higgins, M. Hellen

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Food Adulteration in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proper provision for its enfolrcement, passage of the Federal Food Law. The time seems propitious for the 4 and which will, in co-operation with the Federal law, rfd the State of all adulterated or illegal food. The present Texas law is a good one... itself until the past summer. 3 Samples were then collected in Houston, Bryan, Waco, Dallas, Ft. Worth, and Clebiurne These samples were examined for adulteration or illegal additions, and the results are presented in the following tables. Table I...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Performance analysis of co-firing waste materials in an advanced pressurized fluidized-bed combustor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The co-firing of waste materials with coal in utility scale power plants has emerged as an effective approach to produce energy and manage municipal wastes. Leading this approach is the atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor (AFBC). It has demonstrated its commercial acceptance in the utility market as a reliable source of power by burning a variety of waste and alternative fuels. The application of pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (PFBC) technology, although relatively new, can provide significant enhancements to the efficient production of electricity while maintaining the waste management benefits of AFBC. A study was undertaken to investigate the technical and economical feasibility of co-firing a PFBC with coal and municipal and industrial wastes. Focus was placed on the production of electricity and the efficient disposal of wastes for application in central power station and distributed locations. Issues concerning waste material preparation and feed, PFBC operation, plant emissions, and regulations are addressed. The results and conclusions developed are generally applicable to current and advanced PFBC design concepts. Wastes considered for co-firing include municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge, and industrial de-inking sludge. Conceptual designs of two power plants rated at 250 MWe and 150 MWe were developed. Heat and material balances were completed for each plant along with environmental issues. With the PFBC`s operation at high temperature and pressure, efforts were centered on defining feeding systems capable of operating at these conditions. Air emissions and solid wastes were characterized to assess the environmental performance comparing them to state and Federal regulations. This paper describes the results of this investigation, presents conclusions on the key issues, and provides recommendations for further evaluation.

Bonk, D.L.; McDaniel, H.M. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); DeLallo, M.R. Jr.; Zaharchuk, R. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

263

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Food-Borne Trematodiases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...irrigation systems had been built in Egypt and Peru (70). The construction...29). To meet the projected demand and to maintain food security...who were treated with three daily 25-mg/kg doses of praziquantel...only four countries: Ecuador, Egypt, France, and Venezuela (50...

Jennifer Keiser; Jürg Utzinger

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Kerr Food & Agricultural Products Center FOOD TECHNOLOGY FACT SHEET 405-744-6071 · www.fapc.bizAdding Value to Oklahoma f a p c Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service · Division of Agricultural Sciences issues for food processors: · Green house gas (GHG) · Carbon footprint · Life cycle assessment (LCA

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

266

Development of a Chemical Kinetic Model for a Fluidized-bed Sewage Sludge Gasifier.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As the need for both sustainable energy production and waste minimization increases, the gasification of biomass becomes an increasingly important process. What would otherwise be… (more)

Champion, Wyatt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Food consumption trends and drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...original work is properly cited. Food consumption trends and drivers John Kearney...Government policy. A picture of food consumption (availability) trends and projections...largely responsible for these observed consumption trends are the subject of this review...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Projected ocean dumping rates for municipal and industrial wastes in the year 2000. Report for 26 March 1984-26 August 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amounts of coal ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, sewage sludge, industrial waste, and seafood-processing wastes currently ocean dumped were determined, and ocean dumping of these wastes was projected for the year 2000. The projected rates were made using three different scenarios: Scenario I assumed continued ocean dumping only by current permittees, Scenario II assumed some relaxation of ocean dumping regulation, and Scenario III, to provide a maximum estimate, assumed that future ocean-dumping would be based solely on economic considerations. Coal ash and FGD sludge are projected to be the most voluminous waste dumped under Scenarios II and III, and the East coast of the U.S. would produce the greatest amounts to be dumped.

Cura, J.; Menzie, C.; Borchardt, J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sludge processors have wide choice of solutions for waste ammonia problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ocean Dumping Act of 1988 phased out dumping of sewage sludge into the ocean. To use sewage sludge beneficially, facilities treat and process it using such techniques as digestion, dewatering, composting, thermal drying and chemical stabilization. All of these processes create waste discharges containing high concentrations of nitrogen, mainly in the form of ammonia. When nitrification occurs in receiving waters, ammonia is oxidized to nitrate and can lower dissolved oxygen levels in the water. Excess ammonia also is toxic to fish and other aquatic life. Nitrogen reduction alternatives for sludge dewatering and processing waste discharges include the following: air stripping; steam stripping; breakpoint chlorination; selective ion exchange; reverse osmosis; and chemical precipitation. To remove wastewater nitrogen using biological processes, ammonia and organic nitrogen first are oxidized aerobically (nitrification) to nitrate nitrogen, which then is converted biologically to nitrogen gas (denitrification) under zero or low dissolved oxygen (anoxic) conditions. Because sludge treatment discharges contain valuable quantities of ammonia, they may be considered for reuse as supplemental fertilizer for land application or for reclamation through spraying or injection into soil. Such discharges also may be used in combustion processes.

Chen, Y.S.R.; Samela, D. (Stone and Webster Engineering Corp., Boston, MA (United States). Environmental Technology and Services Div.); Kaylor, F.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Growth and elemental composition of sorghum sudangrass grown on flyash/organic waste-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to evaluate the potential benefitsof using fly ash/organic waste mixtures amended to soils for growth andcomposition of mineral elements by `sorgrass` (Sorghum vulgaris var.sudanense Hitchc.) a shorghum-sudangrass hybrid plant. This experimentwas conducted using a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to either sewage sludge,poultry manure, or dairy manure at six application rates. Our threeorganic wastes when mixed with fly ash at varied rates of applicationresulted in elevated concentrations of NO{sub 3}, P, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Fe, B,Cu and Zn in both soil and plants. The data of this study indicated thatthe availability of elements to plants varied according to the organicsource mixed with fly ash and the rate of application. The elements Band Zn were observed to be significantly greater in plant tissuesexposed to fly ash/poultry manure or fly ash/dairy manure mixtures.Soils amended with fly ash/sewage sludge or poultry manure generallyimproved plant growth and enhanced yield when applied at rates of 25tons/acre, and decreased thereafter. However, soils amended with flyash/dairy manure improved plant growth and enhanced yield when appliedat rates upto 50 tons/acre and decreased thereafter. The decreases inyield beyond these application rates were probably due to theaccumulation of high levels of B and Zn which are phytotoxic and/orelevated levels of inorganic dissolved salts. 22 refs., 4 tabs.

Sajwan, K.S. [Savannah State College, GA (United States); Ornes, W.H.; Youngblood, T.V. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

272

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

273

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

274

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Developing a Sustainable Food Outlet for UBC Food Services in the New Beaty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design, energy usage, waste management and menu options, amongst other things. We also showcase comparison of energy use and light output between 42 standard incandescent bulbs and ES-qualified CFLs 9. CNA with various stakeholders and review of other sustainable food outlets, in order for us to reach our

276

Zero-Waste Events Harvard Office for Sustainability, 46 Blackstone Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 www.green.harvard.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zero-Waste Events Harvard Office for Sustainability, 46 Blackstone Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 www.green-compostable materials (i.e. coffee stirrers, tea in foil bags, little creamers) 3. Determine all food and products

Wolfe, Patrick J.

277

Food Safety Assurance Systems: Food Safety and Ethics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article, ethical issues related to food operations and food safety are discussed. The article starts out by raising the question: What is ethics? Concepts such as, the utilitarian approach, rights approach, fairness or justice approach, common good approach, and virtue approach are briefly explained as an introduction to the further discussion of ethical dilemmas in relation to food safety. Dilemmas related to specific food safety issues, as unpasteurized cheese production and genetically modified organisms among others, are used to illustrate the problems. The precautionary principle and problems related to ethical decision making for the food industry are also presented.

N. Veflen Olsen; Y Motarjemi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The NASA Food Commercial Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The NASA Food Technology Commercial Space Center and How Your Company Can Participate space in a range of food development projects. For more information about NASA FTCSC or to arrange a presentation about the NASA FTCSC program, contact Dr. Anthony L. Pometto III Director NASA Food Technology

Lin, Zhiqun

279

FOOD FISH FACTS (Osmerus mordax)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

89 FOOD FISH FACTS Smelt (Osmerus mordax) Smelt have been a popular food fish on the North American in baskets . Among early Pacific slope Indians, fish were extremely important as food and used as one. Uses of Smelt Smelt have delicate , sweet flavor an d con - tain a pleasant oil that aids digestion. l

280

Safe Food in a Hurry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] Safe Food in a Hurry Mary K. Sweeten* Foodborne illness can lead to time away from the job for the employed homemaker besides causing family misery. You have to work to prevent food poisoning as you buy, store, cook and serve food. When you must...

Sweeten, Mary K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Food Safety and Meat Microbiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food Safety and Meat Microbiology School July 17-19, 2012 Master Meat Crafter Program Department) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison Meat Science Laboratory are again hosting the Food Safety and Meat your food safety systems and the safety of your products. Topics will include microbiology, sanitation

Sheridan, Jennifer

282

Food Safety Policy December 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food Safety Policy December 2011 #12;www.surrey.ac.uk2 Food Safety Policy Some Useful Telephone) Security Extension Number: 2002 or from external phones: (01483) 682002 Health and Safety Department the line to be put through to an operator. www.surrey.ac.uk 3 Food Safety Policy Contents Page 1

Doran, Simon J.

283

Sustainable Food Policy 2013 The University of Exeter recognises its responsibility to carry out its procurement activities in an environmentally and socially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the seasonal produce. Make all our waste oil collected in an approved manner and converted into bio diesel decisions relating to food purchasing and routes to market will consider the impact of such decisions

Bearhop, Stuart

284

Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Removal of copper and lead ions from aqueous solutions by adsorbent derived from sewage sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorbent prepared from sewage sludge has been used for the adsorption of Cu2+ and Pb2+ from aqueous solutions. It was noted that an increase in removal efficiency achieved 72% and 56% when agitation time achieved 120 min, and a decrease in the removal efficiency from 81% and 70% to 36% and 40% when the heavy metals initial concentration from 10 mg L?1 to 80 mg L?1 for Cu2+ and Pb2+ concentration, the removal efficiency increased with the adsorbent concentration increased. The Langmuir model fitted the experimental data reasonably well. The adsorption capacities achieved 9.737 mg g?1 and 7.386 mg g?1 for the Cu2+ and Pb2+, respectively. Desorption studies were performed by using dilute hydrochloric acid. Quantitative recovery of the metal ion is possible. The mechanism of adsorption seems to be ion exchange.

YunBo Zhai; GuangMing Zeng; LaFang Wang; XianXun Wei; CaiTing Li; ShanHong Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge for Improvement of Forest Sites in the Southeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In eight field experiments dried municipal sewage sludge was applied to forest sites before planting of seedlings. In all cases, tree growth was faster on sludge-amended plots than on plots that received fertilizer and lime or no amendment. In all studies, concentrations of total nitrogen in the soil were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots, even on good forest sites. In seven of the eight studies, concentrations of phosphorus also were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots. Nitrogen and phosphorus tended to be higher in foliage from trees growing on sludge plots. Deep subsoiling was beneficial regardless of soil amendment. Where weeds were plentiful at the outset, they became serious competitors on plots receiving sludge.

Charles R. Berry

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of sewage source and fate on southeast Florida coastal reefs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water, sponge and coral samples were collected from stations impacted by a variety of pollution sources and screened for human enteric viruses as conservative markers for human sewage. While human enteroviruses and adenoviruses were not detected, noroviruses (NoV; human genogroups I and II) were detected in 31% of samples (especially in sponge tissue). Stations near inlets were the only ones to show multiple sample types positive for NoV. Fecal indicator bacteria and enteric viruses were further evaluated at multiple inlet stations on an outgoing tide. Greatest indicator concentrations and highest prevalence of viruses were found at the mouth of the inlet and offshore in the inlet plume. Results suggest that inlets moving large volumes of water into the coastal zone with tides may be an important source of fecal contaminants. Efforts to reduce run-off or unintended release of water into the Intracoastal Waterway may lower contaminants entering sensitive coastal areas.

J. Carrie Futch; Dale W. Griffin; Kenneth Banks; Erin K. Lipp

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (1): Flow Resistance and Energy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? Diameter?mm? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? Diameter?mm? Specific Resistance?s 2/m6? 10 77392033.96 125 118.87 400 0.249907 15 9024280.53 150 45.23 450 0.133866 20 1964433.28 175 19.98 500 0.076587 25 602024... pipe and the old cast iron pipe. It is 0.30 0.021 z d? = (6) (1.2/um> )s Defined the ratio of flow resistance of mediate water and sewage is zHw, the ratio of the flux is wz,and the ratio of velocity is z wUr u u= , supposed the inside...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, G.; Li, X.; Huang, L.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Fraunhofer ISE IEA HPP Annex 43  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the future? Biogas from biological waste: agriculture, landfill, waste (sewage) water Usage of biogas: heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

290

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Waste: 1. Radioactive waste from your lab is collected by the RSO. 2. Dry radioactive waste must be segregated by isotope. 3. Liquid radioactive waste must be separated by isotope. 4. Liquid frequently and change them if contaminated. 5. Use radioactive waste container to collect the waste. 6. Check

Jia, Songtao

291

Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, bioenergy production, marketing, distribution, and local food systems. Sustainable Food Systems OptionMontana State University 1 Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems This program is a unique, processing, distribution, and utilization of food and bioenergy. The degree focuses on ecologically sound

Maxwell, Bruce D.

292

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from tank waste. * Decreases the volume of water to create room in double-shell tanks, allowing them to accept waste from noncompliant single- shell tanks. * Treats up to 1...

293

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trucks for scale. The DSTs have limited capacity and are aging. Maintaining these tanks is important to ensure that waste is ready to supply the Waste Treatment Plant. The...

294

Hazardous Waste Management (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states regulations for the disposal of hazardous waste. It also provides information about permit requirements for the transport, treatment and storage of such waste. It also mentions...

295

Nuclear waste solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glass and polycrystalline materials for high-level radioactive waste immobilization are discussed. Borosilicate glass has been selected as the waste form for defence high-level radwaste in the US. Since releas...

L. L. Hench; D. E. Clark; A. B. Harker

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geotechnical investigation of sewage wastewater disposal sites and use of GIS land use maps to assess environmental hazards: Sohag, upper Egypt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land application is the only currently available technique for sewage wastewater disposal along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. Wastewater disposal projects have been established in the lowland desert zone ext...

Ahmed M. Youssef; Adly A. Omer; Mohamed S. Ibrahim…

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both radioactive materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Mixed Chemical and Radioactive Waste Mixed waste is: any waste material containing both as noted on the list, you do not have a mixed waste and it may be managed as a normal radioactive waste radioactive waste after initially dating the container, the hold for decay time is extended, but you cannot

Straight, Aaron

299

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07. Admin Chg 2, dated 6-8-11, cancels DOE M 435.1-1 Chg 1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

300

2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Zero landfill, zero waste: the greening of industry in Singapore  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews how a land-scarce city-state is trying to achieve its goals of zero landfill and zero waste through the greening of industry. The main challenges Singapore confronts in its solid waste management are an increasing volume of industrial waste generated, a shortage of land for landfills, and escalating costs of incineration plants. To green its industries, there has been a coordinated effort to develop a recycling industry and to initiate public-private partnerships that will advance environmental technologies. Case studies on the steel, construction, waste incineration, and the food retail industry illustrate the environmental progress that has been made. These cases show also the crucial role played by the government in accelerating the greening of industry by facilitating the formation of strategic collaborations among organisations, and by reconciling the twin objectives of sustainability and profitability.

Josephine Chinying Lang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China 1 DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR STORM WATER/INFILTRATION SANITARY SEWAGE SEPARATION Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Energy Systems Laboratory Charles Culp, Ph.D., P.... Professor Department of Civil Engineering Bahman Yazdani, P.E., CEM. Assc. Director Energy Systems Laboratory Texas A&M University ABSTRACT This paper presents the procedures developed to calculate the electricity savings and emissions...

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sewage Sludge as a Biomass Resource for the Production of Energy: Overview and Assessment of the Various Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage Sludge as a Biomass Resource for the Production of Energy: Overview and Assessment of the Various Options† ... This effort simultaneously proceeded with an enforcement of the industry and households to reduce or eliminate the discharge of toxic pollutants into the sewer. ... A lot of effort has been put into the manufacturing of valuable products by thermal solidification of the inorganic sludge compounds, especially in Japan. ...

Wim Rulkens

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

305

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

306

Iodine content of food groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iodine content of several kinds of foods representing different product groups available on the Swiss market was analyzed by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using the enriched long-lived nuclide 129I. Considerable variations in levels of iodine between single foodstuffs within food groups were found, which also applied for levels in different food groups. The contribution of the food groups to the average daily iodine intake for the Swiss population was estimated from recent food consumption data. Bread and milk were identified as significant sources of iodine in the Swiss diet as they contributed 58 and 29 ?g/day, respectively. The estimated contribution of all basic food groups to the per capita intake of iodine was approximately 140 ?g/day, which was somewhat below the amount recognized for adequate nutrition (150 ?g/day). In view of the additional consumption of iodized kitchen salt, an average of 140 ?g/day underestimates the actual iodine intake.

M. Haldimann; A. Alt; A. Blanc; K. Blondeau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sewage sludge application in a plantation: Effects on trace metal transfer in soil–plant–snail continuum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We studied the potential bioaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd by the snail Cantareus aspersus and evaluated the risk of leaching after application of sewage sludge to forest plantation ecosystems. Sewage sludge was applied to the soil surface at two loading rates (0, and 6 tons ha? 1 in dry matter) without incorporation into the soil so as to identify the sources of trace metal contamination in soil and plants and to evaluate effects on snail growth. The results indicated a snail mortality rate of less than 1% during the experiment, while their dry weight decreased significantly (sludge over the exposure period considered. Additions of sewage sludge led to higher levels of trace metals in forest litter compared to control subplots, but similar trace metal concentrations were observed in sampling plants. Bioaccumulation study demonstrated that Zn had not accumulated in snails compared to Cu which accumulated only after 28 days of exposure to amended subplots. However, Pb and Cd contents in snails increased significantly after 14 and 28 days of exposure in both the control and amended subplots. At the last sampling date, in comparison to controls the Cd increase was higher in snails exposed to amended subplots. Thus, sludge spread therefore appears to be responsible for the observed bioaccumulation for Cu and Cd after 28 days of exposure. Concerning Pb accumulation, the results from litter–soil–plant compartments suggest that soil is this metal's best transfer source.

Mohamed Bourioug; Frédéric Gimbert; Laurence Alaoui-Sehmer; Mohammed Benbrahim; Lotfi Aleya; Badr Alaoui-Sossé

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Possibilities and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) in the development of waste utilization systems - Applied examples for a region in Northern Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the background of increasing concerns about climate change, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an integral part of processes in both the waste management and the energy industries. This is reflected in the development of new waste treatment concepts, in which domestic and commercial waste is treated with the aim of utilizing its energy content, while at the same time recycling as much of its material content as possible. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a method of assessing the environmental relevance of a waste management system, the basis of which is a material flow analysis of the system in question. GHG emissions from different options for thermal treatment and energy recovery from waste as applied to a region in Northern Germany have been analyzed by the LCA approach and an indicative LCA, which only considers those emissions resulting from operating stages of the system. Operating stages have the main share of emissions compared to pre-processing stages. Results show that through specific separation of waste material flows and highly efficient energy recovery, thermal treatment and energy generation from waste can be optimized resulting in reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases. There are also other areas of waste utilization, currently given little attention, such as the solar drying of sewage sludge, which can considerably contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)], E-mail: wittmaier@hs-bremen.de; Langer, S.; Sawilla, B. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment: Draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological performance assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was conducted to demonstrate compliance with appropriate radiological criteria of the US Department of Energy and the US Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the general public. The calculations involved modeling the transport of radionuclides from buried waste, to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the general public via air, ground water, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses were made for both offsite receptors and individuals intruding onto the site after closure. In addition, uncertainty analyses were performed. Results of calculations made using nominal data indicate that the radiological doses will be below appropriate radiological criteria throughout operations and after closure of the facility. Recommendations were made for future performance assessment calculations.

Case, M.J.; Maheras, S.J.; McKenzie-Carter, M.A.; Sussman, M.E.; Voilleque, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tank Waste and Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. The Defense Waste Processing Facility set a record by producing 267 canisters filled with glassified waste in a year. New bubbler technology and other enhancements will increase canister production in the future. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a shielded enclosure at the Defense Waste Processing Facility where the melter is pouring molten glass inside a canister. A Savannah River Remediation employee uses a manipulator located inside a

311

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

312

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solid Waste Management Plan. Revision 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste types discussed in this Solid Waste Management Plan are Municipal Solid Waste, Hazardous Waste, Low-Level Mixed Waste, Low-Level Radioactive Waste, and Transuranic Waste. The plan describes for each type of solid waste, the existing waste management facilities, the issues, and the assumptions used to develop the current management plan.

NONE

1995-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Waste Confidence Discussion | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Confidence Discussion Waste Confidence Discussion Long-Term Waste Confidence Update. Waste Confidence Discussion More Documents & Publications Status Update: Extended Storage...

315

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste...

316

Transuranic (TRU) Waste | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste Defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act as "waste containing more than 100 nanocuries of alpha-emitting...

317

Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Commercial Commercial Industrial Lighting Energy Smart Grocer Program HVAC Program Shell Measures Commercial Kitchen & Food Service Equipment Plug Load New...

318

Action Plan Food Science and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agroquímica y Tecnolo- gía de Alimentos (Institute of Agrochemicals and Food Technology) in Valencia. During

Fitze, Patrick

319

Ferrocyanide tank waste stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove [sup 137]CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes.

Fowler, K.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

6 - Nuclear Waste Regulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most influential national and international bodies providing recommendations on radiation protection are described, including the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Protection philosophies and the ICRP general principles of radiation protection are discussed. Radioactive material regulations and sources of radiation are explained. Criteria of exemption from regulatory control are discussed with examples of exemption levels for naturally occurring and radioactive waste radionuclides. Clearance of both moderate and bulk amounts of materials from regulatory control is also explained, including examples of EU and the UK regulations. Dose limits recommended by the ICRP are given, as well as the main principles of control of radiation hazards. Nuclear waste classification schemes are outlined, including the IAEA classification scheme. A brief explanation of nuclear waste classes including exempt waste, very short-lived waste, very low-level waste, low-level waste, intermediate-level waste and high-level waste is given. Examples of waste classification schemes are given, including that of the UK.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Tank Waste Information Enclosure 1 1 Hanford Tank Waste Information 1.0 Summary This information demonstrates the wastes in the twelve Hanford Site tanks meet the definition of transuranic (TRU. The wastes in these twelve (12) tanks are not high-level waste (HLW), and contain more than 100 nanocuries

322

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy from Waste UK Joint Statement on Energy from Waste Read more overleaf Introduction Energy from waste provides us with an opportunity for a waste solution and a local source of energy rolled,itcan onlyaddressaportionofthewastestream andisnotsufficientonitsown. Energy obtained from the combustion of residual waste (Energy from

323

Stabilization of compactible waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Inspection Tomography (WIT) provides mobile semi-trailer mounted nondestructive examination (NDE) and assay (NDA) for nuclear waste drum characterization. WIT uses various computed tomography (CT) methods for both NDE and NDA of nuclear waste drums. Low level waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive waste can be inspected and characterized without opening the drums. With externally transmitted x-ray NDE techniques, WIT has the ability to identify high density waste materials like heavy metals, define drum contents in two- and three-dimensional space, quantify free liquid volumes through density and x-ray attenuation coefficient discrimination, and measure drum wall thickness. With waste emitting gamma-ray NDA techniques, WIT can locate gamma emitting radioactive sources in two- and three-dimensional space, identify gamma emitting isotopic species, identify the external activity levels of emitting gamma-ray sources, correct for waste matrix attenuation, provide internal activity approximations, and provide the data needed for waste classification as LLW or TRU. The mobile feature of WIT allows inspection technologies to be brought to the nuclear waste drum storage site without the need to relocate drums for safe, rapid, and cost-effective characterization of regulated nuclear waste. The combination of these WIT characterization modalities provides the inspector with an unprecedented ability to non-invasively characterize the regulated contents of waste drums as large as 110 gallons, weighing up to 1,600 pounds. Any objects that fit within these size and weight restrictions can also be inspected on WIT, such as smaller waste bags and drums that are five and thirty-five gallons.

Bernardi, R.T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Food, Nutrition and Health 300 Food Process Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conduction, convection, radiation and latent heat. 3. Technology of thermal processing of foods. 4. Evaluation of thermal properties of food and packaging materials. 4. Calculation of sterilization, pasteurization and low temperature preservation. . Prerequisite PHYS 101 or 121. [3-0-1]. The overall objectives

Farrell, Anthony P.

326

Food and Feed Safety and Quality "Food&Feed"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on human health · Feed preservation and impact on the hygienic quality, both microbial and chemical of chemicals, especially endocrine disruptors · Veterinary drugs in food producing animals, residues in foodD work, by offering · a scientific platform ­ training in scientific presentations and discussions

327

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

328

SRS - Programs - Waste Solidification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Solidification Waste Solidification The two primary facilities operated within the Waste Solidification program are Saltstone and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. Each DWPF canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter, and typically takes a little over a day to fill. The largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the world, DWPF converts the high-level liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal

329

High level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

Crandall, J L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Underground waste barrier structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an underground waste barrier structure that consists of waste material, a first container formed of activated carbonaceous material enclosing the waste material, a second container formed of zeolite enclosing the first container, and clay covering the second container. The underground waste barrier structure is constructed by forming a recessed area within the earth, lining the recessed area with a layer of clay, lining the clay with a layer of zeolite, lining the zeolite with a layer of activated carbonaceous material, placing the waste material within the lined recessed area, forming a ceiling over the waste material of a layer of activated carbonaceous material, a layer of zeolite, and a layer of clay, the layers in the ceiling cojoining with the respective layers forming the walls of the structure, and finally, covering the ceiling with earth.

Saha, Anuj J. (Hamburg, NY); Grant, David C. (Gibsonia, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CONCEPTUALIZING “HYBRID” FOOD NETWORKS: ENGAGING CONVENTIONAL FOOD SYSTEM INFRASTRUCTURE TO BUILD LOCAL FOOD SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Many alternative food movements have been built around the mantra of “cutting out the middleman.” Direct relationships between producers and consumers counter the faceless anonymity… (more)

Bloom, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Power estimation and reliability evaluation of municipal waste water and self-excited induction generator-based micro hydropower generation system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents power estimation and reliability evaluation of the micro hydro power generation system based on municipal waste water. Self-excited induction generator was used in the developed power plant, situated at IIT (BHU) campus, Varanasi, India. The hydro potential of the waste water flowing through sewage system of the Banaras Hindu University has been determined for annual flow duration and daily flow duration curves by ordering the recorded waste water from maximum to minimum flows. This paper estimates output power and determines reliability indices like: failure rate, repair rate, MTTF, MTTR and MTBF of the MWW-based developed generation plant. Design parameters of the SEIG with suitable values of the capacitor have been used and recommended for improvement of the power generation quality and reliability of the system.

Lokesh Varshney; R.K. Saket; Saeid Eslamian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Sewage sludge ash to phosphorus fertiliser: Variables influencing heavy metal removal during thermochemical treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to improve the removal of heavy metals from sewage sludge ash by a thermochemical process. The resulting detoxified ash was intended for use as a raw material rich in phosphorus (P) for inorganic fertiliser production. The thermochemical treatment was performed in a rotary kiln where the evaporation of relevant heavy metals was enhanced by additives. The four variables investigated for process optimisation were treatment temperature, type of additive (KCl, MgCl{sub 2}) and its amount, as well as type of reactor (directly or indirectly heated rotary kiln). The removal rates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and of Ca, P and Cl were investigated. The best overall removal efficiency for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn could be found for the indirectly heated system. The type of additive was critical, since MgCl{sub 2} favours Zn- over Cu-removal, while KCl acts conversely. The use of MgCl{sub 2} caused less particle abrasion from the pellets in the kiln than KCl. In the case of the additive KCl, liquid KCl - temporarily formed in the pellets - acted as a barrier to heavy metal evaporation as long as treatment temperatures were not sufficiently high to enhance its reaction or evaporation.

Mattenberger, H.; Fraissler, G. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); Brunner, T. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria)], E-mail: thomas.brunner@abc-energy.at; Herk, P. [ARP GmbH, Johann Sacklgasse 65-67, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Hermann, L. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); ASH DEC Umwelt AG, Donaufelderstrasse 101/4/5, 1210 Wien (Austria); Obernberger, I. [Austrian Bioenergy Centre GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria); BIOS BIOENERGIESYSTEME GmbH, Inffeldgasse 21b, 8010 Graz (Austria)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sewage sludge as an amendment for calcareous bauxite mine spoils reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dried aerobically digested sewage sludge applied at seven rates (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}) in a field experiment on calcareous bauxite mine spoils significantly increased the available water capacity, concentrations of organic matter, total N, extractable P (Olsen), exchangeable Mg{sup 2+}, and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable Cu, Mn, Zn, and Pb of mine spoils. Total N and extractable P concentrations decreased with time after sludge application. The DTPA-extractable Cu concentration was high 4 yr after application at sludge rates of 80 and 120 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1}. Extractable Cu and Zn concentrations correlated significantly and positively with Cu and Zn concentrations in burnet (Sanguisorba minor subsp. minor) and fiddleneck (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth) tissue. Sludge application depressed plant Mn uptake. Plant biomass, plant density, and foliar cover significantly increased with treatment rates in the first and fourth growing seasons but decreased with time. Fiddleneck and burnet were the species favored by the high rate of sludge application.

Brofas, G.; Michopoulos, P.; Alifragis, D.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Synthesizing Optimal Waste Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vitrification of tank wastes to form glass is a technique that will be used for the disposal of high-level waste at Hanford. ... Durability restrictions ensure that the resultant glass meets the quantitative criteria for disposal/long-term storage in a repository. ... If glasses are formulated to minimize the volume of glass that would be produced, then the cost of processing the waste and storing the resultant glass would be greatly reduced. ...

Venkatesh Narayan; Urmila M. Diwekar; Mark Hoza

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

FOOD SECURITY: WAYS FORWARD THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOOD SECURITY: WAYS FORWARD THROUGH COOPERATIVE PRODUCTION AND MARKETING1 "Given the chance, poor. The Sustainable Community Connections project, coordinated by AWISH-HELLAS, seeks to address food security issues) olive oil-related products, with targeting of markets in the European Union (EU) and United States (US

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

338

Food Newsletter Summary November 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food Newsletter Summary November 2013 Scottish Government Scotch Beef back on the US menu Seal Bennett. LiveWell for Life Paving the way for sustainable consumption Between July and October of food consumption be in 2050? ­ a discussion paper about what we eat in the future In September 2013

Siddharthan, Advaith

339

Waste Confidence Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Long-Term Long-Term Waste Confidence Update Christine Pineda Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Long-Term Update Draft Report, "Background and Preliminary Assumptions for an Environmental Impact Statement- Long-Term Waste Confidence Update" Elements of the Long-Term Update - Draft environmental impact statement - Draft Waste Confidence Decision - Proposed Waste Confidence Rule based on the EIS and Decision, if applicable 2 Overview of Draft Report Background and assumptions report is first step in process. Basic topics in the report are:

340

Norcal Waste Systems, Inc.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the LNG long-haul heavy-duty trucks at Norcal Waste Systems Inc.'s Sanitary Fill Company.

Not Available

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Section 24: Waste Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy (DOE). 1995b. Transuranic Waste Baseline Inventory Report (Revision 2, December). DOECAO-95-1121. ERMS 531643. Carlsbad Area Office, Carlsbad, NM. PDF Author U.S....

342

Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training, security) * Closure plan Tank-Related Permit Units New * 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) * 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) Existing * 242-A Evaporator * Waste Treatment...

343

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

344

Electronic Waste Transformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic Waste Transformation ... Instead, entrepreneurial individuals and small businesses recover valuable metals such as copper from obsolete equipment through activities such as burning. ...

CHERYL HOGUE

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Avoidable waste management costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 19, 2014 - No second release at WIPP September 12, 2014 - Waste hoist transformer replacement September 09, 2014 - Additional areas cleared in WIPP underground...

349

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Are the World Food Programme’s food consumption groups a good proxy for energy deficiency?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Food Consumption Score (FCS) is the World Food Programme’s main food access indicator, ... as having poor, borderline or acceptable food consumption. The ability of the FCS and its thresholds to classify hous...

Margarita Lovon; Astrid Mathiassen

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................................5 2. Discharges of radioactive waste .................................................................................................................5 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste .................................................................................................................5 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

352

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................................................... 9 2. Discharges of radioactive waste ................................................................................................................... 9 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste ...................................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

353

MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD DIRECTORATE OF FISHERIES RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................................... 9 2. Discharges of radioactive waste ..................................................................................................................... 9 2.1 Liquid radioactive waste ...................................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Solid radioactive waste

354

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-F4 Sanitary Sewer System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-131  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1607-F4 waste site is the former location of the sanitary sewer system that serviced the former 115-F Gas Recirculation Building. The system included a septic tank, drain field, and associated pipeline that were in use from 1944 to 1965. The 1607-F4 waste site received unknown amounts of sanitary sewage from the 115-F Gas Recirculation Building and may have potentially contained hazardous and radioactive contamination. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Waste Loading Enhancements for Hanford Low-Activity Waste Glasses  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE GLASSES Albert A. Kruger, Glass Scientist DOE-WTP Project Office Engineering Division US Department of Energy Richland,...

356

Tank Waste Committee Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a PA is to examine the final waste disposition at Hanford, such as waste in the tanks at C-Farm. Vince said the quest is to model waste movement over 10,000 years,...

357

FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................................... 17 1.2 Disposals of radioactive waste.............................................................................................. 18 1.2.1 Radioactive waste disposal from nuclear sites........................................................... 18 1.2.2 Radioactive waste disposal at sea

358

FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................................................................... 15 1.2 Disposals of radioactive waste.............................................................................................. 15 1.2.1 Radioactive waste disposal from nuclear sites ........................................................... 15 1.2.2 Radioactive waste disposal at sea

359

University of Oklahoma Food Services Policy on Food I. Purpose of policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Oklahoma Food Services Policy on Food Allergies I. Purpose of policy The purpose offered to students with food allergies through the Department of Housing and Food Services.1 II. To Whom Services; and (2) Food Service employees. III. Policy Definitions Food Allergens ­ Substances that can

Oklahoma, University of

360

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...RESEARCH VOL.35 Food Additives and Contaminants argument...substance that caused removal of the cranberries...consideration was given to the removal of Tween 60 as a food additive. The compound has...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

WASTE DESCRIPTION TYPE OF PROJECT POUNDS REDUCED,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTION DETAILS * Radioactive Waste Source Reduction 1,500 Radioactive Waste $6,000 $2,500 $6,000 Waste Yard Sorting Table surveying to sort clean waste from radioactive waste Radioactive Emissions Emission lives. Radioactive Waste generated through wet chemistry Waste Minimization 30 Mixed waste / Liquid

362

Chapter 19 - Nuclear Waste Fund  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 Nuclear Waste Fund 19-1 CHAPTER 19 NUCLEAR WASTE FUND 1. INTRODUCTION. a. Purpose. This chapter establishes the financial, accounting, and budget policies and procedures for civilian and defense nuclear waste activities, as authorized in Public Law 97-425, the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended, referred to hereafter as the Act. b. Applicability. This chapter applies to all Departmental elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration, and activities that are funded by the Nuclear Waste Fund (NWF) or the Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal appropriation. c. Background. The Act established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and assigned it responsibility for the management

363

Solid Waste Rules (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The solid waste statute applies to construction and demolition debris, appliances, recyclables, and the facilities that collect, process, and dispose of solid waste. DES oversees the management of...

364

Solid Waste Management (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Solid Waste Program regulates safe management of solid waste through guidance, technical assistance, regulations, permitting, environmental monitoring, compliance evaluation and enforcement....

365

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Management Waste Management Oak Ridge has an onsite CERCLA disposal facility, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility, that reduces cleanup and transportation costs....

366

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

367

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

368

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Nuclear waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High efficiency removal of technetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

Walker, Darrel D. (1684 Partridge Dr., Aiken, SC 29801); Ebra, Martha A. (129 Hasty Rd., Aiken, SC 29801)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Marine disposal of radioactive wastes. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning radioactive waste disposal in seas, oceans, and coastal regions. Models, standards and regulations, government policy, and evaluations are covered. High-level and low-level nuclear wastes from nuclear power plants and ship propulsion reactors are discussed. References cover radionuclide migration, environmental exposure pathway, ecosystems, radiation dosages, carcinogens and neoplasms, and the effects on food chains. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t DOE 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1981. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP): Record of Decision. Federal Register, Vol. 46, No. 18, p. 9162, (46 Federal Register 9162), January 28, 1981. U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. DOE/EIS-0026-FS, Washington, DC, Office of Environmental Management, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1990. Record of Decision: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 121, 25689-25692, U.S. Department of Energy. DOE 1994. Comparative Study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Transportation Alternatives.

374

Salt Waste Processing Initiatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patricia Suggs Patricia Suggs Salt Processing Team Lead Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition Project Office of Environmental Management Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Initiatives 2 Overview * Current SRS Liquid Waste System status * Opportunity to accelerate salt processing - transformational technologies - Rotary Microfiltration (RMF) and Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) - Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (ARP/MCU) extension with next generation extractant - Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) performance enhancement - Saltstone enhancements * Life-cycle impacts and benefits 3 SRS Liquid Waste Total Volume >37 Million Gallons (Mgal) Total Curies 183 MCi (51% ) 175 MCi (49% ) >358 Million Curies (MCi) Sludge 34.3 Mgal (92% ) 3.0 Mgal (8%)

375

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

376

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive...

377

A Primer on Food Additives.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of their workers. The readers' loud reactions became a pow erful, moving force that helped persuade Con gress to pass the Pure Food and Drugs Act of 1906 as well as the Meat Inspection Act of the same year. The First Food Revolution Before the Civil War.... Factory conditions began to improve. Now that there was a law, complete with inspections and penalties for convicted transgressors, the food additive situation began to change, as did attitudes toward sanitation. The 1906 law de fined as adulterated...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environmental and plant effects of sewage sludge application to forests and pastures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Digested sewage sludge was applied to pastures and tree plantations at 19 to 44 Mg/ha (dry weight) as part of a municipal sludge disposal program. The sludge had low concentrations of heavy metals and traces of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 60/Co. Monitoring of soils, soil solutions, and runoff indicated that N, P, heavy metals, and radionuclides were largely retained in the upper 15cm of the soil. Soil solutions had elevated NO/sub 3//sup /minus// concentrations often >100 mg/L, but no significant increases in groundwater NO/sub 3//sup /minus// were found during the first year. Runoff from active sites had elevated concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup /minus// (20--30 mg/L), soluble P (1 mg/L), BOD/sub 5/ (5--30 mg/L), and fecal coliform (up to 14,000 colonies per 100 ml), not unlike runoff from pastures with cattle. Enrichment of organic N (2 times), available (inorganic) N (5 to 10 times), and Bray-P in the upper soils persisted for several years following sludge application. Sludge increased vegetation N concentrations from 1.5% to 2.3% and P concentrations from 0.16% to 0.31%. With the exception of Zn, heavy metals did not accumulate substantially in the vegetation. The sludge addition increased the survival and growth of sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.). For a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation future growth improvements are expected based on elevated foliar N concentrations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Van Miegroet, H.; Boston, H.L.; Johnson, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, CAU 232 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 232. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the July 1999 corrective action investigation (CAI) activities disclosed no evidence of contamination at the site. Contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) addressed during the CAI included total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, total herbicides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline and diesel/oil range), polychlorinated biphenyls, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data confirmed that none of the COPCs identified exceeded preliminary action levels outlined in the CAIP; therefore, no corrective actions were necessary for CAU 232. After the CAI, best management practice activities were completed and included installation of a fence and signs to limit access to the lagoons, cementing Manhole No. 2 and the diverter box, and closing off influent and effluent ends of the sewage lagoon piping. As a result of the CAI, the DOE/NV recommended that: (1) no further actions were required; (2) no Corrective Action Plan would be required; and (3) no use restrictions were required to be placed on the CAU.

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Carbon sequestration potential of green roofs using mixed-sewage-sludge substrate in Chengdu World Modern Garden City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Green roofs which use sewage sludge to sequestrate urban carbon dioxide may represent a potential opportunity to evaluate carbon sequestration benefits for the urban development under increasing global climate change. In this study, green roofs composed of 6 small green segments with two different substrates, mixed-sewage-sludge substrate (MSSS, volume ratio of sewage sludge and local-natural soil 1:1), and local-natural soil (LNS), three different substrate depths (20 cm, 25 cm and 30 cm), and three types of native plants (Ligustrum vicaryi, Neottia auriculata, and Liriope spicata) in Chengdu City were established to determine carbon sequestration from July 2012 to July 2013 through assessment of the carbon storage and sequestration. Results show that the average carbon storage of MSSS and LNS on green roofs was respectively 13.15 kg C m?2 and 8.58 kg C m?2, and the average carbon sequestration followed the order of LNS (3.89 kg C m?2 yr?1) > MSSS (3.81 kg C m?2 yr?1). Thus MSSS could be considered as a potential material for carbon sequestration. The carbon storage and carbon sequestration by native plants on the green roofs followed the order of L. vicaryi > L. spicata > N. auriculata. The whole green roof had a mean carbon storage of 18.28 kg C m?2 and average carbon sequestration of 6.47 kg C m?2 yr?1 in the combined biomass and substrate organic matter. The best green roof configuration was L. vicaryi together with MSSS substrate, with a middle-high level of carbon sequestration. It will be feasible and worthwhile to scale-up the adaptable green roof configurations in Chengdu World Modern Garden City.

Hongbing Luo; Xiaoling Liu; Bruce C. Anderson; Ke Zhang; Xiaoting Li; Bo Huang; Mei Li; You Mo; Liangqian Fan; Qiong Shen; Fenghui Chen; Mingshu Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum, may react with liquid in a landfill and cause uncontrolled temperature increases, significant changes

382

Developing sustainable food supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unavailable, and oil palm estate and cooperative schemes...value from (more) sustainable production, especially...being developed by the Sustainable Agriculture Initiative...achieve separately (Sustainable Food Laboratory 2005...businesses focus on making a real difference and often...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

POTLUCK FOOD SAFETY 1. Definition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an oven or microwave. If an oven or microwave is not available, the dish should be placed in an insulated chaffing dishes, ice pans, holding cabinets or ice chests. The food coordinator should monitor

384

SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors Maribel Alvarez Diane Austin Mamadou Baro Tim. Potential Helpful Minors Environmental Studies Environmental Sciences Nutritional Science Sustainable Built Environments Sustainable Plant Systems Potential Employers Documentary Films Government Jobs

Holliday, Vance T.

385

Trees, soils, and food security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1996). Such progress could improve household welfare by providing traditional food...Gelder, A. 1995 Development research and energy planning in Kenya. Ambio 14, 228236...mposium Series 1, pp. 108119. Tsukuba, Japan: JIRCAS. Sanchez P. A., Izac, A...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Food security and sustainable intensification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...should be produced using sustainable intensification (SI...nutrition. food security|sustainable intensification|biodiversity...diets are deficient in energy, about the same number suffer the diseases of energy surplus, whereas...more environmentally sustainable methods of farming...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

388

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume I. Waste characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report presents the waste characterization information obtained from sampling and characterizing various aged transuranic waste retrieved from storage at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The data contained in this report include the results of gas sampling and gas generation, radiographic examinations, waste visual examination results, and waste compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant-Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP-WAC). A separate report, Volume II, contains data from the gas generation studies.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Emergency Food and Water Supplies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-11 5-99 Emergency Food and Water Supplies Peggy Van Laanen* Cleaning and Sanitizing Equipment After Any Disaster Emergency Food Preparation Equipment Needs Assembling an Emergency... sealed, airtight metal lids, are safe to use after being thoroughly cleaned and sanitized. All cans, free of rust or dents, must be washed and sanitized before they are opened. Wash containers in a detergent solution using a scrub brush. Rinse...

Van Laanen, Peggy

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

An internship in food services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(see Appendix A). The Director of Food Services, Mr. Lloyd Smith, makes most decisions, particularly those dealing with expansion and administrative staffing. Anything new or innovative goes across the Director's desk for approval. Because... experience. The skills learned are skills that are transferrable to many industries. Anyone interested in the hospitality industry or sales would definitely benefit from an internship in the Department of Food Services at Texas A&M University. ANALYSIS...

Smith, Bradley J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

392

Waste inspection tomography (WIT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WIT program will provide an inspection system that offers the nuclear waste evaluator a unique combination of tools for regulatory-driven characterization of low-level waste (LLW), transuranic waste (TRU), and mixed waste drums. WIT provides nondestructive, noninvasive, and environmentally safe inspections using X-ray and gamma ray technologies, with reasonable cost and throughput. Two emission imaging techniques will be employed for characterizing materials in waste containers. The first of these is gamma emission tomography, commonly called single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rather than using an external radiation source, SPECT uses the emission of radioactive materials within the object of interest for imaging. In this case, emission from actual nuclear waste within a container will provide a three-dimensional image of the radioactive substances in the container. The second emission technique will use high-purity germanium detectors for gamma ray spectroscopy. This technique, called nondestructive assay (NDA), can identify the emitting isotopic species and strength. Work in emission tomography and assay of nuclear waste has been undertaken at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a technique called Passive Tomography. Results from a process development unit are presented.

Bernardi, R.T.; Han, K.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gasification of Model Compounds and Wood in Hot Compressed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Examples of wet waste streams include the following:? vegetable, fruit and garden waste; waste streams from agricultural, food and beverage industries; manure; sewage sludge; and some household wastes. ... Lignin itself is difficult to gasify and it has been observed that lignin blocks the conversion of wood's other constituents:? cellulose and hemi-cellulose. ... The raw biomass feedstock of sawdust with some CMC was also gasified in this system, the gasification efficiency in excess of 95% was reached. ...

Sascha R. A. Kersten; Biljana Potic; Wolter Prins; Wim P. M. Van Swaaij

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

394

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

397

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Methane generation from waste materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic solid waste digester for producing methane from solid waste, the digester comprising a reactor vessel for holding solid waste, a sprinkler system for distributing water, bacteria, and nutrients over and through the solid waste, and a drainage system for capturing leachate that is then recirculated through the sprinkler system.

Samani, Zohrab A. (Las Cruces, NM); Hanson, Adrian T. (Las Cruces, NM); Macias-Corral, Maritza (Las Cruces, NM)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Certification Plan, low-level waste Hazardous Waste Handling Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) handled in the Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end-product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; an executive summary of the Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. This plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Waste Certification Specialist to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Waste generators have the primary responsibility for the proper characterization of LLW. The Waste Certification Specialist verifies and certifies that LBL LLW is characterized, handled, and shipped in accordance with the requirements of WHC-WAC. Certification is the governing process in which LBL personnel conduct their waste generating and waste handling activities in such a manner that the Waste Certification Specialist can verify that the requirements of WHC-WAC are met.

Albert, R.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Income distribution trends and future food demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...available for food consumption. While there is...between food and energy markets via biofuels...century studied food consumption of the Belgian working...in the market or home-produced. Two...over time. Food consumption can be disaggregated...is poor. Their average income is Y, while...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tank Waste Strategy Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tank Waste Subcommittee www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 1 Tank Waste Subcommittee Ken Picha Office of Environmental Management December 5, 2011 Background Tank Waste Subcommittee (TWS)originally chartered, in response to Secretary's request to perform a technical review of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in May 2010. Three tasks: o Verification of closure of WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issues. o WTP Technical Design Review o WTP potential improvements Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 www.em.doe.gov safety performance cleanup closure E M Environmental Management 2 Report completed and briefed to DOE in September 2010 Follow-on scope for TWS identified immediately after briefing to DOE and

402

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

403

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Waste and Recycling  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks about nuclear energy, the challenge of nuclear waste and the research aimed at solutions. For more information about nuclear energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McCarthy, Kathy

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Availability and distribution of heavy metals, nitrogen, and phosphorus from sewage sludge in the plant-soil-water continuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research was conducted during 1984 and 1985 to determine Cd, Cu, N, Ni, P, and Zn availabilities to barley (Hordeum vulgare) and corn (Zea mays) grown on four sludge-amended soils. An aerobically digested sewage sludge, which was dewatered for approximately 2 years on sandbeds, was obtained from a sewage-treatment plant with major industrial inputs. A 14-day anaerobic N incubation study indicated that mineralization of sludge organic N varied from 9.2% at the 42 Mg ha(-1) sludge rate to 4.2% at the 210 Mg ha(-1) rate. This relatively low percentage of N mineralized from the sludge may reflect the inhibitory effects of the high sludge-metal levels on N transformations and the changes in sludge composition during long-term dewatering on sandbeds. Sludge application increased crop yields, except where the amounts of N mineralized from the sludge was inadequate to supply the N requirement of the crop. Crop yields were not decreased by either metal phytotoxity or P deficiency on the four sludge-amended soils.

Rappaport, B.D.; Scott, J.D.; Martens, D.C.; Reneau, R.B.; Simpson, T.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Citrus Waste Biomass Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fixation and partitioning of heavy metals in slag after incineration of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The contents and partitioning of HMs in slag of sludge incineration were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fixation rate decreases with residential time and finally keeps a constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 55% is optimal for the sediment for Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water mass fraction of 75% is optimal for the sediment for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found higher temperature versus lower non-residual fraction except that of Pb. - Abstract: Fixation of heavy metals in the slag produced during incineration of sewage sludge will reduce emission of the metals to the atmosphere and make the incineration process more environmentally friendly. The effects of incineration conditions (incineration temperature 500-1100 Degree-Sign C, furnace residence time 0-60 min, mass fraction of water in the sludge 0-75%) on the fixation rates and species partitioning of Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Mn and Ni in slag were investigated. When the incineration temperature was increased from 500 to 1100 Degree-Sign C, the fixation rate of Cd decreased from 87% to 49%, while the fixation rates of Cu and Mn were stable. The maximum fixation rates for Pb and Zn and for Ni and Cr were reached at 900 and 1100 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The fixation rates of Cu, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn decreased as the residence time increased. With a 20 min residence time, the fixation rates of Pb and Mn were low. The maximum fixation rates of Ni, Mn, Zn, Cu and Cr were achieved when the mass fraction of water in the sludge was 55%. The fixation rate of Cd decreased as the water mass fraction increased, while the fixation rate of Pb increased. Partitioning analysis of the metals contained in the slag showed that increasing the incineration temperature and residence time promoted complete oxidation of the metals. This reduced the non-residual fractions of the metals, which would lower the bioavailability of the metals. The mass fraction of water in the sludge had little effect on the partitioning of the metals. Correlation analysis indicated that the fixation rates of heavy metals in the sludge and the forms of heavy metals in the incinerator slag could be controlled by optimization of the incineration conditions. These results show how the bioavailability of the metals can be reduced for environmentally friendly disposal of the incinerator slag.

Chen Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100082 (China); Yan Bo, E-mail: yanbo2007@gig.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Public Health, Food Studies And Nutrition Department Of Public Health, Food Studies And Nutrition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

therapy, practice of dietetics, community nutrition, food science, and food service systems. All studentsPublic Health, Food Studies And Nutrition Department Of Public Health, Food Studies And Nutrition Kay Stearns Bruening, Chair, 315-443-2386 426 Ostrom Ave. The Department of Public Health, Food

Mather, Patrick T.

410

Food Services | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Food Services Food Services Food Services The Department offers many food services for employees within the Headquarters' buildings. Forrestal Forrestal Cafeteria (2nd floor, West Building). See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 6:45 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and a "Happy Hour" is featured from 2:00-2:30 p.m. offering 30% off all hot and cold buffet items. Other Places to Eat, Forrestal Food services available inside the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Places to eat near the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Germantown Germantown Cafeteria - See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m.

411

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

412

Rhenium solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glasses Developed for Nuclear Waste Immobilization," 91[12],solubility in borosilicate nuclear waste glass Ashutoshfor the researchers in nuclear waste community around the

McCloy, John S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record, Waste Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Observation of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Hazards Analysis Activities (EA-WTP-HLW-2014-08-18(a))...

414

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSolidWaste&oldid...

415

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007 Waste Processing Annual Technology Development Report 2007...

416

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling The Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program was...

417

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

418

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

419

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

420

SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT STRATEGY FOR EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates parameters relevant to River Protection Project secondary waste streams generated during Early Low Activity Waste operations and recommends a strategy for secondary waste management that considers groundwater impact, cost, and programmatic risk. The recommended strategy for managing River Protection Project secondary waste is focused on improvements in the Effiuent Treatment Facility. Baseline plans to build a Solidification Treatment Unit adjacent to Effluent Treatment Facility should be enhanced to improve solid waste performance and mitigate corrosion of tanks and piping supporting the Effiuent Treatment Facility evaporator. This approach provides a life-cycle benefit to solid waste performance and reduction of groundwater contaminants.

CRAWFORD TW

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy from waste via coal/waste co-firing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper reviews the feasibility of waste-to-energy plants using the cocombustion of coal with refuse-derived fuels. The paper discusses the types of wastes available: municipal solid wastes, plastics, tires, biomass, and specialized industrial wastes, such as waste oils, post-consumer carpet, auto shredder residues, and petroleum coke. The five most common combustion systems used in co-firing are briefly described. They are the stoker boiler, suspension-fired boilers, cyclone furnaces, fluidized bed boilers, and cement kilns. The paper also discusses the economic incentives for generating electricity from waste.

Winslow, J.; Ekmann, J.; Smouse, S. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Ramezan, M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Harding, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) Solid Waste and Infectious Waste Regulations (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency establishes the rules and regulations regarding solid waste. The chapter establishes specific regulations for biomass facilities, which includes permitting, siting, operation, safety guidelines, and closing requirements. Siting regulations include setbacks from waste handling areas for state facilities (1000 feet from jails, schools), requirements for not siting

423

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone LANL reaches waste shipment milestone The Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total. May 31, 2011 A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository A shipment of transuranic waste on its way to the WIPP repository. Contact Fred deSousa Communicatons Office (505) 665-3430 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, May 31, 2011 - Los Alamos National Laboratory has reached an important milestone in its campaign to ship transuranic (TRU) waste from Cold War-era nuclear operations to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This month, the Lab surpassed 100,000 plutonium-equivalent curies of TRU waste shipped to WIPP, about one-third of the Lab's total.

424

The largest radioactive waste glassification  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

largest radioactive waste glassification largest radioactive waste glassification plant in the nation, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the liquid nuclear waste currently stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) into a solid glass form suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Scientists have long considered this glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for treating liquid nuclear waste. By immobilizing the radioactivity in glass, the DWPF reduces the risks associated with the continued storage of liquid nuclear waste at SRS and prepares the waste for final disposal in a federal repository. About 38 million gallons of liquid nuclear wastes are now stored in 49 underground carbon-steel tanks at SRS. This waste has about 300 million curies of radioactivity, of which the vast majority

425

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mixed waste characterization reference document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste characterization and monitoring are major activities in the management of waste from generation through storage and treatment to disposal. Adequate waste characterization is necessary to ensure safe storage, selection of appropriate and effective treatment, and adherence to disposal standards. For some wastes characterization objectives can be difficult and costly to achieve. The purpose of this document is to evaluate costs of characterizing one such waste type, mixed (hazardous and radioactive) waste. For the purpose of this document, waste characterization includes treatment system monitoring, where monitoring is a supplement or substitute for waste characterization. This document establishes a cost baseline for mixed waste characterization and treatment system monitoring requirements from which to evaluate alternatives. The cost baseline established as part of this work includes costs for a thermal treatment technology (i.e., a rotary kiln incinerator), a nonthermal treatment process (i.e., waste sorting, macronencapsulation, and catalytic wet oxidation), and no treatment (i.e., disposal of waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)). The analysis of improvement over the baseline includes assessment of promising areas for technology development in front-end waste characterization, process equipment, off gas controls, and monitoring. Based on this assessment, an ideal characterization and monitoring configuration is described that minimizes costs and optimizes resources required for waste characterization.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRS Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank AIKEN, S.C. - (June 7, 2012) Today, the Savannah River Site (SRS) donated $22,000 and 18,000 pounds of food during its annual food drive for the Golden Harvest Food Bank. Several SRS organizations participated in this food drive-Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Remediation, U.S. Forest Service-Savannah River, URS and WSI- Savannah River. The SRS food drive is one of Golden Harvest Food Bank's largest, local fund-raisers. According to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC President and CEO Dwayne Wilson, the Site's past food drives have collec- tively yielded over 262,475 pounds of food for Golden Harvest. "We're pleased to support Golden Harvest in their highly effective efforts as they strive

429

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Treatment Building throughput study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hazardous waste/mixed waste HW/MW Treatment Building (TB) is the specified treatment location for solid hazardous waste/mixed waste at SRS. This report provides throughput information on the facility based on known and projected waste generation rates. The HW/MW TB will have an annual waste input for the first four years of approximately 38,000 ft{sup 3} and have an annual treated waste output of approximately 50,000 ft{sup 3}. After the first four years of operation it will have an annual waste input of approximately 16,000 ft{sup 3} and an annual waste output of approximately 18,000 ft. There are several waste streams that cannot be accurately predicted (e.g. environmental restoration, decommissioning, and decontamination). The equipment and process area sizing for the initial four years should allow excess processing capability for these poorly defined waste streams. A treatment process description and process flow of the waste is included to aid in understanding the computations of the throughput. A description of the treated wastes is also included.

England, J.L.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

1991-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

432

Heavy Metal Removal from Sewage Sludge Ash by Thermochemical Treatment with Gaseous Hydrochloric acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Division 4.3 Waste Treatment and Remedial Engineering, BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin ... Therefore, thermochemical investigations were carried out with focus on the performance of HCl-gas as Cl-donor in comparison to the well investigated solid Cl-donors magnesium chloride and calcium chloride. ... However, Kuderna(11) found that the Pcit test showed worse correlation with the results of pot experiments carried out with thermochemically treated SSA whereas the Pnac test showed very good correlation in the same investigation. ...

Christian Vogel; Christian Adam

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

World Food Crisis: Imperfect Markets Starving Development, A Decomposition of Recent Food Price Increases.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The recent decade has experienced two rather substantial food price spikes. This thesis sets out to provide an in-depth look at the recent food price… (more)

Costello, Christine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Waste generator services implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recurring waste management noncompliance problems have spurred a fundamental site-wide process revision to characterize and disposition wastes at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The reengineered method, termed Waste Generator Services, will streamline the waste acceptance process and provide waste generators comprehensive waste management services through a single, accountable organization to manage and disposition wastes in a timely, cost-effective, and compliant manner. This report outlines the strategy for implementing Waste Generator Services across the INEEL. It documents the culmination of efforts worked by the LMITCO Environmental Management Compliance Reengineering project team since October 1997. These efforts have included defining problems associated with the INEEL waste management process; identifying commercial best management practices; completing a review of DOE Complex-wide waste management training requirements; and involving others through an Integrated Process Team approach to provide recommendations on process flow, funding/charging mechanisms, and WGS organization. The report defines the work that will be performed by Waste Generator Services, the organization and resources, the waste acceptance process flow, the funding approach, methods for measuring performance, and the implementation schedule and approach. Field deployment will occur first at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant in June 1998. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1999, Waste Generator Services will be deployed at the other major INEEL facilities in a phased approach, with implementation completed by March 1999.

Mousseau, J.; Magleby, M.; Litus, M.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Name: Christopher Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is genetically engineered food safe to eat? Replies: Well, I hope so, since I and you and all of us have been eating it for centuries. All common foodstuffs have been seriously engineered since they were discovered. The modern tomato plant, apple tree, wheat stalk, and corn plant bear only a general resemblance to their ancestors, as farmers have engineered them to increase their yield, shelf life, resistance to disease, etc. It is, however, true that up until recently changes to the genetic code of foodstuffs could only be made via natural mutation (which occurs via naturally-occuring ionizing radiation and mutagenic chemicals), and the food engineer's job was limited to selecting those changes he wanted to preserve, and those he wanted to weed out. Now you can induce mutations directly, with intention and forethought, and avoid much of the waiting around for natural mutation that was heretofore necessary in plant breeding.

437

Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity Energy and Scale Issues in Implementation Kristina and biodiversity ­ energy and scale issues in implementation Abstract The aim of this thesis was to test the hypotheses that (1) biodiversity at a farm level differs between small and large farms, and (2

438

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMERCIAL SERVICES SUSTAINABLE FOOD POLICY February 2013 Commercial Services (CS) provides a range high standards of sustainability across all its activities. This policy supports CS aim to become a `Sustainable, Efficient and Effective Organisation' that "....will carefully consider the impact of our

Haase, Markus

439

FOOD REFORM MOVEMENTS Nicolas Larchet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOOD REFORM MOVEMENTS Nicolas Larchet Social historians have broadly defined two cycles of American history characterized by an efflorescence of social movements aiming to reform both the individual to the 1920s. The reform impulse thrived wherever there was a perceived vice, abuse or corruption

Boyer, Edmond

440

Food research 'lost in translation'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... dearth of investment in agricultural and plant science, and virtually no links between public and private sectors, are key drivers of the shortage of affordable food in Africa, a meeting ... shocked" at how little dialogue existed between public agricultural research centres in Africa and the private sector. ...

Natasha Gilbert

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

INFORMATION--ARTS & CRAFTS --FOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFORMATION--ARTS & CRAFTS --FOOD Listed in alphabetical order Ballroom and Kurtzman Room "Al Servicio de la Comunidad" (Latino Catholic Community): Information on community events and volunteer. All proceeds benefit the women of Arte Papel. Brazil Nuts: Student organization at Pitt. Information

Machery, Edouard

442

Developing sustainable food supply chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...consumers to buy green. For those food businesses dependent on hedonistic...environment. No time or energy for strategy vision long-term business vision no long-term...66-67. In How green is my kitchen...that affect our business, 70 pp. See www...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cook food to proper temperature.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and after handling or eating food; nafter playing with pets or visiting a zoo; nafter coughing, sneezing out of their mouths when they cough or sneeze. · Have the children touch something (table or chair. · Explain that if you wash your hands after coughing or sneezing in them, the germs will be washed away

Liskiewicz, Maciej

444

Food security and sustainable intensification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitigate greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously...effects on reducing fertility...in their energy and resource...projecting future energy prices is...pollution, by reducing soil and...to reduce greenhouse gas emissions Action to...opportunities for reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the food...Livestock-related greenhouse...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Transuranic Waste Tabletop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transuranic (TRU) Waste (Hazard Class 7 Radioactive) Moderator's Version of Tabletop Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-07D.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools planning tools planning tools T T T T Tr r r r ransur ansur ansur ansur ansuranic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) W anic (TRU) Waste aste aste aste aste (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazar (Hazard Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radio d Class 7 Radioactiv activ activ activ active) e) e) e) e) Moder Moder Moder Moder Moderat at at at ator' or' or' or' or's V s V s V s V s Version of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of T ersion of Tablet ablet ablet ablet abletop

446

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

447

NEW SOLID FUELS FROM COAL AND BIOMASS WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under DOE sponsorship, McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI), Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W), and Minergy Corporation developed and evaluated a sludge derived fuel (SDF) made from sewage sludge. Our approach is to dry and agglomerate the sludge, combine it with a fluxing agent, if necessary, and co-fire the resulting fuel with coal in a cyclone boiler to recover the energy and to vitrify mineral matter into a non-leachable product. This product can then be used in the construction industry. A literature search showed that there is significant variability of the sludge fuel properties from a given wastewater plant (seasonal and/or day-to-day changes) or from different wastewater plants. A large sewage sludge sample (30 tons) from a municipal wastewater treatment facility was collected, dried, pelletized and successfully co-fired with coal in a cyclone-equipped pilot. Several sludge particle size distributions were tested. Finer sludge particle size distributions, similar to the standard B and W size distribution for sub-bituminous coal, showed the best combustion and slagging performance. Up to 74.6% and 78.9% sludge was successfully co-fired with pulverized coal and with natural gas, respectively. An economic evaluation on a 25-MW power plant showed the viability of co-firing the optimum SDF in a power generation application. The return on equity was 22 to 31%, adequate to attract investors and allow a full-scale project to proceed. Additional market research and engineering will be required to verify the economic assumptions. Areas to focus on are: plant detail design and detail capital cost estimates, market research into possible project locations, sludge availability at the proposed project locations, market research into electric energy sales and renewable energy sales opportunities at the proposed project location. As a result of this program, wastes that are currently not being used and considered an environmental problem will be processed into a renewable fuel. These fuels will be converted to energy while reducing CO{sub 2} emissions from power generating boilers and mitigating global warming concerns. This report describes the sludge analysis, solid fuel preparation and production, combustion performance, environmental emissions and required equipment.

Hamid Farzan

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 1 There is considerable merit to the ideas outlined commitment to foster a green and sustainable economy. The Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC sign that the system is failing. #12;Canadian Energy-From-Waste Coalition (CEFWC) 2 Like you, the CEFWC

Columbia University

449

Waste IncIneratIon and Waste PreventIon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disposing of waste, it also makes consider- able amounts of energy available in the form of electricity emissions annu- ally. About 50 percent of the energy contained in residual municipal waste comes from- sions from the fossil waste fraction and the fos- sil energy purchased from external sources

450

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

451

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

452

High-Level Waste Requirements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide provides the criteria for determining which DOE radioactive wastes are to be managed as high-level waste in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Pathology waste includes: Transgenic animals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

resistant, have tight fitting covers, be clean, and in good repair. · Pathology waste must be transferred via the Internet: · Visit www.ehs.uci.edu/programs/enviro/. · Fill out the "Biomedical Waste

George, Steven C.

454

Waste Management Coordinating Lead Authors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use and recycling ..............602 10.4.6 Wastewater and sludge treatment.....................602 10.4.7 Waste ............................................591 10.2.2 Wastewater generation ....................................592 10.2.3 Development trends for waste and ......................... wastewater ......................................................593

Columbia University

455

Leaching of Nuclear Waste Glasses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resistance to aqueous corrosion is the most important requirement of glasses designed to immobilize high level radioactive wastes. Obtaining a highly durable nuclear waste glass is complicated by the requirement ...

L. L. Hench

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The Discovery of Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When did man discover nuclear waste? To answer this question, we first have to ask if nuclear waste really is something that could be called ... Prize in physics. In early writings within nuclear energy research ...

Göran Sundqvist

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

458

Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

459

Zero Waste, Renewable Energy & Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Dioxins & Furans · The `State of Waste' in the US · WTE Technologies · Thermal Recycling ­ Turnkey dangerous wastes in the form of gases and ash, often creating entirely new hazards, like dioxins and furans

Columbia University

460

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food wastes sewage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

462

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

463

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

California Department of Food and Agriculture | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Logo: California Department of Food and Agriculture Name: California Department of Food and Agriculture Abbreviation: CDFA Address:...

465

Oktoberfest Set for Wednesday, Oct. 29. Volunteers Needed. Food...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

success. More than a dozen volunteer positions still need to be filled -ranging from food service (replenishing food on food lines to assisting with children's games and field...

466

NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NO{sub x} concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. To this end work is progress using an existing 17kW downflow laboratory combustor, available with coal and sludge feed capabilities. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NO{sub x} and low NO{sub x} combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). The proposed work uses existing analytical and experimental facilities and draws on 20 years of research on NO{sub x} and fine particles that has been funded by DOE in this laboratory. Four barrels of dried sewage sludge are currently in the laboratory. Insofar as possible pertinent mechanisms will be elucidated. Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Progress in the Sixth Quarter (January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002) was slow because of slagging problems in the combustor. These required the combustor to be rebuilt, a job that is not yet complete. A paper describing our results heretofore has been accepted by the Journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Jost O.L. Wendt

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy Savings in Food Processing Dehumidification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food processors have the unique responsibility of maintaining environmental, process and sanitation standards for government and consumers. Usually the food plant is a large facility with many sources of contamination, all of which must...

Turney, R. L.; Young, F. J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that might jeopardize food safety....

Vestal, Andy

2003-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Food From The onn Dining Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raw Fr esh Food From The Earth U C onn Dining Service s Available at: Bookworms Cafe & Wilbur's Cafe RAW FRESH FOOD FROM THE EARTH AVOCADO CHOCOLATE PUDDING Raw, Imported Cocoa Powder, Avocado, Maple

Alpay, S. Pamir

470

WORLDWIDE FOCUS ON NUCLEAR WASTE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WORLDWIDE FOCUS ON NUCLEAR WASTE ... Volume grows and years pile up, but world lacks consensus on disposing of nuclear waste ... WHAT TO DO WITH SPENT nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is a problem shared by much of the world. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

471

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. ·We collect over 40

Howitt, Ivan

472

Mixed Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

Not Available

1993-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

473

Waste-to-Energy Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Waste to Energy Roadmapping Workshop was held on November 5, 2014, in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop gathered waste-to-energy experts to identify the key technical barriers to the commercial deployment of liquid transportation fuels from wet waste feedstocks.

474

Food Service Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFoodServiceEquipment&oldid380620...

475

Climate Change Impacts on Global Food Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pressures on food prices, economic...will have many effects on the global...recent data are averages for the period...burning of fossil fuels, with smaller...Goldberg R. , The effect of changes in...other renewable fuels for transport...surging food prices . Agric. Econ...osterdal, “Effects of food price...

Tim Wheeler; Joachim von Braun

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

476

Agent Notes Day 3 ~ Food Safety Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If possible, acquire food and refrigerator thermometers for each participant. Also, show a variety of thermometers (food, refrigerator, oven, candy, etc.), and explain their purpose. You may set up any food for foodborne illness because their immune systems are not fully developed. This lesson outlines the causes

477

Potential Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carcinogenicity of Food Additives and Contaminants 1...as a result of the manufacturing process used; an example...Specifi cations of food additives are of immense significance...use of DES as a food additive for cattle. I am unable...occupational hazards from manufacturing these materials even...

Philippe Shubik

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Disposal of Nuclear Wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generated between now and A.D. 2000 is about 0.04 km3 (0.01...high-level wastes do not be-come a public hazard. The AEC adopts this...pre-sented at the 66th national meeting of the American Institute of...ARH-SA-41 (Atlantic Richfield Hanford Co., Richland, Washington...

Arthur S. Kubo; David J. Rose

1973-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

479

Radioactive Waste Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to ensure that all Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste is managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety and the environment. Cancels DOE O 5820.2A

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

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481

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

482

WIPP TRANSURANIC WASTE How has the WIPP TRU Waste Inventory Changed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tank waste from the Hanford site that is currently managed as high-level waste. None of this waste has that these Hanford tank wastes will be treated and will eventually be able to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria on the Hanford Tank Waste and K-Basin Sludges that were included in the waste inventory for recertifica- tion

483

CSU Master Food Safety Advisor Program Do you enjoy the art and science of food preservation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSU Master Food Safety Advisor Program Do you enjoy the art and science of food preservation? Would Advisor! What is a Master Food Safety Advisor The Master food Safety Advisor program serves to extend CSU Safety Advisor is a trained volunteer educator and resource person in the community to provide the public

484

5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan suppresses food intake in food-deprived and stressed rats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan suppresses food intake in food-deprived and stressed rats Ahmed Amera , Jeff consumption and tissue 5-HTP levels among rats subjected to two different hyperphagic stimuli, food in a 1- h feeding test in food-deprived rats. In this study, both serotonin and 5-HTP exhibited anorectic

Wurtman, Richard

485

Hanford Tank Waste - Near Source Treatment of Low Activity Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment and disposition of Hanford Site waste as currently planned consists of I 00+ waste retrievals, waste delivery through up to 8+ miles of dedicated, in-ground piping, centralized mixing and blending operations- all leading to pre-treatment combination and separation processes followed by vitrification at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The sequential nature of Tank Farm and WTP operations requires nominally 15-20 years of continuous operations before all waste can be retrieved from many Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). Also, the infrastructure necessary to mobilize and deliver the waste requires significant investment beyond that required for the WTP. Treating waste as closely as possible to individual tanks or groups- as allowed by the waste characteristics- is being investigated to determine the potential to 1) defer, reduce, and/or eliminate infrastructure requirements, and 2) significantly mitigate project risk by reducing the potential and impact of single point failures. The inventory of Hanford waste slated for processing and disposition as LAW is currently managed as high-level waste (HLW), i.e., the separation of fission products and other radionuclides has not commenced. A significant inventory ofthis waste (over 20M gallons) is in the form of precipitated saltcake maintained in single shell tanks, many of which are identified as potential leaking tanks. Retrieval and transport (as a liquid) must be staged within the waste feed delivery capability established by site infrastructure and WTP. Near Source treatment, if employed, would provide for the separation and stabilization processing necessary for waste located in remote farms (wherein most ofthe leaking tanks reside) significantly earlier than currently projected. Near Source treatment is intended to address the currently accepted site risk and also provides means to mitigate future issues likely to be faced over the coming decades. This paper describes the potential near source treatment and waste disposition options as well as the impact these options could have on reducing infrastructure requirements, project cost and mission schedule.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollutant hydrogen fluoride Integrated Pollution Prevention and Controland control technology requirements for toxic air pollutants.control technologies for gaseous pollutants from Portland cement manufacturing (Greer 2003) Potential control technologies Mixing air

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two trails of using solid recovered fuel and received theand briquettes. Densified recovered solid fuel can have net

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December. Busato, L.C. n.d. Dioxins and Furans in Brazil:release and control of dioxins in cement kilns - A review.and Quantification of Dioxin and Furan Releases. Geneva,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.S. 2008. “Complete alternative fuel solution for cementKolyfetis, E. 2007. “Alternative Fuels & Raw Materials inof the workshop on Alternative Fuels & Alternative Raw

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of high-heat or pyroprocessing kiln used today is theinternal scrubber SO 2 Pyroprocessing system design SO 2 AG,and turbulence) Pyroprocessing system design (time, Material

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Waste acceptance and waste loading for vitrified Oak Ridge tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Science and Technology of the DOE has funded a joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to evaluate vitrification and grouting for the immobilization of sludge from ORNL tank farms. The radioactive waste is from the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT), the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST), the Bethel Valley Evaporator Service Tanks (BVEST), and the Old Hydrofractgure Tanks (OHF). Glass formulation development for sludge from these tanks is discussed in an accompanying article for this conference (Andrews and Workman). The sludges contain transuranic radionuclides at levels which will make the glass waste form (at reasonable waste loadings) TRU. Therefore, one of the objectives for this project was to ensure that the vitrified waste form could be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In order to accomplish this, the waste form must meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). An alternate pathway is to send the glass waste forms for disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). A sludge waste loading in the feed of 6 wt percent will lead to a waste form which is non-TRU and could potentially be disposed of at NTS. The waste forms would then have to meet the requirements of the NTS WAC. This paper presents SRTC`s efforts at demonstrating that the glass waste form produced as a result of vitrification of ORNL sludge will meet all the criteria of the WIPP WAC or NTS WAC.

Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

1997-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

493

Vision - Food | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vision - Food Vision - Food Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture This website is supported by the Interagency Council on Agricultural and Rural Statistics (ICARS). ICARS is the effort of the US federal government's statistical agencies in support of the "Global Strategy to Improve Agriculture and Rural Statistics" which was developed under the United Nations Statistical Commission. The impetus for the Global Strategy was the recognition that agriculture and rural statistics are declining across the globe at the same time as new data requirements are emerging. ICARS brings together experts from economic, demographic, environmental and agricultural statistical agencies and from natural resource agencies to

494

Impact of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Quality on the Behavior of Alkali Metals and Trace Elements during Combustion: A Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light, thermal- and bacterial-resistant, and inexpensive leathers, especially in the footwear industry, are obtained by the Cr tanning method. ... The selected waste items are representing the major combustible fractions found in MSW, i.e. paper, plastic, textile, and biogenic materials (both food and biomass), but also the other waste fraction (a mixed and poorly defined fraction). ... Pedersen et al.(6) studies six different waste fractions separately under different operational conditions in a full-scale incinerator: NaCl (road salt), household batteries, automotive shredder waste (rubber and plastics), Cu?Cr?As (CCA)-impregnated wood, PVC, and shoes (leather mainly). ...

Michae?l Becidan; Lars Sørum; Daniel Lindberg

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

495

Photosynthesis—path to food  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photosynthesis—path to food ... The idea of producing more and better agricultural products by tinkering with the extremely complex mechanisms which control photosynthesis is today little more than a dream. ... However, much research remains to be done to bring the dream to reality, he said at the Symposium on Photosynthesis, held to highlight the dedication of International Minerals & Chemical's -S6.5 million Growth Science Center in Libertyville, 111. ...

1966-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

496

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 1607-B1 Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-015  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1607-B1 Septic System includes a septic tank, drain field, and associated connecting pipelines and influent sanitary sewer lines. This septic system serviced the former 1701-B Badgehouse, 1720-B Patrol Building/Change Room, and the 1709-B Fire Headquarters. The 1607-B1 waste site received unknown amounts of nonhazardous, nonradioactive sanitary sewage from these facilities during its operational history from 1944 to approximately 1970. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

497

Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida.36 billion), which includes food service establishments (restaurants and bars) and retail food storesFE935 Economic Contributions of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Related Food Industries

Pilyugin, Sergei S.

498

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

499

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

500

Waste Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Management Waste Management Nuclear Materials Disposition In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel. These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for national security or other purposes, including spent nuclear fuel, special nuclear materials (as defined by the Atomic Energy Act) and other Nuclear Materials. Read more Tank Waste and Waste Processing The Department has approximately 88 million gallons of liquid waste stored in underground tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic meters of solid waste derived from the liquids stored in bins. The current DOE estimated cost for retrieval, treatment and disposal of this waste exceeds $50 billion to be spent over several decades.