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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stone et al. Industries Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for the Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry by Source, 1994. Three sources, coal, natural gas, and electricity, account for...

2

Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions for Selected Stone, Clay, and Glass Industries, 1994. The cement and lime manufacturing industries emit almost half of ...

3

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Clay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clay Clay Nature Bulletin No. 435-A November 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CLAY When Nebuchadnezzar was king of Babylon in the 6th century B.C., messages were sent and records kept by writing on little pillow-shaped tablets of soft wet clay. They were baked in the sun. Those clay tablets are still found by the thousands in ruins of ancient cities excavated in that dry climate. The Babylonians also sun-dried bricks of clay and straw for building, as the Israelites did during their captivity in Egypt. This process spread to Spain and Mexico and our American Southwest. Called "adobe", in regions with little rainfall it has the advantages of being cheap, fireproof, cool in summer and warm in winter.

6

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the author. ) Stone Tool Production, Hikade, UEE 2010Short Citation: Hikade 2010, Stone Tool Production. UEE.Thomas, 2010, Stone Tool Production. In Willeke Wendrich (

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Stone Fire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Change in Cookstove Types on Visibility - Case Study of the Berkeley-Darfur Stove and Three- Stone Fire Extended Abstract #1 Yungang Wang, Ashok J. Gadgil, Thomas W. Kirchstetter Environmental Energy Technologies Division Indoor Environment Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA September 2012 This publication was made possible by grant number 500-99-013 from the California Energy Commission (CEC). This work was also supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE- AC02- 05CH11231. LBNL-6291E LBNL-6291E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

8

Stone's code reveals Earth's processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

determine the best methods to capture the greenhouse gas that increases global warming. August 27, 2013 Ian Stone At the Lab's Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division,...

9

Modified clay sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

Fogler, H. Scott (Ann Arbor, MI); Srinivasan, Keeran R. (Livonia, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Econophysics of precious stones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the power law has been well realized in econophysics over the last decade. For instance, the distribution of the rate of stock price variation and of personal assets show the power law. While these results reveal the striking scale invariance of financial markets, the behaviour of price in real economy is less known in spite of its extreme importance. As an example of markets in real economy, here we take up the price of precious stones which increases with size while the amount of their production rapidly decreases with size. We show for the first time that the price of natural precious stones (quartz crystal ball, gemstones such as diamond, emerald, and sapphire) as a function of weight obeys the power law. This indicates that the price is determined by the same evaluation measure for different sizes. Our results demonstrate that not only the distribution of an economical observable but also the price itself obeys the power law. We anticipate our findings to be a starting point for the qua...

Watanabe, A; Uchida, N

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Milling Stone Cultures in Northern California: Berryessa I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weight 313 g. Edge angle MILLING STONE CULTURES IN NORTHERNSite and the Early Milling Stone Cultures of SouthernMilling Stone Cultures in Northern California: Berryessa I

True, D. L; Baumhoff, M. A; Hellen, J. E

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Civilian Unemployment Rate Industrial Production Total Industrial Production Manufacturing Food Paper Chemicals Petroleum Stone, Clay, Glass Primary ...

13

Documenting stone age cleverness by tool development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stone tools showing the pace of remarkable technological enhancements over time (1.75 to 0.85 million years ago). Credit, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Ancient stone tools...

14

Wellbore instability mechanisms in clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation investigates the stability of wellbores drilled in Ko-consolidated clays using non-linear finite element method (FEM) and effective stress soil models to characterize the behavior of clay and unconsolidated ...

Akl, Sherif Adel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San Diego County, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2, pp. 233-261 (1982). Two Milling Stone Inventories from5. Manos from Rincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SANd-e) from Rincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN

True, D. L; Beemer, Eleanor

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Williams Stone Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Williams Stone Wind Turbine Facility Williams Stone Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Williams Stone Developer Sustainable Energy Developments Energy Purchaser Williams Stone Location Otis MA Coordinates 42.232526°, -73.070952° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.232526,"lon":-73.070952,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Hallosite Clay Nanotubes as “Green” Nanocontainers for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Coatings and Surface Treatments for Corrosion Protection. Presentation Title, Hallosite Clay Nanotubes as “Green” Nanocontainers for ...

19

Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay  

SciTech Connect

Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

Ita, S.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dynamic Responses in Polymer-Clay Gels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... INTRODUCTION ... Under similar conditions a comparable pure clay solution or a pure ... P.; Nicolai, T.; Tassin, JF Journal of Colloid and Interface ...

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

22

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Roberts, K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

23

CAST STONE FORMULATION AT HIGHER SODIUM CONCENTRATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K.; Roberts, K.; Edwards, T.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ultrasonic-assisted alkaline leaching of vanadium from stone coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... used to extract vanadium from the stone coal, with alkali as leaching reagent. ... of low grade copper sulfide ore(Chalcopyrite) of Sarcheshmeh copper mine.

25

Big Stone Gap, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigStoneGap,Virginia&oldid227780" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here...

26

Big Stone City, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Big Stone City, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia...

27

The Milling Stone Horizon Revisited: New Perspectives from Northern and Central California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Berryessa II. Journal THE MILLING STONE HORIZON REVISITEDI, pp. 67-93 (1999). The Milling Stone Horizon Revisited:nearly half a century, the Milling Stone Horizon has been

Fitzgerald, Richard T.; Jones, Terry L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility...

29

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Solar Thermal Loans Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool...

30

Experimental Study of Wellbore Instability in Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an extensive program of laboratory model wellbore tests that have been performed to study wellbore instability in saturated clays. The tests were conducted on resedimented Boston blue ...

Abdulhadi, Naeem O.

31

HANFORD'S SIMULATED LOW ACTIVITY WASTE CAST STONE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Y.

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

33

Pressure Acid Leaching Vanadium from Stone coal - Programmaster ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vanadium extraction from stone-coal was investigated by pressure acid ... The results show that with the leaching time for 3~4h, temperature at 150?, sulfuric acid consumption of 25%~30%, ... Calcium Reductants – A historical review.

34

GreyStone Power - Photovoltaic Rebate Program (Georgia) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative in Georgia, offers a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to members. The one-time rebate is offered for PV...

35

GreyStone Power - Photovoltaic Rebate Program | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative in Georgia, offers a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to members. The one-time rebate is offered for PV...

36

Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

Randall T. Cygan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

38

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and LiF for 2 days with an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by US patent No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, June 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have water-solubility, positive charge, and thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

Gregar, Kathleen C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Botto, Robert E. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Study on leaching vanadium from roasted residue of stone coal  

SciTech Connect

In China, the total reserves of vanadium, reported as V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, in stone coal is 118 Mt (130 million st). Recovering vanadium from such a large resource is very important to China's vanadium industry. The technology now being used to recover vanadium from stone coal has the following two problems in the leaching process: a low recovery of vanadium and high acid consumption. To resolve these problems, a new leaching technology is proposed. The effects of factors such as H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration, liquid-solid ratio, temperature and time, and the types and additions of additives were studied. By adding 1.5% (by weight) CaF2 and leaching the roasted residue of stone coal with 5.4% (by weight) sulfuric acid at 90{sup o}C for 12 hours at a liquid-solid ratio of 2 mL/g, the leaching degree of vanadium reached 83.10%. This proposed leaching technology gives a feasible alternative for the processing of roasting residue of stone coal and can be applied in the comprehensive utilization of stone coal ores in China.

He, D.; Feng, Q.; Zhang, G.; Luo, W.; Ou, L. [Central South University, Changsha (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

GreyStone Power Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreyStone Power Corporation GreyStone Power Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name GreyStone Power Corporation Place Georgia Utility Id 7090 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Ball Park Metered Outdoor Lighting Lighting Commercial General Service Commercial Commercial General Service Seasional On Commercial Commercial General Service Seasonal Off Commercial Commercial Green Power Cost Adjustment Commercial Commercial Load Management Service Commercial

43

The Possibilities of Women and Men: Gender and the California Milling Stone Horizon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richard 1991 Archaic Milling Cultures of the Southern SanGender and the California Milling Stone Horizon KELLY R.those subsumed under the Milling Stone Horizon, that are not

McGuire, Kelly R; Hildebrandt, William R

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Investigation of Renal Stones by X-ray and Neutron Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Renal stones were investigated by X-ray diffraction. The obtained results showed only one crystal phase in every sample. With the aim to verify eventual availability of second phase (under 3 volume %) the same renal stones were investigated by neutron diffraction. The neutron spectra proved that additional crystal phase was absent in the renal stones. The obtained results are scientific-practical, in aid of the medicine, especially in the case of renal stone disease.

Baeva, M.; Boianova, A. [Institute of Solid State Physics-BAS, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Beskrovnyi, A. I.; Shelkova, I. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc Place Florida Utility Id 3757 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate Schedule - FL (Large) Lighting Rate Schedule - FL (Small) Lighting Rate Schedule - GS Commercial Rate Schedule - GS - 1 Commercial Rate Schedule - GSD Commercial Rate Schedule - HLF Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Primary Metering Voltage) Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Secondary Metering Voltage) Industrial Rate Schedule - INT (Transmission Metering Voltage) Industrial

46

Geosynthetic clay liners subjected to differential settlement  

SciTech Connect

Geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs), which consist of a thin layer of bentonite attached to one or more geosynthetic materials, are receiving increased use as low-permeability barrier layers in waste-containment systems. Tests were performed in tanks to measure the hydraulic conductivity of GCLs that were subjected to differential settlement. In most cases the GCLs maintained a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s or less when subjected to tensile strains of 1{minus}> 10%, depending on the material and test conditions. Overlapped GCL panels maintained their hydraulic integrity despite in-plane slippage of up to 25--100 mm. In general, the ability of GCLs to withstand differential settlement appears to be greater than that of compacted clay liners, but less than that of geomembranes. GCLs are a promising barrier material for situations in which differential settlement is expected, for example, in landfill final covers.

LaGatta, M.D. [Golder Associates, Mt. Laurel, NJ (United States); Boardman, B.T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Cooley, B.H. [GeoSyntec Consultants, Huntington Beach, CA (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Stone & McCarthy Research Associates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stone & McCarthy Research Associates Stone & McCarthy Research Associates Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stone & McCarthy Research Associates Name Stone & McCarthy Research Associates Address 101 Business Park Drive Place Princeton, New Jersey Zip 08540 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1989 Phone number 609-683-4261 Coordinates 40.4400025°, -74.6013294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4400025,"lon":-74.6013294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Characterization of Heavy Clay Ceramic Mixed with Red Mud Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Characterization of Heavy Clay Ceramic Mixed with Red Mud Waste. Author(s), Carlos Maurício Fontes Vieira, Michelle Pereira Babisk, ...

49

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

50

Recent Results from USANS Measurements of Clays and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of cement pastes, clays and ANSTO-produced SYNROC have been performed on the new ultra-high resolution instruments at ORNL, NIST and ILL ...

51

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial...

52

Big Stone County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Big Stone County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Big Stone County, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4932045°, -96.4724° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.4932045,"lon":-96.4724,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect

Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Functional Foods Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contains five (5) titles regarding functional foods. Functional Foods Package Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Value Packages Nutrition Health Food Science Biochemistry This Value Package includes: ...

55

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a jurassic opalinum shale, switzerland. Clays and Clay96   1 INTRODUCTION Clay/shale has been considered asand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

Liu, H.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Damage Development on Stone Armored Breakwaters and Revetments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to calculate damage progression on a rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, or jetty trunk armor layer. The methods apply to uniform-sized armor stone (0.75W50 ? W50 ? 1.25W50, W50 = median weight of armor stone) as well as riprap (0.125W50 ? W50 ? 4W50) exposed to depthlimited wave conditions. The equations discussed herein are primarily intended to be used as part of a life-cycle analysis, to predict the damage for a series of storms throughout the lifetime of the structure. This lifecycle analysis including damage prediction allows engineers to balance initial cost with expected maintenance costs in order to reduce the overall cost of the structure. The equations are intended to provide a tool for accurate damage estimates in order to reduce the possibility of unexpected maintenance costs. INTRODUCTION: Rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, and jetty projects require accurate damage prediction as part of life-cycle analyses. But few studies have been conducted to determine damage progression on stone armor layers for variable wave conditions over the life of a structure. Previous armor stability lab studies were intended to determine damage for the peak of a design storm. As such, most previous laboratory studies were begun with an undamaged

Jeffery A. Melby

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project 7: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project SUMMARY A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission line and substation upgrades and modifications that would be required to support the addition of 600 MW of capacity within the system. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 24, 2009 EIS-0377: Record of Decision Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project June 1, 2009 EIS-0377: Final Environmental Impact Statement Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project October 26, 2007 EIS-0377: Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement

58

Illuminating clay: a 3-D tangible interface for landscape analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel system for the real-time computational analysis of landscape models. Users of the system - called Illuminating Clay - alter the topography of a clay landscape model while the changing geometry is captured in real-time by ... Keywords: 3D laser scanner, DEM, GIS, landscape design, physical models, tangible user interface

Ben Piper; Carlo Ratti; Hiroshi Ishii

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

Short, Daniel

60

Moose Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Moose Food Moose Food Name: Mrs. Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My husband & I own 30 acres of prime moose habitat. Unfortunately they have just about eaten up all of the aquatic browse. Either that or the hard winters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and the fact that we have a shallow lake has killed these plants the moose like. What would be best to plant native to our lakes in michigan for the moose? They like aquatic plants the best that we have observed from afar, but what kinds. Hope you can help. The biologist for our area is new & didn't have any names of aquatic plants. Replies: Dear Mrs. The following sites may be useful: http://www.mooseworld.com/moosebrowse.htm http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF9/910.html http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/taxbre/value_and_use.html

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room Air Conditioners: $50 Geothermal Heat Pump: $750/ton new installation; $150/ton for replacement Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $150/ton plus $.01 rate reduction (above 200 kWh) Water Heaters: Discounted price Provider Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative Platte-Clay Electric Cooperative offers a variety of rebates to residential and commercial customers who wish to upgrade to energy efficient equipment. Newly installed ground source heat pumps are eligible for a $750 per ton

62

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $600 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.01 per BTU output Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per system, or $600. Eligible solar water heaters can be either passive or active systems. The proposed solar system must meet Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) specifications and be installed by a contractor certified to install solar water heating

63

Notice of Availability and Public Hearings of the Big Stone II...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CODE 6450-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE EIS-0377)...

64

CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

MINWALL HJ

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Evading stepping-stone detection under the cloak of streaming media with SNEAK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Network-based intrusions have become a serious threat to the users of the Internet. To help cover their tracks, attackers launch attacks from a series of previously compromised systems called stepping stones. Timing correlations on incoming and outgoing ... Keywords: Stepping-stone detection, Time-based watermarking, Traffic analysis

Jaideep D. Padhye; Kush Kothari; Madhu Venkateshaiah; Matthew Wright

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Heating Facilities, Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center, Klamath Falls, Oregon.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stepping Stones Rehabilitation Center is leased from Klamath County and operated by the Klamath Council on Alcohol and Drugs. Buildings consist of interconnected and adjoining buildings laid out in a U configuration, with a total floor plan area of about 13,000 square feet. Construction is conventional single story, with tile roofs, masonry facing on the walls, and single glazed windows. Heating is by room wall convectors using low pressure steam. Steam is generated in an oil fired boiler. It is economically feasible to heat Stepping Stones using a water to water heat pump. Low temperature geothermal water from a relatively shallow well would be boosted from 80/sup 0/F to a 150/sup 0/F in the heat pump. This hot water would supply space heating requirements and potable hot water. The existing boiler, steam and condensate piping, and room convectors would be removed. The water to water heat pump, new piping, and room convectors would be installed. Estimated capital cost is $140,000. Annual energy savings in fuel oil purchases is about 26,000 gallons with a first year value of about $19,000. This savings, less operating costs, when applied with escalation considerations over a period of twenty years, results in a present worth of $91,778 when discounted at 10%. This is the amount of surplus generated after the payment of all obligations, when the project is financed with 10% bonds.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydraulic conductivity of desiccated geosynthetic clay liners  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale tests were performed to determine the effect of a cycle of wetting and drying on the hydraulic conductivity of several geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs). The GCLs were covered with 0.6 m of pea gravel and permeated with water. After steady seepage had developed, the water was drained away, and the GCL was desiccated by circulating heated air through the overlying gravel. The drying caused severe cracking in the bentonite component of the GCLs. The GCLs were again permeated with water. As the cracked bentonite hydrated and swelled, the hydraulic conductivity slowly decreased from an initially high value. The long-term, steady value of hydraulic conductivity after the wetting and drying cycle was found to be essentially the same as the value for the undesiccated GCL. It is concluded that GCLs possess the ability to self-heal after a cycle of wetting and drying, which is important for applications in which there may be alternate wetting and drying of a hydraulic barrier (e.g. within a landfill final cover).

Boardman, B.T. [CH2M Hill, Oakland, CA (United States); Daniel, D.E. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation Deputy Secretary Clay Sell Touts Georgian Efforts to Advance Regional Energy Cooperation and Non-Proliferation March 16, 2007 - 10:55am Addthis Visits National Nuclear Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia TBILISI, Georgia - U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today visited the National Radioactive Waste Repository in Mtskheta, Georgia, and praised Georgia for issuing a license this week to open the facility to consolidate radioactive sources. Deputy Secretary Sell also met with Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili and other senior government and business leaders to address the importance of diversifying energy sources, increasing the use of energy efficient technologies, and further efforts to

69

The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Rate of flow of leachate through clay soil liners  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the research was to measure the time of travel (TOT) of inorganic solutes through laboratory columns of compacted clay, to determine the physical and geochemical parameters that controlled solute transport through the soil columns, and to compare measured and predicted TOT's. Two clay soils were used: kaolinite (a low-plasticity, commercially-produced clay) and Lufkin clay (a highly plastic, naturally-occurring clay soil). Anionic tracers were chloride and bromide; potassium and zinc were the cationic tracers. Diffusion cells were designed, constructed, and used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient of the tracers in the two soils. Diffusion coefficients for anions were typically 0.000002 to 0.000007 sq cm/s; somewhat lower values were determined for cations. Column tests showed that the effective porosity ratio (defined as effective divided by total porosity) increased with increasing hydraulic gradient in kaolinite from a low of about 0.25 at a gradient of 1 to a high of 1 at a gradient of 20. With Lufkin clay, the effective porosity ratio was between 0.02 and 0.16. Breakthrough times were controlled much more by the low effective porosities than by molecular diffusion. The computer program SOILINER predicted times of travel that were larger than actual TOT's by a factor of up to 52. The failure to account for effective porosity ratios less than 1 was the cause for the poor predictions from SOILINER.

Daniel, D.E.; Shackelford, C.D.; Liao, W.P.; Liljestrand, H.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Natural clay-shredded tire mixtures as landfill barrier materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A natural overconsolidated fissured clay, Keuper Marl, was mixed with shredded tire, 1--4 and 4--8 mm angular size particles, in weight percentages between 6 and 15%, and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, stress-strain behavior, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, free swell behavior and swelling pressure. The results showed that the compacted dry density reduced solely due to the lighter weight of the tire and the unconfined compressive strength of the mixture was as low 40% of the strength of the clay alone. In stress-strain behavior the clay-tire mixtures produced a prolonged strain range at failure of roughly double that observed for the clay alone. The permeability to paraffin was reduced by more than 50 times compared to that of water. The leachability results showed different leached levels of copper and nickel from the NRA and TCLP leaching tests which will need to be assessed in relation to appropriate standards. Paraffin caused considerable swelling of the clay-tire mixtures compared to the clay alone and caused the development of swelling pressures of up to 600 kPa. Combinations of the various test results will need to be assessed in relation to the design requirement of the specific landfill liner being designed.

Al-Tabbaa, A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering; Aravinthan, T. [Babtie Group, Croydon (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Gender, IFIs and Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haiti, the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, suffers from chronic food insecurity (World Food Program, 2010). One third of the population is food insecure, the most vulnerable of whom are women and children. International Financial

Elizabeth Arend; Lisa Vitale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

NETL: News Release - DOE Projects Provide Stepping Stone to America's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2006 13, 2006 DOE Projects Provide Stepping Stone to America's Hydrogen Economy New Twist on Old Technology Stresses Feedstock Flexibility, Plant Mobility, Lower Emissions WASHINGTON, DC - Department of Energy (DOE)-funded research is tweaking an old technology to develop new supplies of ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels from both coal and natural gas-and in the process provide a new source of non-polluting hydrogen energy. Two projects managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) use a proprietary technology developed by Syntroleum Corp. of Tulsa, OK, to convert the Nation's abundant raw fossil fuels into either hydrogen or high hydrogen-content liquids, such as ultra-clean diesel and other environmentally-friendly liquid fuels.

75

Percutaneous Transhepatic Removal of Bile Duct Stones: Results of 261 Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic removal of bile duct stones when the procedure of endoscopic therapy fails for reasons of anatomical anomalies or is rejected by the patient. Methods: Between April 2001 and May 2010, 261 patients (138 male patients and 123 female patients; age range, 14-92 years; mean age, 64.6 years) with bile duct stones (common bile duct [CBD] stones = 248 patients and hepatolithiasis = 13 patients) were included in the study. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography was performed, and stones were identified. Percutaneous transhepatic balloon dilation of the papilla of Vater was performed. Then stones were pushed out into the duodenum with a Fogarty balloon catheter. If the stone diameter was larger than 15 mm, then basket lithotripsy was performed before balloon dilation. Results: Overall success rate was 95.7%. The procedure was successful in 97.5% of patients with CBD stones and in 61.5% of patients with hepatolithiasis. A total of 18 major complications (6.8%), including cholangitis (n = 7), subcapsular biloma (n = 4), subcapsular hematoma (n = 1), subcapsular abscess (n = 1), bile peritonitis (n = 1), duodenal perforation (n = 1), CBD perforation (n = 1), gastroduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm (n = 1), and right hepatic artery transection (n = 1), were observed after the procedure. There was no mortality. Conclusion: Our experience suggests that percutaneous transhepatic stone expulsion into the duodenum through the papilla is an effective and safe approach in the nonoperative management of the bile duct stones. It is a feasible alternative to surgery when endoscopic extraction fails or is rejected by the patient.

Ozcan, Nevzat, E-mail: nevzatcan@yahoo.com; Kahriman, Guven, E-mail: guvenkahriman@hotmail.com; Mavili, Ertugrul, E-mail: ertmavili@yahoo.com [Erciyes University, Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty (Turkey)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Holiday Food Drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Drive Food Drive Holiday Food Drive During the recent holiday food drive, employees donated enough food to provide about 23,604 holiday meals for Northern New Mexico families. More than 432 frozen turkeys were donated this year by employees and other donors during 'Bring a Turkey to Work Day,' an annual Lab event that takes places Thanksgiving week. September 16, 2013 LANL employees organize food for the Holiday Food Drive. Contacts Giving Drives Ed Vigil Community Programs Office (505) 665-9205 Email Giving Drives Enrique Trujillo Community Programs Office (505) 665-6384 Email Helping feed Northern New Mexico families Community partners The Food Depot (Santa Fe) Del Norte Credit Union Smith's Food and Drug Giving Holiday Food Drive Holiday Gift Drive LANL Laces Los Alamos Employees' Scholarship Fund

77

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Energy Efficiency Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Ceiling Insulation: $600 Spray Foam Insulation: $600 Heat Pump: $500 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Insulation: $0.11 per square foot Spray Foam Insulation: $0.28 per square foot Window Film: $0.44 per square foot Heat Pump Water Heater: $175 Heat Recovery Unit: $200 Heat Pump: $50 to $500 Provider Clay Electric Co-op Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential

78

Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Loans Conservation Loans Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc - Energy Conservation Loans < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5,000 ($7,500 for metal roofs) Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $7,500 Provider Clay Electric Co-op Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 North Florida counties, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs. It offers loans to help customers

79

Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Place Missouri Utility Id 15138 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DF - Dual Fuel Heating Residential GP - Schedule of Green Power Rate Adder MC3 - Medium Commercial Service Commercial R - Rural and Residential Service Residential R-ETS - Residential ETS Service Residential SL - 100 watt HPS Ornamental Fixture Lighting SL - 100 watt HPS Ornamental Fixture w/Pole Lighting

80

A reinterpretation of "sense of place" : a study of the Stone Town of Zanzibar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis attempts to understand the evolution of the Stone Town of Zanzibar, an urban fabric that had undergone a phase of upheaval that was brought about by a brief period of rapid change in its political, social and ...

De Costa, Alfred Franklin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors on the Stability and Transport of Clay Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clays which exist in formations in the vicinity of injection and disposal wells is a worldwide problem in the petroleum industry. Clays can be categorized as two major groups: swelling clays, which include smectite group clays, and dispersing clays, which include the kaolinite groups of clays. Therefore, two basic damage mechanisms of clay minerals are swelling and dispersion. Both mechanisms cause pore plugging, and thus aggravate hydrocarbon ease of flow. In this thesis, the effect of temperature, injected water chemical composition, pH, and flowrate of the injected fluid were tested experimentally. Clay mineralogy, chemistry, and composition of the exchangeable cations were also examined. The existing theoretical models of evaluation of forces between clay particles and the rock matrix were used to quantify the interactions. Coreflood experiments were conducted to determine the effect of parameters such as variation of temperature, flowrate, pH, presence of various salts in working solution and their concentration. The results obtained from experimental and theoretical work show that clay minerals in sandstone formation are subject to fines migration and can cause a detrimental impact on the reservoir permeability. Every aforementioned factor has its influence on clays behavior and therefore, a degree of fines migration. The work accomplished summarizes and concludes what parameters sensitize clays migration. Moreover, recommendations for formation damage due to fines migration are given. The scope of work presented can be useful for petroleum engineers as well as geologists and clay mineralogists.

Musharova, Darya

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Periodic Inspections of Coastal Structures with Stone Armor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information on the long-term structural performance of selected stone-armored navigation structures to their environment. Coastal structures at St. Paul Harbor, AK, and Burns Harbor, IN, are discussed herein. The response of concrete-armored coastal structures to their environment will be presented in a subsequent CHETN. OVERVIEW: In the “Periodic Inspections ” work unit of the Monitoring Completed Navigation Projects (MCNP) Program, selected coastal navigation structures are periodically monitored to gain an understanding of their long-term structural response. Periodic data sets are evaluated to improve knowledge in design, construction, and maintenance of both existing and proposed coastal navigation projects, and will help avoid repeating past designs that have failed and/or resulted in high maintenance costs. Relatively low-cost remote sensing tools and techniques, with limited ground truthing surveys, are the primary inspection tools used in the periodic monitoring efforts. Most periodic inspections consist of capturing above-water conditions of the structures at periodic intervals using high-resolution aerial photography. Structural changes (primary armor unit movement) are quantified through photogrammetric techniques. When a coastal structure is photographed at low tide, an accurate permanent record of all visible armor units is obtained. Through the use of

Robert R. Bottin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

Magee, Joseph W.

85

Food Sales | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sales Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Food Sales Definition Buildings used for retail or wholesale of food. Sub Categories grocery store or food market, gas station with...

86

ClayVision: the (elastic) image of the city  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe ClayVision, a new quasi-immersive urban navigation system that rethinks the design conventions of existing Augmented Reality (AR) applications, by aggressively incorporating knowledge from non-Computer Science fields - namely ... Keywords: augmented reality, computer vision, information design, urban navigation, urban planning

Yuichiro Takeuchi; Ken Perlin

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Everly School Dist Wind Farm Everly School Dist Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Clay Central Everly School Dist Wind Farm Facility Clay Central/Everly School Dist Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Clay Central/Everly School District Energy Purchaser Clay Central/Everly School District Location IA Coordinates 43.1392°, -95.2644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1392,"lon":-95.2644,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Food Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Food Service Food service buildings are those used for preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Food Service Buildings... An overwhelming majority (72 percent) of food service buildings were small buildings (1,001 to 5,000 square feet). Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Food Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Categories Figure showing number of food service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Food Service Buildings

89

City of Clay Center, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clay Center Clay Center Place Kansas Utility Id 3710 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Rural Commercial Commercial- Urban Commercial Industrial- Rural Industrial Industrial- Urban Industrial Residential- Rural Residential Residential- Urban Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1050/kWh Commercial: $0.1120/kWh Industrial: $0.0876/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

90

Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact StatementS Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers Title: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Location: Proposed Big Stone II Plant: Big Stone City, South Dakota Proposed Transmission Facilities: Northeastern South Dakota and Southwestern Minnesota Contacts: For additional information on this Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, or to receive a copy, contact: For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act process, write or call: Ms. Nancy Werdel Western Area Power Administration

91

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY STONE & WEBSTER FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STONE & WEBSTER FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF STONE & WEBSTER FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS UNDER AN NREL SUBCONTRACT NO. ZCG-6-15143-01, W(A)-96-006, CH-0898 AND FOR LARGE BUSINESS LOWER-TIER SUBCONTRACTS THEREUNDER Stone & Webster Corporation has petitioned for an Advance Waiver of Patent Rights under the above-identified National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and under lower tier subcontracts entered into thereunder with parties who do not qualify for treatment under Public Law 96-517, as amended, or National Laboratories. NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute (MRI) under the prime contract number DE-AC02- 83CH10093. The scope of the subcontract is to prepare a feasibility study for economical conversion of rice straw to ethanol near Gridley,

92

VEE-0090 - In the Matter of Smurfitt Stone Container Corp. | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

90 - In the Matter of Smurfitt Stone Container Corp. 90 - In the Matter of Smurfitt Stone Container Corp. VEE-0090 - In the Matter of Smurfitt Stone Container Corp. This Decision decides the merits of five Applications for Exception filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 1003.20. See infra Appendix. These Applications concern annual revenues and sales data pertaining to each firm's sale of electricity that the DOE Energy Information Administration (EIA) collects through Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report." EIA publishes this data, by state, in firm-specific form. The present exception request seeks to have the Applicants' data withheld as confidential. In their Applications for Exception, the Applicants

93

Diffusion of inorganic chemical wastes in compacted clay  

SciTech Connect

The factors that were investigated included the water content/dry unit weight, the method of compaction, the mineralogy of the soil, and the concentration of the ions. The effective diffusion coefficients (D{asterisk}) of three anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, and I{sup {minus}}) and three cations (K{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+}) in a simulated waste leachate were measured. Two clay soils (kaolinite and Lufkin clay) and a sand were used in the study. The clay samples were compacted and pre-soaked to minimize hydraulic gradients due to negative pore pressures. Mass balance calculations were performed to indicate possible sinks/sources in the diffusion system. The results of the diffusion tests were analyzed using two analytical solutions to Fick's second law and a commercially available semi-analytical solution. The D{asterisk} values for tests using high-concentration (0.04 N) leachate generally fell in the narrow range of about 4.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s, and were relatively insensitive to compaction water content/dry unit weight and to compaction method. The variability in the results from the tests with low-concentration (0.013 N) leachate precluded any definite conclusions from these tests. The values of D{asterisk} measured in this study were compared to values from previous studies, and the D{asterisk} values from this study were found to be slightly conservative (i.e., high). However, the results of the tests may be affected by several chemical and physical factors, and care should be taken to ensure that the soils used in the tests are representative of those used in the application of the test results. Recommendations are made for estimating D{asterisk} values for use in the design of compacted clay barriers for the containment of inorganic chemical wastes.

Shackelford, C.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

2012 Food for Thought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as Safeway and Whole Foods, department stores like JC Penney and Sears, apparel companies Gap and VF Corporation, and DIY and big ...

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

95

Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read the January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum newsletter. Food Structure & Functionality Forum Newsletter January 2013 Food Structure & Functionality Forum Division division divisions food materials food structure Food Structure & Functional

96

DOI 10.1007/s11083-011-9224-2 Modal Logics of Stone Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topological semantics of modal logic was first developed by McKinsey and Tarski [13], who interpreted modal, the Cantor space C is the unique dense-in-itself metriz- able Stone space. The result of McKinsey and Tarski of countable Boolean algebras and of complete Boolean algebras. The original result of McKinsey and Tarski

Harding, John

97

Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell to Depart Clay Sell to Depart Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell to Depart January 14, 2008 - 10:23am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the following statement: "It is with regret that I announce the resignation of Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell. Clay has served with distinction as the Deputy Secretary of Energy for nearly three years and has played a key role in the Administration's efforts to enact landmark energy legislation in 2005 and 2007." "As the Department's Chief Operating Officer, Clay has led and implemented many of the successful Departmental improvements of the last three years, including improving the performance and capability of our nuclear weapons and intelligence organizations, streamlining the management and focus of

98

Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy March 21, 2005 - 10:53am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was sworn in today as Deputy Secretary of Energy at a small ceremony held at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington, DC. Mr. Sell was sworn in by Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman after being unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate on Thursday, March 17, 2005. "Clay brings a tremendous amount of knowledge and experience to the department, which will be critical as we seek to ensure an affordable, reliable energy supply for America's future," Secretary Bodman said. "As Deputy Secretary, Clay will play a critical role in the management of our nuclear stockpile and the effort to continue America's leadership in

99

Indian Agriculture and Foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agriculture and Foods Agriculture and Foods Nature Bulletin No. 387-A September 19, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation INDIAN AGRICULTURE AND FOODS Most of the Indian tribes east of the Great Plains were part-time farmers. Some of them cultivated sunflowers, giant ragweed, canary grass and pigweed for their seeds, which they used as food. Many grew tobacco. But corn, beans and squash -- wherever the climate permitted - - were the principal crops. There were several varieties of beans. They ate both the seeds and rinds of some dozens of kinds of squash and pumpkin. When game was not abundant there was a wealth of wild fruits, berries, and many kinds of wild plants with edible leaves, seeds, or roots. Corn, however, was the ' staff of life" and they depended on corn, beans and squash -- "the three sisters" -- for year-round food.

100

Summer Food Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUMMER FOOD SAFETY SUMMER FOOD SAFETY Year after year, we hear and read the same advice: Handle food carefully in the summer because foodborne illness -- also known as "food poisoning" -- is more prevalent in warmer weather. Do foodborne illnesses increase during the summer months? If so, why? Yes, foodborne illnesses do increase during the summer, and the answer appears to be twofold. First, there are the natural causes. Bacteria are present throughout the environment in soil, air, water, and in the bodies of people and animals. These microorganisms grow faster in the warm summer months. Most foodborne bacteria grow fastest at temperatures from 90 to 110 °F. Bacteria also need moisture to flourish, and summer weather is often hot and humid. Given the right circumstances, harmful bacteria can quickly multiply on food to large numbers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Comparison and analysis of reservoir rocks and related clays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of instrumental and chemical analyses was made on sedimentary rocks to determine the surface chemical properties of sedimentry rocks and the physical characteristic of the pores. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analytic capability was used to study the morphology of the samples, surface mineral composition and type and location of clays, and to obtain a qualitative estimate of the pore sizes. A centrifuge was used to determine the pore size distributions which are correlated with SEM observations. An atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with an inductively coupled plasma for complete spectral analysis was used to obtain analyses of the rocks, clays, and effluents from ion exchange tests. Two of the results are as follows: (1) Sweetwater gas sands have a bimodal pore size distribution composed of pores with a mean diameter of 0.2 microns which is attributed to intergranular spaces and cracks in the expanded laborboratory sample but which will be close under the pressure of the overburden formations, and these Sweetwater sands have a distribution of pores at 2 microns which are solution vugs rather than intergranular porosity since the sand grains are completely packed together with the cementing material due to the high overburden pressures; and (2) Ion-exchange capacities of two rocks were 5.3 meq/kg and 18.0 meq/kg, and the surface areas were 0.9 m/sup 2//g and 2.30 m/sup 2//g, respectively, even though each had almost identical mineral composition, clay type and quantity, and permeability. 7 references, 12 figures, 3 tables.

Crocker, M.E.; Donaldson, E.C.; Marchin, L.M.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geothermal alteration of clay minerals and shales: diagenesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to perform a critical review of the data on the mineral and chemical alterations that occur during diagenesis and low-grade metamorphism of shale and other clay-rich rocks - conditions similar to those expected from emplacement of heat-producing radioactive waste in a geologic repository. The conclusions drawn in this document are that the following type of alterations could occur: smectite alteration, ion mobilization, illitic shales, kaolinite reactions, chlorite reactions, organic reactions, paleotemperatures, low temperature shales, high temperature shales, and phase equilibrium changes.

Weaver, C.E.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

OIL WELL REMEDIATION IN CLAY AND WAYNE COUNTIES, IL  

SciTech Connect

This is the second progress and final technical report of the remediation of abandoned wells in Clay and Wayne Counties in Illinois. The wells will be identified as the Routt No.3 and No.4 and the Bates Hosselton 1 and 2. Both sites have met all legal, financial and environmental requirements to drill and/or pump oil on both leases. We have also obtained all available information about both leases. All steps were taken to improve access roads, dig the necessary pits, and build the necessary firewalls. This progress and final technical report will address the remediation efforts as well as our results and conclusions.

Peter L. Dakuras; Larry Stieber; Dick Young

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clayshale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level...

105

Food Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sale of food and beverages for consumption. Sub Categories fast food, restaurant or cafeteria References EIA CBECS Building Types 1 References EIA CBECS...

106

Food science-based instruction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The food industry faces a shortage of graduates needed to fill scientific and technical positions available in the coming years, and university food science programs… (more)

Peacock, Amy Rowley

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Graduate Study Food Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Graduate Study Field of Food Science and Technology Cornell University #12;Field of Food Science and Technology DE P A R T M E N T O F FO O D SC I E N C E A N D TE C H N O L O G Y Mission Science represents the application of the basic sciences, biotechnology, and engineering to the production

Walter, M.Todd

108

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

Rollins, Andrew M.

109

Interactions of uranium with bacteria and kaolinite clay Toshihiko Ohnukia,*, Takahiro Yoshidaa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of uranium with bacteria and kaolinite clay Toshihiko Ohnukia,*, Takahiro Yoshidaa of uranium (VI) by a bacterium, Bacillus subtilis, suspended in a slurry of kaolinite clay, to elucidate, removed approximately 80% of the associated uranium. However, in the presence of B. subtilis the amount

Kasama, Takeshi

110

Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandstone acidizing has been carried out with mud acid which combines hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid at various ratios. The application of mud acid in sandstone formations has presented quite a large number of difficulties like corrosion, precipitation of reaction products, matrix deconsolidation, decomposition of clays by HCl, and fast spending of the acids. There has been a recent trend to use chelating agents for stimulation in place of mud acid which are used in oil industry widely for iron control operations. In this study, two chelates, L-glutamic-N, N-diacetic acid (GLDA) and hydroxyethylethylene-diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) have been studied as an alternative to mud acid for acidizing. In order to analyze their performance in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation of colloidal silica gel residue. Hence, compatibility of chelates with clay minerals was investigated through the static solubility tests. GLDA and HEDTA were analyzed for their permeability enhancement properties in Berea and Bandera cores. In the coreflood experiments conducted, it was found out that chelating agents can successfully stimulate sandstone formations. The final permeability of the Berea and Bandera cores were enhanced significantly. GLDA performed better than HEDTA in all applications. The substitution of seawater in place of deionized water for mixing purposes also led to an increased conductivity of the core implying GLDA is compatible with seawater. In the static solubility tests, chelates were mixed with HF acid at various concentrations. GLDA fluids kept more amounts of minerals in the solution when compared with HEDTA fluids. Sodium-based chelates when mixed with HF acid showed inhibited performance due to the formation of sodium fluorosilicates precipitates which are insoluble damage creating compounds. The application of ammonium-based chelate with HF acid was able to bring a large amount of aluminosilciates into the solution. The study recommends the use of ammonium-based GLDA in acidizing operations involving HF acid and sodium-based GLDA in the absence of the acid.

George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Water structure and vibrational properties in fibrous clays.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The behavior of water confined in porous materials influences macroscopic phenomena such as solute and water mobility, ion exchange, and adsorption. While the properties of bulk water are generally understood, that of nanoconfined water remains an active area of research. We used molecular simulation and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to investigate the effect of local structure on the vibrational behavior of nanoconfined water. We focus specifically on the nanosized pores found in the 2:1 phyllosilicate clay minerals palygorskite and sepiolite. These are charge neutral, Mg-rich trioctahedral clays with idealized formulas Mg{sub 5}Si{sub 8}O{sub 20} (OH){sub 2} {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}O and Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 12}O{sub 30} (OH){sub 2} {center_dot} 12H{sub 2}O for palygorskite and sepiolite, respectively. The regular pattern of inverted phyllosilicate layers results in narrow channels with effective van der Waals dimensions of 3.61 {angstrom} x 8.59 {angstrom} (palygorskite) and 4.67 {angstrom} x 12.29 {angstrom} (sepiolite). These clay minerals represent a unique opportunity to study water adsorbed at 'inner edge' sites of uncoordinated Mg{sup 2+}. INS spectra taken at 90 K reveal a large shift in the water librational edge between palygorskite (358 cm{sup -1}) and sepiolite (536 cm{sup -1}), indicating less restricted water motion in the smaller-pore palygorskite. The librational edge of the reference sample (ice I{sub h}) is similar to sepiolite, which confirms the unique water behavior in palygorskite. We used both classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations and more rigorous density functional theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the hydrogen bonding environment and vibrational behavior of structural water, defined as those water molecules coordinated to Mg{sup 2+} along the pore walls. These waters remain coordinated throughout the 1-ns timescale of the CMD simulations, and the resulting vibrational spectra indicate a similar shift in the water librational edges seen in the INS spectra. The DFT-optimized structures indicate differences in hydrogen bonding between palygorskite and sepiolite, which could explain the librational shift. Corner-sharing silicate tetrahedra in palygorskite are tilted with respect to the crystallographic a-axis due to the induced strain of layer inversion. As a result, only two short (1.9 {angstrom}) hydrogen bonds form between each water and the framework. In contrast, the relatively unstrained sepiolite structure, each water forms three hydrogen bonds with the framework, and at greater distances (2.0 {angstrom} - 2.5 {angstrom}).

Ockwig, Nathan W.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. This report documents results from three R&D activities: (1) implementation and validation of constitutive relationships, (2) development of a discrete fracture network (DFN) model for investigating coupled processes in the excavation damaged zone, and (3) development of a THM model for the Full-Scale Emplacement Experiment tests at Mont Terri, Switzerland, for the

113

Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact StatementS Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-1 ES-1 ES.0 Summary In May 2006, Western Area Power Administration (Western), Rural Utilities Service (RUS), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) issued the Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (Draft EIS, DOE/EIS-0377). The Draft EIS described the details of constructing and operating a nominal 600-megawatt (MW), coal-fired, baseload electric generating facility and associated transmission line and substation upgrades, known as the Big Stone II Project (proposed Project). The proposed Project would be constructed by Otter Tail Corporation (dba Otter Tail Power Company (OTP)), Central Minnesota Municipal Power Agency, Great River Energy, Heartland Consumers Power District, Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency, and

114

Green food through green food: a human centered design approach to green food technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Real sustainability will only be possible by consuming less." A ubiquitous computing path to consume less while improving health is to help us consume less processed food (60-70% of US/UK diet) in favor of whole food. The paper shows both the ... Keywords: design, food, health, processed food

m.c. schraefel

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

116

Michelle Springfield Food Insecurity: The prospects for Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................................................44 4 Kenya and Ethiopia as examples of food insecure countries ..........................................................................................................................................148 Food aid from developing countries Countries. IASSTD The International Assessment of Agricultural Knowledge, Science and Technology IATP

Sheldon, Nathan D.

117

Interaction of Uranium Mill Tailings Leachate with Soils and Clay Liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates leachate-soil interactions that will take place at the Morton Ranch for certain disposal alternatives. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate the following: 1) physical and chemical characteristics of geologic materials from the Morton Ranch. 2) physical and chemical characteristics of acid leach tailings and tallings solution, 3) leaching tests with selected tailings materials and leach solutions to evaluate the leachability of contaminants with time under specific disposal alternatives, 4) adsorption studies measuring the sorption characteristics of heavy metals and radionuclides on the geologic materials at Morton Ranch, 5) clay liner stability tests to evaluate effects of acid leachate on clay mineralogy and clay permeability.

Gee, G. W.; Campbell, A. C.; Sherwood, D. R.; Strickert, R. G.; Phillips, S. J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ac- tivists and practitioners from organizations such as Via Campesina, the Slow Food Movement, and the World

McLean, Lindsey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radioactivity in food crops  

SciTech Connect

Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Dressing and modeling food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food and the kitchen that it is made in are key components of our film Ratatouille. We treated them almost as if they were characters that grew and changed along with the story line. It was extremely important to create a kitchen that becomes ...

Han Cho

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

122

Sediment diagenesis, fossil preservation, and depositional environment in the Stone City/Lower Cook Mountain transgression (Middle Eocene, southeast Texas): a test of chemical taphofacies in the rock record  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recognition of taphonomic loss in the fossil record is important because it provides information about the depositional environment, sediment geochemistry, and post-depositional bias present in the fossil assemblage. Because diagenetic mineral formation and fossil preservation are controlled by geochemical conditions in the sediment, the diagenetic minerals present may be useful indices of sediment geochemistry and the preservational condition of fossils. Most taphonomic studies are of modern sediments, and there is a great need to test the taphofacies concept on the rock record. The taphofacies concept has been tested in the Stone City/Cook Mountain formations, middle Eocene, in Southeast Texas. The strata consist of brown shales, pelleted green shales, green shales, and quartose event units, representing several depositional environments. Two diagenetic minerals, framboidal pyrite and green marine clay, as well as sediment texture and composition were compared to mollusk preservation. Additional information was obtained through the use of organic carbon data, carbon/sulfur ratios, and observations on concretions. Several factors thought to control shell dissolution were tested. Life position/habit was found to be of some importance in dissolution acquired during life. Shells of closely related taxa with the same composition and microstructure underwent differential taphonomic preservation, indicating that all the factors controlling shell preservation are not well known. Composition and microstructurewere not tested because they did not vary in the taxa analyzed. Shell size does not correlate with preservation, nor does valve type (for bivalves) control shell preservation. Shells preserved well in one environment frequently fared much worse than their cohorts in other environments, underlining the importance of depositional environment. Pyrite content, sediment composition, and total carbonate content were not linearly correlated with preservation. However, fossils did show differential preservation within lithologic type for all three variables. Data clustered within depositional environments when taphonomic condition was compared to any other variable. Brown shales containing pyrite but no green clay consistently possessed poorly preserved shells. Units containing both pyrite and green clay possessed the best shell preservation regardless of pyrite content, indicating that iron cycling may buffer pH and lead to good preservation.

Thornton, Charles Anthony

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

124

Effects of tunneling on groundwater flow and swelling of clay-sulfate rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Swelling of clay-sulfate rocks is a major threat in tunneling. It is triggered by the transformation of the sulfate mineral anhydrite into gypsum as a result of water inflow in anhydrite-containing layers after tunnel ...

Butscher, Christoph

125

Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

House, Robert Donald

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The effects of sample disturbance on preconsolidation pressure for normally consolidated and overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sample disturbance has always been a particularly challenging topic in Geotechnical Engineering exercise. The effect and importance of disturbance on stress-strain history and undrained shear strength of soft clays are ...

Kontopoulos, Nikolaos S. (Nikolaos Stefanos)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation,...

129

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—Cast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer  

SciTech Connect

PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 × 10-11 to 2.3 × 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 × 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 × 10-9 to 1.8 × 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Petrographic correlations and mathematical analysis of log signatures for clay identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of correlation of log signature with information on distribution of the types and volumes of clays in the sandstone pore spaces determined from detailed CT-scan, XRD, SEM and thin section analyses of core samples from three sandstone reservoirs. The log signatures are then analyzed to determine if suitable mathematical/statistical parameter(s) could be calculated from the logs for identification of types and volumes of clays in sandstone reservoirs.

Sharma, B.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Clay enhancement of methane, low molecular weight hydrocarbon and halocarbon conversion by methanotrophic bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described in this report relates to a combined system of an apparatus and a method of increasing the rates of oxidation of gases and hazardous vapors by methanotrophic and other bacteria. The gases of interest are methane and trichlorethylene and other hazardous vapors. In a preferred embodiment, the oxidation rate of methane is improved by the addition of clays, e.g., kaolin, sometimes called ``China clay.``

Apel, W.A.; Dugan, P.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

CAST STONE OXIDATION FRONT EVALUATION: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR SAMPLES EXPOSED TO MOIST AIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. • The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. • Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. • Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduct

Langton, C.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

Food Safety and Nutrition in MML  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Material Measurement Laboratory's program area in Food Safety and Nutrition. MML Program Area: Food Safety and Nutrition. ...

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Stone Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United States, Minnesota, Sandstone, Jordan, 9RA33, 26687, y, Front Face (South), Dscf0282.jpg. No 9RA33 is: Description. buff. rust-spotted. fine grain ...

135

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massimo Cammelli 2010 The flint quarries of Wadi El Sheikh (and its relationship to the flint mines of Wadi el-Scheikh.Egypt). In The human uses of flint and chert: Proceedings of

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Stone Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United States, New York, Limestone, Sandy Hill, 8RA6, 26828, y, Front Face (South), Dscf0268_6.jpg. No 8RA6 is: Description. dark gray. fine grain. ...

137

Formation of hydrocarbons from acid-Clay suspensions by gamma irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of certain organic compounds by clays gives rise to the transformation of the adsorbate through the action of the clays. This phenomenon can be enhanced using ionizing radiation. In this context, these kinds of reactions play an important role in many natural and industrial processes. For example, in oil and gas exploration, the source and trap of petroleum hydrocarbons is frequently clay-rich rocks. Clay-water-based muds are also seen as environmentally friendly alternatives to toxic oil-based fluids. The principal processes that occur in sediments are usually held to be of bacterial action and thermal transformation, which may include thermally induced catalytic alteration of the organic debris. On the other hand, radioactive materials are widely distributed throughout Earth. They were more abundant in the past, but are present in petroleum reservoirs. Their presence induced radioactive bombardment, which may have altered these sediments. This important subject has not been extensively studied. The aim of this work is to study the behavior of fatty acids-like behenic acid-and dicarboxylic acids-like fumaric acid-as model compounds, which are adsorbed in a clay mineral (Na-montmorillonite) and exposed to gamma radiation. The results show that the radiation-induced decomposition of the clay-acid system goes along a definitive path (oxidation), rather than following several modes of simultaneous decomposition, as happens in radiolysis without clay or by heating the system. The main radiolytic products for fatty acids are their corresponding hydrocarbons, with one C-atom less than the original acid.

Cruz-Castaneda, J.; Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

138

Food and Agriculture Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International cereal prices (in US dollar terms) have been increasing since 2003, but it is domestic prices that affect food consumption and production. This paper analyzes, for seven large Asian countries, the extent to which domestic prices have increased since 2003 and presents several conclusions. First, the data show that the increases in world cereal prices have been accompanied by a real depreciation of the US dollar. For many countries (but not all), this depreciation has neutralized a substantial proportion of the increase in world prices. Second, domestic commodity specific policies in several of these Asian countries have further stabilized domestic prices relative to the change in world prices. This has been especially true for rice, the main staple food in the region, but it is also true for wheat. On average, through the end of 2007, the increase in real domestic rice prices was about onethird of the increase in real US dollar world market rice prices. Third, for the specific cases analyzed here, producer or farmgate prices have changed by approximately the same percentage as consumer prices. Thus, in these Asian countries, domestic markets seem to be transmitting price changes between farmers and consumers rather efficiently. Fourth, the

David Dawe; Of The United Nations; David Dawe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

COMPUTER MODELING OF GEOLOGY IN THE SPARTA AND MONTPELIER QUADRANGLES OF CLAY AND CHICKASAW COUNTIES, MISSISSIPPI: A TANTALIZING NEAR MISS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project attempted to combine digital data sets to define and map geologic features in the Sparta and Montpelier quadrangles of Chickasaw and Clay counties… (more)

Defibaugh y Chavez, Jason

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass — CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE, VOLUME 57 , NUMBER 4 and therefore the food supplyand biomass in many aquatic systems. A low nutrient supply

Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Müller-Solger, Anke B.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low pressure storage of methane on interlayered clays for potential vehicular applications. [Comparison with activated carbon  

SciTech Connect

Inexpensive, high surface area sorbents were prepared by treating naturally occurring hectorite and bentonite clays with aluminum chlorohydroxide, zirconium chlorohydroxide, or silica-sol solutions. Data were obtained comparing these interlayered clays with activated carbons and zeolites as sorbents for the low pressure storage of methane onboard natural gas powered vehicles. Methane sorption at pressures up to 7 MPa (1000 psig) resembled a Langmuir-type curve with a saturation sorption equal to about six micromoles of methane per square meter of surface area. Even at low pressures, methane sorption capacity was largely determined by surface area. At 2.2 MPa (300 psig), the best interlayered clay sorbed less than one-third the methane sorbed by an equal volume of Witco grade 9JXC activated carbon. Both the activated carbons and interlayered clays exhibited excellent release-on-demand capability. Driving ranges were calculated for a 2500-lb automobile equipped with three, 35-liter fuel tanks filled with sorbent and pressurized to 3.6 MPa (500 psig) with methane. Enough methane was stored with the best interlayered clay to travel 41 km (25 mi). With 9JXC carbon, one could travel 82 km (51 mi). The same vehicle equipped with high pressure (2400 psig) fuel tanks having the same volume but containing no sorbent would have a 190 km (118 mi) range.

Innes, R.A.; Lutinski, F.E.; Occelli, M.L.; Kennedy, J.V.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

City of Big Stone City, South Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dakota (Utility Company) Dakota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Big Stone City Place South Dakota Utility Id 1698 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Class I Controlled Commercial Commercial Class I Controlled, All Electric Businesses Commercial Commercial Class II Controlled Commercial Commercial Class II Regular Commercial Commercial Class II, All Electric Businesses Commercial Commerical Class I Regular Commercial Industrial Industrial

144

K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Seventeen K/Ar dates were obtained on illitic clays within Valles caldera (1.13 Ma) to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on Quaternary to Precambrian intracaldera and pre-caldera rocks in a large,

145

Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application Statement by Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell on NRG's License Application September 25, 2007 - 2:49pm Addthis "Today marks the most significant and tangible step to date, towards the construction of the first new nuclear power plant in the United States in over 30 years. DOE is confident that with NRG's reactor design selection and cooperation with their partners, General Electric and Toshiba, this project will likely result in the first of many new reactors being constructed and operated in the U.S. This reactor would join an American nuclear industry that is safe, secure and has a strong record to prove it. We look forward to the continued cooperation with industrial partners and

146

Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2 Report on THMC Modeling of the Near Field Evolution of a Generic Clay Repository: Model Validation and Demonstration Rev 2 Shale and clay-rich rock formations have been considered as potential host rocks for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world. Coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, and chemical (THMC) processes have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a repository in this type of rocks. The validity of the two-part Hooke's model (TPHM), a new constitutive relationship, and associated formulations regarding rock hydraulic/mechanical properties is demonstrated by the consistency between observations from a mine-by test at the Mont Terri site

147

IMPACTS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION ON FOOD SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food to meet their dietary needs and food preferences for a healthy and active life”. This definition was adopted at the World Food Summit in 1996 (FAO, 1996) when references to food safety,

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Fried Food Away From Home With Body Mass Index and DietJuly 2011 Food Environments Near Home and School Related toof the food environment near home with diet healthier food

Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

Pitman, Michael C. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; Van Duin, Adri C. T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

Pitman, Michael C. [IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY; Van Duin, Adri C. T. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Free 3-MCPD in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference list for Free 3-MCPD(3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )in Foods. Free 3-MCPD in Foods 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles certified chemists chloropropanediol contaminants detergents esters fat

152

Linguistic Acculturation and Food Behaviors among Mexican-Origin Populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that  sell  food.   Restaurant  spending  includes  dine-­?of  Eating  Fast  Food  or   Restaurant  Food  within  the  Food  or  Sit-­?Down  Restaurants  in  the  Previous  Two  

Langellier, Brent Alan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid oxidation in food systems is one of the most important factors which affect food quality, nutrition, safety, color and consumers’ acceptance. Lipid Oxidation: Challenges in Food Systems Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol con

154

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients is written to serve as a reference for food product developers, food technologists, nutritionists, plant breeders, academic and government professionals, college graduates, and anyone who is interested in learni

155

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

Schumann, Dirk

157

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hectorite Clay as the Ionic Conductor in LiCoO2 Cathodes Michael W. Riley,* Peter S. Fedkiw Carolina 27695-7905, USA Cathodes based on LiCoO2 that contain various lithium-conducting species lithium hectorite, lithium Laponite, and lithium- exchanged Nafion are studied in conjunction with lithium metal

Khan, Saad A.

158

1 DEMONSTRATION OF NUCLEAR FUSION IN AN ORDINARY CLAY FLOWER POT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work demonstrates a sustainable nuclear fusion reaction of hydrogen using a clay flower port as a reactor vessel. Our novel approach uses a “charge mirror ” that reduces the electromagnetic repulsion between nuclei enough to allow fusion initiation at room temperature. The device can also be used as a secure error-free transgalactic communications pipe with zero latency and near infinite bandwidth. I.

Albert Einstein; Er Bell; Richard Feynman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Status of LANL investigations of temperature constraints on clay in repository environments  

SciTech Connect

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign is presently evaluating various generic options for disposal of used fuel. The focus of this experimental work is to characterize and bound Engineered Barrier Systems (EBS) conditions in high heat load repositories. The UFD now has the ability to evaluate multiple EBS materials, waste containers, and rock types at higher heat loads and pressures (including deep boreholes). The geologic conditions now available to the U.S.A. and the international community for repositories include saturated and reduced water conditions, along with higher pressure and temperature (P, T) regimes. Chemical and structural changes to the clays, in either backfill/buffer or clay-rich host rock, may have significant effects on repository evolution. Reduction of smectite expansion capacity and rehydration potential due to heating could affect the isolation provided by EBS. Processes such as cementation by silica precipitation and authigenic illite could change the hydraulic and mechanical properties of clay-rich materials. Experimental studies of these repository conditions at high P,T have not been performed in the U.S. for decades and little has been done by the international community at high P,T. The experiments to be performed by LANL will focus on the importance of repository chemical and mineralogical conditions at elevated P,T conditions. This will provide input to the assessment of scientific basis for elevating the temperature limits in clay barriers.

Caporuscio, Florie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cheshire, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Dennis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCarney, Mary Kate [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

160

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Ă? 10Ă?22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

Herbert, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Food Industry 2000: Food Processing Opportunities, Challenges, New Technology Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of some of the major factors affecting the food processing industry, i. e., economic pressures, consumer concerns and pressures, regulatory restrictions, and general conservatism. The food industry must be responsive to the growing consumer interest in the relationship between diet and general health, to the changes in consumer demographics and desires, and to the opportunities offered by new technology, especially electrotechnologies.

2000-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

162

Food Apps | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 next Global Food Security Showing 1 - 4 of 22 results. aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence...

163

FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of coal--the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States with supplies projected to last 250 years. FutureGen's co-production of power and hydrogen will also serve as a stepping-stone to an environmentally sustainable energy future.

Zitney, S.E.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A simulation study to verify Stone's simultaneous water and gas injection performance in a 5-spot pattern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water alternating gas (WAG) injection is a proven technique to enhance oil recovery. It has been successfully implemented in the field since 1957 with recovery increase in the range of 5-10% of oil-initially-in-place (OIIP). In 2004, Herbert L. Stone presented a simultaneous water and gas injection technique. Gas is injected near the bottom of the reservoir and water is injected directly on top at high rates to prevent upward channeling of the gas. Stone's mathematical model indicated the new technique can increase vertical sweep efficiency by 3-4 folds over WAG. In this study, a commercial reservoir simulator was used to predict the performance of Stone's technique and compare it to WAG and other EOR injection strategies. Two sets of relative permeability data were considered. Multiple combinations of total injection rates (water plus gas) and water/gas ratios as well as injection schedules were investigated to find the optimum design parameters for an 80 acre 5-spot pattern unit. Results show that injecting water above gas may result in better oil recovery than WAG injection though not as indicated by Stone. Increase in oil recovery with SSWAG injection is a function of the gas critical saturation. The more gas is trapped in the formation, the higher oil recovery is obtained. This is probably due to the fact that areal sweep efficiency is a more dominant factor in a 5-spot pattern. Periodic shut-off of the water injector has little effect on oil recovery. Water/gas injection ratio optimization may result in a slight increase in oil recovery. SSWAG injection results in a steady injection pressure and less fluctuation in gas production rate compared to WAG injection.

Barnawi, Mazen Taher

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection, in some foods and vegetable oils, of fatty acid esters of the contaminant known as 3-MCPD is an emerging issue for food and vegetable oil processors Chloroesters in foods: An emerging issue Inform Magazine Inform Archives 3-MCPD Food Sci

166

ISLAND AND SHIP TRAIL CLOUDS: THE ROSETTA STONE OF CLOUDS, POLLUTION, AND CLIMATE?  

SciTech Connect

Cloud/Climate Feedback is a combination of words known to be important but extremely difficult to quantify or even assign a direction. A 4 % increase in boundary layer clouds would cool the earth as much as a doubling of CO{sub 2} would warm it (Randall et al, 1984). Studies have shown that warmer sea surface temperatures are associated with fewer clouds (Oreopoulos and Davies, 1992). We do not know how much of this effect is due to direct solar warming of surface water in the absence of clouds. We also know there are more eastern ocean marine boundary layer clouds in summer than winter. Do warmer sea surface temperatures or more summer-like conditions best represent global warming? Twomey, 1974 has proposed that increasing aerosol pollution would lead to brighter clouds (indirect aerosol effect). This relationship does have determined sign (i.e. cooling) but is very difficult to quantify. Cloud trails from ships and islands hold the potential of addressing Cloud/Climate Feedback by observing atmospheric response to large perturbations in turbulence and aerosol. However, before cloud trails can be used as a Rosetta Stone connecting pollution and climate, much more needs to be understood about the micro- and macrophysics of cloud trails.

W. PORCH; S. WINIECKI; L. O' STEEN

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Food Services | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Services Food Services Food Services The Department offers many food services for employees within the Headquarters' buildings. Forrestal Forrestal Cafeteria (2nd floor, West Building). See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 6:45 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m., and a "Happy Hour" is featured from 2:00-2:30 p.m. offering 30% off all hot and cold buffet items. Other Places to Eat, Forrestal Food services available inside the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Places to eat near the Forrestal building (DOE Powerpedia) Germantown Germantown Cafeteria - See the Cafeteria web page for further information. Hours: Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Breakfast hours are from 7:00 a.m. until 10:00 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m.

168

Mesquite pods into nutritious foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesquite trees produce bean pods that a new process can turn into nutrient-rich foods. A simple, automated procedure converts the dried mesquite pods into a high-protein, sweet-tasting flour and a gum that can be used as a natural thickening additive in foods. Standard food-processing equipment can be used. For flour, whole pods are ground with a disk mill, which produces a mixture of seeds and flour. The mixture is then sifted to separate the two components. Its the seeds that contain the gum - a thin, white film that lines the inside of the hard, brown seed coat. To extract gum, seeds are split and soaked in an alkali solution. The solution, after being neutralized, is sprayed through a fine-mist nozzle into a heated chamber, where it dries as a fine powder of edible gum. This spray-drying is the same process that converts fresh milk into powdered. Analyses showed that the natural gum in mesquite pods is better than the guar gum US food processors now import to use as a natural thickener in ice cream; salad dressings, puddings, and other foods.

Wood, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Long-term modeling of glass waste in portland cement- and clay-based matrices  

SciTech Connect

A set of ``templates`` was developed for modeling waste glass interactions with cement-based and clay-based matrices. The templates consist of a modified thermodynamic database, and input files for the EQ3/6 reaction path code, containing embedded rate models and compositions for waste glass, cement, and several pozzolanic materials. Significant modifications were made in the thermodynamic data for Th, Pb, Ra, Ba, cement phases, and aqueous silica species. It was found that the cement-containing matrices could increase glass corrosion rates by several orders of magnitude (over matrixless or clay matrix systems), but they also offered the lowest overall solubility for Pb, Ra, Th and U. Addition of pozzolans to cement decreased calculated glass corrosion rates by up to a factor of 30. It is shown that with current modeling capabilities, the ``affinity effect`` cannot be trusted to passivate glass if nuclei are available for precipitation of secondary phases that reduce silica activity.

Stockman, H.W.; Nagy, K.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Morris, C.E. [Wollongong Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Civil and Mining Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS SRS Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank Employees Donate Food to Golden Harvest Food Bank AIKEN, S.C. - (June 7, 2012) Today, the Savannah River Site (SRS) donated $22,000 and 18,000 pounds of food during its annual food drive for the Golden Harvest Food Bank. Several SRS organizations participated in this food drive-Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Remediation, U.S. Forest Service-Savannah River, URS and WSI- Savannah River. The SRS food drive is one of Golden Harvest Food Bank's largest, local fund-raisers. According to Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC President and CEO Dwayne Wilson, the Site's past food drives have collec- tively yielded over 262,475 pounds of food for Golden Harvest. "We're pleased to support Golden Harvest in their highly effective efforts as they strive

171

Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

Cameron, Caitlin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hydraulic Conductivity of Geosynthetic Clay Liners to Coal Combustion Product Leachates: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydraulic conductivity tests are being conducted on geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) using solutions representing leachates observed in disposal facilities for coal combustion products (CCPs). Five different GCL products that are commercially available within the United States are being tested: two containing conventional sodium bentonite (NaB), two containing polymer-modified bentonite (PMB), and one with a bentonite polymer composite (BPC). Testing to date has been conducted by direct permeation ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Network Jump to: navigation, search Name Peak Oil Food Network Place Crested Butte, Colorado Zip 81224 Website http://www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References Peak Oil Food Network[1] LinkedIn Connections This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak Oil Food Network is a networking organization located in Crested Butte, Colorado, and is open to the general public that seeks to promote the creation of solutions to the challenge of food production impacted by the peak phase of global oil production. Private citizens are encouraged to join and contribute by adding comments, writing blog posts or adding to discussions about food and oil related topics. Peak Oil Food Network can be followed on Twitter at: http://www.Twitter.com/PeakOilFoodNtwk Peak Oil Food Network on Twitter

176

Gas Migration In The Opalinus Clay As A Function Of The Gas Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clay formations have long been proposed as potential host rocks for nuclear waste disposal. After the operational phase of a repository the openings, e.g., boreholes, galleries, and chambers, have to be backfilled in order to avoid the release of radionuclides into the biosphere. After healing and re-saturation of the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) and saturation of the backfill, the waste containers and the metallic components will corrode resulting in a generation of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon dioxide will be released as a result of oxidation and thermal decomposition of the organic components in the waste and in the clay. If the disposal boreholes and chambers are sealed gas-tight, high gas pressure may be produced leading to the potential generation of fractures in the host rock which could influence the integrity of the repository. Therefore it is essential that the gases migrate through the technical barriers (backfill) or into the surrounding host rock at lower pressure and without any irreversible damage of the repository. In order to estimate the consequences of the gas generation the knowledge of the gas paths in the host rock and the knowledge of the parameters which influence the gas migration in the host rock are important. During an ongoing project at the underground research laboratory Mt. Terri in Switzerland the gas migration in the undisturbed over-consolidated Opalinus Clay is investigated. (authors)

Jockwer, N.; Wieczorek, K. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Goa, India Cyclic Lateral Response of Model Pile Groups in Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: This paper presents the results of two-way cyclic lateral load tests conducted in the laboratory on the model pile groups embedded in soft clay. The purpose of this research work is to investigate the effects of spacing, number of cycles of loading and cyclic load level on the pile group behaviour in clay. A pneumatic system is used to simulate cyclic loading typical of wave loading. Similitude laws are adhered to in selecting the material and size of the model piles. Piles are instrumented so that bending moments developed along the piles can be calculated. The results emphasized highly nonlinear nature of load-deflection behaviour. Group interaction effect under cyclic lateral loading is predominant for groups with spacing to diameter ratio less than 7. It is found that the cyclic load levels exceeding 0.5 times of static ultimate capacity, produce large deflections of the pile group due to gaps developed at the pile-soil interface, remoulding of clay and subsequent reduction in the stiffness. The bending moments in the piles are increased with the number of cycles and the location of maximum bending moment shifted downwards along the length of the pile. Numerical analysis using software ? GROUP is also carried out for closely spaced pile groups subjected to static lateral loads and the results are compared with the experimental ones. 1

S. S. Ch; A. Boominathan; G. R. Dodagoudar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

CO2-driven Enhanced Oil Recovery as a Stepping Stone to What?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper draws heavily on the authors’ previously published research to explore the extent to which near term carbon dioxide-driven enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) can be “a stepping stone to a long term sequestration program of a scale to be material in climate change risk mitigation.” The paper examines the historical evolution of CO2-EOR in the United States and concludes that estimates of the cost of CO2-EOR production or the extent of CO2 pipeline networks based upon this energy security-driven promotion of CO2-EOR do not provide a robust platform for spurring the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies (CCS) as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The paper notes that the evolving regulatory framework for CCS makes a clear distinction between CO2-EOR and CCS and the authors examine arguments in the technical literature about the ability for CO2-EOR to generate offsetting revenue to accelerate the commercial deployment of CCS systems in the electric power and industrial sectors of the economy. The authors conclude that the past 35 years of CO2-EOR in the U.S. have been important for boosting domestic oil production and delivering proven system components for future CCS systems. However, though there is no reason to suggest that CO2-EOR will cease to deliver these benefits, there is also little to suggest that CO2-EOR is a necessary or significantly beneficial step towards the commercial deployment of CCS as a means of addressing climate change.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

World Food Crisis: Imperfect Markets Starving Development, A Decomposition of Recent Food Price Increases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The recent decade has experienced two rather substantial food price spikes. This thesis sets out to provide an in-depth look at the recent food price… (more)

Costello, Christine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Genetic Engineered Food and Safety Name: Christopher Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Is genetically engineered food safe to eat? Replies: Well, I hope so, since I and you and all of us have been eating it for centuries. All common foodstuffs have been seriously engineered since they were discovered. The modern tomato plant, apple tree, wheat stalk, and corn plant bear only a general resemblance to their ancestors, as farmers have engineered them to increase their yield, shelf life, resistance to disease, etc. It is, however, true that up until recently changes to the genetic code of foodstuffs could only be made via natural mutation (which occurs via naturally-occuring ionizing radiation and mutagenic chemicals), and the food engineer's job was limited to selecting those changes he wanted to preserve, and those he wanted to weed out. Now you can induce mutations directly, with intention and forethought, and avoid much of the waiting around for natural mutation that was heretofore necessary in plant breeding.

182

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Battery Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Materials Research Society (MRS growing populations and energy needs forever. Batteries have evolved a great deal and when you compare the bulky, heavy, toxic car lead batteries to the novel and outstanding lithium-ion batteries, you can

Tennessee, University of

183

The bottom of the ocean food chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The bottom of the ocean food chain 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2013 All Issues submit The bottom of the ocean food chain Global ocean...

184

Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of omega-3 fatty acids from both plant and marine sources in food supplements and pharmaceuticals. Omega-3 Oils: Applications in Functional Foods Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary

185

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The wet corn milling industry emits almost a sixth of the energy-related carbon in the food industry. ...

186

Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse.g. tons) of carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalent per functional unit (e.g. kg or liter of goods sold) (PAS2050

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

187

Food Security in the Western US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food Security in the Western US and Pacific Territories 23 Rural Connections Nov. 2009 By PeteR BaRcinas ADAP is tackling the food security implications of climate change, rising sea levels, and fuel costs Pacific (aDaP) Regional Food security and Sufficiency Project brings together community, local, state

188

Clay-sewage sludge co-pyrolysis. A TG-MS and Py-GC study on potential advantages afforded by the presence of clay in the pyrolysis of wastewater sewage sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater sewage sludge was co-pyrolyzed with a well characterized clay sample, in order to evaluate possible advantages in the thermal disposal process of solid waste. Characterization of the co-pyrolysis process was carried out both by thermogravimetric-mass spectrometric (TG-MS) analysis, and by reactor tests, using a lab-scale batch reactor equipped with a gas chromatograph for analysis of the evolved gas phase (Py-GC). Due to the presence of clay, two main effects were observed in the instrumental characterization of the process. Firstly, the clay surface catalyzed the pyrolysis reaction of the sludge, and secondly, the release of water from the clay, at temperatures of approx. 450-500 deg. C, enhanced gasification of part of carbon residue of the organic component of sludge following pyrolysis. Moreover, the solid residue remaining after pyrolysis process, composed of the inorganic component of sludge blended with clay, is characterized by good features for possible disposal by vitrification, yielding a vitreous matrix that immobilizes the hazardous heavy metals present in the sludge.

Ischia, Marco, E-mail: marco.ischia@ing.unitn.it [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Maschio, Roberto Dal [Department of Materials Engineering and Industrial Technologies, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Grigiante, Maurizio [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, via Mesiano 77, 38100 Trento (Italy); Baratieri, Marco [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Universita 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Vision - Food | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision - Food Vision - Food Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture This website is supported by the Interagency Council on Agricultural and Rural Statistics (ICARS). ICARS is the effort of the US federal government's statistical agencies in support of the "Global Strategy to Improve Agriculture and Rural Statistics" which was developed under the United Nations Statistical Commission. The impetus for the Global Strategy was the recognition that agriculture and rural statistics are declining across the globe at the same time as new data requirements are emerging. ICARS brings together experts from economic, demographic, environmental and agricultural statistical agencies and from natural resource agencies to

190

Preferred Orientations and Anisotropy in Shales: Callovo-Oxfordian Shale (France) and Opalinus Clay (Switzerland)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anisotropy in clay-rich sedimentary rocks is receiving increasing attention. Seismic anisotropy is essential in the prospecting for petroleum deposits. Anisotropy of diffusion has become relevant for environmental contaminants, including nuclear waste. In both cases, the orientation of component minerals is a critical ingredient and, largely because of small grain size and poor crystallinity, the orientation distribution of clay minerals has been difficult to quantify. A method is demonstrated that relies on hard synchrotron X-rays to obtain diffraction images of shales and applies the crystallographic Rietveld method to deconvolute the images and extract quantitative information about phase fractions and preferred orientation that can then be used to model macroscopic physical properties. The method is applied to shales from European studies which investigate the suitability of shales as potential nuclear waste repositories (Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory near Bure, France, and Benken borehole and Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland). A Callovo-Oxfordian shale from Meuse/Haute-Marne shows a relatively weak alignment of clay minerals and a random distribution for calcite. Opalinus shales from Benken and Mont Terri show strong alignment of illite-smectite, kaolinite, chlorite, and calcite. This intrinsic contribution to anisotropy is consistent with macroscopic physical properties where anisotropy is caused both by the orientation distribution of crystallites and high-aspect-ratio pores. Polycrystal elastic properties are obtained by averaging single crystal properties over the orientation distribution and polyphase properties by averaging over all phases. From elastic properties we obtain anisotropies for p waves ranging from 7 to 22%.

Wenk, H.-R.; Voltolini, M.; Mazurek, M.; Van Loon, L.R.; Vinsot, A. (PSI); (UCB); (Bern); (LSMHM)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Toxicity of lead to soil respiration: mediation by clay minerals, humic acids, and compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Pb has no known biological function, elevated levels of Pb in soils and in other natural environments may adversely affect the indigenous biota, including the microbiota. Elevated levels of Pb in soil may also adversely affect microbemediated ecologic processes. There is, however, relatively little information on the mediating influence of the physicochemical factors of the recipient environment on the toxicity of Pb to microbe-mediated ecologic processes. This present study evaluated the influence of the clay minerals, kaolinite and montmorillonite, particulate humic acids, and compost on the degradation of glucose in soil.

Debosz, K.; Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Experimental Test of the validity of "Isotropic" Approximation for the Mechanical Behaviour of Clay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental data from axially symmetric compression test at constant mean pressure p on kaolinite clay are used to study the validity of an "isotropic" modelling as a function of the overconsolidation ratio (OCR).The isotropic assumption is found to be quite good for 24. For very large OCR (OCR >10), anisotropic response is observed at few percents of axial deformation. Relation with anisotropic distribution of local forces is made. Pacs # : 5.40 ; 45.70 ; 62.20 ; 83.70.Fn

P. Evesque; M. Hattab

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 10 Soy Molasses: Processing and Utilization as a Functional Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

194

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 8 Barriers to Soy Protein Applications in Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

195

Data - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data - Food Community Data - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Search Terms Category -Any- Agriculture Investment and Engineering Animals and Animal Systems Agriculture Fire Hazard Food/Non-Food Agricultural Products Geography and Environment Human Health and Nutrition International Trade Local and Regional Food Systems Markets, Prices, and Economics Natural Resources and Environment Plants and Plant Systems Agriculture Rural Development Science and Technology Water Quality Watershed Protection Items per page 25 50 100 Apply Name Downloads Rating Pesticide Data Program 1994 The USDA Pesticide Data Program (PDP) database provides national data on pesticide residues in food and water, with an emphasis on foods consumed by infants and children. PDP data are used primarily...

196

CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ??0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Ĺ. The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauss, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

Miller, William A [ORNL

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum exploration and production in recent years have moved into increasingly deeper water off the continental shelf. Some of these facilities are anchored in water depths in excess of 1000 meters. Exploration and production in deep water present new technological challenges where traditional fixed platforms have given way to floating structures. Today suction caissons are the most commonly used anchorage system for permanent offshore oil production facility. The objective of this study is to numerically predict the ultimate capacity of suction caissons in normally consolidated and lightly overconsolidated clays. Representative soil profile from the Gulf of Mexico and the North Sea are taken and analyzed for suction caissons with length over diameter ratios of 2, 4, 6 & 8. Normalized failure load interaction diagrams are generated for each of the cases. The location of optimum attachment point is also reported for each of the cases. General purpose finite element computer program ABAQUS is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay is treated as an incompressible material. Results of the study compares well with existing simplified method for estimating load capacity of suction caisson anchors.

Sharma, Partha Pratim

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil price? It does not relate to Mick' short stint at the London School of Economics, the oil industry operates on the same principle, at least in the short run. The industry relies on proven

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EI Summary of SIC 24  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in cutting timber and pulpwood; merchant sawmills, lath mills, and shingle mills, cooperage stock mills, planing mills and plywood and veneer mills engaged in producing lumber and wood basic materials; and establishments engaged in manufacturing finished articles made entirely or mainly of wood or related materials. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy

202

EI Summary of SIC 39  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in manufacturing products not classified in any other manufacturing major group. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 39 Source: Table 12 of this report.

203

EI Summary of SIC 38  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Instruments (38) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Instruments (38) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in manufacturing instruments (including professional and scientific) for measuring, testing, analyzing, and controlling, and their associated sensors and accessories; optical instruments and lenses; surveying and drafting instruments; hydrological, hydrographic, meteorological, and geophysical equipment; search, detection, navigation, and guidance systems and equipment; surgical, medical, and dental instruments, equipment and supplies; ophthalmic goods; photographic equipment and supplies; and watches and clocks.

204

EI Summary of SIC 35  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Machinery (35) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in manufacturing industrial and commercial machinery and equipment, and computers. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 35 Source: Table 12 of this report.

205

EI Summary of SIC 26  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper (26) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Paper (26) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in the manufacture of pulps from wood and other cellulose fibers, and from rags; the manufacture of paper and paperboard; and the manufacture of paper and paperboard into converted products, such as paper coated off the paper machine, paper bags, paper boxes, and envelopes. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace

206

EI Summary of SIC 33  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Metals (33) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Primary Metals (33) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in smelting and refining ferrous and nonferrous metals from ore, pig, or scrap; in rolling, drawing, and alloying metals; in manufacturing castings and other basic metal products; and in manufacturing nails, spikes, and insulated wire and cable. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios

207

EI Summary of All Manufacturing SIC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) The manufacturing sector includes establishments engaged in the mechanical or chemical transformation of materials or substances into new products. These operations are generally conducted in facilities described as plants, factories, or mills, while characteristically using power-driven machines and material-handling equipment. Manufacturing also includes such activities as the assembly of components of manufactured products and the blending of materials, such as lubricating oil, plastics, resins, or liquors.

208

EI Summary of SIC 29  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refineries (29) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Refineries (29) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments primarily engaged in petroleum refining, manufacturing paving and roofing materials, and compounding lubricating oils and greases from purchased materials. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage Energy and Operating Ratios Energy-Management Activities Technology Fuel-Switching Capability Motors Figure on ratio of energy consumed per 1992 constant dollar for SIC 29

209

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

210

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

211

Energy Efficiency in Food-Service Facilities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Food-service facilities have high energy intensities compared to other commercial buildings due to their energy use for cooking and refrigeration. Assessing the energy performance… (more)

Paillat, Etienne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to:...

213

The Future of Food in Suburbia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses resilience for the future of Canadian suburbs, through the lens of buildings and food, particularly against the backdrop of peak oil and… (more)

Khalid, Sarah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Cat under Food and Water Stress Name: Nitin Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside...

215

Food Industry - Motor Contactors Burning Up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of motor contactors that have burnt up several times in the last year at a food manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Free Online Food Safety Legislation Training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 25, 2011 ... F4ESL - From Farm to Fork European Food Safety Legislation Training Programme is an EU Project under EC LLP Leonardo da Vinci Program ...

217

Water uptake of clay and desert dust aerosol particles at sub- and supersaturated water vapor conditions  

SciTech Connect

Airborne mineral dust particles serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby influencing the formation and properties of warm clouds. It is therefore of particular interest how dust aerosols with different mineralogy behave when exposed to high relative humidity (RH) or supersaturation with respect to liquid water similar to atmospheric conditions. In this study the sub-saturated hygroscopic growth and the supersaturated cloud condensation nucleus activity of pure clays and real desert dust aerosols was determined using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and a cloud condensation nuclei counter (CCNC), respectively. Five different illite, montmorillonite and kaolinite clay samples as well as three desert dust samples (Saharan dust (SD), Chinese dust (CD) and Arizona test dust (ATD)) were used. Aerosols were generated both with a wet and a dry disperser and the water uptake was parameterized via the hygroscopicity parameter, ?. The hygroscopicity of dry generated dust aerosols was found to be negligible when compared to processed atmospheric aerosols, with CCNC derived ? values between 0.00 and 0.02. The latter value can be idealized as a particle consisting of 96.7% (by volume) insoluble material and ~3.3% ammonium sulfate. Pure clay aerosols were found to be generally less hygroscopic than real desert dust particles. All illite and montmorillonite samples had ?~0.003, kaolinites were least hygroscopic and had ?=0.001. SD (?=0.023) was found to be the most hygroscopic dry-generated desert dust followed by CD (?=0.007) and ATD (?=0.003). Wet-generated dust showed an increased water uptake when compared to dry-generated samples. This is considered to be an artifact introduced by redistribution of soluble material between the particles while immersed in an aqueous medium during atomization, thus indicating that specification of the generation method is critically important when presenting such data. Any atmospheric processing of fresh mineral dust which leads to the addition of more than ~3% soluble material is expected to significantly enhance hygroscopicity and CCN activity.

Herich, Hanna; Tritscher, Torsten; Wiacek, Aldona; Gysel, Martin; Weingartner, E.; Lohmann, U.; Baltensperger, Urs; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Development of the foods grasping mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this mechanism, and shows performance. Key Words: Remote shopping, Mobile Manipulator, Foods handling 1. 1·1 1) 1Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­Development of the foods grasping mechanism­ Tetsuo) Abstract-- Our purpose is developing the remote shopping system as a concrete application. A human uses

Ohya, Akihisa

219

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods Method of handling foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Shopping Robot System for Fresh Foods ­ Method of handling foods ­ Tetsuo TOMIZAWA, Akihisa a mobile manipulator as a teleoperated tool for accessing and manipulating remote objects. A human uses the system to select and buy fresh foods of a super market from a remote location via the Internet. We

Ohya, Akihisa

220

Food practices as situated action: exploring and designing for everyday food practices with households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Household food practices are complex. Many people are unable to effectively respond to challenges in their food environment to maintain diets considered to be in line with national and international standards for healthy eating. We argue that recognizing ... Keywords: everyday practice, food, health, situated action

Rob Comber; Jettie Hoonhout; Aart van Halteren; Paula Moynihan; Patrick Olivier

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2006 MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRESIDENT'S MANAGEMENT COUNCIL FROM: Clay Johnson Deputy Director for Management SUBJECT: Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (Pub. L. No. 109-282) Implementation This memorandum establishes an interagency task force to ensure effective implementation of the Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act (the Act). I have asked OMB Associate Director for Management Robert Shea to lead the task force. The first meeting of the task force will take place on Thursday, November 16, 2006 at 2:00 p.m. in Room 248 of the Old Executive Office Building. Please appoint a senior level official from your agency that can contribute to the development of the website required by the Act as well as

222

Durability of LDPE nanocomposites with clay, silica, and zinc oxide: part I: mechanical properties of the nanocomposite materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three types of LDPE-based nanocomposites with montmorillonite clay, silica, and zinc oxide were prepared by melt blending the nanofiller with the resin. As a prelude to studying their durability, the extent of reinforcement of the LDPE matrix by the ...

Halim Hamid Redhwi, Mohammad Nahid Siddiqui, Anthony L. Andrady, Syed Hussain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cat under Food and Water Stress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asimikas Asimikas Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: USA Date: N/A Question: How long can a domestic cat live without food, and drink water only? Replies: Asimikas, If at all possible, attempt to coax food into the cat by mixing wet cat food with water until 'soupy', and use a syringe to inject food into the back of the cat's mouth. The cat probably won't like this, but if you try repeatedly and with gentle firmness, you may successfully get food into the feline. From observing a case as a veterinary assistant, a cat refusing solid food can go several days on water alone. Then, the cat generally begins to refuse water as well and there is a noticeable gauntness about the body shape of the cat. The skin on the back, for example, when gently pinched will not quickly spring back to laying flat as it should --- this indicates serious dehydration on a subcutaneous level, indicating the cat needs an IV to get fluids in quickly before organ failure etc. Again, this is the general series of events I observed in a vet's office when a cat was brought in, having refused food for more than a few days. A vet should definitely be contacted if a feline has refused food for two consecutive days or more.

226

Transparency in complex dynamic food supply chains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food supply chains are increasingly complex and dynamic due to (i) increasing product proliferation to serve ever diversifying and globalising markets as a form of mass customisation with resulting global flows of raw materials, ingredients and products, ... Keywords: Consumer and governmental demands, Food supply chain, Governance, Information systems, Quality and safety standards, Transparency

J. H. Trienekens; P. M. Wognum; A. J. M. Beulens; J. G. A. J. van der Vorst

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

High-oleic canola oils and their food applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-oleic canola oils are among the major healthful oils replacing trans fat in food processing and foodservices in North America. High-oleic canola oils and their food applications Inform Magazine Edible Applications Food Structure and Functionality

228

New Food-Addiction Link Found  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2002 May 20, 2002 Electronic newsroom 02-40 New Food-Addiction Link Found Mere sight/smell of food spikes levels of brain “pleasure” chemical UPTON, NY — Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Brookhaven National Laboratory have found that the mere display of food — where food-deprived subjects are allowed to smell and taste their favorite foods without actually eating them — causes a significant elevation in brain dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of pleasure and reward. This activation of the brain’s dopamine motivation circuits is distinct from the role the brain chemical plays when people actually eat, and may be similar to what addicts experience when craving drugs. “Eating is a highly reinforcing behavior, just like taking illicit drugs,” said psychiatrist Nora Volkow, the study’s lead investigator. “But this is the first time anyone has shown that the dopamine system can be triggered by food when there is no pleasure associated with it since the subjects don’t eat the food. This provides us with new clues about the mechanisms that lead people to eat other than just for the pleasure of eating, and in this respect may help us understand why some people overeat.” The study will appear in the June 1, 2002 issue of Synapse (now available online ).

229

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Big Data, New Physics and Geospatial Super-Food. Purpose: As ... amazing. As it turns out, geospatial data are analytic super-food. ...

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Internet Food...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet Food Service for SRS Employees Sought Greater Aiken-Augusta area food service companies are invited to consider providing meal ordering via the internet for delivery to...

231

Event:Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Second Global Conference on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change: on...

232

SUSTAINABILITY INDICATORS IN THE VERMONT-REGIONAL FOOD SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food systems are inherently complex areas of interaction between economic, environmental, and social factors. The local food movement in Vermont presents new opportunities to shape… (more)

Schattman, Rachel

233

Central, peripheral, and contextual regulation of food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Grinker, JA. Food and water intake, meal patterns andreceptors in food and water intake. Neuropharmacology.hyperdipsic response (>10 ml water intake within 30 min) to

Parylak, Sarah Lynne; Parylak, Sarah Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Human exposure through food chains:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using information collected under the community right to know'' provision of the Superfund reauthorization act, the US Environmental Protection Agency has revealed that some two to three billion pounds of toxic chemicals are released annually to the atmosphere from industries in the US. Human populations can contact these environmental pollutants through food, water, and air in varying amounts each day throughout a lifetime. A realistic strategy for managing the potential health risks of industrial emissions requires a comprehensive approach with adequate attention to uncertainties. Using contaminant transfers from air to milk and as a case study, I consider here two important issues in exposure assessment --- (1) estimation of and (2) reduction of uncertainty in exposure estimates. This case study provides a distinction between variability, ignorance and uncertainty. For the air/milk pathways, I explore the use of exposure models that combine information on environmental partitioning with data on human diet, behavior patterns, and physiology into a numerical expression that links ambient air concentrations with chronic daily intake. I examine how uncertainty limits current exposure modeling efforts and suggest research to reduce these uncertainty. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

McKone, T.E.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need November 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteers from West Valley Demonstration Project gather before distributing items collected in an annual food drive. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. Volunteer John Schelble helps unload a delivery truck at a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry. John Rizzo passes canned food to John Rendall to deliver to a food pantry.

236

Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods individuals choose to consume; therefore, by assessing the home food environment a better understanding of what people are eating can be obtained. Methods of measuring home food availability have been developed and tested in recent years; however most of these methods assess food availability on one occasion only. This study aimed to capture "usual" availability by using multiple assessments. After the development and pre-testing of the 171-item home observation guide to determine the presence and amount of food items in the home (refrigerator, freezer, pantry, elsewhere), two trained researchers recruited a convenience sample of 9 households (44.4% minority), administered a baseline questionnaire (personal info, shopping habits, food resources, and food security), and conducted 5 in-home assessments (5-7 day interval) over a 30-day period. Each in-home assessment included shopping and fast food activities since the last assessment and an observational survey of types and amounts of foods present. The final in-home assessment included an audio recorded interview on food habits and beliefs. Complete data were collected from all 9 women (32.8 y +/- 6.0; 3 married; 4 +/- 1.6 adults/children in household; 4 SNAP; 6 food insecure) and their households. Weekly grocery purchases (place, amount, and purpose) use (frequency) varied from once (n=1) to every week (n=5); 4 used fast food 2-3 times/wk for 4 weeks. Quantity and types of fresh and processed fruits and vegetables varied by week and by family. The feasibility of conducting multiple in-home assessments was confirmed with 100% retention from all participants. This methodology is important in that it provided detailed information on intra-monthly variation in food availability. The findings suggest the inadequacy of a single measure to assess food availability in the home.

Sisk, Cheree L.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Global Food Security | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Food Security Global Food Security aWhere aWhere transforms how global development initiatives are managed and monitored. aWhere's location intelligence data management platform enables integration of complex agricultural, environmental and public health data into local, actionable insight. Application URL: http://www.awhere.com/en-us Read more about aWhere 0 comment(s) | Food Frequency Method Online A fast, low cost, effective method to assess micro-nutrient deficiencies in a developing country on a household basis, while also allowing for an aggregation to a community or regional basis quickly and effectively. Application URL: http://www.foodfrequencyonline.org/index Read more about Food Frequency Method Online 0 comment(s) | e-Afghan AG e-Afghan Ag provides credible relevant information to those helping farmers

238

West Pico Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pico Food Pico Food Jump to: navigation, search Name West Pico Food Place Vernon, California Sector Solar Product A distributor of wholesale frozen foods to supermarket chains in Southern California, which has had a solar installation built on its roof. Coordinates 42.761624°, -72.511495° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.761624,"lon":-72.511495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Collaborate - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaborate - Food Community Collaborate - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Collaborate This Food, Agriculture, and Rural Community establishes a unified point of access to data and statistics, and tools to identify relevant data sets. Providing researchers and other users of data and statistics with authoritative, high quality sources will realize greater benefits from public research, help to coordinate effort and reduce duplication in scientific investigation, and reveal new connections for innovative uses. It is hoped that this community will foster the development of new applications and tools to improve agricultural production, human health and nutrition, environmental benefits, and global food security and poverty

240

A systems approach to food accident analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

Helferich, John D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-rich foods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BNL Blood Drives: Iron-Rich Foods Blood Drive Home Seafood: Fish (cod, sardines, tuna, clams, oysters, shrimp) Poultry: Chicken, eggs, yolk Lean Red Meats: Beef, lamb, veal, pork,...

242

Early Days of Food and Environmental Virology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells, so that the water produced as a byproduct wasproblem. Although the water produced by the hydrogen–oxygenof food produced for human consumption, plus water ad lib.

Cliver, Dean O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Sechage solaire des aliments (solar food drying and conservation of food for year-round consumption)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an introduction to food drying as a measure to avoid the loss of agricultural surpluses, and conserve food for year-round consumption. It discusses the basic rules of food drying and gives an overview of various methods and appropriate dryer constructions. It also provides detailed explanations on how to process vegetables, fruits, and meats and gives advice on storage and cooking.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Recycle of Wastes of Clay Brick Industry for Producing Eco-cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work aims at recycling of the solid wastes of clay brick industry (WCB) in the manufacture of blended cement. The various characteristics of collected samples of the waste were determined. WCB was ground to different surface areas. Different mixes were designed from the WCB and ordinary Portland cement (OPC). After adding the required amount of water for each mix, the pastes were moulded in 5x5x5cm3 mould. The initial and final setting time were measured. The moulded specimens were cured at room temperature for 24hr, then demoulded and cured at water for the required testing time. The compressive strength for the hardened specimens was measured. The kinetic of the reaction was followed by determining free lime and chemically combined water contents. The obtained results were compared with OPC and different types of blended cement already existing in the market. The results clearly illustrate the suitability of WCB for the production of series of different types of blended cement (green products) having great impact on the energy saving moreover decreasing carbon dioxide content released during cement industry .

Amin, A. M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Liquid-impregnated clay solid sorbents for CO2 removal from postcombustion gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel liquid-impregnated clay sorbent #1;R. V. Siriwardane, U.S. Patent No. 6,908,497 B1 #2;2003#3;#4; was developed for carbon dioxide #1;CO2#2; removal in the temperature range of ambient to 60°C for both fixed-bed and fluidized-bed reactor applications. The sorbent is regenerable at 80–100°C. A 20-cycle test conducted in an atmospheric reactor with simulated flue gas with moisture demonstrated that the sorbent retains its CO2 sorption capacity with CO2 removal efficiency of about 99% during the cyclic tests. The sorbents suitable for fluidized-bed reactor operations showed required delta CO2 capacity requirements for sorption of CO2 at 40°C and regeneration at 100°C. The parameters such as rate of sorption, heat of sorption, minimum fluidization velocities, and attrition resistance data that are necessary for the design of a reactor suitable for capture and regeneration were also determined for the sorbent. A 20-cycle test conducted in the presence of flue-gas pollutant sulfur dioxide—SO2 #2;20 parts per million#3;—indicated that the sorbent performance was not affected by the presence of SO2.

Siriwardane, R.; Robinson, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

By the MSU Food Security Group 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decades of research have led to substantially improved understanding of the nature of food insecurity. 2 Until the food crisis of 2007/08, a combination of economic growth and targeted programs resulted in a steady fall in the percentage of the world’s population suffering from under-nutrition (from 20 % in 1990/92 to 16 % in 2006). 3 Yet over a billion people still face both

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

248

QUANTITATIVE X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION ANALYSES OF CLAYS USING AN ORIENTING INTERNAL STANDARD AND PRESSED DISKS OF BULK SHALE SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstraet--Quantitative analysis of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction requires oriented clays in order to increase detection limits of the analyses. This is achieved commonly either by smear or sedimentation techniques; however, these techniques can lead to poor analytical precision when used with an internal standard because they often produce non-homogeneous internal standard-clay mineral mixtures. Compaction of bulk shale material at 8000 psi in an hydraulic press produces preferred orientations comparable to that produced by smear or sedimentation. When used with a suitable platy internal standard which provides an estimate of clay mineral preferred orientation, excellent analytical precision is achieved routinely. Several lines of experimental evidence indicate that 1-5 /tm MoS2 is an ideal orienting internal standard for use with compaction mounts.

R. D. Cody; G. L. Thompson

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Mobile Food Fusion: Using the Power of Mobile Food to Create a New Restaurant Typology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mobile food vending has recently experienced a dramatic resurgence, providing lucrative opportunities for entrepreneurs in a difficult economy. By accessing larger regional networks that engage… (more)

Bohlman, Steven Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

FOOD-ASTRUCTURE: Re-Articulating the Architectural Space of Food Distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract a. Material processes and their catalysts shape urban and exurban morphology. b. Food distribution is an example of a material process. Its catalysts are… (more)

Bartell, Christopher R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Trade My Food | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trade My Food Trade My Food Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trade My Food Agency/Company /Organization: Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: hackerleague.org/hackathons/boston-cleanweb-hackathon/hacks/trade-my-f Country: USA Web Application Link: www.FoodForYouFoodFor.Me Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 42.3490737°, -71.0481764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3490737,"lon":-71.0481764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

252

Food and Beverage Manufacturing Subsectors in Lane County, Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and employment multipliers that indicate that the brewing, flour milling, and a few other select food

Oregon, University of

253

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in More than 80 persons participated in the presentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New book on `Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security in Bolivia' More than 80 persons participated in the presentation of a new book, `InnovaciĂłn TecnolĂłgica, SoberanĂ­a y Seguridad AlimentarĂ­a' (Technological Innovation, Food Sovereignty and Food Security). The book was written by Freddy

Richner, Heinz

254

Numerical Simulation of Injectivity Effects of Mineral Scaling and Clay Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major concern in the development of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths such as those caused by thermally-induced stress cracking. Past analyses of HDR and HFR reservoirs have tended to focus primarily on the coupling between hydrology (flow), heat transfer, and rock mechanics. Recent studies suggest that rock-fluid interactions and associated mineral dissolution and precipitation effects could have a major impact on the long-term performance of HFR reservoirs. The present paper uses recent European studies as a starting point to explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in HFR systems. We examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance by maintaining or even enhancing injectivity. Chemical manipulations considered here include pH modification and dilution with fresh water. We performed coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua), using the non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Results indicate that modifying the injection water chemistry can enhance mineral dissolution and reduce clay swelling. Chemical interactions between rocks and fluids will change a HFR reservoir over time, with some changes favorable and others not. A detailed, quantitative understanding of processes and mechanisms can suggest chemical methods for reservoir management, which may be employed to improve the performance of the geothermal system.

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Novel Anionic Clay Adsorbents for Boiler-Blow Down Waters Reclaim and Reuse  

SciTech Connect

Our goal in this study is to utilize novel anionic clay sorbents for treating and reclaiming/reusing power-plant effluents, in particular, boiler blow-down waters containing heavy metals, such as As and Se. Developing and using novel materials for such application is dictated by the challenge posed by reclaiming and recycling these too-clean-to-clean effluent streams, generated during electricity production, whose contaminant levels are in the ppm/ppb (or even less) trace levels. During the study model blow-down streams have been treated in batch experiments. Adsorption isotherms as a function of pH/temperature have been established for both As and Se. Adsorption rates have also measured as a function of concentration, temperature, pH, and space time. For both the equilibrium and rate measurements, we have studied the As/Se interaction, and competition from background anions. A homogeneous surface diffusion model is used to describe the experimental kinetic data. The estimated diffusivity values are shown to depend on the particle size. On the other hand, a model taking into account the polycrystalline nature of these adsorbent particles, and the presence of an intercrystallite porous region predicts correctly that the surface diffusivity is particle size independent. A mathematical model to describe flow experiments in packed-beds has also been developed during phase I of this project. The goal is to validate this model with flow experiments in packed-beds during the phase II of this project, to determine the adsorption capacity under flow conditions, and to compare it with the capacity estimated from the adsorption isotherms determined from the batch studies.

Muhammad Sahimi; Theodore T. Tsotsis

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 15 Food Uses for Soybean Oil and Alternatives to Trans Fatty Acids in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science &

257

Data Call - Food Community | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Call - Food Community Data Call - Food Community Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Data Call Understanding food, agriculture, and rural issues is a multidisciplinary effort that incorporates natural resources and land use, biological and physical sciences, international commodity and financial market information, social sciences, human health and nutrition, and many other areas. Relevant data collection and compilation of official statistics occur throughout the U.S. government, not just in agencies with an explicit focus on agriculture. With so many different sources of knowledge and widely felt areas of impact, successful data integration and distribution requires making full use of new approaches and technologies.

258

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stabilization traps toxic contaminants (usually both chemically and physically) in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. Typical contaminants are metals (mostly transition metals) that exhibit the characteristic of toxicity. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP-the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC-the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California`s and EPA`s, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens). The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

Bowers, J.S.; Anson, J.R.; Painter, S.M.; Maitino, R.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Hazardous Waste Management Div.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Energy Use In American Food Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dale Pfeiffer (2006, 29) opens the fifth chapter of his book Eating Fossil Fuels with the statement, “Current civilization is founded upon an abundance of cheap energy derived from hydrocarbons.” He presents the natural extension of that premise to food production in the opening of his sixth chapter, “Modern industrial agriculture is unsustainable. It has been pushed to the limit and is in

Michael Minn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Satiating Effects of Rye Foods Hanna Isaksson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= 15 Increased satiety during 120 min (Hlebowicz et al., 2008b) Bread with 80% whole-grain wheat flour., 1998) Bread with 15% pearled barley flour (6 g df) Control: refined wheat bread (0.1 g df) Higher rye foods, compared with iso-caloric refined wheat bread, served as parts of breakfast meals in cross

262

10/1/2010 1 Biotech Foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for new materials and energy sources Develop Crops as production vehicles for medicines and vaccines) ­2000 American Society of Microbiology ­2000 American Medical Association ­2001 US National Research"... states Joel Cohen and colleagues in a brief issued by the International Food Policy Research Institute

Hammock, Bruce D.

263

ORGANICS: YARD TRIMMINGS AND FOOD SCRAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter describes the methodology used in EPA’s Waste Reduction Model (WARM) to estimate streamlined life-cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emission factors for yard trimmings and food scraps beginning at the point of waste generation. The WARM GHG emission factors are used to compare the net emissions associated with these two organic material types in the following three

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Food Safety & Functionality Forum Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryFood Structure & Functionality Forum Division2013 Members116 Members as of July 1, 2013Acevedo, NuriaUniversity of GuelphAmes, IA, USAAdriaenssens, MarkBarry CallebautPennsauken, NJ, USAAimutis, WilliamCargill IncWayzata

265

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lectures Suitable for Food Economy Exhibitions. Apr. 1917.F. C. No. 17: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions forF. C. No. 44: Food Economy Exhibitions: Suggestions as to

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-H members in the level three food project learn about nutrients, foods of different cultures, and careers in the food industry.

Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

1995-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

267

The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

Iyer, Neetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Homeward Bound: Food-Related Transportation Strategies in Low Income and Transit Dependent Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Ad Hoc Food Security ing Home the Broccoli: Innovativeor administrative home for food security planning, includingtheir goods home. broadly, food security approaches. The

Gottlieb, Robert; Fisher, Andrew; Dohan, Marc; O'Connor, Linda; Parks, Virginia

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Hot Food Holding Cabinets to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements Covered Product Categories

270

A center for food, Kowloon City, Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern day living limits us from understanding and seeing where our food comes from and how it was planted, grown, and manufactured. As we become more and more conscious about our diets, our relationship to food is more ...

Chan, Kwan Yue, 1979-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Curbside eating : mobilizing food trucks to activate public space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past 5 years, cities across the United States have seen the rise of a new form of street vending: the modern food truck. Nearly overnight, food trucks have become an expected and anticipated occurrence in many ...

Sheppard, Alison Marguerite

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

trans Fatty acid content of foods in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growing evidence that dietary consumption of trans fatty acid (TFA) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease has made TFA a hot topic among people, food industries, and government officials in China. trans Fatty acid content of foods in China

274

Business plan for the frozen food industry in Morocco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I develop a business plan for a frozen food company (Chiwate) that will operate in Morocco. Until very recently, the frozen food product-line in Morocco was very restricted. However, recent demographic and ...

Miri, Leila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Buffers between grazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sheep and the edge of a food crop was adequate to preventgrazing sheep and leafy crops augment food safety Thedomestic animals and the crop edge is adequate to minimize

Hoar, Bruce R; Atwill, Edward R; Carlton, Lesa; Celis, Jorge; Carabez, Jennifer; Nguyen, Tran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson 4 HEART SMART NUTRITION Prepare Food Right--Ensure It's Light To prepare foods lower in fat Heart Smart? True or False ______ 1. A cholesterol- free product is also fat-free. True or False

277

Dr. Jack A. Stone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Latest Publications. Weak value thermostat with 0.2 mK precision; Performing three dimensional measurements on micro-scale features using a ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

278

NIST Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

279

Stone Test Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... purposes. There are many varieties of the common types used in building, such as marble, limestone, sandstone, and granite. ...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11. Upper Egyptian rhomboid flint knife found at Maadi. (author. ) Figure 12. Flint hippopotamus from Hierakonpolis (lithique In ancient Egypt, flint or chert was used for

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research has barely begun. Handbook of Indian Foods andeffort was remarkable, and his Handbook should be a standard

Sutton, Mark Q

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Sorption and desorption characteristics of a packed bed of clay-CaCl{sub 2} desiccant particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desiccants can be used in conjunction with solar energy to provide a viable alternative to traditional air conditioning techniques. A desiccant consisting of clay and calcium chloride was developed and tested using multiple sorption and desorption cycles. During sorption, inlet air temperatures from 23 to 36 C with corresponding relative humidities of 42-66% were tested. Additionally, superficial air velocities from 0.17 to 0.85 m/s were tested. During desorption, inlet air temperatures from 50 to 57 C and superficial air velocities of approximately 0.30 and 0.60 m/s were tested. A regression equation was determined for the mass of water sorbed by the clay-CaCl2 desiccant with a R{sup 2} value of 0.917. The desorption data was regressed to an exponential function and significant k-values were determined. An equation for pressure drop through the desiccant was determined and compared to existing models. The desiccant was found to perform well during the repeated test cycles though small masses of desiccant were lost due to surface disintegration of the desiccant spheres. (author)

Tretiak, C.S.; Abdallah, N. Ben [Department of Process Engineering and Applied Science, Dalhousie University, P.O. Box 1000, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE/EA-1083; Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (and FONSI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 April 1997 Environmental Assessment and Plan for New Silt/Clay Source Development and Use at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR A NEW SILT/CLAY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT AND USE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY Agency: U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Action: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The DOE-Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing its current silt/clay source and opening as many as three new sources with volumes sufficient to support potential Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) projects through 2005. The current source, Spreading Area B

284

Food web complexity and chaotic population Gregor F. Fussmann1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT Food web complexity and chaotic population dynamics Gregor F. Fussmann1 * and Gerd Heber2 1 their complexity increases. We determined the dynamical stability of a universe of mathematical, nonlinear food web, chaotic dynamics increases with the number of trophic levels in a food web but decreases with the degree

Fussman, Gregor

285

Negotiating food waste: Using a practice lens to inform design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability is becoming of increasing concern to the HCI community, though little focus has been given yet to issues around food waste. Given the environmental impact of food waste, there is potential to make a significant difference. To ... Keywords: Everyday practice, design, food and waste, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer, Geraldine Fitzpatrick, Rob Comber

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Zero emissions systems in the food processing industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The food processing industry is part of an interlinked group of sectors. It plays an important role in the economic development of every country. However, a strongly growing food processing industry greatly magnifies the problems of waste management, ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, food processing industry, pineapple waste, zero emissions system

Uyen Nguyen Ngoc; Hans Schnitzer

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Creating visibility: understanding the design space for food waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support for ecological sustainability is of growing interest and the over-consumption, production and disposal of foods are a major concern for sustainability, ethics and the economy. However, there is a deficit in current understandings of how technologies ... Keywords: food waste, human food interaction, in-home tour, mobile diary, qualitative study, sustainability

Eva Ganglbauer; Geraldine Fitzpatrick; Georg Molzer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Recipe for Reform: The Food Economy Movement in Britain During the First World War  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Food Economy League Handbook for Housewives. 24thThe National Food Fund Handbook for Housewives. 1915. Women,of Food. Food Economy Handbook. Dec. 1917. GD Gt Brit.

Buckley, Michael Dennis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 FOREWORD We are pleased to present the 9th annual Radioactivity in Food and the Environment report, which contains radiological monitoring data for 2003. This report is the second to contain radiological monitoring data from our four agencies, providing a complete picture of the levels of radioactivity found in food and the environment in the UK. The report builds on the success of last year’s report by considering a new methodology of assessing dose to the public for some of the UK’s nuclear sites. This new methodology takes account of all public exposure routes in a realistic way, leading to an improved and more reliable assessment of dose to the public from

Radiological Monitoring; Bamber Bridge; Preston Pr Bx; Castle Place; Erskine Court; Stirling Fk Tr

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Food for fuel: The price of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Geothermal demonstration: Zunil food dehydration facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A food dehydration facility was constructed near the town of Zunil, Guatemala, to demonstrate the use of geothermal energy for industrial applications. The facility, with some modifications to the design, was found to work quite satisfactorily. Tests using five different products were completed during the time geothermal energy was used in the plant. During the time the plant was not able to use geothermal energy, a temporary diesel-fueled boiler provided the energy to test dehydration on seven other crops available in this area. The system demonstrates that geothermal heat can be used successfully for dehydrating food products. Many other industrial applications of geothermal energy could be considered for Zunil since a considerable amount of moderate-temperature heat will become available when the planned geothermal electrical facility is constructed there. 6 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Maldonado, O. (Consultecnia, Guatemala City (Guatemala)); Altseimer, J.; Thayer, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cooper, L. (Energy Associates International, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Caicedo, A. (Unidad de Desarrollo Geotermico, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Inst. Nacional de Electrificacion)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EI Summary of SIC 32  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the form of stone, clay, and sand. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy Electricity Manufacturing Floorspace Prices Energy Storage...

293

Food Applications List | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food Applications List Food Applications List Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture Apps & Maps This page highlights apps and websites for Food, Agriculture, and Rural community. Showing 1 - 25 of 48 results. Resources sort ascending Type Last Updated On Web Soil Survey Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. Agriculture 04/28/2013 VegScape This U.S. vegetative crop condition tool provides satellite-based U.S. crop condition vegetation assessment and monitoring web service; provides data exploration and visualization tools; delivers public dissemination of NASS geospatial vegetation condition; and decision support tools providing open quantitative access, interactive visualization, web based data dissemination, and geospatial queries. Agriculture 05/17/2013

294

A Look at Food Service Buildings - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Service Food Service Home: A Look at CBECS Building Activities How large are they? How many employees are there? Where are they located? How old are they? Who owns and occupies them? How do they use energy and how much does it cost? How do they use electricity? How do they use natural gas? What types of equipment do they use? How do they measure up on conservation efforts? Summary Comparison Table (All Activities) FOOD SERVICE BUILDINGS There were an estimated 285,000 food service buildings in the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), food service buildings are those used for the preparation and sale of food and beverages for consumption; they include buildings such as fast food establishments, full service restaurants, caterers, cafeterias, diners, and bars.

295

Notice of Intent for the Construction and Operation of the Proposed Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project, South Dakota and Minnesota (5/27/05)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 16 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 102 / Friday, May 27, 2005 / Notices Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Note that also there is an ''eSubscription'' link on the web site that enables subscribers to receive e- mail notification when a document is added to a subscribed docket(s). For assistance with any FERC Online service, please e-mail FERCOnlineSupport@ferc.gov, or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: June 9, 2005. Magalie R. Salas, Secretary. [FR Doc. E5-2702 Filed 5-26-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Construction and Operation of the Proposed Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project, South Dakota and Minnesota

296

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Rhizosphere Effects on Cesium Fixation Sites of Soil Containing Micaceous Clays Laura A. Wendling,* James B) on rhizosphere soil as compared with bulk soil. This study The strongest association between Cs and the soil

Flury, Markus

297

Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Award Review Analysis of Food Allergen Structures and Development of Foods for Allergic Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food allergy is one of the important health problems, and countermeasures are socially required. We have been undertaking studies on wheat allergens and their epitopes, and have developed a method for producing hypoallergenic wheat flour by enzymatic modification. The hypoallergenic products are now provided to patients. More noteworthy, by taking hypoallergenic cupcakes over a long period, more than half of patients are hyposensitized and become able to eat normal wheat products. This suggests that the hypoallergenic wheat flour can act as anti-allergenic via allergen-specific immunotolerance. This series of studies was followed by expansive research on food allergy: analysis of epitopes of bovine serum albumin (the major beef allergen), isolation and identification of inhibitory peptides for allergen absorption at the intestine, evaluation of hesperetin as an inhibitor of degranulation of mast cells, and the development of PCR detection methods for verifying allergen labeling and for identifying hidden allergic ingredients in processed foods. Key words: food allergy; epitope; hypoallergenic wheat flour; allergen permeation; Caco-2 The worldwide prevalence of allergic diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis has increased during the last two decades, 1) and it is assumed that in Japan more than one-third of the population is now suffering from at least one of these diseases. Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Hen’s egg, 2) cow’s milk, 3) wheat 4) and peanuts 5) are generally known allergens for food-allergic patients. Allergens are proteins characterized by their ability to induce a pathogenic IgE response in susceptible individuals, giving rise to asthma, atopic dermatitis, and rhinitis. Although the reasons that certain individuals suffer particular hypersensitivities are unclear, there is evidence that both genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility. 6)

Soichi Tanabe

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We investigate the health consequences of changes in the supply of fast food using the exact geographical location of fast food restaurants. Specifically, we ask how the supply of fast food affects the obesity rates of 3 million school children and the weight gain of over 1 million pregnant women. We find that among 9 th grade children, a fast food restaurant within a tenth of a mile of a school is associated with at least a 5.2 percent increase in obesity rates. There is no discernable effect at.25 miles and at.5 miles. Among pregnant women, models with mother fixed effects indicate that a fast food restaurant within a half mile of her residence results in a 2.5 percent increase in the probability of gaining over 20 kilos. The effect is larger, but less precisely estimated at.1 miles. In contrast, the presence of non-fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with obesity and weight gain. Moreover, proximity to future fast food restaurants is uncorrelated with current obesity and weight gain, conditional on current proximity to fast food. The implied effects of fast-food on caloric intake are at least one order of magnitude smaller for mothers, which suggests that they are less constrained by travel costs than school children. Our results imply that policies restricting access to fast food near schools could

Janet Currie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Bioenergy and Food Security Criteria and Indicators (BEFSCI) Website Focus Area: Other Biofuels Topics: Training Material Website: www.fao.org/bioenergy/foodsecurity/befsci/en/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/bioenergy-and-food-security-criteria- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This website-created by the Bioenergy and food Security project of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)-provides policymakers and practitioners a set of criteria, indicators, good practices, and policy options for sustainable bioenergy production to

302

Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production  

SciTech Connect

Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

UPDATE July 2012 | The Food Crises: The US Drought  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent droughts in the midwestern United States threaten to cause global catastrophe driven by a speculator amplified food price bubble. Here we show the effect of speculators on food prices using a validated quantitative model that accurately describes historical food prices. During the last six years, high and fluctuating food prices have lead to widespread hunger and social unrest. While a relative dip in food prices occurred during the spring of 2012, a massive drought in the American Midwest in June and July threatens to trigger another crisis. In a previous paper, we constructed a model that quantitatively agreed with food prices and demonstrated that, while the behavior could not be explained by supply and demand economics, it could be parsimoniously and accurately described by a model which included both the conversion of corn into ethanol and speculator trend following. An update to the original paper in February 2012 demonstrated that the model previously published was predictive of the ongoing pric...

Lagi, Marco; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fast food in a Chinese provincial city: a comparative analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More than a decade ago American fast food entered the Chinese market. Since then the number of fast food and organized chain restaurants in China has multiplied. Chinese consumers, especially those who live in large urban areas, have accepted Western-style fast food restaurants that serve French fries and other popular dishes as a way of life. Inspired by the success of the symbolism of McDonald's and KFC, many Chinese restaurants have tried to use traditional Chinese culture to lure customers into what is advertised as indigenous, modern fast food outlets. Recently some Chinese fast food entrepreneurs have successfully developed local versions of the Western fast food system. Based on my three months� ethnographic research in Huai�an, I address the competitive situation between American fast food restaurants and local Chinese restaurants by examining service, price, management, food, and customer expectations. Specifically, this case analysis includes one of the largest American fast food chains and one of the largest Chinese fast food restaurant chains. The data are based on participant observation, informal and formal interviews, a sample survey, and historical documents. The study finds that in Huai�an, one local Chinese fast food restaurant, after improving décor, hygiene and service, has experienced increasing success in the local market. I show that the globalization process has experienced two types of localization in Huai�an. First, Western chains have striven to adapt to the consumers in Huai�an, by insisting on a high degree of local ownership and by modestly tailoring their products to local taste. Second, the mere presence of these Western chains has encouraged Chinese entrepreneurs to develop decidedly local versions of modern fast food enterprises.

Zhu, Haiying

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30 X 30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30 X 30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the mitigation of predicted global climate change. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Grosshans, Raymond R.; Kostelnik, Kevin, M.; Jacobson, Jacob J.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Biomass Program recently implemented the Biofuels Initiative, or 30x30 program, with the dual goal of reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil by making cellulosic ethanol cost competitive with gasoline by 2012 and by replacing 30 percent of gasoline consumption with biofuels by 2030. Experience to date with increasing ethanol production suggests that it distorts agricultural markets and therefore raises concerns about the sustainability of the DOE 30x30 effort: Can the U.S. agricultural system produce sufficient feedstocks for biofuel production and meet the food price and availability expectations of American consumers without causing environmental degradation that would curtail the production of both food and fuel? Efforts are underway to develop computer-based modeling tools that address this concern and support the DOE 30x30 goals. Beyond technical agronomic and economic concerns, however, such models must account for the publics’ growing interest in sustainable agriculture and in the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This paper discusses ongoing work at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies that investigates the potential consequences and long-term sustainability of projected biomass harvests by identifying and incorporating “sustainable harvest indicators” in a computer modeling strategy.

Raymond R. Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jacob J. Jacobson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

NIST, Food Marketing Institute Co-Host Webinar on Ensuring ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST, Food Marketing Institute Co-Host Webinar on Ensuring Accurate Net Weights in Retail. From NIST Tech Beat: March 1, 2011. ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Food Machinery and Chemical...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Letter; Barr, Jr. to Ardis; Subject: Wisconsin Nitrogen Fixation Process; September 9, 1954 WV.04-3 - MemorandumChecklist; Williams to File; Subject: Food Machinery Corps; June...

309

Avista Utilities (Gas and Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through electric food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates...

310

Avista Utilities (Gas & Electric)- Commercial Food Equipment Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Avista Utilities offers incentives to customers who improve efficiency through food service equipment retrofits. A variety of cooking and refrigeration equipment are eligible for rebates through...

311

Food Safety/Nutrition/Cosmetics Programs and Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 03/15/2013 The US agricultural system is a major exporter of raw materials such as grain and finished foods. A large part ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Teaming Profile - McCain Foods and Gardner Denver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ID 83318 Business: Air Compressor Manufacturing Business: Food Processing Tom Beck Jordan Green Product Specialist Engineering Manager Phone: 217-231-5842 Phone: 630-857-4938...

313

Developer Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector + A Synthesis of Agricultural Policies in...

314

Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-off  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. 2008. Income distribution implica- tions of biofuels.Sustainable Biofuels and Human Security Conference,of Food and Agriculture 2008: Biofuels: Prospects, risks and

Rajagapol, Deepak; Sexton, Steven; Hochman, Gal; Roland-Holst, David; Zilberman, David D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

UNDERSTANDING THE LINK BETWEEN ETHANOL PRODUCTION AND FOOD PRICES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food prices have increased rapidly in recent years, and so has ethanol consumption. Some studies have claimed that there is a connection between those two.… (more)

Monteiro, Nathalia Ferreira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biofuels and Food Security. A report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 2011, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) recommended a ''review of biofuels policies -- where applicable and if necessary -- according to balanced science-based assessments of the opportunities and challenges that they may represent for food security so that biofuels can be produced where it is socially, economically and environmentally feasible to do so''. In line with this, the CFS requested the HLPE (High Level Panel of Experts) to ''conduct a science-based comparative literature analysis taking into consideration the work produced by the FAO and Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) of the positive and negative effects of biofuels on food security''. Recommendations from the report include the following. Food security policies and biofuel policies cannot be separated because they mutually interact. Food security and the right to food should be priority concerns in the design of any biofuel policy. Governments should adopt the principle: biofuels shall not compromise food security and therefore should be managed so that food access or the resources necessary for the production of food, principally land, biodiversity, water and labour are not put at risk. The CFS should undertake action to ensure that this principle is operable in the very varied contexts in which all countries find themselves. Given the trend to the emergence of a global biofuels market, and a context moving from policy-driven to market-driven biofuels, there is an urgent need for close and pro-active coordination of food security, biofuel/bioenergy policies and energy policies, at national and international levels, as well as rapid response mechanisms in case of crisis. There is also an urgent need to create an enabling, responsible climate for food and non-food investments compatible with food security. The HLPE recommends that governments adopt a coordinated food security and energy security strategy, which would require articulation around the following five axes/dimensions: Adapt to the change to global, market-driven dynamics; Address the land, water and resource implications of biofuel policies; Foster the transition from biofuels to comprehensive food-energy policies; Promote research and development; and, Develop methods and guidelines for coordinated food, Biofuels, and bio-energy policies at national and international levels.

NONE

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biofuels and Food Security. A report by the High Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition  

SciTech Connect

In October 2011, the UN Committee on World Food Security (CFS) recommended a ''review of biofuels policies -- where applicable and if necessary -- according to balanced science-based assessments of the opportunities and challenges that they may represent for food security so that biofuels can be produced where it is socially, economically and environmentally feasible to do so''. In line with this, the CFS requested the HLPE (High Level Panel of Experts) to ''conduct a science-based comparative literature analysis taking into consideration the work produced by the FAO and Global Bioenergy Partnership (GBEP) of the positive and negative effects of biofuels on food security''. Recommendations from the report include the following. Food security policies and biofuel policies cannot be separated because they mutually interact. Food security and the right to food should be priority concerns in the design of any biofuel policy. Governments should adopt the principle: biofuels shall not compromise food security and therefore should be managed so that food access or the resources necessary for the production of food, principally land, biodiversity, water and labour are not put at risk. The CFS should undertake action to ensure that this principle is operable in the very varied contexts in which all countries find themselves. Given the trend to the emergence of a global biofuels market, and a context moving from policy-driven to market-driven biofuels, there is an urgent need for close and pro-active coordination of food security, biofuel/bioenergy policies and energy policies, at national and international levels, as well as rapid response mechanisms in case of crisis. There is also an urgent need to create an enabling, responsible climate for food and non-food investments compatible with food security. The HLPE recommends that governments adopt a coordinated food security and energy security strategy, which would require articulation around the following five axes/dimensions: Adapt to the change to global, market-driven dynamics; Address the land, water and resource implications of biofuel policies; Foster the transition from biofuels to comprehensive food-energy policies; Promote research and development; and, Develop methods and guidelines for coordinated food, Biofuels, and bio-energy policies at national and international levels.

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Molecular dynamics simulation of complex molecules at interfaces: dendritic surfactants in clay and amyloid peptides near lipid bilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique to complex molecules at interfaces. Partitioning of dendritic surfactants into clay gallery and Ab protein behavior near hydrated lipids are chosen for the purpose. Using a full atomistic model of dendritic surfactants, the confinement force profiles featuring oscillatory fashion at moderate layer separation of 10 to 25 Ĺ were observed. Integration of the confinement forces led to free energy profiles, which, in turn, were used to determine the final morphology of the nanocomposite. From the free energy profiles, smaller and linear surfactants (G1 and G2L) are expected to intercalate into the clay comfortably, while larger surfactants (G2 and G3) are expected to form frustrated intercalated structures due to the location and depth of the free energy minima. This would agree with the previous observations. As primary steps to understand the Ab protein behavior under biological conditions, simulations of bulk water and hydrated lipids were performed and the results were compared with the literature. Hydrated lipids were simulated using a full atomistic model of lipids (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine) and water with a cvff force-field and it was found that structural properties such as the molecular head group area and membrane thickness were accurately produced with MD simulation. Systems of the protein Ab(1-42) in bulk water were simulated and some secondary structural change, with loss of part of the a-helical structure, occurred during the 1 ns of simulation time at 323K. The fragment Ab(31-42) with b-sheet conformation was also simulated in bulk water, and the extended b-sheet structure became a bent structure. Simulations of Ab(1- 42) or Ab(31-42) near lipid bilayers have been performed to investigate the structural property changes under biological conditions. The different nature of structural change was observed from the simulations of the protein or fragment in water and near lipid bilayers due to the different solvent environment. The protein has close contacts with the membrane surface. It was impossible to observe the conformational change to b-sheet and protein entrance into the lipid bilayer within 1 ns simulations.

Han, Kunwoo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Oilseeds: at the center of food, water, and energy security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readers have indicated the sustainable use of food, water, and energy by the world’s growing population will be the most pressing challenge. Here, inform explores the interrelatedness of these critical resources. Oilseeds: at the center of food, water, and

320

For a Few Cents More: Why Supersize Unhealthy Food?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Health-care experts believe that increases in portion sizes served by food vendors contribute to the obesity epidemic. This paper shows that food vendors can profit handsomely by using supersizing strategies where regular portion sizes are priced sufficiently ... Keywords: moderating policies, obesity, overeating, pricing, public policy, self-control, social responsibility, supersizing, temptation

Paul W. Dobson; Eitan Gerstner

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - Lipid_Food_Chemistry_Proctor.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FDSC 6133 Food Lipid Chemistry Instructor: Dr. A. Proctor Room N204. Department of Food Science Phone: 575-2980 E mail: aproctor@uark.edu Time/Place: Mon/Wed/Fri 8.15-9.05am FDSC N221 Texts:

322

The Food Crises: A quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent increases in basic food prices are severely impacting vulnerable populations worldwide. Proposed causes such as shortages of grain due to adverse weather, increasing meat consumption in China and India, conversion of corn to ethanol in the US, and investor speculation on commodity markets lead to widely differing implications for policy. A lack of clarity about which factors are responsible reinforces policy inaction. Here, for the first time, we construct a dynamic model that quantitatively agrees with food prices. The results show that the dominant causes of price increases are investor speculation and ethanol conversion. Models that just treat supply and demand are not consistent with the actual price dynamics. The two sharp peaks in 2007/2008 and 2010/2011 are specifically due to investor speculation, while an underlying upward trend is due to increasing demand from ethanol conversion. The model includes investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take ad...

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for Industry Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for Industry February 17, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis PORTLAND, OR - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Northwest Food Processors Association today set ambitious goals to reduce energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial sector. DOE Industrial Technologies Program Manager Douglas Kaempf and Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA) President David Zepponi signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) announcing an industry-wide target of reducing energy intensity (energy use per unit of output) by 25 percent over the next ten years. This aggressive goal demonstrates the continued leadership of the Northwest region and the

324

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy November 1, 2013 - 1:28pm Addthis Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 1.4 billion pounds of pumpkins are produced in the U.S. each year, many of which end up in landfills or compost piles after Halloween. Oakland's EBMUD collects food waste and uses microbes to convert it into methane gas that is burned to generate electricity. The Energy Department is helping to fund the development of integrated biorefineries, industrial centers dedicated to converting plant material into biofuels and other products. To commemorate National Energy Action Month, we're featuring some scarily

325

Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate-Smart Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Climate Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Adaptation, Finance, Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Website: www.fao.org/docrep/013/i1881e/i1881e00.htm References: "Climate-Smart" Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food Security, Adaptation and Mitigation [1] Scope "Agriculture in developing countries must undergo a significant transformation in order to meet the related challenges of achieving food security and responding to climate change. Projections based on population

326

EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening EM's Portsmouth Site Donations Lead to Food Pantry Reopening September 6, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Community Action Committee Senior/Social/Transit Assistant Program Director Pamela Crawford unloads pantry donations from EM’s Portsmouth site employees. | Photos courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. Community Action Committee Senior/Social/Transit Assistant Program Director Pamela Crawford unloads pantry donations from EM's Portsmouth site employees. | Photos courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. It took two trucks and a van to transport the food items to the pantry in the Aug. 27 drop-off. It took two trucks and a van to transport the food items to the pantry in

327

REFRIGERATIONREFRIGERATION ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E 2010 #6424503 E 2010 #6 --rzrz 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and quality of life, population growth, consumption Cooling and freezing of food gives important alternatives 6. Food cooling and freezing6. Food cooling and freezingg f gg f g Ron Zevenhoven Ă?Ă?bo Akademi, , nutricity, change taste, etc. Special considerations in food freezing and cooling are, for l h f i d bl i

Zevenhoven, Ron

328

Evaluation of past and future alterations in tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, based on the clay mineralogy of drill cores USW G-1, G-2, and G-3  

SciTech Connect

The tuffs at Yucca Mountain in south-central Nevada are being studied by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to determine their suitability for a high-level radioactive waste repository. For predictive purposes, it is important to understand the alteration history of Yucca Mountain and to know how the minerals in Yucca Mountain tuffs respond to changing conditions such as elevated temperatures. The clay mineralogy of these tuffs has been examined using x-ray powder diffraction, and approximation temperatures of alteration have been determined using available clay mineral data and fluid inclusion analyses. Also, several illites from drill holes USW G-1 and G-2 have been dated using K/Ar techniques, yielding ages of about 11 Myr. The clay mineral in Yucca Mountain tuffs are predominantly interstratified illite/smectites, with minor amounts of chloride, kaolinite, and interstratified chlorite/smectite at depth in USW G-1 and G-2. The reactions observed for these illite/smectites are similar to those observed in pelitic rocks. With depths, the illite/smectites transform from random interstratifications (R = 0) through ordered intermediates (R = 1) to illite in USW G-2 and to Kalkberg (R {ge} 3) interstratifications in USW G-1. The illite/smectites in USW G-3 have not significantly transformed. It appears that the illites in deeper rock results from hydrothermal and diagenetic reactions of earlier-formed smectites. These data demonstrate that the rocks at depth in the northern end of Yucca Mountain were significantly altered about 11 Myr ago. Both clay mineralogy and fluid inclusions suggest that the rocks at depth in USW G-2 have been subjected to postdepositional temperatures of at least 275{degree}C, those in USW G-1 have reached 200{degree}C, and USW G-3 rocks probably have not exceeded 100{degree}C. 64 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Bish, D.L.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Measuring availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive in-store survey may capture the availability of healthful food alternatives in different store types in two rural counties. The purpose of this study was to: (1) compare the availability of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties; and (2) compare the variety of healthful foods in two rural Texas counties. This study also acts as a pilot test for further food availability research in four other rural counties of the Brazos Valley. An unobtrusive, observational survey was used to measure availability of healthful food in all (100%) grocery, convenience, and discount stores (n=44) in two rural counties in the Brazos Valley of Texas. Results from the surveys indicated that availability of healthful food alternatives varied greatly among the three different store types and two counties surveyed. Grocery stores (n=7) were more likely than convenience (n=31) and discount (n=6) stores to offer fresh fruits and vegetables, leanmeat options, and low-fat/skim milk products. Fresh fruits and vegetables were available in 100% of grocery stores. Only 16.1% of convenience stores, compared with 0.0% in discount stores, offered fresh fruits and vegetables. Variety of fruits and vegetables varied greatly among the three different store types and the two counties surveyed. Findings suggest that the survey utilized was feasible in determining the availability of healthful food items in two rural counties. Implications of this study include the need for knowledge and awareness of rural consumers and rural food supply. Furthermore, nutrition education for rural consumers and those purchasing foods provided to rural areas is desired. This study provided that further investigation into the availability of healthful foods in rural areas is needed.

Bustillos, Brenda Diane

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Programmatic environmental assessment of the DOE Solar Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program's potential environmental impacts are evaluated to ensure that environmental issues are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process. The existing environment is studied for the following: grain drying; crop drying; livestock shelter heating; food processing; textile products; lumber and wood products; paper products; chemicals; petroleum refining; stone, clay, and glass products; and primary metals industries. Environmental impacts of the proposed action on the following are studied: air quality, water quality, ecosystems, health and safety, land use, esthetics, and social and institutional impacts. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy conservation: industry. 1964-June, 1980 (citations from the ntis data base). Report for 1964-June, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Potential methods of conserving energy, including fuel and materials substitutions, are considered for various industries. Many abstracts deal with reports that also cover processes used, amount of energy consumed, and environmental considerations of energy conserving options. Industries covered include food, paper, chemical, cement, metals, petroleum refining, contract construction, synthetic rubber, plastics, drug manufacturing, and stone, clay, and glass. Energy conservation through the use of waste heat is covered in a related Published Search entitled Waste Heat Utilization. (This updated bibliography contains 335 citations, 37 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Hundemann, A.S.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Energy conservation: industry (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1964-May 1979  

SciTech Connect

Potential methods of conserving energy, including fuel and materials substitutions, are considered for various industries. Many abstracts deal with reports that also cover processes used, amount of energy consumed, and environmental considerations of energy conserving options. Industries covered include food, paper, chemical, cement, metals, petroleum refining, contract construction, synthetic rubber, plastics, drug manufacturing, and stone, clay, and glass. Energy conservation through the use of waste heat is covered in a related Published Search entitled Waste Heat Utilization. The updated bibliography contains 298 abstracts, 74 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

Hundemann, A.S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

{sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix  

SciTech Connect

Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

Hartzell, C.J. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

1994-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

A test program to determine the structural properties of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry walls at the DOE Oak Ridge plants  

SciTech Connect

A recent Department of Energy (DOE) General Design Criteria'' has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and safety of both new and existing facilities to natural phenomenon hazards. Many of the buildings at the DOE Oak Ridge facilities are constructed with unreinforced masonry hollow clay tile infill walls -- in some cases these walls comprise a substantial part of the lateral force resistance for a building. In order to perform a realistic assessment of the strength of the buildings to seismic events it is important to accurately predict the behavior of these walls. Very little information is currently available on hollow clay tile masonry, its structural properties and behavior. As the in-situ condition of these walls throughout the plants is suspect due to their age and exposure to numerous chemicals, a test program was initiated at the Oak Ridge plants to obtain material properties for use in the natural phenomena hazards analysis. This paper presents the preliminary results of that testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar bed shear strength, (2) compression strength, (3) splitting tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels which had been removed from existing walls. The testing program is ongoing, is being expanded, and will include not only in-plane tests, but out-of-plane bending testing as well. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 5 Soy Flour: Varieties, Processing, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 5 Soy Flour: Varieties, Processing, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

336

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle)Chapter 8 Fat as, or in, Food  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils Handbook (Nahrungsfette und Öle) Chapter 8 Fat as, or in, Food Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

337

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd EditionChapter 20 Oil in Water Foods: Mayonnaise and Salad Dressing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diacylglycerol Oil, 2nd Edition Chapter 20 Oil in Water Foods: Mayonnaise and Salad Dressing Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry   D

338

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 8 Labeling of Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 8 Labeling of Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 8 Labeli

339

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 1 Trans Fatty Acid Effects on Cardiovascular Disease Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 7D1218959FAE1721B6FEA28

340

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 5 Ruminant Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 5 Ruminant Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 6 Consumption of Trans Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 6 Consumption of Trans Fatty Acids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of

342

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 2 Trans Fats and Cancer Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 2

343

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 3 Safety and Efficacy of CLA Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapt

344

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 10 Fried Foods and Their Interaction with Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 10 Fried Foods and Their Interaction with Packaging Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloa

345

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 6 Soy Protein Concentrate: Technology, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 6 Soy Protein Concentrate: Technology, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

346

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

347

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 7 Isolated Soy Protein: Technology, Properties, and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 7 Isolated Soy Protein: Technology, Properties, and Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Pre

348

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 13 Soy Sauce as Natural Seasoning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 13 Soy Sauce as Natural Seasoning Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

349

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 14 Food Use of Whole Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

350

The Food Safety Knowledge Level of Certified Food Managers Who Attended Two Self-Selected Training Courses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The foodservice industry is dependent on millions of employees daily to ensure proper and safe food handling of food products consumed by the general public. The State of Texas requires food establishments’ management or person in charge be trained in food protection. For this inquiry, the researcher studied the knowledge level gained by food mangers from two food companies and two certification courses. There were 90 food service operations that participated in the study. The data was collected through the use of a food safety knowledge test instrument. The scope of the study was to explore the level of food safety knowledge of two self-selected certified food managers in Texas. Sixty-five percent (65.6%) of the certified food managers were certified by course A and 34.4% were certified by course B. The researcher explored two educational theories that are often utilized in the agricultural education discipline. Adult education and training programs in agriculture should use appropriate and effective instructional methods. Creswell and Martin (1993) inferred a linkage between adult education and instructional design as it related to agriculture. This study explored the phenomenon regarding certified food manager training courses and knowledge level through certification. In agricultural education, lives are affected through education and training. Trede and Wade (1993) suggested that agricultural education helps people improve their lives through an educational process using scientific knowledge. The participants’ knowledge test scores were as follows: course A (n=59) 72.9% and course B (n=31) 69.0%. The resulting t-test was determined to the knowledge test score of course A and course B, and proved not to be statistically significant at an alpha level .05. Thus, the researcher concluded instructional design and adult learning theory did not have an impact on the knowledge level of participants as a result of the two self-selected courses for certified food manager training in this study. Food safety knowledge of participants who spoke English or Korean as their native languages were analyzed closely as they represented the largest population of the participants. Korean as a native language represented the largest group at 45.6% of the population. English as a native language represented the second largest group at 43.3% of the population. Certified Food Manager Training is offered in these languages throughout Texas. Differences were found within the participants’ native or first languages. The certified food managers who identified as English and Korean native or first language resulted a statistically significant comparison when analyzed via independent t-test. The researcher recommends further research on affects of native language on certified food manager training. This research study discusses potential improvements that may be implemented in future research for certified food management training. The scope of this study utilized two self selected courses that were available to the participating certified food managers. For example, the Food Safety Knowledge Test instrument which was developed specifically for the scope of this research. Although this instrument was only used once it served as a suitable tool for this research project and could serve as a guide for the development of future research instruments. The researcher suggests that future researchers consider utilizing a tested and established research instrument. A study with a broader scope including courses supported by other National and State level accreditation organization as well as increasing the number of participant; may yield additional findings.

Payton, Larry Sean

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A Theoretical Study of the Interactions of In+ and In+3 with a Stone-Wales Defect Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental techniques [1] have demonstrated the controllable, reversible and mass transport exchange of indium nanocrystals along surfaces of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). In particular, at certain sites robust nucleation occurs suggesting preferred locations for controlled manipulation. We believe these site locations represent structural defects, like rehybridization, incomplete bonding and topological defects within the carbon network. Although minute, these defects can drastically modify the electrical, chemical and mechanical properties of CNTs. This study was devoted to understand the role of structural defects, specifically a Stone-Wales (SW) defect in the surface transport and interaction properties of the In{sup +1} and In{sup +3} for both the singlet and triplet state. The effects of CNT surface curvature on In+1 and In{sup +3} is also studied and compared to graphite. Geometries of complexes were optimized at the B3LYP level. The standard 6-31G(d) basis set was used for carbon and hydrogen atoms while an effective core potential (ECP) was used for indium. All calculations were performed using the Gaussian 03 suite of programs. The computed Mulliken charges and HOMOLUMO gap energies, interactions and interaction energy (corrected by the basis set superposition error) of the systems have been studied and will be discussed. Figure 1 represents the comparison of the molecular electrostatic potential maps for (a) In{sup +} and (b) In{sup +3} with a SW defect CNT.

Simeon, T; Balasubramanian, K; Leszczynski, J

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Use of Ozone as an Antimicrobial Agent: Agricultural and Food Processing Technical Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ozone treatment, a highly effective disinfectant long used in Europe, deactivates even the most stubborn organisms. Food processors can use ozone to disinfect raw fruits and vegetables during processing or to disinfect water used for washing foods and food plant equipment. Food researchers and regulators have confirmed ozone as safe. In 1997, EPRI convened an expert panel that submitted a Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) affirmation of ozone in food applications to the U.S. Food and Drug Administratio...

2001-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Use of cooling-temperature heat for sustainable food production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food production and energy are undoubtedly interlinked. However, at present food production depends almost exclusively on direct use of stored energy sources, may they be nuclear-, petroleum- or bio-based. Furthermore, non-storage based “renewable” energy systems, like wind and solar, need development before bering able to contribute at a significant level. This presentation will point towards surplus heat as a way to bridge the gap between today’s food systems and truly sustainable ones, suitable to be performed in urban and peri-urban areas. Considering that arable land and fresh water resources are the base for our present food systems, but are limited, in combination with continued urbanisation, such solutions are urgently needed. By combining the use of surplus energy with harvest of society’s organic side flows, like e.g. food waste and aquatic based cash crops, truly sustainable and urban close food systems are possible at a level of significance also for global food security.

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food for Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens inwell documented, the social impact of urban and communityunderstanding of their social impact. Introduction Food and

Flachs, Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Investigating Opportunities to Strengthen the Local Food System in South Eastern Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2004, a local food system report, entitled Toward a Sustainable Food System: Assessment and Action Plan for Localization in Washtenaw County, Michigan, was released… (more)

Buck, Karl; Kaminski, Laura; Stockmann, Deirdra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Memorandum on Land Use Change and the Global Food System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The LUC (Land Use Change) term in an LCA assessment of a biofuel’s global warming effect (GW), while superposable for small excursions, is not independent of other events in the global food system. In particular, the GW effect of biofuel use resulting from remote land use change mediated by global grain markets is probably larger to the extent that food supplies are under pressure from whatever other causes. Fuel use of any inputs to food production, especially land, unambiguously causes an increase in food prices relative to what they would otherwise be as long as the demand curve for food slopes upward to the left. Limited opportunities do exist for what are termed ‘pro-poor ’ land use strategies; namely positve, synergestic, interactions of biofuel production and food availability. An example from Africa is included in this memo. Past experience with the ‘Green Revolution ’ of agricultural intensification suggests, however, that the chance to improve the sitation of the global poor can be exceedingly difficult to implement. Discussion Current analysis of the global warming (GW) effect resulting from the substitution of biofuels for petroleum recognizes that land use change (LUC) remote in space (and possibly time) induced by competition with food consumption for biofeedstocks may be large, and that the carbon releases from these changes may not only reduce the GW advantage of [some] biofuels over petroleum but actually reverse it. The discussion has been especially influenced by two recent journal articles (Fargione, Hill, Tilman, Polasky, & Hawthorne, 2008; Searchinger et al., 2007). Because LUC is ‘caused ’ directly by price changes for food crops, discussion of policy implications, including especially discussion in the popular press (for example, (Garber, 2008)), has noted the rapid worldwide increase in food prices, especially grains, over the past two or three years. A good part of that discussion comprises contradictory assertions about whether the increase in US corn ethanol production is responsible for the increases, part of them, or very little. Other

Richard Rhoda; Daniel Kammen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Resource Conservation in Snack Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frito-Lay, Inc., the world's largest salty snack food company, operates 39 manufacturing facilities in the U.S. and Canada. Operations in these facilities require substantial amounts of energy and water. In the past, these resources have been perceived as "free" by the manufacturing function. This perception, and the resulting practices, has resulted in significant opportunity for resource conservation. This paper describes Frito-Lay's Resource Conservation program, which is a nation-wide productivity effort aimed at reducing the consumption and cost of electrical energy, fuels, water, and nitrogen. Key elements of the program include Resource Conservation "opportunity" audits, benchmarking, implementation of "no debate" operating practices, performance tracking and reporting, awareness training, "strike-team" audits for under-performing facilities, and integration into the existing "Green Team" environmental management system. The program has driven real improvement in the awareness of environmental and resource conservation concerns among manufacturing associates as well as substantial reduction in our consumption of water and energy resources.

Perry, L. E.; Meyers, G. R.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Corn fiber hulls as a food additive or animal feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a novel animal feed or food additive that may be made from thermochemically hydrolyzed, solvent-extracted corn fiber hulls. The animal feed or food additive may be made, for instance, by thermochemically treating corn fiber hulls to hydrolyze and solubilize the hemicellulose and starch present in the corn fiber hulls to oligosaccharides. The residue may be extracted with a solvent to separate the oil from the corn fiber, leaving a solid residue that may be prepared, for instance by aggolmerating, and sold as a food additive or an animal feed.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IN); Cecava, Michael J. (Decatur, IN); Doane, Perry H. (Decatur, IN)

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

food face-off | National food face-off | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative food face-off Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative holds a Feds Feeds Family face-off

360

Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hot Food Holding Cabinets Hot Food Holding Cabinets Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets October 7, 2013 - 11:08am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying the label, check the qualified products lists maintained on the ENERGY STAR website. This product category overview covers the following: Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Global Water Availability and Requirements for Future Food Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares, spatially explicitly and at global scale, per capita water availability and water requirements for food production presently (1971–2000) and in the future given climate and population change (2070–99). A vegetation and ...

D. Gerten; J. Heinke; H. Hoff; H. Biemans; M. Fader; K. Waha

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Biocatalysis and Biotechnology for Functional Foods and Industrial Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divided into two sections, this book covers the latest applications for enzyme catalysis, biotransformation, bioconversion, fermentation, genetic engineering, and product recove Biocatalysis and Biotechnology for Functional Foods and Industrial Products H

363

Removing Odors from Refrigerators and Freezers after Food has Spoiled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If food has spoiled in a refrigerator or freezer because of a power outage or some other reason, undesirable odors can result. This publication explains how to eliminate odors from these appliances.

FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Geothermal Food Processors Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Fernley, Nevada Coordinates 39.6079683°, -119.2518349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

365

Reinventing Africa into a Global Supplier of Food Goods: An Analysis of Agri-business Development, Sustainability, Supply Chain Integration and Export in Developing Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wholesalers - Food manufacturers, processors and retailers Selling and Trading - Food and beverage manufacturers - Packaging firms - Biofuel

Chisholm, Lisa M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

One thousand friends of food : strategies for the implementation of local food policy in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an exploration into how New York City can incorporate local food system planning into their existing sustainability program by capitalizing on recent energy and grassroots initiatives. I argue for the ...

Morris, Deborah Helaine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

UPDATE February 2012 - The Food Crises: Predictive validation of a quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in global food prices have led to widespread hunger and social unrest---and an imperative to understand their causes. In a previous paper published in September 2011, we constructed for the first time a dynamic model that quantitatively agreed with food prices. Specifically, the model fit the FAO Food Price Index time series from January 2004 to March 2011, inclusive. The results showed that the dominant causes of price increases during this period were investor speculation and ethanol conversion. The model included investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take advantage of increased expected returns. Here, we extend the food prices model to January 2012, without modifying the model but simply continuing its dynamics. The agreement is still precise, validating both the descriptive and predictive abilities of the analysis. Policy actions are needed to avoid a third speculative bubble that would cause prices to rise above recent peaks by the end of 2012.

Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Domestic food and sustainable design: a study of university student cooking and its impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In four university student kitchens over twenty-one days, we captured participants' food preparation activity, quantified the greenhouse gas emissions and direct energy connected to the food and cooking, and talked to participants about their food practices. ... Keywords: energy, everyday life, food, greenhouse gas, practices, sustainability

Adrian K. Clear; Mike Hazas; Janine Morley; Adrian Friday; Oliver Bates

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A real-time food safety management system for receiving operations in distribution centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food safety plan is being promoted in the food industry by the Hong Kong Government as a preliminary quality control tool. However, it appears to be a challenging task for Distribution Centers (DC) that handles food inventory since most of them are lack ... Keywords: Case-Based Reasoning, Food safety, Operating procedures, RFID, Receiving operations

S. I. Lao; K. L. Choy; G. T. S. Ho; Y. C. Tsim; T. C. Poon; C. K. Cheng

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Systems for sustainability and transparency of food supply chains - Current status and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food chains need to become more sustainable to regain and retain consumer trust after several food incidents and scandals that have taken place in the past. Consumers increasingly wish to be informed about the safety of their food, its origin, and the ... Keywords: Food supply chain, Sustainability, Traceability, Transparency, e-Communication

P. M. (Nel) Wognum; Harry Bremmers; Jacques H. Trienekens; Jack G. A. J. van der Vorst; Jacqueline M. Bloemhof

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 17 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 29 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

372

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ......................................................................................................................................... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table of Contents College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences ........................................................................................................................................................... 16 Animal Science ............................................................................................................................................................. 28 Dairy Science

Sze, Lawrence

373

W. Clay Davis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dr. Davis' research focuses on coupling gas and liquid chromatography to ICP-MS using high accuracy analytical methods such as speciated ...

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

374

Application of Brazilian kaolinite clay as adsorbent to removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution: Kinetic and thermodynamic of cation-basic interactions  

SciTech Connect

The compound N{sup 1}-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route. The modified and natural kaolinite samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopic, X-ray diffraction, and nuclear magnetic nuclei of {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C. The well-defined peaks obtained in the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum in the 5.0-62.1 ppm region confirmed the attachment of organic functional groups as pendant chains bonded into the porous clay. The ability of these materials to remove U(VI) from aqueous solution was followed by a series of adsorption isotherms adjusted to a Sips equation at room temperature and pH 4.0. The kinetic parameters analyzed by the Lagergren and Elovich models gave a good fit for a pseudo-second order reaction with k{sub 2} values 16.0 and 25.1 mmol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} ranges for natural and modified kaolinite clays, respectively. The energetic effects caused by metal ion adsorption were determined through calorimetric titrations. - Graphical abstract: This investigation reports the use of original and modified kaolinites as alternative absorbents. The compound N-[3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]diethylenetriamine was anchored onto Amazon kaolinite surface by heterogeneous route.

Guerra, Denis L., E-mail: denis@cpd.ufmt.b [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Leidens, Victor L.; Viana, Rubia R. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, UFMT, Centro de Recursos Minerais, Cuiaba 78060 900, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Airoldi, Claudio [Chemistry Institute, State University of Campinas, P.O. Box 6154, 13084-971 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

376

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

377

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom Geobacter: The Junk Food Connoisseurs of the Bacterial Kingdom September 30, 2011 - 10:06am Addthis Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Colorized TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) micrograph of a cell of Geobacter sulfurreducens (orange) with its pili (yellow) stretching out like arms and immobilizing the uranium (black precipitate). | Image courtesy of Dena Cologgi and Gemma Reguera, Michigan State University Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux

378

Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd Dr Writer s Food Products Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Dr. Writerâ€(tm)s Food Products Pvt. Ltd. Place Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Sector Biomass Product Mumbai-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 19.076191°, 72.875877° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":19.076191,"lon":72.875877,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security Facility will focus on bioenergy, global food security The New Mexico Consortium expects to complete the 27,000 square foot laboratory and office facility next spring. May 22, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Kevin Roark Communications Office (505) 665-9202 Email Los Alamos, N.M., May 22, 2012 - U.S. Senator Tom Udall (D-NM) spoke at the groundbreaking ceremony marking the start of construction on the New Mexico Consortium's (NMC) biological research facility last Friday afternoon. Senator Udall noted New Mexico's novel and extensive contributions to our nation's renewable energy efforts and congratulated LANL, the NMC, and Richard Sayre on their commitment to advancing the nations goals for energy

380

EM Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks EM Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks December 5, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis West Valley Demonstration Project has a reputation for strong community involvement. Pictured here are the volunteers who distributed food to seven food banks. West Valley Demonstration Project has a reputation for strong community involvement. Pictured here are the volunteers who distributed food to seven food banks. WEST VALLEY, N.Y. - EM employees and their contractor counterparts at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) have supported their local food banks for several years, and this year was no exception. With just two days to go in the recent eight-day food drive, the employees and contractors at WVDP and other volunteers had collected only 43,982

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment of food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.

Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The food processing industry is the fourth largest consumer of energy in the US industrial sector. Food processors use nearly 1,200 trillion Btu of energy per year. The industry is comprised of more than 21,000 processing plants. Total production values make it $400 billion industry. While energy represents on average between one and two percent of total operating costs, in some industry sub-sectors energy comprises as much as 20%. Major energy end-uses include drying, refrigeration, process heating and cooling, and machine drives. Energy efficiency becomes more important in an industry of tight margins. Today, Americans spend the same percentage of disposable income on food as they did 20 years ago. The Food Marketing Institute notes that supermarket sales were only expected to rise about 2% in 2000. Rising energy costs, increasing restrictions on land application of waste, sanitation standards, and a high demand for product quality, and processed foods contribute to the industry's energy and power quality needs. In addition to documenting a variety of energy end uses in the industry in spring 2000, E SOURCE surveyed 148 plant managers by telephone and conducted in-depth interviews with 8 corporate energy managers. We asked the plant managers to respond to a variety of questions on topics such as decision-making, plant energy use, electricity and deregulation, natural gas use, energy services and outsourcing, energy efficiency, and plans for plant renovations and new construction. In our interviews with the corporate energy managers, we explored their current strategies for purchasing energy and energy services and asked them what they expect to do in the future. This paper provides some of the key findings from this report including an overview of industry challenges, key energy end-uses and innovations, and valuable insights from energy managers on the energy issues that food processors face.

Adams, N.; Milmoe, P. H.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

EI Summary of SIC 28  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals (28) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Chemicals (28) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments producing basic chemicals, and establishments manufacturing products by predominately chemical processes. Establishments classified in this major group manufacture three general classes of products; (1) basic chemicals, such as acids, alkalies, salts, and organic chemicals; (2) chemical products to be used in further manufacture, such as synthetic fibers, plastics materials, dry colors, and pigments; and (3) finished chemical products used for ultimate consumption, such as drugs, cosmetics, and soaps; or to be used as materials or supplies in other industries, such as paints, fertilizers, and explosives.

384

EI Summary of SIC 22  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Textiles (22) All (20-39) Food (20) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Textiles (22) All (20-39) Food (20) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in performing any of the following operations: (1) preparation of fiber and subsequently manufacturing of yarn, thread, braids, twine, or cordage; (2) manufacturing broadwoven fabrics, narrow woven fabrics, knit fabrics, and carpets and rugs from yarn; (3) dyeing and finishing fiber, yarn, fabrics, and knit apparel; (4) coating, waterproofing, or otherwise treating fabrics; (5) the integrated manufacture of knit apparel and other finished articles from yarn; (6) the manufacture of felt goods, lace goods, nonwoven fabrics, and miscellaneous textiles.

385

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Accurate Air Engineering, Inc. and Kraft Foods Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

386

Y-12 and Stone & Webster`  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a map of Oak Ridge dated September 27, 1945, prepared by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Architect - Engineer and The Roane- Anderson Company. The title of the map is, Town of Oak...

387

International Food Policy Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Food Policy Research Institute Food Policy Research Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: International Food Policy Research Institute Name International Food Policy Research Institute Address 2033 K St, NW Place Washington, DC Zip 20006-1002 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Phone number +1 202-862-5600 Website http://www.ifpri.org/contact Coordinates 38.902873°, -77.046518° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.902873,"lon":-77.046518,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Minimum Energy Ventilation for Fast Food Restaurant Kitchens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooking equipment exhaust systems have a significant impact on the energy consumption of fast food restaurants. This research investigated issues that relate to the energy performance of commercial kitchen ventilation systems and demonstrated that significant energy and cost savings can be achieved by reducing ventilation rates.

1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

389

MMU Sustainable Food Policy Statement Purpose of Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environmental impact of supply. It has been established that food has high indirect carbon emissions and a high: Increase the use of seasonal fruit and vegetables through planning and promoting of menus that reflect in- house) that reflect the availability of fruit and vegetables that are in season and abundant

390

Soy Protein ProductsChapter 6 Uses in Food Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soy Protein Products Chapter 6 Uses in Food Systems Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 92B3B17CCACD0D1166530AEA8D994D92 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Uses in

391

ShapingTHE FUTURE Biofuels or food? Quest for land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ShapingTHE FUTURE Biofuels or food? Quest for land poses a threat to poor women in Africa. PAGE 4 an impetus both for biofuels and for `green artificial fertiliser'." n TEXT: DAVID STEPHANSSON Even better countries. It is estim- ated that biofuels accounted for 30 per cent of the increase in grain prices from

392

Networks Against Time: From Food to Pharma Anna Nagurney  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pharmaceutical Industry, Issues, and a Full Model Some Other Issues in Supply Chain Networks that We Have Against Time #12;Automotive Supply Chains Anna Nagurney Networks Against Time #12;Energy Supply Chains and Competitive Advantage Fascinating Facts About Food Perishability Why User Behavior Must be Captured in Supply

Nagurney, Anna

393

Vantage Point: Views on Food, Fuel and 24 May, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable & efficient resource use Land, soil, water Biofuels - done right* Rural employment Rural markets "In defense of biofuels, done right" "...bioenergy is not only compatible with food production; it can;Global deforestation rate drops 2000-2010 (FAO Forest Resource Assessment 2010) U.S. Biofuel Production

394

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Terminal Flour Mill.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an energy study that was conducted at Terminal Flour Mill in Portland, Oregon. Terminal Flour Mill is one of five food industry (SIC 20) plants that are being studied. Energy conservation measures (ECM's) are divided into two groups; operation and maintenance (O and M) measures, and equipment modification measures.

United Industries Corporation.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Multivariate Bayesian Semiparametric Models for Authentication of Food and Beverages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- nation of origin of an olive oil bottle is correct or if the variety of a certain bottle of wine matches, the mislabeling of foods represents commercial fraud (Mafra et al.; 2008). On the other hand, producers and beverages of high commercial value, like honey, wines or olive oil, because their prices depend

Quintana, Fernando Andrés

396

METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS IN IMPUTATION, FOOD CONSUMPTION AND OBESITY RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Obesity is a rapidly growing public health threat as well as an economic problem in the United States. The recent changes in eating habits, especially the relative increase of food away from home (FAFH) consumption over the last three decades raised the possibility of causal linkage between obesity and FAFH. This study confirms the positive, significant association between the body mass index and FAFH consumption in adults, consistent with previous findings in the economic and nutrition literature. This work goes a step further, however. We demonstrate FAFH consumption at quick-service restaurants has a significantly larger effect on body mass index than FAFH consumption at full-service restaurants. Further disaggregation of FAFH by meal occasion reveals that lunch consumed away from home has the largest positive effect on body mass index compared to other meal occasions (breakfast, dinner and snacks). Survey data with missing observations or latent variables are not rare phenomena. The missing value imputation methods are combined into two groups, contingent upon the existence or absence of an underlying explicit statistical model. Explicit modeling methods include unconditional mean value imputation, conditional mean and regression imputation, stochastic regression imputation, and multiple imputation. The methods based on implicit modeling include hot deck and cold deck imputation. In the second essay, we review imputation methods commonly used in the agricultural economics literature. Our analysis revealed strong preference of researchers for the regression imputation method. We consider several alternative (regression, mean and median) single imputation methods to impute and to append prices of foods consumed at home (foods commercially purchased and prepared from ingredients) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) dietary intake data. We also demonstrate the superiority of regression imputation method compared to the mean and median imputation methods for commercially prepared foods. For ingredient foods, the results are ambiguous with no imputation method clearly outperforming the others.

Kyureghian, Gayaneh

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Fish Bulletin 152. Food Habits of Albacore, Bluefin Tuna, and Bonito In California Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. 1962. Food of albacore tuna, Thunnus germo (Lacepede), inOcean. Inter-Amer. Trop. Tuna Comm. , Bul. , 7 Berry, S.T.B. 1962. Food of albacore tuna, Thunnus germo (Lacepede),

Pinkas, Leo; Oliphant, Malcolm S; Iverson, Ingrid L.K.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Export Email Add to MyF1000 Food security implications of global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jobs, revenue, and food, particularly in poor countries. But could we do better? Answering -- in currencies of biomass, food energy, and revenues. The analysis found that 16-31% of world fish stocks

Dunne, Jennifer

399

Accounting for taste : regulating food labeling in the "affluent society," 1945-1995  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation traces a transformation in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's governance of food markets during the second half of the 20th century. In response to new correlations between diet and risk of disease, ...

Frohlich, Xaq Zachary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Does Household Food Security Affect Cognitive and Social Development of Kindergartners?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveyed participated in AFDC/TANF than in food stamps inN Participation in AFDC/TANF in the last 12 months Yes Noin the last 12 months, use of AFDC/TANF, food stamps in the

Stormer, Ame; Harrison, Gail G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of different toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending the cereus group genomics to putative food- borneGoltsman, et al Author(s) Division Genomics Extending thecereus group genomics to putative food-borne pathogens of

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 9 Analysis and Characterization of trans Isomers by Silver-Ion HPLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 9 Analysis and Characterization of trans Isomers by Silver-Ion HPLC Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

403

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 3 Soy Isoflavones: Chemistry, Processing Effects, Health Benefits, and Commercial Production Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - N

404

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 19 Food Uses of Palm Oil and Its Components Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

405

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and CharacterizationChapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Palm Oil: Production, Processing, Uses, and Characterization Chapter 20 Palm Oleochemicals in Non-food Applications Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemis

406

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients\tChapter 2 Edible Soybean Products in the Current Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 2 Edible Soybean Products in the Current Market Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

407

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 11 Formation and Content of Cholesterol Oxidation Products in Other Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Bioche

408

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 15 Formation and Content of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

409

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 4 Soybean Saponins: Chemistry, Analysis, and Potential Health Effects Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

410

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 21 Flaxseed Proteins: Potential Food Applications and Process-Induced Changes Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemi

411

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd EditionChapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flaxseed in Human Nutrition, 2nd Edition Chapter 22 Availability and Labeling of Flaxseed Food Products and Supplements Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry P

412

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation ProductsChapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cholesterol and Phytosterol Oxidation Products Chapter 16 Determination of Phytosterol Oxidation Products in Foods and Biological Samples Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition

413

Soybeans as Functional Foods and IngredientsChapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans as Functional Foods and Ingredients Chapter 9 Value-Added Products from Extruding-Expelling of Soybeans Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press

414

Food Security Among California's Low-Income Adults Improves, But Most Severely Affected Do Not Share in Improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the WIC Program on Food Security Status of Pregnant First-Insecurity and Very Low Food Security Among Adults Age 18M, Carlson S. Household Food Security in the United States,

Harrison, Gail G.; Sharp, Matthew; Manolo-LeClair, George; al., et

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel Preliminary Food & Fuel Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

To promote economic growth and energy security, and to protect the environment, the U.S. is pursuing a national strategy of energy independence and climatic protection in which domestic renewable carbon-neutral biofuels displace 30 percent of U.S. oil consumption by the mid-21st century. Such fuels, including ethanol and biodiesel, will be produced from biological feed stocks (biomass). The availability of this billion-ton biomass will hinge on the application of modern scientific and engineering tools to create a highly-integrated biofuel production system. Efforts are underway to identify and develop energy crops, ranging from agricultural residues to genetically engineered perennials; to develop biology-based processing methods; and, to develop large-scale biorefineries to economically convert biomass into fuels. In addition to advancing the biomass-to-biofuel research and development agenda, policy makers are concurrently defining the correct mix of governmental supports and regulations. Given the volumes of biomass and fuels that must flow to successfully enact a national biomass strategy, policies must encourage large-scale markets to form and expand around a tightly integrated system of farmers, fuel producers and transporters, and markets over the course of decades. In formulating such policies, policy makers must address the complex interactions of social, technical, economic, and environmental factors that bound energy production and use. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The INL Bioenergy Program supports the DOE and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Key multidisciplinary INL capabilities are being leveraged to address major science and technology needs associated with the cost-effective utilization of biomass. INL’s whole crop utilization (WCU) vision is focused on the use of the entire crop, including both the grain and traditionally discarded plant biomass to produce food, feed, fiber, energy, and value-added products.

Ray Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jake Jacobson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Coal resources of the Southwestern District, Kentucky: Bell, Clay, Clinton, Estill, Jackson, Knox, Laurel, Lee, Madison, McCreary, Owsley, Pulaski, Rockcastle, Wayne, and Whitley counties  

SciTech Connect

The Southwestern District contains an estimated 7.43 billion short tons of original coal resources. Remaining coal resources total an estimated 6.85 billion short tons as of January 1, 1981. The coal resources are tabulated by standard U. S. Geological Survey resource classes for 25 of the coal beds that occur in the district. Clay County contains an estimated 1.54 billion tons, or 21 percent of the district total, followed by Knox, which contains 1.38 billion tons, or 19 percent of the district total. Bell County contains an estimated 1.03 billion tons, or 14 percent, and Whitley County contains 975 million tons, or 13 percent of the district total. Remaining coal resources in the other 11 counties range from 70 thousand tons in Madison County to nearly 574 million tons in Owsley County.

Brant, R.A.; Smith, G.E.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

"Honey=sugar" means unhealthy: investigating how people apply knowledge to rate food's healthiness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While previous research studied the high level attributes people consider when they assess the healthiness of food they are familiar with, little work has looked at how people assess arbitrary, potentially unfamiliar, food to decide whether it is a healthy ... Keywords: behavior change, diet, health, healthiness of food

Feng Gao; Enrico Costanza; M. C. Schraefel

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Food-web structure and network theory: The role of connectance and size  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web structure and network theory: The role of connectance and size Jennifer A. Dunne called food webs possess the characteristic path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree- ments are based on selective use of relatively few food webs, as well as analytical decisions

Dunne, Jennifer

419

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Papers Contents Introduction Food-web assembly and collapse: mathematical models and implications for conservation Alaska: a food-web perspective 1647 J. A. Estes, D. F. Doak, A. M. Springer and T. M. Williams Parasites

Pascual, Mercedes

420

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts Marta, a quantification of their food-web structure and functioning, and how these change across space and human impacts the structural features of food webs associated with Zostera marina across 16 study sites in 3 provinces

Myers, Ransom A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Effective Supply Chain Management Strategy for Food Products: An Insight to Linked Partnerships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores and extends the supply chain management strategy for food products effectively and efficiently through analysis of insights to linked partnerships within the supply chain due to the possibility of a global food crisis. The required ... Keywords: Food Crisis Resolution, Logistics Management, Strategic Partnership, Supply Chain Management Strategy, Supply Chain Strategy, Supply Chain for Agricultural Products

Witaya Krajaysri

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Remote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket Realization of the shopping task from remote places  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experimental result performed with the integrated system. Index Terms-- Remote shopping, Foods handling, Human dailylifeRemote shopping, Foods handling, Human dailylife I. INTRODUCTION In this research we focusedRemote Food Shopping Robot System in a Supermarket ­Realization of the shopping task from remote

Ohya, Akihisa

423

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 7 Zero/Low Trans Margarine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 7 Zero/Low Trans Margarine Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS BE5E5B1D1ACDDD4CB5DD45065EA26BB5 Press ...

424

Trans Fats in FoodChapter 4 Metabolism of Trans and Cis Fatty Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trans Fats in Food Chapter 4 Metabolism of Trans and Cis Fatty Acid Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS 0C05A4BDE92AAC84620807E63F87BEF4

425

Impact of Poverty and Household Food Security on the Use of Preventive Medical Services in the California Health Interview Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a “medical home” regardless of food security status. ThereSecurity Status Food Insecure w/o hunger Have a medical home

Harrison, Gail G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

An Act Concerning the Recycling of Organic Materials by Certain Food Wholesalers, Manufacturers, Supermarkets, and Conference Centers (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act requires all commercial food wholesalers and distributors, industrial food manufacturers, and resource and conservation centers that generate at least 104 tons of organic waste each year...

427

Food Safety versus Environmental Protection on the Central California Coast: Exploring the Science Behind an Apparent Conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O157: H7 in cow manure compost. Journal of Food Protectionduring manure composting. Compost Science & Utilization 12(with contaminated manure composts or irrigation water. Food

Stuart, Diana; Shennan, Carol; Brown, Martha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

"Making a difference in quality of life...for everyone" INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consumes vast areas of land and produces enormous volumes of the waste products phosphogypsum and phosphatic clay wastes. Phosphogypsum is a byproduct of the chemical conversion of fluorapatite (ore for miles. Elevated radium levels in phosphogypsum (a consequence of processing) have generated concerns

Watson, Craig A.

429

Effects of Biofuel Policies on World Food Insecurity -- A CGE Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The food vs. fuel debate has heated up since the 2008 global food crisis when major crop prices dramatically increased. Heavily subsidized biofuel production was blamed for diverting food crops from food production and diverting resources from food and feed production, triggering a food crisis globally and leading to increases in the world food insecure population. Few studies have quantified the effects of biofuel policies on world food prices and world food insecurity. This study added the Brazil and China's biofuel sectors to an existing global trade CGE model, and applies the measurement of food insecurity as developed by FAO. Alternative scenarios were food insecurity. Results are examined with focus on (1) effects on domestic biofuel productions, (2) change in food commodity productions and trade, (3) change in land use and land rents, and (4) change in regional undernourished populations. Results indicated that biofuel expansion is not cost competitive to traditional fossil fuel. Without any policy incentives, huge expansion of biofuel production is not likely under current technology. The conventional biofuel mandates in U.S., Brazil and China lead to increases in world food insecurity, while the advanced biofuel mandate in U.S. has the opposite effect. Subsidies to biofuels production help to lessen the increase in world food insecurity that is caused by increases in conventional biofuel production. Additionally, the effects from U.S. biofuel policies are smaller but more widespread than the effects from Brazil or China's biofuel policies. Overall, the long term effects of biofuel production expansion on world food insecurity are much smaller than expected.

Lu, Jiamin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone Fusion, Food, and Fun for Everyone By Patti Wieser April 29, 2010 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Among the demos planned for the May 1 Open House at PPPL is the Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, which caused PPPL's Marianne Tyrrell to have a "hair raising" experience during an earlier PPPL Open House. (Photo by John Bennevich) Among the demos planned for the May 1 Open House at PPPL is the Van de Graaff electrostatic generator, which caused PPPL's Marianne Tyrrell to have a "hair raising" experience during an earlier PPPL Open House. PPPL Science Education Head Andrew Zwicker shows a plasma ball to students visiting the Laboratory. Similar demonstrations will occur at PPPL's May 1 Open House. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office Of Communications)

431

List of Food Service Equipment Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Equipment Incentives Service Equipment Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 112 Food Service Equipment Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 112) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Energy Efficiency Solutions for Business (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Retail Supplier Schools State Government Building Insulation Central Air conditioners Chillers Comprehensive Measures/Whole Building Custom/Others pending approval Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Motor VFDs Motors Programmable Thermostats Refrigerators LED Exit Signs Evaporative Coolers Vending Machine Controls Food Service Equipment Yes Agricultural Energy Efficiency Program (New York) State Rebate Program New York Agricultural Agricultural Equipment

432

Data Collection for HWIR: Section 10 - Farm Food Chain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DATA COLLECTION FOR THE DATA COLLECTION FOR THE HAZARDOUS WASTE IDENTIFICATION RULE SECTION 10.0 FARM FOOD CHAIN AND TERRESTRIAL FOODWEB DATA Work Assignment Managers Stephen M. Kroner and Technical Direction: David A. Cozzie U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 Prepared by: Center for Environmental Analysis Research Triangle Institute 3040 Cornwallis Road Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2194 Under Contract No. 68-W-98-085 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste Washington, DC 20460 October 1999 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS A number of individuals have been involved with the database development in support of the aquatic food web module. David Cozzie and Stephen Kroner of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Solid Waste, provided overall technical direction and review

433

Anaerobic Digestion of Food Waste?recycling Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Food waste?recycling (FWR) wastewater was evaluated as feedstock for two?stage anaerobic digestion at different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). The FWR wastewater tested contained high concentrations of organic materials and had chemical oxygen demand (COD) >130 g/L and volatile solids (VS) >55 g/L. Two identical two?stage anaerobic digesters were operated to investigate the performance at six HRTs ranging from 10–25 days. In the acidogenic reactor

Gyuseong Han; Seung Gu Shin; Juntaek Lim; Minho Jo; Seokhwan Hwang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Energy Conservation in the Food Industry : Follow-up Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United Industries Corporation (UIC) conducted an energy analysis at five food processing plants (SIC 20) in the winter of 1984-1985. Tour of plants (Alpac, Carnation, Terminal flour mill, Tree Top) were revisited eighteen months later to determine what energy conservation measures (ECM's) had been or would be implemented. Additionally, the follow-up investigation evaluated the actual energy savings that accrued for the implemented ECM's and recorded the plants' views on the usefulness of the energy analysis.

United Industries Corporation.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DOE Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive DOE Joins Federal Agencies in Summer Food Drive June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The DOE is working with the Chief Human Capital Officers Council, Office of Personnel Management and other federal agencies to help stock area food banks as part of the fourth annual Feds Feed Families campaign that runs June through August this year. The DOE Feeds Families drive, which is part of the greater federal effort, hopes to alleviate the severe shortage food banks in the Washington, D.C. region and U.S. face during the summer months. DOE hopes to collect at least 230,000 pounds of food this summer. Last year, DOE and other participants in the Feds Feed Families campaign donated a record 5,793,446 pounds of nonperishable food items to local area

437

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Agency/Company /Organization: Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research Sector: Land Focus Area: Agriculture Topics: Implementation, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.cgiar.org/pdf/CCAFS_Strategy_december2009.pdf Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity: A Strategy for Change Screenshot References: Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity[1] References ↑ "Climate, Agriculture and Food Scarcity" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate,_Agriculture_and_Food_Scarcity:_A_Strategy_for_Change&oldid=328536"

438

OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Sector: Land, Climate Focus Area: Agriculture, Food Supply Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/10/48224529.pdf OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Screenshot References: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture[1] "This preliminary report outlines a broad strategy for green growth in the food and agriculture sector. It is part of the OECD's Green Growth Strategy that seeks to define an economic development path that is

439

Senegal food and energy study: energy use and opportunities for energy-related improvements in the food system  

SciTech Connect

The growth of agriculture, the mainstay of Senegal's economy, is contingent upon the acquisition of imported energy. This study examines the key constituents of the Senegalese food system in relation to energy supply and demand. The study first analyzes the food system (crop characteristics, and physical and institutional components) and the energy system (sources, costs, supply/conversion technologies, and consumption patterns). Next, energy-use profiles are provided on the production and distribution processes of millet/sorghum, rice, groundnuts, and fish. Household cooking practices are also discussed. Recommendations to improve irrigation, the second key to increasing food supplies, include funding for low-capacity photovoltaic and solar-thermal systems, setting up windmills in coastal areas, and designing large-capacity solar plants similar to those at Bakel. To save energy at the household level, wood or charcoal cooking stoves must be made more efficient and the use of biogas plants should be studied. To counter the serious depletion of fuelwood, Senegal's main indigenous energy resource, energy-efficient charcoal production should be developed, the charcoal industry reorganized, and afforestation and forest management programs expanded.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Overview of the Cuban Food MarketOverview of the Cuban Food Market & Prospects for US Exports& Prospects for US Exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview of the Cuban Food MarketOverview of the Cuban Food Market & Prospects for US Exports& Prospects for US Exports Parr Rosson, Professor & Director Center for North American Studies Department, 2010 #12;SituationSituation Trade Sanctions Reform & Export Enhancement Act (2000) Allows US Exports

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Plastic packaging: Migration of plastics into foods. March 1972-November 1989 (Citations from the Food Science and Technology Abstracts data base). Report for March 1972-November 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the leaching of plastics and plasticizers from packaging materials into foods. Measurement of plastics in oils and dairy products is emphasized. Analytical methods, toxicology, and legislation concerning plastic migration and food safety are included. (This updated bibliography contains 191 citations, 27 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Time Series Analysis of Food Price and Its Input Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid increases in consumer food price beginning in 2007 generated interest in identifying the main factors influencing these increases. In subsequent years, food prices have fluctuated, but generally have continued their ascent. The effects of crude oil, gasoline, corn, and ethanol prices, as well as, the relative foreign exchange rate of the U.S. dollar and producer price indexes for food manufacturing and fuel products on domestic food prices are examined. Because the data series are non-stationary and cointegrated, a vector error correction model is estimated. Weak exogeneity and exclusion tests in the cointegration space are performed. Directed acyclical graphs are used to specify contemporaneous causal relationships. Dynamic interactions among the series are given by impulse response functions and forecast error variance decompositions. Weak exogeneity tests indicate all eight series work to bring the system back into equilibrium following a shock to the system. Further, exclusion tests suggest crude oil, gasoline, food CPI, ethanol, and food PPI variables are not in the long-run relationships. Dynamic analyses suggest the following relationships. Ethanol price is not a major factor in domestic food prices, suggesting that food prices are largely unaffected by the recent increased use of corn-based ethanol for fuel. Crude oil prices, corn prices, and the relative foreign exchange rate of the U.S. dollar, however, do influence domestic food prices with corn price contributing the most to food price variability. Innovation accounting inferences are robust to potential different contemporaneous causal specifications.

Routh, Kari 1988-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Solar demonstration project in a fast-food restaurant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of a two-phase program in which the first phase included the successful use of heat reclamation equipment and energy conservation techniques at a typical fast-food restaurant. The project's second phase involved the engineering, designing, installation and interfacing of a solar collector system at the facility. The report will help to serve as a guide for other restaurants around the state, and possibly the nation, which wish to install energy saving systems, or adopt energy-saving techniques, geared to their special needs and equipment.

McClenahan, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cogeneration handbook for the food processing industry. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. In addition, an annotated bibliography and a glossary of terminology are provided. Appendix A provides an energy-use profile of the food processing industry. Appendices B through O provide specific information that will be called out in subsequent chapters.

Eakin, D.E.; Fassbender, L.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Moore, N.L.; Fasbender, A.G.; Gorges, H.A.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Agriculture Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.fao.org/bestpractices/index_en.htm Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Screenshot References: FAO Best Practices[1] Logo: Best Practices-Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Summary "FAO's new model is based on a determination to learn from the Organization's experience and will require new mechanisms that allow and

446

Sb(III) and Sb(V) Sorption onto Al-Rich Phases: Hydrous Al Oxide and the Clay Minerals Kaolinite KGa-1b and Oxidized and Reduced Nontronite NAu-1  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the immobilization of Sb(III) and Sb(V) by Al-rich phases - hydrous Al oxide (HAO), kaolinite (KGa-1b), and oxidized and reduced nontronite (NAu-1) - using batch experiments to determine the uptake capacity and the kinetics of adsorption and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Spectroscopy to characterize the molecular environment of adsorbed Sb. Both Sb(III) and Sb(V) are adsorbed in an inner-sphere mode on the surfaces of the studied substrates. The observed adsorption geometry is mostly bidentate corner-sharing, with some monodentate complexes. The kinetics of adsorption is relatively slow (on the order of days), and equilibrium adsorption isotherms are best fit using the Freundlich model. The oxidation state of the structural Fe within nontronite affects the adsorption capacity: if the clay is reduced, the adsorption capacity of Sb(III) is slightly decreased, while Sb(V) uptake is increased significantly. This may be a result of the presence of dissolved Fe(II) in the reduced nontronite suspensions or associated with the structural rearrangements in nontronite due to reduction. These research findings indicate that Sb can be effectively immobilized by Al-rich phases. The increase in Sb(V) uptake in response to reducing structural Fe in clay can be important in natural settings since Fe-rich clays commonly go through oxidation-reduction cycles in response to changing redox conditions.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Trainor, Thomas P. (Alaska Fairbanks)

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

447

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993a). The 1994 natural gas price for the stone, clay andagain. In August 2010 the natural gas price in the U.S. wasIn the previous report, natural gas price of $3.38/MBtu and

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The role of knowledge management in supply chains: evidence from the Italian food industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study deals with interorganisational Knowledge Management (KM) in the Italian food industry. Based on case studies, the paper defines the need for knowledge sharing amongst supply chain members in different collaborative activities. Then ... Keywords: Italy, SCM, case studies, collaborative supply networks, e-business, electronic business, food industry, food supply chain, information technology, knowledge management, supply chain collaboration, supply chain management, supply chain performance

Mariano Corso; Seyhan Firdevs Dogan; Riccardo Mogre; Alessandro Perego

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Name Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Address Viale delle Terme di Caracalla Place Rome, Italy Year founded 1945 Phone number (+39) 06 57051 Website http://www.fao.org/about/en/ Coordinates 41.8792066°, 12.4952115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8792066,"lon":12.4952115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

SensorNet: Food and Public Health Safety - Oak Ridge National ...  

SensorNet: Food and Public Health Safety Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this intellectual property may

451

Taking ramen seriously : food, labor, and everyday life in modern Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laced noodles made from wheat flour, and various toppingsthe popularity of other wheat-flour based foods such asof rice in relation to wheat flour particularly after the

Solt, George Sekine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food and Drug Administration Green Energy Management Systemthe project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS)the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS)

Lewis, Glen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

The connection between the issue of food waste and its collection for biogas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Reduction is the best way of handling the issue of food waste, however, considering the difficulties of achieving reduction, a collection of waste for… (more)

Blomgren, My

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Body Mass Index, Neighborhood Fast Food and Restaurant Concentration, and Car Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VW. Weight status and restaurant availability: a multilevelL, MacIntyre S. McDonald's restaurants and neighborhoodprevalence of fast food restaurants: state- level analysis.

Inagami, Sanae; Cohen, Deborah A.; Brown, Arleen F.; Asch, Steven M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Significance. NRC Bull. No. 109. Washington: NRC, 1943.NRC Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on NutritionTheir Techniques and Value. NRC Bull. No. 17. Washington:

Renner, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Food and Yard Waste Compost as a Nutrient Source for Corn Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Utilizing food and yard waste (FYW) compost for plant production requires determination of application rates that support crop production, improve soil properties and avoid excessive… (more)

Garnett, Angela

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey”, Washington,impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulativeemerging technologies on energy consumption in the U.S. food

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Essays on the Economics of Climate Change, Biofuel and Food Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45 2.4.2 Biofuelwith Non-convex iii 2.4.1 Biofuelal. Model estimates food-versus-biofuel trade-o?. California

Seguin, Charles

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

An evaluation of food security in Manitoba: an issue of sustainable supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The discipline of Sociology has been quiet regarding the production of food by industrial agriculture. However, there are issues that potentially undermine the ability of… (more)

Sasaki, Nicholas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Applying experimental economics to determine consumers' willingness to pay for food attributes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Changes in the features of food demand and consumption have moved from the mass consumption model towards an increasing qualitative differentiation of products and demand.… (more)

Van Zyl, Karlien

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "food stone clay" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sorting It out: Food Waste Separation in Large New Zealand Hotels: Barriers and Incentives.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Food waste presents a resource management challenge for New Zealand communities, businesses and governance institutions. The energy, labour, soil, water and myriad other inputs used… (more)

Singleton, Richard L

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Food-Regional Crop Areas and Climatic Profiles Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov Communities...

463

FOCUS GROUPS ON CONSUMER ATTITUDES ON FOOD SAFETY EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS IN KENTUCKY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Four focus groups were conducted in Kentucky to evaluate differences in the participants knowledge of safe food handling practices, where they obtained their knowledge, which… (more)

Coleman, Holly Holbrook

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Characterization of the ROAMS Simulation Environment for Testing Rover Mobility on Sloped Terrain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the tight arcs due to interaction of the wheels with the underlying mixed sand and concrete paving stones types (clay, loose sand, mixed, etc.). 2.7. Wheel-soil contact model The primary goal of the wheel table has a mosaic of paving stones glued to a plywood surface and covered with a layer of fine sand

465

Nanoparticle Technology for Biorefining of Non-Food Source Feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this proposed work is to develop and optimize the synthesis of mesoporous nanoparticle materials that are able to selectively sequester fatty acids from hexane extracts from algae, and to catalyze their transformation, as well as waste oils, into biodiesel. The project involves studies of the interactions between the functionalized MSN surface and the sequestering molecules. We investigate the mechanisms of selective extraction of fatty acids and conversion of triglycerides and fatty acids into biodiesel by the produced nanoparticles. This knowledge is used to further improve the properties of the mesoporous nanoparticle materials for both tasks. Furthermore, we investigate the strategies for scaling the synthesis of the catalytic nanomaterials up from the current pilot plant scale to industrial level, such that the biodiesel obtained with this technology can successfully compete with food crop-based biodiesel and petroleum diesel.

Pruski, Marek; Trewyn, Brian G.; Lee, Young-Jin; Lin, Victor S.-Y.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fiber, fuel and food from whole-tree chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future shortages of fiber, fuel, and food are predicted. Because forests are renewable, they have the potential of solving long and short-term shortages if each tree is more completely utilized. The combined vacuum-airlift and steaming-compression debarking process developed by the USDA Forest Service segregates whole-tree chips into foliage, wood chips, bark, and fines at an estimated processing cost of $5.14 per oven-dry debarked metric ton. Several alternatives are available for utilizing the wood chips, bark, and foliage. The value of the bark as a fuel and the folage as an animal feed supplement more than covers the cost of upgrading the whole-tree chips. Beneficiation of whole-tree chips coupled with intergrated utilization should improve chip quality, reduce costs, and help the pulp and paper industry become energy self-sufficient. (Refs. 34).

Sturos, J.A.; Dickson, R.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Representation of Energy Use in the Food Products Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional representations of energy in the manufacturing sector have tended to represent energy end-uses rather than actual energy service demands. While this representation if quite adequate for understanding how energy is used today, for forecasting future technology choices it is creates a rigid representation of how future energy is used. This representation can restrict the range of technology choices considered, particularly for fuel switching and on-site conversion processes such as combined heat and power (CHP). This paper discusses the differences between energy end-uses and service demands, proposes an approach for approximating service demands and discusses the ramifications of this alternative representation to energy modeling. An example for food products manufacturing (NAICS 311) is provided as an example.

Elliott, N. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Waste Energy Analysis Recovery for a Typical Food Processing Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy analysis made for the Joan of Arc Food Processing Plant in St. Francisville, Louisiana indicated that a significant quantity of waste heat energy was being released to the atmosphere in the forms of low quality steam and hot flue gases. Additional analysis, measurements, and observations over a period of 12 months resulted in an evaluation of the losses as well as recommended methods for the effective recovery of the waste heat energy. The waste energy recovery results in significant savings in energy costs as well as a reduction in the consumption of scarce fuel. The research was supported by the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, College of Engineering, Louisiana State University, and the Joan of Arc Company, St. Francisville, Louisiana.

Miller, P. H.; Mann, L., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Research on Food Allergy Information using Smart Mobile Media Devices to Enhance Communication at Restaurants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dealing with food allergies in the restaurant industry is becoming important as more customers have needs and restaurants are concerned with corporate social responsibilitiy CSR. This research discusses how to provide information to facilitate the communication ... Keywords: Consumer Communication, Enhanced Restaurant Communication, Food Allergy Information, Restaurant Industry, Smart Mobile Media Devices

Donald L. Amoroso; Mikako Ogawa; Ayaka Tanaka; Keiichi Noda; Ayako Kawai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Improving productivity in food processing industries using simulation: a case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process optimization is a major decision problem when drawing a balance between meeting variable demands and maintaining the quality of products in food processing industries. Simulation is a useful technique to study the effects of system changes in ... Keywords: business process reengineering, food processing, production planning, productivity, simulation models

Seraj Yousef Abed

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Food and Fiber System and Production Agriculture's Contributions to the Texas Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2001, Texas agriculture generated $14 billion in cash receipts. The production, processing, distribution and consumption of food and fiber products contributes substantially to the economy of Texas. This publication reports the contributions of the food and fiber system and individual commodities.

Nelson, Gene

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

“Gastrobots”—Benefits and Challenges of Microbial Fuel Cells in FoodPowered Robot Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper introduces the concept of i>Gastrobots, a class of intelligent machines that derive their operational power by exploiting the digestion of real food. Robots of this type could potentially be made self sufficient with just an input ... Keywords: bio-machines, food powered, microbial fuel cells, self-sufficient robots

Stuart Wilkinson

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIM J.W. Anaerobic Co-digestion of Brown Water and Food Waste for Energy Recovery Jun Wei LIM, Singapore 639798 (E-mail: jwlim3@e.ntu.edu.sg) Abstract The anaerobic digestion of brown water (BW), food in a decentralized reactor via anaerobic digestion. The bio-methane potential of these substrates at different feed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

474

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and UtilizationChapter 22 Soy Foods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Handbook of Soybean Processing and Utilization Chapter 22 Soy Foods Processing eChapters Processing 37663F0039EBE3BCA80DEDC9EB92A3B8 AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 22 Soy Foods from ...

475

Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reference papers for bound 3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol and 3-MCPD esters)in foods, vegetable oils, and fats. Bound 3-MCPD in Foods, Vegetable Oils and Fats (3-MCPD Esters) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis ao

476

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows P Faverdin, N of this experiment was to compare the effects of energy supply to the rumen before or during a meal on dry matter of rumen fill on food intake occurs directly whereas the effect of energy supply is delayed and probably

Recanati, Catherine

477

What’s in a Claim? Would a Food Not Labeled “Natural” Taste as Sweet?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consumers purchase foods labeled as “natural” for a variety of reasons, assuming, for example, that these foods are less processed, have improved health benefits, or have less impact on the environment. But does a “natural” product provide all of those ben

478

Biofuel-Food Market Interactions:A Review of Modeling Approaches and Findings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction between biofuels and food markets remains a policy issue for a number of reasons. There is a continuing need to understand the role of biofuels in the recent spikes in global food prices. Also, there is an ongoing discussion of changes to biofuel policy as a means to cope with severe weather-induced crop losses. Lastly, there are potential interactions between food markets and advanced biofuels, although most of the latter are expected to be produced from non-food feedstocks. This study reviews the existing literature on the food market impacts of biofuels. Findings suggest that initial conclusions attributing most of the spike in global food prices between 2005 and 2008 to biofuels have been revised. Instead, a multitude of factors, in addition to biofuels, converged during the period. Quantitative estimates of the impacts of biofuels on food markets vary significantly due to differences in modeling approaches, geographical scope, and assumptions about a number of crucial factors. In addition, many studies do not adequately account for the effects of macroeconomic changes, adverse weather conditions and direct market interventions during the recent food price spikes when evaluating the role of biofuels.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL; Msangi, Siwa [International Food and Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Extending fieldbus standards to food processing and packaging industry: A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several fieldbus systems based on different standards are in use since a decade. Bearing in mind that a dedicated fieldbus for food plant operation and management (FOAM) does not exist, this paper highlights their applications in this sector. In recent ... Keywords: Automation, Fieldbus, Food industry, Operation and management

N. P. Mahalik; Matthew Yen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

USDA Database for the Isoflavone Content of Selected Foods, Release 2.0 |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USDA Database for the Isoflavone Content of Selected Foods, Release 2.0 USDA Database for the Isoflavone Content of Selected Foods, Release 2.0 Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data USDA Database for the Isoflavone Content of Selected Foods, Release 2.0 Dataset Summary Description This database contains data on the isoflavone content of 557 food items. Isoflavones included in the database are daidzein, genistein, glycitein and total isoflavones. Other phytoestrogens included in the database are coumestrol, biochanin A, and formononetin. Tags {isoflavones,"compostion of foods",daidzein,genistein,glycitein} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness 0 No votes yet Ease of Access 0 No votes yet

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481

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year Demand for Food for People in Need Remains High Throughout the Year December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. Pictured are donations the Office of Human Capital at EM headquarters provided to the campaign. WASHINGTON, D.C. - EM and its field sites donated 53,630 pounds - or 27 tons - of non-perishable items to a food drive by federal workers to help feed families across the country in 2013. EM surpassed its goal to donate 50,000 pounds to the 2013 Feds Feed Families Campaign. In Ohio, EM's Portsmouth site donated to the Community Action Committee of Pike County Food Pantry, which typically feeds about 250 needy families

482

Food-packaging materials: migration of constituents into food contents. January 1982-December 1988 (Citations from Packaging Science and technology Abstracts data base). Report for January 1982-December 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the migration of food-packaging materials into foods. Plastic, glass, cardboard, metal, and ceramic containers are discussed. Techniques for analyzing packaging contamination are included. (Contains 90 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mood, food, traits, and restraint: an experimental investigation of negative affect, borderline personality, and disordered eating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eating disorders and borderline personality disorder involve several overlapping features, such as impulsivity, negative affectivity, and dissociation. However, few studies have specifically assessed how eating pathology and borderline personality may be related. The present study sought to evaluate this relationship by focusing on one particular area of overlap, negative affectivity. A pilot study assessed the psychometric properties of a dietary restraint measure among undergraduate women (N = 149). In the main study, undergraduate women (N = 307) completed a baseline mood assessment, then viewed a 39-minute sad film either with or without concurrent food presentation. Participants then completed a second mood assessment, and those who received food completed a third mood assessment following a 10-minute post-reflection delay. Results suggest that women reporting more borderline features exhibited greater negative affect across three different time points (baseline, post-movie/food, and post-reflection period), and were more reactive to the sad film. Food presentation appeared to have a small tempering effect on sadness, such that individuals who received food reported relatively less sadness after viewing the film when compared to those who did not receive food. However, actual quantity of food consumption was associated with improvements in mood only for women reporting higher levels of borderline features. Finally, highscorers on dietary restraint measures consumed greater quantities of food than their lowscoring counterparts. In sum, these data suggest that women with borderline personality features may be at elevated risk for developing problems with binge-eating, as consuming larger quantities of food appeared to have a tempering effect on their negative mood and specific feelings of sadness. Further, results are consistent with earlier findings in that reported efforts to restrain dietary intake were associated with greater food consumption in response to negative affect, and this relationship may need to be addressed in treating individuals with problematic eating behaviors.

Ambwani, Suman

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z