National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for food stone clay

  1. Stone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    D. diameter T. thickness P. piercing dimensions (height x width) for stone anchors (hawser and secondary holes) and lead block pres. preserved xii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Stone Anchors .......................................................................... 51 Catalog of Stone Anchors ............................................ 54 Ceramic Evidence...

  2. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

  3. Carbon Emissions: Stone, Clay, and Glass Industry

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948California (MillionThousandChemicalsPaperCarbon

  4. The Swelling of Clays Within Portland Brownstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    the stone comes into contact with water. Water enters between the clay layers and surrounds the positive and buckling Ex.: rain #12;Example of Damage: Victoria Mansion in Portland, Maine oh my #12;2. Equipment: How 2. Water is poured on top, causes differential swelling 3. Sample warps due to the stress from

  5. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  6. Quarrying and Mining (Stone)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloxam, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    the author.   Quarrying and Mining (Stone), Bloxam, UEE 2010archaeology and anthropology of mining. In Social approachesand anthropology of mining, ed. Bernard Knapp, Vincent

  7. Wellbore instability mechanisms in clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Sherif Adel

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the stability of wellbores drilled in Ko-consolidated clays using non-linear finite element method (FEM) and effective stress soil models to characterize the behavior of clay and unconsolidated ...

  8. Food Stories Exhibition Trail Leader's Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neri, Peter

    Food Stories Exhibition Trail Leader's Notes 1. Take a look at the stone fragment. Where do you a story about a celebration involving food? (No answer required) 3. This is a food hook from Papua New of grass, palm leaves and bamboo. The food hook would hang from the ceiling of the hut. Why do you think

  9. Semi-Precious Stones to the Aegean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1979-01-01

    A short review of the imported stones used for sealstones in the Aegean Bronze Age, and their possible sources....

  10. Multiscale modeling of clay-water systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebrahimi, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    The engineering properties of soils are highly affected by clay content and clay-water interactions. However, existing macro-scale continuum models have no length scale to describe the evolution of the clay microstructure ...

  11. Stone's code reveals Earth's processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2,BL4-2StefanLightsource504,103 100,658Stone's

  12. Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-11

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

  13. Facile residue analysis of recent and prehistoric cook-stones using handheld Raman spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Laura; Cao, Bin; Sinyukov, Alexander M; Joshi, Amitabh; Scully, Rob; Sanders, Virgil; Voronine, Dmitri V

    2013-01-01

    We performed food residue analysis of cook-stones from experimental and prehistoric earth ovens using a handheld Raman spectrometry. Progress in modern optical technology provides a facile means of rapid non-destructive identification of residue artifacts from archaeological sites. For this study spectral signatures were obtained on sotol (Dasylirion spp.) experimentally baked in an earth oven as well as sotol residue on an experimentally used processing tool. Inulin was the major residue component. The portable handheld Raman spectrometer also detected traces of inulin on boiling stones used to boil commercially obtained inulin. The Raman spectra of inulin and sotol may be useful as signatures of wild plant residues in archaeology. Spectroscopic analysis of millennia-old cook-stones from prehistoric archaeological sites in Fort Hood, TX revealed the presence of residues whose further identification requires improvement of current optical methods.

  14. Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays | netl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Quantum Chemistry of CO2 Interaction with Swelling Clays Ubiquitous clay minerals can play an important role in assessing...

  15. GreyStone Power- Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative in Georgia, offers a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to members. The one-time rebate is offered for PV installations that are interconnected...

  16. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  17. Economy in embodied utterances1 Matthew Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCarlo, Doug

    Economy in embodied utterances1 Matthew Stone Rutgers University In natural language generation to explore one kind of brevity, TEXTUAL ECONOMY, or, more generally, COMMUNICATIVE ECONOMY, which I introduce in Section 1. In communicative economy, speakers organize their actions to contribute to multiple

  18. Stone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract) Yuval Emek Distributed Computing Group ETH Zurich, Switzerland yemek@ethz.ch Roger Wattenhofer Distributed Computing Group ETH Zurich, Switzerland and cellular automata is suitable for applying the distributed computing lens to the study of networks of sub

  19. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Solar Thermal Loans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, covers 14 counties in northern Florida, including Gainesville, Keystone Heights, Lake City, Orange Park, Palatka, and Salt Springs....

  20. Competitive sorption of pyrene and pyridine to natural clay minerals and reference clay standards 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lai Man

    2001-01-01

    understood. This study followed a mechanistic approach to confirm suspected specific mineral-PAH interactions. The focus was on the sorption of pyrene to three clay sorbents, a soil clay fraction and two reference clay standards, in the presence of a...

  1. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ClaY and Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the clays are mainly underclays associated with coal. domestic production data for clays were developed-based products in Canada and the United S

  2. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2014-02-28

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

  3. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

    2013-10-02

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  4. Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

    2013-09-17

    A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

  5. TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS By: J. A. Kuhn1 and J. G. Zornberg for use in highly plastic clay. The clay used for experimentation was taken locally from the Eagle Ford Ford Clay is determined. INTRODUCTION The progression of wetting and drying fronts in highly plastic

  6. Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The influence of blending method, compatibil- izers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation. RHDPE/clay hybrids containing completely exfoliated clay were obtained using a two-step blending method), high density polyethylene (HDPE), and polypropylene (PP) are the three largest components

  7. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  8. On The Thermal Consolidation Of Boom Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2012-01-01

    When a mass of saturated clay is heated, as in the case of host soils surrounding nuclear waste disposals at great depth, the thermal expansion of the constituents generates excess pore pressures. The mass of clay is submitted to gradients of pore pressure and temperature, to hydraulic and thermal flows, and to changes in its mechanical properties. In this work, some of these aspects were experimentally studied in the case of Boom clay, so as to help predicting the response of the soil, in relation with investigations made in the Belgian underground laboratory at Mol. Results of slow heating tests with careful volume change measurements showed that a reasonable prediction of the thermal expansion of the clay-water system was obtained by using the thermal properties of free water. In spite of the density of Boom clay, no significant effect of water adsorption was observed. The thermal consolidation of Boom clay was studied through fast heating tests. A simple analysis shows that the hydraulic and thermal trans...

  9. Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Economic Impact of New Residents in Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui Parle, Swift, and Yellow of Minnesota Extension Center for Community Vitality August 2011 1 ECONOMIC IMPACT ANALYSIS An Extension Community Economics Program #12; Economic Impact of New Residents: Big Stone, Chippewa, Lac Qui

  10. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivay Obsidian Source Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; MacKay, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Variations in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the ChivayVariations in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivayof widely cir- culated raw materials provides an opportunity

  11. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crout, Neil

    1 TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL PREDICTION OF RADIOCAESIUM TRANSFER TO FOOD PRODUCTS A.G. GILLETT1 , N #12;2 ABSTRACT A recently developed semi-mechanistic temporal model to is used predict food product (exchangeable K, pH, % clay and % organic matter content). A raster database of soil characteristics

  12. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  13. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, K.C.; Winans, R.E.; Botto, R.E.

    1994-05-03

    A method is described for incorporating diverse varieties of intercalates or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalate or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalates or templates may be introduced. The intercalates or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays. 22 figures.

  14. Organic or organometallic template mediated clay synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregar, Kathleen C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Winans, Randall E. (Downers Grove, IL); Botto, Robert E. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for incorporating diverse Varieties of intercalants or templates directly during hydrothermal synthesis of clays such as hectorite or montmorillonite-type layer-silicate clays. For a hectorite layer-silicate clay, refluxing a gel of silica sol, magnesium hydroxide sol and lithium fluoride for two days in the presence of an organic or organometallic intercalant or template results in crystalline products containing either (a) organic dye molecules such as ethyl violet and methyl green, (b) dye molecules such as alcian blue that are based on a Cu(II)-phthalocyannine complex, or (c) transition metal complexes such as Ru(II)phenanthroline and Co(III)sepulchrate or (d) water-soluble porphyrins and metalloporphyrins. Montmorillonite-type clays are made by the method taught by U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,454 issued to Hickson, Jun. 13, 1975; however, a variety of intercalants or templates may be introduced. The intercalants or templates should have (i) water-solubility, (ii) positive charge, and (iii) thermal stability under moderately basic (pH 9-10) aqueous reflux conditions or hydrothermal pressurized conditions for the montmorillonite-type clays.

  15. Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11_9_06.doc | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc Microsoft Word - Clay Memo PMC Coburn Obama 11906.doc More Documents & Publications...

  16. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  17. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay Electric

  18. Characterization of Gulf of Mexico Clay Using Automated Triaxial Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri

    2012-02-14

    . This thesis presents the results of SHANSEP triaxial testing performed on undisturbed samples of Gulf of Mexico clay. Background information is given about the clay, the sampling program and the laboratory testing program. The GEOTAC Truepath automated stress...

  19. GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

  20. EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

  1. Extended Leach Testing of Simulated LAW Cast Stone Monoliths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Williams, Benjamin D.; Jung, H. B.; Wang, Guohui

    2015-07-09

    This report describes the results from long-term laboratory leach tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the release of key constituents from monoliths of Cast Stone prepared with four simulated low-activity waste (LAW) liquid waste streams. Specific objectives of the Cast Stone long-term leach tests described in this report focused on four activities: 1. Extending the leaching times for selected ongoing EPA-1315 tests on monoliths made with LAW simulants beyond the conventional 63-day time period up to 609 days reported herein (with some tests continuing that will be documented later) in an effort to evaluate long-term leaching properties of Cast Stone to support future performance assessment activities. 2. Starting new EPA-1315 leach tests on archived Cast Stone monoliths made with four LAW simulants using two leachants (deionized water [DIW] and simulated Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) Site vadose zone pore water [VZP]). 3. Evaluating the impacts of varying the iodide loading (starting iodide concentrations) in one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) Average) by manufacturing new Cast Stone monoliths and repeating the EPA-1315 leach tests using DIW and the VZP leachants. 4. Evaluating the impacts of using a non-pertechnetate form of Tc that is present in some Hanford tanks. In this activity one LAW simulant (7.8 M Na HTWOS Average) was spiked with a Tc(I)-tricarbonyl gluconate species and then solidified into Cast Stone monoliths. Cured monoliths were leached using the EPA-1315 leach protocol with DIW and VZP. The leach results for the Tc-Gluconate Cast Stone monoliths were compared to Cast Stone monoliths pertechnetate.

  2. Application of a Novel Clay Stabilizer to Mitigate Formation Damage due to Clay Swelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Timothy

    2014-12-09

    and drilling engineers’ responsibilities. This research focuses on the application of a cationic inorganic Al/Zr-based polymer clay stabilizer to prevent swelling of smectite particles in a sandstone matrix. Previous work has focused on mitigating fines...

  3. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  4. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2013-03-27

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

  5. Coatings and films derived from clay/wax nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Leyva, Argentina A.

    2006-11-14

    The invention provides methods for making clay/wax nanocomposites and coatings and films of same with improved chemical resistance and gas barrier properties. The invention further provides methods for making and using emulsions of such clay/wax nanocomposites. Typically, an organophillic clay is combined with a wax or wax/polymer blend such that the cohesion energy of the clay matches that of the wax or wax/polymer blend. Suitable organophilic clays include mica and phyllosilicates that have been surface-treated with edge or edge and surface modifying agents. The resulting nanocomposites have applications as industrial coatings and in protective packaging.

  6. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  7. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  8. FREDERICK E. STONE, HAROLD J. BARNETT, PATRICK J. HUNTER, GLENN C. ROBERTS, and RICHARD W. NELSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FREDERICK E. STONE, HAROLD J. BARNETT, PATRICK J. HUNTER, GLENN C. ROBERTS, and RICHARD W. NELSON- Frederick E. Stone, Chemist; Harold J. Barnett, Research Chemist; Patrick J. Hunter, Chemical Engineering

  9. What is a Stone Crab? The biggest crab that you might find at a Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    !) that might want to eat you. Your eyes would be on stalks similar to a little submarines periscope. Stone

  10. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    arc. Three directional wells were drilled in 2001 to optimize the productivity of the geothermal field up to 15 MWe and to investigate the vertical distribution of clay...

  11. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets...

  12. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of...

  13. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Nanodroplets on Clay Surfaces in Deep Saline Aquifers. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide...

  14. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rebates are available only to Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) residential members who are making efficiency upgrades to primary residence served by CEC. Rebates are available for residential...

  15. The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may be damaged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    The need to design and construct roadways on highly plastic clays is common in central and eastern Texas, where expansive clays are prevalent. Roadways constructed on highly plastic clay subgrades may the infiltration of water into highly plastic clays under an increased gravity field in a centrifuge. Project

  16. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    of a jurassic opalinum shale, switzerland. Clays and Clay96   1 INTRODUCTION Clay/shale has been considered asand Rupture of Heterogeneous Shale Samples by Using a Non-

  17. Stone Age Distributed Computing Yuval Emek Jasmin Smula Roger Wattenhofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone Age Distributed Computing Yuval Emek Jasmin Smula Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering.g. traffic), or electrical engineering (e.g. circuits). Distributed computing is the area that studies on "Internet-capable" devices. The standard model in distributed computing is the so called message passing

  18. Naphthene upgrading with pillared synthetic clay catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.K.; Olson, E.S. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Catalytic hydrotreatment of methylcyclohexane was investigated to model upgrading of coal-derived naphthenes. Nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM), alumina-pillared NiSMM and Zirconia-pillared NiSMM were prepared and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization of methylcyclohexane. Infrared and thermal desorption studies of the pyridine-adsorbed catalysts indicated the presence of Lewis and Bronsted acid sites. Total acidity and surface area increased with pillaring of NiSMM with polyoxy aluminum and polyoxy zirconium cations. Methylcyclohexane was reacted with these catalysts under a variety of conditions. Pillared clays gave higher gas yields and higher hydrocracking but lower hydroisomerization activity than nonpillared clay. The majority of the products were branched alkanes (isoparaffinic). These catalysts effectively use hydrogen as indicated by the minimal formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, coke, or other oligomeric materials. The effect of various operating conditions, i.e., reaction temperature, contact time, H{sub 2} pressure, and catalyst, on the product distribution will be described.

  19. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  20. The Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors on the Stability and Transport of Clay Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musharova, Darya

    2012-07-16

    clays, which include the kaolinite groups of clays. Therefore, two basic damage mechanisms of clay minerals are swelling and dispersion. Both mechanisms cause pore plugging, and thus aggravate hydrocarbon ease of flow. In this thesis, the effect...

  1. Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water in clay-water systems (1) Philip F. LOW Department of Agronomy, Purdue University. Agric. Exp. Stn., West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. SUMMARY The swelling of clay-water systems and the thermodynamic, hydrodynamic and spectroscopic properties of water in these systems are discussed. The swelling

  2. Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    ´, Budapest, Hungary 2012 Abstract Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan of Science, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad, Pakistan-012-1876-x #12;In Pakistan geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common especially amongst the women

  3. Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    Cesium Adsorption on Clay Minerals: An EXAFS Spectroscopic Investigation B E N J A M I N C . B O, Arizona 85721-0038 Cesium adsorption on the clay minerals vermiculite and montmorilloniteisdescribedasafunctionofsurfacecoverage using extended X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cesium (Cs) possessed

  4. Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Testing of Expansive Clays in a Centrifuge Permeameter M. D. Plaisted & J. G. Zornberg with the objective of characterizing the swelling of highly plastic clays using a centrifuge permeameter. The new. This study, conducted using a comparatively simple, non- instrumented centrifuge device complements ongo- ing

  5. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Stone and Asphalt Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moray, S.; Throop, N.; Seryak, J.; Schmidt, C.; Fisher, C.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01

    of locations use underground mines. Mining methods involve removing the overburden to extract the underlying rock deposits. Tricone rotary drills, long-hole percussion drills, and churn drills are used to create the blast holes in the rocks. Blasting... Energy & Resource Solutions, Inc. Haverhill, MA Abstract The highly energy-intensive stone mining and crushing industry, grouped with other mining industries, has been one of the focal sectors of the US Department of Energy’s Industries...

  6. Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-05

    Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

  7. Potassium Fixation and Supply by Soils with Mixed Clay Minerals. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hipp, Billy W.

    1969-01-01

    potassium Fixation and Supply By Soils With Misd Clay Minerals I KUS A&M UNIVERSITY Tcrv Agricultural Experiment Station r i 0. Kunkel, Acting Director, College Station, Texas Summary to the plants while Cameron clay supplied onl!. Studies were made... of plants for any one crop period. The plants were n , with distilled water throughout the experiment. ' Ther I Previous work by Hipp and Thomas (3) pointed out the importance of clay type in the assessment of K avail- ability in certain soils of Texas...

  8. Sandstone Acidizing Using Chelating Agents and their Interaction with Clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Noble Thekkemelathethil 1987-

    2013-01-09

    in the application of acidizing, coreflood tests were performed on Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. Another disadvantage of mud acid has been the fast spending at clay mineral surfaces leading to depletion of acid strength, migration of fines, and formation...

  9. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  10. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

  11. Analysis of consolidation around driven piles in overconsolidated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niarchos, Dimitrios G

    2012-01-01

    The principal objective of this thesis is to assess the capabilities of an already established analytical framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of piles driven in highly overconsolidated clays (OCR24). ...

  12. The mechanical behavior of heavily overconsolidated resedimented Boston Blue Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Bustamante, Albalyra Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    Geotechnical engineers encounter some of the most challenging problems in heavily overconsolidated soils. Clays under this condition originated in nature or man-made construction. This thesis investigates the mechanical ...

  13. Unsaturated properties for non-Darcian water flow in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Physical chemistry of clay-water interaction, Advance inporous media. Advances in Water Resources 2, 351-362. Zou,Newtonian fluids Figure 2. A water element in a capillary

  14. Intercalation of Trichloroethene by Sediment-Associated Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthieu, Donald E.; Brusseau, Mark; Johnson, G. R.; Artiola, J. L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Curry, J. E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the potential for intercalation of trichloroethene (TCE) by clay minerals associated with aquifer sediments. Sediment samples were collected from a field site inTucson, AZ. Two widely used Montmorillonite specimen clays were employed as controls. X-ray diffraction, conducted with a controlled-environment chamber, was used to characterize smectite interlayer dspacing for three treatments (bulk air-dry sample, sample mixed with synthetic groundwater, sample mixed with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater). The results show that the d-spacing measured for the samples treated with TCE-saturated synthetic groundwater are larger (*26%) than those of the untreated samples for all field samples as well as the specimen clays. These results indicate that TCE was intercalated by the clay minerals, which may have contributed to the extensive elution tailing observed in prior miscible-displacement experiments conducted with this sediment.

  15. Stone & McCarthy Research Associates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNew York: Energy ResourcesStokes County,Stone

  16. GreenStone Technologies LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEniaElectricHydro ElectricGreen St. EnergyGreenStone

  17. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  18. Building Stones (C002638) Valid in the academic year 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    from several different research domains (petrography, microscopy, engineering ,...) (M. 1.1; M 1.3; M 1 and petrography Recognizing the most important natural building stones used in Belgium based on microscopical reason can lead to a failure practicals: Petrography of natural stones used in Belgium ( hand specimens

  19. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MINWALL HJ

    2011-04-08

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  20. Toward a global space exploration program: A stepping stone approach Pascale Ehrenfreund a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of exploration programs and to safeguard the potential scientific assets of solar system objects. In this reportReview Toward a global space exploration program: A stepping stone approach Pascale Ehrenfreund a to a global space exploration program. The proposed stepping stones are intended to transcend cross

  1. Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-09-30

    This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points were analyzed for rheological properties and density. Both the rheological properties (plastic viscosity and yield strength) and density were consistent with previous and later SCPF runs.

  2. Midbarrel hydrocracking process employing rare earth pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gortsema, F.P.; McCauley, J.R.; Miller, J.G. Rabo, J.A.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes improvement in a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbons boiling above about 700{degrees} F. to midbarrel fuel products boiling between about 300{degrees} F. and about 700{degrees} F. which includes contacting the hydrocarbons with hydrogen under effective hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a catalyst composition consisting of at least one hydrogenation component and at least one cracking component. The improvement comprises utilizing as the cracking component an expanded clay including pillars comprising at least one pillaring metal, at least one rare earth element and oxygen located between the sheets of at least one clay mineral or synthetic analogue thereof.

  3. Diagenesis of clay minerals from early Eocene shales of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whynot, John David

    1983-01-01

    expandable layers with depth that is reflected in the K 0 content and cation exchange capac- 2 ity (CEC) of the mixed-layer clay rich fine clay (& 0. 2 )jm) fraction. Samples high in expandable layers have a low K 0 content and high CEC. Samples low... in expandable layers have a high K 0 content and low CEC, which reflect the potassium being fixed in the interlayer positions of expandable layers. Potassium for this reaction may come from the K-feldspar rich silt (2 ? . 63 um) fraction. Some samples show...

  4. Lateral load test of a drilled shaft in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasch, Vernon R

    1977-01-01

    LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering LATERAL LOAD TEST OF A DRILLED SHAFT IN CLAY A Thesis by VERNON RAY KASCH Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle - Ch irman of Committee Charles H. Samson, Jr. Head of Department Wayne . Dunlap - Ne er Christop er C...

  5. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay

  6. Multiscale micromechanical modeling of the thermal/mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng, Nuo, 1977-

    2006-01-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced thermal/mechanical properties at low weight fractions (We) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly ...

  7. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  8. On the relationship between water-flux and hydraulic gradient for unsaturated and saturated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Threshold gradient for water flow in clay systems. Soil.Darcy’s law for the flow of water in soils. Soil Science 93:1970. Saturated flow of water through clay loam subsoil

  9. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    illitization in burial diagenesis environments. Geochimicausually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation (is usually part of the diagenesis process of clay formation.

  10. Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams Thomas Bever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bever, Thomas G.

    Chinese character decoding: a semantic bias? Clay Williams · Thomas Bever Published online: 6 April on Chinese character decoding were examined. Our results suggest that semantic and phonetic radicals are each response times. These results are interpreted to indicate that while educated native Chinese speakers have

  11. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples Pierre DELAGE 1 , Trung-Tinh LE 1 , Anh-Minh TANG located at Mol (Belgium) called Boom clay, in the context of research into deep nuclear waste disposal. Suction effects in deep Boom clay block samples were investigated through the characterisation

  12. A reinterpretation of "sense of place" : a study of the Stone Town of Zanzibar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Costa, Alfred Franklin

    1989-01-01

    This thesis attempts to understand the evolution of the Stone Town of Zanzibar, an urban fabric that had undergone a phase of upheaval that was brought about by a brief period of rapid change in its political, social and ...

  13. Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvell, Catherine Drew

    Isotopic and microbial indicators of sewage pollution from Stone Town, Zanzibar, Tanzania Molly A, Washington, DC, USA c Institute of Marine Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Zanzibar, Tanzania a r t i c

  14. Conservation of stone-roofs: Challenges and the effect of new Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teba, Tarek

    Stone-roofing has a great history which spans many millennia BC which witnessed a lot of development to roofing systems and geometry regarding the area and type of building demands. Therefore, this paper discusses this ...

  15. TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Matthew

    TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber Dept, thatexploitsthe hearer's recognitionof inferentiallinkstomaterial elsewhere withina sentence. Textual economy argue that achieving textual economy imposes strong requirements on the representation and reasoning

  16. Palynology and paleoecology of the Stone City member, Crockett Formation, Middle Eocene, Burleson Co, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Jennifer Marie

    1997-01-01

    A total of 103 genera and 157 species of terrestrial pollen, and at least 36 genera and 52 species of dinoflagellates were recovered from a core taken from the Stone City section in Burleson County, Texas. Both terrestrial ...

  17. Worn Stones with Flat Sides - All Time Regularity of the Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worn Stones with Flat Sides - All Time Regularity of the Interface. We study the all time regularity of the free-boundary problem associated to the de- formation of ...

  18. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  19. Food Allergies DEFINITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Food Allergies DEFINITIONS: Definition of a Food Allergy: Immune system response to a food that the body mistakenly thinks is harmful. Upon deciding a particular food is harmful, the immune system creates a defense immune system response (antibodies) to fight it. Food allergy symptoms develop when

  20. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01

    and Expectations about Food Safety." Giannini Foundation ofof Bio?lm-Forming Bacteria for Food Safety Control." IEEEpower fights germs in food. ” Food Production Daily. (2013).

  1. Clay County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:

  2. Clay County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,

  3. FOOD ALLERGY RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    FOOD ALLERGY RESEARCH PROGRAM INNOVATION ENGINES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE INFLAMMATION, AUTOIMMUNITY, IMMUNOLOGY The growing prevalence of food allergy and the relative lack of treatment options investigation, and mechanistic science, we are striving towards halting the increase in food allergies, ensuring

  4. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1999-01-01

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  5. Agricultural and Food Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) #12;86 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Officers in agriculture was initiated in 1956. #12;87Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences (FAFS) Undergraduate

  6. FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    FOOD SERVICE Professional Organizations: National Association of College and University Food National Association of College and University Food Services (NACUFS) conference NACUFS Mid-Atlantic Region of Colleges and University Food Services e-newsletter Social Media: National Association of College

  7. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jové Colón, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David H.; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kunhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens; Caporuscio, Florie A.; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael S.; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark; Jerden, James; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William

    2014-08-29

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: ? Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; ? Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; ? Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; ? Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment; ? ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  8. Detection and Quantification of Expansive Clay Minerals in Geologically-Diverse Texas Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, George 1983-

    2012-11-28

    minerals identified from XRD pattern of Jones Mill clay ???... 48 4.2 Rankin clay with HIM plateau at 12 ? of ?Mg, RT? treatment ............... 48 4.3 Armor aggregate with palygorskite (10.6 ?) and sepiolite (12.2 ?) ?.. 49 4.4 Fibrous palygorskite... and sepiolite minerals in Armor clay (29000X) ?. 50 4.5 Clay mineral quantities in aggregate fines (- 2 mm starting material) ?. 54 4.6 SEM image of high-crystallinity kaolinite ?books? in Rankin fines ?? 59 4.7 SEM images of Scarmado, Tolar, and Yarrington...

  9. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    parameters (permeability, capillary pressure of concrete/Concrete Clay Van Genuchten Po (Pa) Van Genuchten m Specific Heat (J/kg K) Permeability (

  10. Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump

  11. Clay County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy Resources

  12. Clay County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: Energy

  13. Clay County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana: Energy

  14. Clay County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana:

  15. Clay County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida: EnergyIndiana:Kansas:

  16. Clay County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota: Energy

  17. Clay County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:

  18. Clay County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County, Florida:Minnesota:Missouri:

  19. Clay County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy Resources

  20. Clay County, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: Energy

  1. Clay County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina: EnergyTennessee:

  2. Clay County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:

  3. Clay-Union Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,ThermalCubaParker,Georgia (UtilityWilliamsCentralClay-Union

  4. Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

  5. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-11-01

    Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. One of the major radionuclides that Cast Stone has the potential to immobilize is technetium (Tc). The mechanism for immobilization is through the reduction of the highly mobile Tc(VII) species to the less mobile Tc(IV) species by the blast furnace slag (BFS) used in the Cast Stone formulation. Technetium immobilization through this method would be beneficial because Tc is one of the most difficult contaminants to address at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site due to its complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes (vitrification, steam reformation, etc.), and high mobility in subsurface environments. In fact, the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS) identifies technetium-99 (99Tc) as one of the radioactive tank waste components contributing the most to the environmental impact associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site. The TC&WM EIS, along with an earlier supplemental waste-form risk assessment, used a diffusion-limited release model to estimate the release of different contaminants from the WTP process waste forms. In both of these predictive modeling exercises, where effective diffusivities based on grout performance data available at the time, groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well exceeded the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for 99Tc. (900 pCi/L). Recent relatively short-term (63 day) leach tests conducted on both LAW and secondary waste Cast Stone monoliths indicated that 99Tc diffusivities were at or near diffusivities where the groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well would exceed the allowable maximum permissible 99Tc concentrations. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of Tc in the Cast Stone waste form. One method to improve the performance of the Cast Stone waste form is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc inside Cast Stone.

  6. Radioactivity and food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. (Laboratorio Unificado de Control de Alimentos y Medicamentos (LUCAM) (Guatemala))

    1990-03-01

    Two topics relating to radioactivity and food are discussed: food irradiation for preservation purposes, and food contamination from radioactive substances. Food irradiation involves the use of electromagnetic energy (x and gamma rays) emitted by radioactive substances or produced by machine in order to destroy the insects and microorganisms present and prevent germination. The sanitary and economic advantages of treating food in this way are discussed. Numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undesirable changes take place in food that has been irradiated nor is radioactivity induced. Reference is made to the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station, which aroused public concern about irradiated food. The events surrounding the accident are reviewed, and its consequences with regard to contamination of different foods with radioactive substances, particularly iodine-131 and cesium-137, are described. Also discussed are the steps that have been taken by different international organizations to set limits on acceptable radioactivity in food.15 references.

  7. Food Science and Nutrition Department of Food Science and Nutrition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Science and Nutrition Department of Food Science and Nutrition Institute for Food Safety of Food Science and Nutrition (FdSN) at the School of Applied Technology and the Institute for Food Safety and Health (IFSH), with IIT faculty, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) scientists, and food industry

  8. Diagenesis and clay mineral formation at Gale Crater, Mars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bridges, J. C.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Leveille, R.; Westall, F.; Wiens, R. C.; Mangold, N.; Bristow, T.; Edwards, P.; Berger, G.

    2015-01-18

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity found host rocks of basaltic composition and alteration assemblages containing clay minerals at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater. On the basis of the observed host rock and alteration minerals, we present results of equilibrium thermochemical modeling of the Sheepbed mudstones of Yellowknife Bay in order to constrain the formation conditions of its secondary mineral assemblage. Building on conclusions from sedimentary observations by the Mars Science Laboratory team, we assume diagenetic, in situ alteration. The modeling shows that the mineral assemblage formed by the reaction of a CO?-poor and oxidizing, dilute aqueous solution (Gale Portage Water)more »in an open system with the Fe-rich basaltic-composition sedimentary rocks at 10–50°C and water/rock ratio (mass of rock reacted with the starting fluid) of 100–1000, pH of ~7.5–12. Model alteration assemblages predominantly contain phyllosilicates (Fe-smectite, chlorite), the bulk composition of a mixture of which is close to that of saponite inferred from Chemistry and Mineralogy data and to that of saponite observed in the nakhlite Martian meteorites and terrestrial analogues. To match the observed clay mineral chemistry, inhomogeneous dissolution dominated by the amorphous phase and olivine is required. We therefore deduce a dissolving composition of approximately 70% amorphous material, with 20% olivine, and 10% whole rock component.« less

  9. Food Movements Unite! Strategies to Transform Our Food Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    the social movements actively transforming our food systems.For more information about Food First’s publicationsor the global food system, visit their website:

  10. Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Change in the hydraulic properties of a Brazilian clay Ferralsol on clearing for pasture L. C 80 to 300 m in size. The aim of this study was to analyze how the hydraulic properties of a clay retention properties were determined by using pressure cell equipment. We determined the saturated hydraulic

  11. A Simple Method To Improve the Clarity and Rheological Properties of Polymer/Clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Srinivasa

    of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 ABSTRACT We present a simple method to improve. INTRODUCTION P olymer nanocomposites made by mixing thermo- plastic polymers with clay particles have been applications. The one property of polymers/plastics that is adversely impacted by the addition of clay

  12. Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Evacuated Panels Utilizing Clay-Polymer Aerogel Composites for Improved Housing Insulation March 17 encompasses a newly developed clay-polymer aerogel composite material (developed and patented by Dr. David Aerogel ~22 > 2,500 Silica Aerogel Blanket 10 1,800 (Aspen Aerogel) Silica Aerogel / PP Evacuated Panel 50

  13. Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Physicochemical Controls on the Formation of Polynuclear Metal Complexes at Clay Mineral Surfaces R. G. Ford Metal sorption to clay minerals may lead to the formation of secondary precipitates structurally similar to the mineral takovite. Saturation with respect to this phase is promoted, in part

  14. Attitudes about Food 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Nicole Alexis

    2012-10-19

    Approximately 18% of adolescents are obese. Attitudes about Food is a cross sectional study that seeks to identify lifestyle factors associated with adolescent obesity such as fast food consumption, physical activity, ...

  15. utism is the Rosetta Stone of human neurobiology. Deciphering autism will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A utism is the Rosetta Stone of human neurobiology. Deciphering autism will lead us to new insights ways to bring autism research to the forefront of mod- ern brain science, not just to help our children Autism" lectures to parent groups, I like to refer to this phenomenon because I imagine that someday we

  16. New Hampshire "4-H Horse of the Year" Peter Stone Model Horse Contest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    New Hampshire "4-H Horse of the Year" Peter Stone Model Horse® Contest Current and former 4-H members are invited to submit nominations for the New Hampshire "4- H Horse of the Year" award. The focus.Davis@unh.edu ****************************************************************************** February 2015 The University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension is an equal opportunity educator

  17. THE EFFECTS OF STONE FRUIT EXTRACT ON THE PROCESS OF PLATELET AGGREGATION IN VITRO 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deleeuw, Peter 1990-

    2011-07-25

    This project attempts to examine the impact stone fruits can have on the clotting of blood in the human body. Plum rich anthocyanin extract (RAE) was added in different concentrations (1-25ug/ml) to rabbit platelets suspended in Tyrode’s buffer...

  18. Multi-robot Human Guidance using Topological Graphs Piyush Khandelwal and Peter Stone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter

    Multi-robot Human Guidance using Topological Graphs Piyush Khandelwal and Peter Stone Department,pstone}@cs.utexas.edu Abstract Prior approaches to human guidance using robots in- side a building have typically been limited to a single robot guide that navigates a human from start to goal. However, due to their limited mobility

  19. TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS ·Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber Dept efficientdescriptionsofobjects, actions and events. Wedefinea typeof efficiency, textual economy, thatexploitsthehearer goals, and is therefore overloaded in the sense of Pollack [18]. We argue that achieving textual economy

  20. Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments, this treatment reduced decay incidence from 100 to less than 5% on fruit stored at 20 C and from 73 to 28% on cold-stored fruit. Therefore, brief immersion in heated water can be an effective approach to manage

  1. An evaluation of Stones method to determinte pseudo-relative permeability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Permadi, Asep Kurnia

    1994-01-01

    saturations in the vertical direction have been published. However, at present, the most common method is either the method proposed by Jacks et al. or Kyte and BeiTy. Both methods use fine-grid reservoir simulation results. Stone developed a new method based...

  2. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR TREATMENT & DISPOSAL OF IODINE RICH CAUSTIC WASTE DEMONSTRATION FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    2005-07-14

    CH2M HILL is working to develop, design, and construct low-activity waste (LAW) treatment and imcholization systems to supplement the LAW capacity provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. CH2M HILL is investigating use of cast stone technology for treatment and immobilization of caustic solutions containing high concentrations of radioactive Iodine-129.

  3. Delayed Linear Expansion of Two Ultra-low Expansion Dental Stones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppedisano, Michael

    2013-12-20

    The purpose of this study was to measure the linear setting expansion of two ultra-low expansion dental stones used in definitive cast/ prosthesis fabrication which claim to have very low to no setting expansion. Five specimens of each material...

  4. ANALYSIS OF INDENTATION CREEP D.S. Stone,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Don

    -forward to analyze and interpret as the more conventional uniaxial creep experiment, the indentation test1 ANALYSIS OF INDENTATION CREEP D.S. Stone,1,2 J.E. Jakes,2,3 J. Puthoff,2 and A.A. Elmustafa4 1 of Materials Research #12;2 ABSTRACT Finite element analysis is used to simulate cone indentation creep

  5. An Experiment on Length Perception with a Virtual Rolling Stone Hsin-Yun Yao Vincent Hayward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    the hand. It is natural that learned gravity-related invariance in humans (and probably in most animals) be An Experiment on Length Perception with a Virtual Rolling Stone Hsin-Yun Yao Vincent Hayward contingency posits that humans exploit invariants about the physics of their environment and about their own

  6. Seawater Osmium Isotope Records from Pacific ODP and IODP Sites- Refining the Paleogene Curve and Dating Red Clay Sequences 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolewicz, Zachary Louis

    2013-02-04

    exclusively of pelagic clay with little existing age control. Recent work indicates that seawater Osmium (Os) isotope analyses provide useful age control for red clay sequences due to its relatively long residence time compared to oceanic mixing. The drawback...

  7. A New Application of Potassium Nitrate as an Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Jing

    2015-04-15

    The application of potassium chloride (KCl) as a temporary clay stabilizing additive in water-based drilling fluids is problematic in chloride-sensitive formations. However, failure to utilize clay stabilization leads to additional costs to drilling...

  8. Four Simple Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    luncheon meat, cold cuts, deli-style meat and poul- try until steaming hot. Chill: Refrigerate or freeze Safe Food Handling and Preparation USDA's Meat and Poultry Hotline: 1-800-535-4555 FDA's Food. August, 2004 Separate: Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from other foods in your grocery shopping

  9. WATERCHARRETTE food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATERCHARRETTE food deserts University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design, and Planning 3 summary introduction context To provide a more local society that is less dependent upon large-scale food dialogues will be held to engage students in the concepts of sustainable water management, food deserts

  10. Model of crack propagation in a clay soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carriere, Patrick Edwidge

    1985-01-01

    of variance (ANOVA) to obtain the best selection to be included in the model. The ANOYA model was expressed by: Model = BO(H) + Bl(CL) + B2(M) + B3(H"M) + B4(H*CL) + B5(M*CL) + B6(H~M*CL) where: H = humidity effect, CL = clay content effect, M = initial.... 0280* T5 0. 7413 0. 5771 6. 16 0. 0001* T6 0. 2973 0. 2887 4. 94 0. 001* T7 0. 2065 0. 3432 2. 89 0. 0084* T8 0. 2543 0. 0767 15. 89 0. 0001* * significant at level 0. 05 30 Table 3. ANOVA results for crack de th. Source Sum of Degrees of Mean F...

  11. Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2 , A. M. In the present work, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay samples from the borehole Essen-1 at a depth and hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay from Essen at 227-m, 240-m and 248-m depths are similar

  12. EPOK Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects.slu.se/epok/english #12;ORGANIC FOOD ­ food quality and potential health effects Publishing year: 2015, Uppsala Publisher: SLU, EPOK ­ Centre for Organic Food & Farming Lay-out: Pelle Fredriksson, SLU, EPOK Photo, cover: i

  13. 1 Food Safety Policy July 2010 Food Safety Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    1 Food Safety Policy July 2010 Food Safety Policy Food Safety Policy 19.7.2010 19.7.2014 #12;2 Food 5. Organisational Responsibilities 6. The Legal References 7. Glossary of Terms #12;3 Food Safety Policy July 2010 Food Safety Policy 1. Introduction 1.1 The University has a duty to assess the risks

  14. FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry Instructor: Dr. David Kitts Department of Food Sciences Room 243 ­ Food, Nutrition & Health Building 2205 East Mall Food, Nutrition & Health Faculty of Land and Food Systems ­ University of British Columbia Phone: 604-822-5560; Fax: 604

  15. Characterization of Interlayer Cs+ in Clay Samples Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Laser Sample Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; R. Avci; C. Karahan; K. Lefebre; R. V. Fox; M. M. Cortez; A. K. Gianotto; J. Sunner; W. L. Manner

    2004-04-01

    Ultraviolet laser irradiation was used to greatly enhance the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) detection of Cs+ adsorbed to soil consisting of clay and quartz. Imaging SIMS showed that the enhancement of the Cs+ signal was spatially heterogeneous: the intensity of the Cs+ peak was increased by factors up to 100 for some particles but not at all for others. Analysis of standard clay samples exposed to Cs+ showed a variable response to laser irradiation depending on the type of clay analyzed. The Cs+ abundance was significantly enhanced when Cs+-exposed montmorillonite was irradiated and then analyzed using SIMS, which contrasted with the behavior of Cs+-exposed kaolinite, which displayed no Cs+ enhancement. Exposed illitic clays displayed modest enhancement of Cs+ upon laser irradiation, intermediate between that of kaolinite and montmorillonite. The results for Cs+ were rationalized in terms of adsorption to interlayer sites within the montmorillonite, which is an expandable phyllosilicate. In these locations, Cs+ was not initially detectable using SIMS. Upon irradiation, Cs+ was thermally redistributed, which enabled detection using SIMS. Since neither the illite nor the kaolinite is an expandable clay, adsorption to inner-layer sites does not occur, and either modest or no laser enhancement of the Cs+ signal is observed. Laser irradiation also produced unexpected enhancement of Ti+ from illite and kaolinite clays that contained small quantities of Ti, which indicates the presence of microscopic titanium oxide phases in the clay materials.

  16. Radioactivity and foods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olszyna-Marzys, A.E. (Unified Lab. of Food and Drug Control, Guatemala City (Guatemala))

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and contrast two relationships between radiation and food--on the one hand, beneficial preservation of food by controlled exposure to ionizing radiation; and, on the other, contamination of food by accidental incorporation of radioactive nuclides within the food itself. In food irradiation, electrons or electromagnetic radiation is used to destroy microorganisms and insects or prevent seed germination. The economic advantages and health benefits of sterilizing food in this manner are clear, and numerous studies have confirmed that under strictly controlled conditions no undersirable changes or induced radioactivity is produced in the irradiated food. An altogether different situation is presented by exposure of food animals and farming areas to radioactive materials, as occurred after the major Soviet nuclear reactor accident at Chenobyl. This article furnishes the basic information needed to understand the nature of food contamination associated with that event and describes the work of international organizations seeking to establish appropriate safe limits for levels of radioactivity in foods.

  17. Extension Investment Option 2015-17 Food Systems, Food Security, Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Extension Investment Option 2015-17 Food Systems, Food Security, Food Safety The Statewide Need: Food is complicated--culturally, politically, and economically. A food systems approach is a key the foundational strengths of OSU Extension and its delivery model in communities and across the state. Food

  18. The provenance of the stone ballast from the Molasses Reef Wreck 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamb, William Reginald

    1988-01-01

    with the actual (optically observed) mi nera I composition, the mode. The samples that were sent for chemical analysis were only from those basalt ballast stones which had been petrographically examined. Chemical analysis was used to decrease the potential...). The proportion of groundmass in the individual rocks is variable. Some of the rocks are nearly andesitic in composition as judged by the high amount of p lagioclase feldspars. They are grouped with basalts because of their similarity in overall appearance...

  19. Monitoring the Excavation Damaged Zone in Opalinus clay by three dimensional reconstruction of the electrical resistivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    rock laboratory: Characterization, simulation and application, Engineering Geology, 117, 39-51. #12; with structural geology, Applied clay science, 33, 21-34. Nicollin, F., Gibert, D., Lesparre, N. & Nussbaum, C

  20. Dechlorination of Pentachlorophenol by ammonium amended clays: development of field applicable techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Junying

    1997-01-01

    superfund sites in both soil and groundwater. The objective of this thesis is to study mechanisms to dechlorinate PCP into less harmful derivatives. The method that we are interested in utilizes ammonium-amended clays to dechlorinate PCP. Based...

  1. Clay Electric Cooperative, Inc- Energy Smart Solar Water Heater Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clay Electric Cooperative (CEC) provides a rebate of $0.01 per BTU output to its residential members when they purchase qualified solar water heaters. This rebate is capped at 60,000 BTUs per...

  2. A comparison of the behavior of intact and Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (BBC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House, Robert Donald

    2012-01-01

    Resedimented Boston Blue Clay (RBBC) has been used as an analog test material for research at MIT for decades, due to local variability and the high cost of sampling. However, a comprehensive study of the differences in ...

  3. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  4. Investigating the Use of Chelating Agents for Clay Dissolution and Sandstone Acidizing Purposes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andotra, Gautam

    2014-08-06

    Mud acid, a mixture of HCl and HF, has been frequently used for stimulating sandstone reservoirs. However, using HCl in such environments can be problematic, especially at higher temperatures. Some of the most common problems are the following: clay...

  5. Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Radon spectroscopy of packet delay Andre Broido, Ryan King, Evi Nemeth, kc cla#y CAIDA, SDSC techniques, specifically the Radon transform previously applied in geophysics [6] and computer tomography [7

  6. Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Clay-filled Polymer Nanocomposite Thin Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Woo-Sik

    2010-01-14

    robotic dipping system, for the preparation of these thin films, was built. The robot alternately dips a substrate into aqueous mixtures with rinsing and drying in between. Thin films of sodium montmorillonite clay and cationic polymer were grown...

  7. 182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    . L. Sparks Dent of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19717 The1ldsorption. (1970). Clays Clay Miner., 18,203-212. 3. Greenland, D.J. and J.P. Quirk. (1964) J. Soil ScL, 15, 178.A., P.R. Jaffe, and C.T. Chiou. (1990). Environ. Sci. Techno!., 24, 1167-1172. 6. Cadena, F. and R

  8. Retention of anhydrous ammonia as influenced by clay mineral types, cations, temperature and moisture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBee, George G

    1956-01-01

    samples . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 0 13 Ammonia retained by clays heated to various temperature levels prior to treatment with anhydrous ammonia . . . . ~ 1'9 Ammonia retained by clays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating... to various temperature levels . . . . . ~ 20 5a 6. 70 Ammoni. a retained sxuressed as psr cent of cation-exchange capacity for olays treated with anhydrous ammonia prior to heating to various temperature levels . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 21 Ammonia retained...

  9. Muffle furnace evaluation of FGD sludge-coal-clay mixtures as potential synthetic aggregates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettit, Jesse William

    1978-01-01

    MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Thesis JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Suoject: Civil Engineering MUFFLE FURNACE EVALUATION OF FGD SLUDGE-COAL-CLAY MIXTURES AS POTENTIAL SYNTHETIC AGGREGATES A Theseus by JESSE WILLIAM PETTIT Approved as to style and content by: r n of Commi tee...

  10. Food Redistribution as Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Caleb; Higbee, Becky

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the simultaneous problems of food waste and hunger in the context of the possible solution of food (waste) rescue and redistribution. To this end, we develop an empirical model that can be used in Monte Carlo simulations to study the dynamics of the underlying problem. Our model's parameters are derived from a unique data set provided by a large food bank and food rescue organization in north central Colorado. We find that food supply is a non-parametric heavy-tailed process that is well-modeled with an extreme value peaks-over-threshold model. Although the underlying process is stochastic, the basic approach of food rescue and redistribution appears to be feasible both at small and large scales. The ultimate efficacy of this model is intimately tied to the rate at which food expires and hence the ability to preserve and quickly transport and redistribute food. The cost of the redistribution is tied to the number and density of participating suppliers, and costs can be reduced (and supp...

  11. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. The PA is needed to satisfy both Washington State IDF Permit and DOE Order requirements. Cast Stone has been selected for solidification of radioactive wastes including WTP aqueous secondary wastes treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. A similar waste form called Saltstone is used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to solidify its LAW tank wastes.

  12. carleton.ca Food Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Food Science and Nutrition #12;The production and distribution of food is one on the effective processing, storage and handling of food. The field of food science integrates and applies, process, package and distribute foods that are nutritious, affordable, desirable and safe to eat

  13. Local Food, Sustainability, and Cuba's National Food Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusco, Audrey Corinne

    2008-01-01

    There is a tendency in food systems research and planning to associate sustainable and socially just food provisioning with the local scale. This thesis questions the assumption that food security and environmental ...

  14. of Your Food Contents Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B-1400 8/11 of Your Food Content The Sodium #12;Contents Page Introduction.......................................................................................3 Sodium content of foods Beverages and fruit juices activity, and encourages Americans to consume more healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, seafood, whole

  15. Food Exemption Request Organization Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Exemption Request Organization Information Organization Received ______ Organizations are permitted one food exemption per semester. Requests must be submitted and Regulations Your group has requested a food exemption for an event. The rules and regulations for use

  16. Safe Home Food Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22

    leftovers? The charts in this publication give storage times for many leftover foods. Planning and us- ing leftovers carefully can save money and time. To prevent food-borne illness, it is important to prepare and handle foods properly: a78 Wash your hands.... Cooked fish or shellfish 2-3 days 3 months Canned fish or shellfish (unopened) 12 months (opened) 1 day Surimi seafood 2 weeks 9 months Fruits Fresh Do not wash fruit before storing?mois- Apples 1 month ture encourages spoilage?but wash Apricots, avocados...

  17. HDS and deep HDS activity of Co/Mo/S-mesostructured synthetic clays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrado, K. A.; Song, C.; Kim, J. H.; Castagnola, N.; Fernandez-Saavedra, R.; Marshall, C. L.; Schwartz, M. M.; Penn State Univ.; ICMM-CSIC

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work is to identify more promising supports from synthetic clay materials to advance hydrotreating catalyst development. Silica sol can be used as the silicon-containing starting material when creating nanoporous layered silicate catalysts with a certain portion of unreacted sol particles incorporated into the final matrix. The resulting structure then has mesoporosity and a unique morphology. Hectorite-based clays have been prepared using different silica sols in order to ascertain the importance of sol characteristics on the final matrix. Several techniques have been applied to characterize the materials, including XRD, TGA, N2 porosimetry, and TEM. For hydrodesulfurization (HDS), the conversion of dibenzothiophene (DBT) to biphenyl was examined at 400 degrees C using CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay supports. No hydrogenation or hydrocracking was observed with any of the clay supports. The most active clay was derived from Ludox silica sol AS-30 with an activity of 65% DBT conversion and 100% selectivity to biphenyl (BP). For comparison, a reference commercial catalyst displayed 94% BP selectivity. For deep HDS, the conversion of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was tested at 325 and 350 degrees C. At 325 degrees C, conversions are 92% of commercial catalysts for a CoMoS-loaded mesostructured clay derived from Ludox AM-30 silica sol. A commercially available synthetic hectorite called laponite has very low activity, indicating that the unique morphology of the mesostructured clays is important. Hydrogenolysis vs. hydrogenation pathways are compared for the deep HDS reaction. HR-TEM of the most active deep HDS catalyst revealed a multilayered MoS2 morphology.

  18. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  19. Food Adulteration in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1906-01-01

    ............ .Houston. ...... Salicylic Acid, Starch, Be zoic Acid, artificial colo 35 Fruit Catsup ......... Houston. ....... Colored. ig Tomato catsup ..... .Houston; ...... Starch. , , TABLE VE-CATSUP, NOT FOUND ADULTERATED ,aboratory N 0. 57 Tomato Catsup... is made in the Texas law-. The fol- lowing is the definition od misbranding under the Federal Food Law: In case of food- "First. If it be an imitation of or offered for sale under the distinctive , name of another article. n "Second. If it .be...

  20. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—Cast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2010-06-28

    PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 × 10-11 to 2.3 × 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 × 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 × 10-9 to 1.8 × 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

  1. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic elimination of a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kibanova, Daria

    2010-01-01

    of semiconductor photocatalysis Chem. Rev. 1995, 95, 69-effluents by TiO 2 photocatalysis Catalysis Today 2000, 63,clay on adsorption and photocatalysis of gaseous molecules

  2. Reduction And Immobilization Of Hexavalent Chromium By Microbially Reduced Fe-bearing Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, Michael E.; Glasser, Paul; Dong, Hailiang; Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor

    2014-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) is a major contaminant in the environment. As a redox-sensitive element, the fate and toxicity of chromium is controlled by reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions. Previous research has shown the ability of structural Fe(II) in naturally present and chemically reduced clay minerals to reduce Cr6+ to Cr(III) as a way of immobilization and detoxification. However, it is still poorly known whether or not structural Fe(II) in biologically reduced clay minerals exhibits a similar reactivity and if so, what the kinetics and mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction are. The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics and possible mechanisms of Cr6+ reduction by structural Fe(II) in microbially reduced clay minerals and the nature of reduced Cr(III). Structural Fe(III) in nontronite (NAu-2), montmorillonite (SWy-2), chlorite (CCa-2), and clay-rich sediments from the Ringold Formation of the Hanford site of Washington State, USA was first bioreduced to Fe(II) by an iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens with acetate as the sole electron donor and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfate (AQDS) as electron shuttle in synthetic groundwater (pH 7). Biogenic Fe(II) was then used to reduce aqueous Cr6+ at three different temperatures, 10°, 20°, and 30°C, in order to determine the temperature dependence of the redox reaction between Cr6+ and clay-Fe(II). The results showed that nontronite and montmorillonite were most effective in reducing aqueous Cr6+ at all three temperatures. In contrast, most Fe(II) in chlorite was not reactive towards Cr6+ reduction at 10°C, though at 30°C there was some reduction. For all the clay minerals, the ratio of total Fe(II) oxidized to Cr6+ reduced was close to the expected stoichiometric value of 3. Characterization of the Cr-clay reaction product with scanning electron microscopy with focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy with electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed that reduced chromium was possibly in the form of sub-nanometer Cr2O3 in association with residual clay minerals as micro-aggregates. This textural association was expected to minimize the chance of Cr(III) reoxidation upon exposure to oxidants. These results are important for our understanding of how various clay minerals may be used to reductively immobilize the heavy metal contaminant Cr in the environment.

  3. Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

    2013-11-26

    The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity

  4. Abundance and distribution of the western Gulf stone crab (Menippe adina) in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boslet, Jane Murray

    1989-01-01

    I BUNDANCE AND DI STRISUT . ON OF THE WESTERN GULF STOiuE CRAB LilFNIL'PC l', Diijil) IN GALVESTON BAY TEXAS Thesis JALXE iiURRAY HOSLET SuL&mitted to th= Office of Graduate Studies of Texa Aai1 University in :. a- Dial fulfullment... of the requirements for the deqree of MAS'I ~ R OI" SCIENCE May 19B9 Major subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE WESTERN GULF STONE CRAB (NENIPPE ADINA) IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by JANE MURRAY BOSLET Approved...

  5. "Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentatabout Who WorksNameGlaser,Rolling Stone" covers

  6. Texas Food may be foun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selling H When you a 1) Texa follo 2) FDA 3) FDA 4) Loca 5) Hom Texas Food You may Food Facilit Food Labeli al Health Dep meowner or d Manufactu will need a nd at the fol ide column y The room us (also known Warehousin Your firm ob nt to becom he Foods hom click on sec ring facility a n

  7. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    UEE 2012 “Concrete” or “lime plaster” made from limestoneto reduce (calcine) calcite (CaCO 3 ) to “quick lime” (CaO).When powdered quick lime is mixed with water (a process

  8. Utilitarian Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2012-01-01

    and other metals, and raw materials for paint pigments andand other metals, and raw materials for paint pigments and

  9. Ornamental Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

  10. Utilitarian Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrell, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

  11. Building Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

  12. Dynamics of confined reactive water in Smectic clay-zeolite composites.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  13. Dynamics of confined reactive water in smectite clay-zeolite composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitman, Michael C.; Van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of water confined to mesoporous regions in minerals such as swelling clays and zeolites is fundamental to a wide range of resource management issues impacting many processes on a global scale, including radioactive waste containment, desalination, and enhanced oil recovery. Large-scale atomic models of freely diffusing multilayer smectite particles at low hydration confined in a silicalite cage are used to investigate water dynamics in the composite environment with the ReaxFF reactive force field over a temperature range of 300 647 K. The reactive capability of the force field enabled a range of relevant surface chemistry to emerge, including acid/base equilibria in the interlayer calcium hydrates and silanol formation on the edges of the clay and inner surface of the zeolite housing. After annealing, the resulting clay models exhibit both mono- and bilayer hydration structures. Clay surface hydration redistributed markedly and yielded to silicalite water loading. We find that the absolute rates and temperature dependence of water dynamics compare well to neutron scattering data and pulse field gradient measures from relevant samples of Ca-montmorillonite and silicalite, respectively. Within an atomistic, reactive context, our results distinguish water dynamics in the interlayer Ca(OH)2 nH2O environment from water flowing over the clay surface, and from water diffusing within silicalite. We find that the diffusion of water when complexed to Ca hydrates is considerably slower than freely diffusing water over the clay surface, and the reduced mobility is well described by a difference in the Arrhenius pre-exponential factor rather than a change in activation energy.

  14. Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Michael

    Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones This article has been IOPscience #12;Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones Alejandro Mota1 Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550, USA July 25, 2006 Abstract The brittle fracture of a gypsum cylinder, which

  15. Food for the Family. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, M. Hellen

    1924-01-01

    furnish a kind of protein that is cap­ able of replacing the protein found in the tissues of the body. Animal Protein. Veuetable Protein. Dried Peas. Dried Cow Peas. Dried Beans. Nuts. Peanuts. Milk. Skim Milk. Cheese. Eggs. Meat. Fish. Poultry. Group II... and starches, they should be eaten more sparingly in summer than in winter. Certain fat foods, especially butter and cream, furnish Vitamine A for this reason have a great advantage over the other foods of the group. Fats and Oils. Nuts. Salt Pork. Bacon...

  16. Holiday Food Drive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.Food Drive Holiday Food Drive Laboratory employees

  17. Effect of composite microstructure on electrical and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl acetate) composites with carbon black and clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miriyala, Sethu M.

    2009-05-15

    black with a primary particle size of 20 nm (a) and a schematic of networked high structure carbon black (b). Clay Overview Hydrous sodium or aluminium phyllosilicates which are typically less than 2 ?m in diameter are known as clay [44, 45...

  18. Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before and During Excavation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Long-Term Monitoring of a Drilled Shaft Retaining Wall in Expansive Clay: Behavior Before are that the instrumentation survived construction and is working, residual stresses developed in the drilled shafts prior The motivation for this work is uncertainty in the design of drilled shaft retaining walls in expansive clay

  19. La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table of Contents Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 La052605k(250) "Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions" Table" #12;2 Osmotic compression and expansion of highly ordered clay dispersions Céline Martin1 , Frédéric, mechanical compression, and osmotic stress (dialysis against a polymer solution). The positional

  20. Oxygen isotope fractionation effects in soil water via interaction with cations (Mg, Ca, K, Na) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    ) adsorbed to phyllosilicate clay minerals Erik Oerter a, , Kari Finstad a , Justin Schaefer b , Gregory R the isotope effects caused by high CEC clays in mineral­water systems, we created a series of monominerallic with quartz to determine the isotope effect of non-, or very minimally-, charged mineral surfaces. The d18 O

  1. 069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM OXIDES USING X-RAY ABSORPTICN FINE STRUCIURE (XAFS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    069 MCNITORINGTHE GROWTH OF SEODNDARYPRECIPITATES UPON METALSORPTICN CM CLAY MINERALS AND ALUMINUM and oxide minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature on surfaces of clay minerals and aluminum oxides. #12;

  2. Formation of Replicating Saponite from a Gel in the Presence of Oxalate: Implications for the Formation of Clay Minerals in Carbonaceous Chondrites and the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Dirk

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous ...

  3. Radioactivity in food crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Baldauf, M.F.; Daniel, E.W.; Fore, C.S.; Uziel, M.S.

    1983-05-01

    Published levels of radioactivity in food crops from 21 countries and 4 island chains of Oceania are listed. The tabulation includes more than 3000 examples of 100 different crops. Data are arranged alphabetically by food crop and geographical origin. The sampling date, nuclide measured, mean radioactivity, range of radioactivities, sample basis, number of samples analyzed, and bibliographic citation are given for each entry, when available. Analyses were reported most frequently for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 40/K, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 228/Ra, plutonium, uranium, total alpha, and total beta, but a few authors also reported data for /sup 241/Am, /sup 7/Be, /sup 60/Co, /sup 55/Fe, /sup 3/H, /sup 131/I, /sup 54/Mn, /sup 95/Nb, /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Po, /sup 106/Ru, /sup 125/Sb, /sup 228/Th, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 95/Zr. Based on the reported data it appears that radioactivity from alpha emitters in food crops is usually low, on the order of 0.1 Bq.g/sup -1/ (wet weight) or less. Reported values of beta radiation in a given crop generally appear to be several orders of magnitude greater than those of alpha emitters. The most striking aspect of the data is the great range of radioactivity reported for a given nuclide in similar food crops with different geographical origins.

  4. FOOD SYSTEM PLANNING FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    justice, conservation and renewable energy options, integrated resource planning, and technology with an overview of the efficiency and environmental benefits associated local food systems. The Center for Energy of Delaware Center for Energy & Environmental Policy University of Delaware February 2011 #12;Mailing Address

  5. Development Food Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    House Berkowitz Basketball Complex Breslin Student Events Center Wonders Coal Storage Simon Power Plant Power Plant Student Services IM Sports Circle Main Library Reservoir Food Safety and Toxicology Anthony Pegasus Critical Care Molecular Plant Sciences Plant Biology Laboratories Amtrak/ Greyhound Station Mc

  6. A Primer on Food Additives. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    stream_source_info Bull1208a.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 25137 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Bull1208a.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 45.7 8-1208 :08 A Primer... on Food Additives Extension Foods and Nutrition Specialists The Texas A&M University System Consumers today are very concerned about what goes into their food. This primer on food additives describes what food additives do and why modern food...

  7. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  8. Transformation Plasticity in Steel Weld Metals H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia, J. A. Francis, H. J. Stone, S. Kundu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Transformation Plasticity in Steel Weld Metals H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia, J. A. Francis, H. J. Stone, S transformation is particularly important when dealing with martensite or bainite. These phases evolve, a phenomenon intrinsic to the mechanical behaviour of TRIP­ assisted steels. The subject of this paper

  9. A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane Galbraith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    A PCT funding formula for England based on faith may be wasting billions1 Mervyn Stone and Jane by slicing a Treasury cake of £44B. The division was guided by targets given by a weighted capitation formula/science divide will not block future attempts to devise a funding formula based on direct measurement of health

  10. Rolling stones: The motion of a sphere down an inclined plane coated with a thin liquid film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bico,José

    Rolling stones: The motion of a sphere down an inclined plane coated with a thin liquid film J 2009 A spherical bead deposited on a smooth tilted dry plane wall rolls down the slope under that is coated with a thin layer of order 50­100 m of a viscous liquid. The steady motion of the sphere under

  11. USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-193. 2004. 159 Turning Stumbling Blocks into Stepping Stones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact statement and environmental impact report, several timber harvest plans, a habitat conservation); it is the environmental impact that must be evaluated, not a change relative to a hypothetical alternative. Another Stones in the Analysis of Cumulative Impacts1 Leslie M. Reid2 Federal and state legislation

  12. Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine Nunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine. We utilized microfluidic methods to investigate the role of geometric structures, e.g. thin spherical, microfluidic devices with two consecutive flow-focusing junctions were used to generate air bubble

  13. Ultimate capacity of suction caisson in normally and lightly overconsolidated clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Partha Pratim

    2005-08-29

    is used for the numerical prediction. The finite element study is carried out with three-dimensional models using hybrid elements. A simplified elastic perfectly plastic model with von-Mises yield criterion is used for the study. The saturated clay...

  14. Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Study on the hydraulic conductivity of Boom clay1 2 Yong-Feng Deng1, 2 , Anh-Minh Tang2 , Yu Geotechnical Journal 48 (2011) 1461-1470" DOI : 10.1139/T11-048 #12;2 Abstract1 The hydraulic conductivity. Experimental results show that the hydraulic conductivity3 is mainly governed by the soil porosity

  15. Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, Bruce

    Permeability of illite-bearing shale: 1. Anisotropy and effects of clay content and loading-rich shale recovered from the Wilcox formation and saturated with 1 M NaCl solution varies from 3 Â 10À22 transport; KEYWORDS: permeability, shale, connected pore space Citation: Kwon, O., A. K. Kronenberg, A. F

  16. Phosphonic-Based HF Acid: Interactions With Clay Minerals And Flow In Sandstone Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2015-05-13

    , phosphonic-based HF acid systems (HF and a phosphonic acid) have been used as an alternative to mud acid. However, very limited research has been performed to investigate the interactions of phosphonic-based acid systems with clay minerals in sandstone...

  17. Influence of an adsorbing polymer in the aging dynamics of Laponite clay suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zulian; B. Ruzicka; G. Ruocco

    2008-11-18

    Clay-polymer dispersions in aqueous solutions have attracted a great interest in recent years due to their industrial applications and intriguing physical properties. Aqueous solutions of bare Laponite particles are known to age spontaneously from an ergodic state to a non ergodic state in a time varying from hours to months depending on Laponite concentration. When a polymer species like Polyethylene Oxide (PEO) is added to the solution, it weakly adsorbs on clay particle surfaces modifying the effective interaction potential between Laponite particles. A dynamic light scattering study, varying polymer concentration at fixed polymer molecular weight (Mw=200.000 g/mol), has been performed in order to understand the effect of polymer on the aging dynamics of the system. The results obtained show that arresting phenomena between clay particles are hindered if PEO is added and consequently the aging dynamics slows down with increasing PEO concentration. This process is possibly due to the progressive coverage of the clay surface by polymers that grow with increasing PEO concentration and may lead to steric stabilization.

  18. Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tunable staged release of therapeutics from layer-by-layer coatings with clay interlayer barrier of coatings for medical devices and tissue engineering scaffolds, there is a need for thin coatings a self-assembled, polymer-based conformal coating, built by using a water-based layer-by-layer (Lb

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Environmentally Acceptable Clay Stabilizer on Bandera Sandstone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emecheta, Akunna C

    2013-08-26

    it possible for large areas of the formation to be effectively treated. 3.2.1.1 BENTONITE Bentonite is impure clay consisting mainly of montmorillonite. It is an absorbent aluminum phyllosilicate (Casás, L. M., M. Pozo, et al. 2013). Bentonite...

  20. On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the dynamics of subaqueous clay rich gravity mass flows--the giant Storegga slide, Norway F, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1047 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway b Norges Geotekniske Institutt, Postboks 3930 Ulleva°l Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway c Norsk Hydro ASA, 0246 Oslo, Norway Received 10 November 2003

  1. Redox-driven dissolution of clay minerals by uranium under high pressure CO2 conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    online 21 June 2014 Editor: J. Fein Keywords: Carbon sequestration Iron-bearing clay minerals Uranium, indicative of potential risks associated with geologic carbon sequestration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is a process where CO2 is captured

  2. THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    THE LINK BETWEEN CLAY MINERAL WEATHERING AND THE FORMATION OF NI SURFACE PRECIPITATES Andreas C minerals may proceed via formation of surface precipitates, which may lead to a significant long the formation of several mineral phases with distinct solubilities. While turbostratic a-type metal hydroxides

  3. Evaluation of Alpha-Phased Zirconium Phosphate Nanoparticles as a Clay Stabilizer and an EOR Agent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi

    2014-12-15

    Migration. Paper presented at the Nigeria Annual International Conference and Exhibition, Lagos, Nigeria, July 30 - August 1. SPE-167503. I.A. El-Monier, H.A.Nasr-El-Din, T.L. Harper, R. Rosen. 2013. A New Environmentally Friendly Clay Stabilizer. SPE...

  4. Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models of oblique rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland: Comparison with experimental clay models have used high-resolution scanned air photos and field measurements to analyze fracture population on the evolution of fracture populations on the Reykjanes Peninsula, SW Iceland. The peninsula is oriented

  5. RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    2) Institute of Mineralogy, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg, Germany #12;clays and hydrocarbons conventional resource non-conventional resource project: Nicht-konventionelle Kohlenwasserstoffe (non-conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale

  6. Application of the Modified Methylene Blue Test to Detect Clay Minerals in Coarse Aggregate Fines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitre, Brandon

    2012-12-04

    ............................................................................... 34 3.2. Plasticity Index (ASTM D 4318) ..................................................................... 41 3.3. Bar Linear Shrinkage (Tex-107-E) .................................................................. 42 3.3.1. Results... ............................................................................... 47 vi 4. CONCRETE PERFORMANCE TESTING ............................................................. 50 4.1. Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) Mixes with Pure Clays ............................... 51 4.1.1. Effect on Drying Shrinkage...

  7. Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    Auxiliary Information for "Wind-blown sandstones cemented by sulfate and clay minerals in Gale. Sharp exhibit features consistent with eolian sandstones that may be cemented by sulfates. As described to features observed in terrestrial eolian sandstones such as the Navajo sandstone in the southwestern U

  8. The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Çagin, Tahir

    The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco inhibitor oil production chemical. 1. Introduction Molecular modeling studies of clay and related zeolite of water, hydrocarbons, and polar organic compounds such as oil field production chemicals on clay mineral

  9. Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L. SPARKS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Ion Exchange on Clay Minerals and Soil: I. Evaluation of Methods1 R. A. OGWADA AND D. L,vermiculite. Ogwada, R.A., and D.L. Sparks. 1986. Kinetics of ion exchangeon clay minerals and soil: I. Evaluation displacement or flow techniques to investigate kinetics of ion exchange on soils and clay minerals (Sparks

  10. #WomenInSTEM: Stepping Stones From One Career to Another

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Cheryl

    2014-11-24

    Meet Cheryl Martin, Acting Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) and the latest profile in the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. Cheryl looks at transformational projects to explore the uncharted territories of energy technology to generate options for entirely new paths to create, store and use energy. There are many challenges to overcome in the energy field, and it's important to have a diverse set of voices in STEM careers to meet these demands. Cheryl recommends that young women include all the skills they have - those gained at formal jobs as well as through volunteering or nonprofit organizations - when they take their next career step. These skills form the stepping stones that lead from one career to the next. And with a solid grounding in STEM, the opportunities are endless.

  11. Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-05-31

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

  12. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  13. Electronic and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons with Stone–Wales defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Haixia; Fang, Dangqi; Gong, Baihua; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Erhu; Zhang, Shengli

    2015-02-14

    The structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Stone–Wales (SW) defects were investigated using first-principles calculations. We found that two types of SW defects (named SW-? and SW-??) exist in ZSiNRs. The SW defect was found to be the most stable at the edge of the ZSiNR, independently of the defect orientation, even more stable than it is in an infinite silicene sheet. In addition, the ZSiNRs can transition from semiconductor to metal or half-metal by modifying the SW defect location and concentration. For the same defect concentration, the band structures influenced by the SW-? defect are more distinct than those influenced by the SW-?? when the SW defect is at the edge. The present study suggests the possibility of tuning the electronic properties of ZSiNRs using the SW defects and might motivate their potential application in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  14. Food grain policy in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rausser, Gordon C.

    1981-01-01

    ~o. FOOD GAAIN POLICY IN BANGLADESH by Gordon C. Rausser ;.period of time before Bangladesh becomes self-sufficient. Infor Food Grains in Bangladesh, Unpublished Ph.D. thesis,

  15. Emergency Food and Water Supplies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    1999-05-14

    Creating an emergency supply of food and water, and knowing how to safely handle food and water after a disaster, can reduce stress, worry and inconvenience. This publication provides information on water supply storage and purification...

  16. Setting and stiffening of cementitious components in Cast Stone waste form for disposal of secondary wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun, E-mail: jaehun.chun@pnnl.gov; Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S.K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast Stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. However, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior, which is essential to ensure proper workability and is important to safety in a nuclear waste field-scale application. X-ray diffraction, rheology, and ultrasonic wave reflection methods were used to understand the specific phase formation and stiffening of Cast Stone. Our results showed a good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh mixture and phase formation in Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation was observed with low concentration simulants, and the formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. Highlights: • A combination of XRD, UWR, and rheology gives a better understanding of Cast Stone. • Stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. • A drastic change in stiffening of Cast Stone was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  17. Setting and Stiffening of Cementitious Components in Cast Stone Waste Form for Disposal of Secondary Wastes from the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Chul-Woo; Chun, Jaehun; Um, Wooyong; Sundaram, S. K.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2013-04-01

    Cast stone is a cementitious waste form, a viable option to immobilize secondary nuclear liquid wastes generated from Hanford vitrification plant. While the strength and radioactive technetium leaching of different waste form candidates have been reported, no study has been performed to understand the flow and stiffening behavior of Cast Stone, which is essential to ensure the proper workability, especially considering necessary safety as a nuclear waste form in a field scale application. The rheological and ultrasonic wave reflection (UWR) measurements were used to understand the setting and stiffening Cast Stone batches. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to find the correlation between specific phase formation and the stiffening of the paste. Our results showed good correlation between rheological properties of the fresh Cast Stone mixture and phase formation during hydration of Cast Stone. Secondary gypsum formation originating from blast furnace slag was observed in Cast Stone made with low concentration simulants. The formation of gypsum was suppressed in high concentration simulants. It was found that the stiffening of Cast Stone was strongly dependent on the concentration of simulant. A threshold concentration for the drastic change in stiffening was found at 1.56 M Na concentration.

  18. Food behavior checklist effectively evaluates nutrition education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Food behavior checklist effectivelyB. Joy We developed a short food behavior checklist (FBC) todiverse women in the Food Stamp Nutrition Education

  19. Rinse food containers. PLASTIC CONTAINERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Rinse food containers. PLASTIC CONTAINERS PLASTIC BOTTLES & BOTTLE CAPS PLASTIC CUPS EXCEPT FOAM - www.jmu.edu/stewardship JMU WASTE BIN GUIDE Food residue, liquids and trash contaminate the recycling & Student Center: FOOD WASTE · NAPKINS · PAPER TOWELS Deposit these JMU Dining & Catering items in marked

  20. Safe Food in a Hurry. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1980-01-01

    S fe Food ill a Hurry 8-1281 EMPLOYEO@ OMEMAKER Texas Agricultural Extension Service Til,e Texas A&M University System Daniel C. Pfannstiel, Director? College Station, Texas [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Safe Food in a Hurry Mary K.... Sweeten* Foodborne illness can lead to time away from the job for the employed homemaker besides causing family misery. You have to work to prevent food poisoning as you buy, store, cook and serve food. When you must care for food in a hurry, keep...

  1. Food Grinders and Sustainable Food Waste Disposal Objective: Explore the environmental viability of household and commercial food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    Food Grinders and Sustainable Food Waste Disposal Objective: Explore the environmental viability of household and commercial food grinders by quantifying their impact in an urban setting. Background: Food cities, food wastes are disposed of in two ways. Liquid waste--including ground up food waste

  2. Science for a healthy society Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    the global challenges of: Food Security Diet & Health Healthy Ageing Food Waste The IFR aims system? How we can best reduce food waste, or exploit it to improve sustainability? How can what we eatScience for a healthy society Food Safety & Security Food Databanks Food & Health National

  3. Carbon Emissions: Food Industry

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948California (MillionThousandChemicals IndustryFood

  4. Temporary Food Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water andFood Service

  5. Coupled hydro-mechanical processes in crytalline rock and ininduratedand plastic clays: A comparative discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Blumling, Peter; Bernier, Frederic

    2006-02-15

    This paper provides a comparative discussion of coupledhydromechanical processes in three different geological formations:crystalline rock, plastic clay, and indurated clay. First, the importantprocesses and associated property characteristics in the three rock typesare discussed. Then, one particular hydromechanical coupling is broughtup for detailed consideration, that of pore pressure changes in nearbyrock during tunnel excavation. Three field experiments in the three rocktypes are presented and their results are discussed. It is shown that themain physical processes are common to all three rock types, but with verydifferent time constants. The different issues raised by these cases arepointed out, and the transferable lessons learned are identified. Suchcross fertilization and simultaneous understanding of coupled processesin three very different rock types help to greatly enhance confidence inthe state of science in this field.

  6. Report on "Methodologies for Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions: A Clay Minerals Society Short Course"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia A. Maurice

    2010-02-08

    A workshop entitled, “Methods of Investigating Microbial-Mineral Interactions,” was held at the Clay Minerals Society meeting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA on June 19, 2004. The workshop was organized by Patricia A. Maurice (University of Notre Dame) and Lesley A. Warren (McMaster University, CA). Speakers included: Dr. P. Bennett, Dr. J. Fredrickson (PNNL), Dr. S. Lower (Ohio State University), Dr. P. Maurice, Dr. S. Myneni (Princeton University), Dr. E. Shock (Arizona State), Dr. M. Tien (Penn State), Dr. L. Warren, and Dr. J. Zachara (PNNL). There were approximately 75 attendees at the workshop, including more than 20 students. A workshop volume was published by the Clay Minerals Society [Methods for Study of Microbe-Mineral Interactions (2006), CMS Workshop Lectures, vol. 14?(Patricia A. Maurice and Leslie A. Warren, eds.) ISBN 978-1-881208-15-0, 166 pp.

  7. Effects of aluminosilicate minerals in clay soil fractions on pore water hydroxide ion concentrations in soil/cement matrices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Evan Russell

    1998-01-01

    between clay minerals and calcium hydroxide. Pozzolanic reactions between aluminosilicate minerals in soils and portiandite or calcium silicate hydrate, generated by cement hydration, may significantly reduce the hydroxide ion concentration in soi...

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of complex molecules at interfaces: dendritic surfactants in clay and amyloid peptides near lipid bilayers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Kunwoo

    2009-06-02

    We apply a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation technique to complex molecules at interfaces. Partitioning of dendritic surfactants into clay gallery and Ab protein behavior near hydrated lipids are chosen for the purpose. ...

  9. An investigation of some of the effects of anhydrous ammonia on the clay minerals montmorillonite and illite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whiteley, Eli Lamar

    1959-01-01

    A survey of small, medium and large Nicaraguan producers indicated a heavy reliance on imported complete fertilizer. Analysis of soils sampled from the large-scale commercial producers found low P retention in the lowland heavy clay soils...

  10. The effects of the interphase and strain gradients on the elasticity of layer by layer (LBL) polymer/clay nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yaning

    A synergistic stiffening effect observed in the elastic mechanical properties of LBL assembled polymer/clay nanocomposites is studied via two continuum mechanics approaches. The nanostructure of the representative volume ...

  11. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  12. The aggregation of clay minerals and marine microalgal cells : physicochemical theory and implications for controlling harmful algal blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengco, Mario Rhuel

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, the use of clay minerals has emerged as one of the most promising strategies for directly controlling harmful algal blooms (HABs). Its principle is based on the mutual aggregation of algal cells and mineral ...

  13. The effectiveness of a foliar spray of kaolinite clay in reducing transpiration of cotton plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMichael, Bobbie Lee

    1967-01-01

    in light and to keep them from closing in darkness. Lower temperatures tended to cause the reverse. Culm (8) reported that leaf temperatures are usually higher than the surround- ing air temperatures and that transpiration accounts for a cooling effect...THE EFFECTIVENESS OF A FOLIAR SPRAY OI" KAOLINITE CLAY IN REDUCING TRANSPIRATION OF COTTON PLANTS A Thesis Bobble L. McMichael Submitted to the Graduate Col]ege cf the Texas A&I University ir, Partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  14. Stereo soft x-ray microscopy and elemental mapping of hematite and clay suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleber, S.-C.; Thieme, J.; Chao, W.; Fischer, P.

    2008-09-01

    The spatial arrangements of hematite particles within aqueous soil and clay samples are investigated with soft X-ray microscopy, taking advantage of the elemental contrast at the Fe-L edge around E = 707 eV. In combination with stereo microscopy, information about spatial arrangements are revealed and correlated to electrostatic interactions of the different mixtures. Manipulation of a sample mounted to the microscope is possible and particles added while imaging can be detected.

  15. Preventing Food Contamination: A Need for Innovation in Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Mark

    2013-01-01

    174 Preventing Food Contamination A Need for Innovation infurther prevent microbial contamination. Due largely becausequick migration of the contamination in the example given

  16. Sub-THz complex dielectric constants of smectite clay thin samples with Na$^{+}$/Ca$^{++}$-ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezwanur Rahman; Douglas K. McCarty; Manika Prasad

    2015-07-28

    We implement a technique to characterize the electromagnetic properties at frequencies 100 to 165 GHz (3 cm$^{-1}$ to 4.95 cm$^{-1}$) of oriented smectite samples using an open cavity resonator connected to a sub-millimeter wave VNA (Vector Network Analyzer). We measured dielectric constants perpendicular to the bedding plane on oriented Na$^{+}$ and Ca$^{++}$-ion stabilized smectite samples deposited on a glass slide at ambient laboratory conditions (room temperature and room light). The clay layer is much thinner ($\\sim$ 30 $\\mu$m) than the glass substrate ($\\sim$ 2.18 mm). The real part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{re}$, is essentially constant over this frequency range but is larger in Na$^{+}$- than in Ca$^{++}$-ion infused clay. The total electrical conductivity (associated with the imaginary part of dielectric constant, $\\epsilon_{im}$) of both samples increases monotonically at lower frequencies ($$ 110 GHz. The dispersion of the samples display a dependence on the ionic strength in the clay interlayers, i.e., $\\zeta$-potential in the Stern layers.

  17. The occurrence of clays and their bearing on evaporite mineralogy in the Salado Formation, Delaware Basin, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harville, Donald Gene

    1985-01-01

    THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Geology THE OCCURRENCE OF CLAYS AND THEIR BEARING ON EVAPORITE MINERALOGY IN THE SALADO FORMATION, DELAWARE BASIN, NEW MEXICO A Thesis by DONALD GENE HARVILLE Approved as to style...

  18. Authigenic clay minerals in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group: Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, Waha Field, West Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walling, Suzette Denise

    1992-01-01

    AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SUZETTE DENISE WALLING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Geology AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS...

  19. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, February 9, 1992--May 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of iron-pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported iron hydroxyoxide catalysts and the determination of their catalytic activities was continued in this quarter. Previous work in this project showed that a catalyst prepared by adding ferric nitrate and ammonia to an acid-washed clay gave an active catalyst following sulfidation. Further testing of this catalyst with a model compound showed that its hydrocracking activity was considerably lower when used in 10% concentration rather than 50%. In contrast, the mixed iron/alumina pillared clay catalysts were still highly effective at 10% concentration and gave good conversions at one and two hour reaction times. An investigation of preparation methods demonstrated that calcination of both the iron hydroxyoxide-impregnated clay and the mixed iron/alumina pillared clays is essential for activity. High activity was obtained for these catalysts only when they were removed from the aqueous media rapidly, dried, and calcined. The use of ferric sulfate to prepare a clay-supported sulfated iron catalyst was attempted, the resulting catalyst was relatively inactive for hydrocracking. Several new catalysts were synthesized with the idea of decreasing the pillar density and thereby increasing the micropore volume. A zirconia-pillared clay with low pillar density was prepared and intercalated with triiron complex. The hydrocracking activity of this catalyst was somewhat lower than that of the mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalyst. Other new catalysts, that were prepared by first pillaring with an organic ammonium pillaring agent, then introducing a lower number of silica or alumina pillars, and finally the iron component, were also tested. The mixed alumina/iron-pillared catalysts was further tested at low concentration for pyrene hydrogenating and hydrocracking activities.

  20. A study of the effects of repeated loadings and free water on the stability of a lime stabilized clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantos, Carl Thomas

    1959-01-01

    . Sere Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Results . 9, Twe Percent Lime Triaxial Results . 10. Four Percent Lime Triaxial Results 37 37 40 LIST OF FIGURES 1. Triaxial Compression Device and Universal Testing Nachine . 2. Harvard Nlniature Compactor... Equipment 3. Typical Test Speoimens 4. Ltterberg Limits - Brasos River Clay 5. Modified JULS80 Compaction - Brasos River Clay 6. Nohr's Circles and Rupture Envelopes 7, 0 Percent Lime (Raw Soil) Triaxial Test, 15 psi 45 47 48 Lateral Pressure 49 S...

  1. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  2. Good Food is the longest running weekly food and wine guide in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Good Food Overview Good Food is the longest running weekly food and wine guide industry. Written and edited by some of the most noted food and wine writers and columnists, Good Food food related feature articles. Why Advertise ·262,000 or 60% of Good Food Epicure readers have been

  3. MECS 2006- Food and Beverage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Food and Beverage (NAICS 311, 312) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  4. Assessment of the Cast Stone Low-Temperature Waste Form Technology Coupled with Technetium Removal - 14379

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Rapko, Brian M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Cozzi, Alex; Fox, Kevin M.; Mccabe, Daniel J.; Nash, C. A.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-03-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing low-temperature waste forms for immobilization of DOE aqueous waste streams, including technetium removal as an implementing technology. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the Cast Stone waste immobilization and technetium removal projects at Hanford. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) conducting performance assessments and risk assessments of waste form and disposal system performance, and 2) technetium chemistry in tank wastes and separation of technetium from waste processing streams. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps were identified and an initial sequencing priority was suggested. A subset of research was initiated in 2013 to begin addressing the most significant science and technology gaps. The purpose of this paper is to report progress made towards closing these gaps and provide notable highlights of results achieved to date.

  5. The effects of food advertising and cognitive load on food choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, FJ; Shimoga, SV

    2014-01-01

    The effects of food advertising and cognitive load on foodeffects of television food advertising on eating behavior.R: The effects of advertising on food demand elasticities.

  6. Integrating Food Production and Biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with food, and NPK fluxes at farm level. The biofuels were crude rapeseed oil, horse draft, ethanol from a combination of a workhorse and a crude rapeseed oil-fuelled tractor. Ethanol from wheat had the largest impactIntegrating Food Production and Biodiversity Energy and Scale Issues in Implementation Kristina

  7. Food Image Recognition with Deep Convolutional Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Food Image Recognition with Deep Convolutional Features Yoshiyuki Kawano, Keiji Yanai and diseases. If there is a food recommendation system, it is work to keep people in good health. A food recognition engine is needed to build a automatic food recommendation system. Food recognition: Deep

  8. Food Biophysics ISSN 1557-1858

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franzese, Giancarlo

    1 23 Food Biophysics ISSN 1557-1858 Food Biophysics DOI 10.1007/s11483-013-9310-7 Water.springer.com". #12;Food Biophysics DOI 10.1007/s11483-013-9310-7 SPECIAL ISSUE ARTICLE Water at Biological and inorganic interfaces. In fields like food processing, food preservation or bionanotechnology

  9. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

  10. Using Multiple Household Food Inventories to Measure Food Availability in the Home 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisk, Cheree L.

    2010-10-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of conducting multiple household food inventories over the course of 30 days to examine weekly food variability. Household food availability influences the foods ...

  11. CO2-driven Enhanced Oil Recovery as a Stepping Stone to What?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

    2010-07-14

    This paper draws heavily on the authors’ previously published research to explore the extent to which near term carbon dioxide-driven enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) can be “a stepping stone to a long term sequestration program of a scale to be material in climate change risk mitigation.” The paper examines the historical evolution of CO2-EOR in the United States and concludes that estimates of the cost of CO2-EOR production or the extent of CO2 pipeline networks based upon this energy security-driven promotion of CO2-EOR do not provide a robust platform for spurring the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies (CCS) as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The paper notes that the evolving regulatory framework for CCS makes a clear distinction between CO2-EOR and CCS and the authors examine arguments in the technical literature about the ability for CO2-EOR to generate offsetting revenue to accelerate the commercial deployment of CCS systems in the electric power and industrial sectors of the economy. The authors conclude that the past 35 years of CO2-EOR in the U.S. have been important for boosting domestic oil production and delivering proven system components for future CCS systems. However, though there is no reason to suggest that CO2-EOR will cease to deliver these benefits, there is also little to suggest that CO2-EOR is a necessary or significantly beneficial step towards the commercial deployment of CCS as a means of addressing climate change.

  12. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  13. Effects of biogenic silica on acoustic and physical properties of clay-rich marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tribble, J.S.; Mackenzie, F.T.; Urmos, J.; O'Brien, D.K.; Manghnani, M.H. )

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of marine sediments are influenced by compaction and diagenesis during burial. Changes in mineralogy, chemistry, density, porosity, and microfabric all affect a sediment's acoustic and electrical properties. Sediments from the Japan Trench illustrate the dependence of physical properties on biogenic silica content. Increased opal-A content is correlated with increased porosity and decreased grain density and compressional velocity. Variations with depth in opal-A concentration are therefore reflected in highly variable and, at times, inverse velocity-depth gradients. The diagenetic conversion of opal-A to opal-CT and finally to quartz was investigated at a site in the San Miguel Gap, California. Distinct changes in microfabric, particularly in the porosity distribution, accompany the diagenetic reactions and contribute to a sharp velocity discontinuity at the depth of the opal-A to opal-CT conversion. Evaluation of this reaction at several sites indicates a systematic dependence on temperature and age in clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments. In ocean margin regions, sediments are buried rapidly, and opal-A may be converted to opal-CT in less than 10 m.y. Temperatures of conversion range from 30{degree} to 50{degree}C. Much longer times (>40 m.y.) are required to complete the conversion in open ocean deposits which are exposed to temperatures less than 15{degree}C. In the absence of silica diagenesis, velocity-depth gradients of most clay-rich and moderately siliceous sediments fall in the narrow range of 0.15 to 0.25 km/s/km which brackets the gradient (0.18 km/s/km) determined for a type pelagic clay section. Relationships such as these can be useful in unraveling the history of a sediment sequence, including the evolution with time of reservoir properties and seismic signatures.

  14. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  15. High gradient magnetic separation of iron oxide minerals from soil clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Darrell Gene

    1977-01-01

    steel wool, placed in a strong magnetic field (1. 6 Tesla), provides the magnetic field and magnetic field gradients necessary to trap weakly magnetic, clay size particles flowing through the filter as a dilute suspension in pH 10. 5 Na C03 solution...- magnetic particles. 2. There must be magnetic field gradients across the volume of the particles for magnetic attraction and trapping to occur. A magnetic field on the order of 1-2 Tesla produced by an electro- magnet is necessary to magnetize...

  16. Areal distribution of clay minerals and their relationship to physical properties, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hottman, William Edward

    1975-01-01

    of Commi t e lead of De rtment Member Member December 1975 ABSTRACT Areal Distribution of Clay Minerals and their Relationship to Physical Properties, Gulf of Mexico. (December 1975) William E. Hottman, B. A. , California State University (Fullerton... 2 5 12 X 52 X 52 5 X 52 X 2 5 X 52 5 25. 2 11. 7 3. 42 25. 5 20 5 4. 5 25. 25 72. 5 8. 5 24. 0 7. 67 2 ' 77 29, 8 24. 7 4-97 34. 7 36. 24 6. 02 21. 25 6. 92 2, 63 24. o 17, 6 4. 2 21. 0 68. o 8. 8 28. 0 70. 0...

  17. Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bierschwale, Mark W.

    1980-01-01

    , and develop a new design procedure for drilled shafts supporting precast panel retaining walls. FIELD LOAD TESTS The prediction of the behavior of laterally loaded shafts involves the determination of the shaft-soil interaction. One approach... 4ft to l3 ft 5 -very stiff red clay(CH) below 5ft I-O zL 128 l30 P IC WA R L I QUI 0 LIMIT CONTENT /o LI Ml T ? + 7 IO 20 30 COHESIVE SHEAR STRENGTH, Cu, 0. 6 0, 8 I 0 I. 2 I, 4 I, 6 I. 8 ~ Unconfined Compression Test + Miniature Vane...

  18. Clay Sell Sworn in as Deputy Secretary of Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargingWASHINGTON, DC - Jeffrey Clay Sell was

  19. CO2 Sorption to Subsingle Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene S.; Wallacher, Dirk; Hauss, Thomas; Schaef, Herbert T.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Krukowski, Elizabeth; Stack, Andrew G.; Grimm, Nico; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2013-01-15

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may interact with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of ??0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 Å. The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At the excess sorption maximum, increasing CO2 sorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak temperature dependence.

  20. CO2 Adsorption to Sub-Single Hydration Layer Montmorillonite Clay Studied by Excess Sorption and Neutron Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Ilton, Eugene [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Hauss, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Schaef, Herbert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Qafoku, Odeta [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Rosso, Kevin M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Felmy, Andrew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Krukowski, Elizabeth G [ORNL; Stack, Andrew G [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert J [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Geologic storage of CO2 requires that the caprock sealing the storage rock is highly impermeable by CO2. Swelling clays, which are important components of caprocks, may react with CO2 under volume change, potentially impacting the seal quality. The interactions of scCO2 with Na saturated montmorillonite clay containing a sub-single layer of water in the interlayer region have been studied by sorption and neutron diffraction techniques. The excess sorption isotherms show maxima at bulk CO2 densities of 0.15 g/cm3, followed by an approximately linear decrease of excess sorption to zero and negative values with increasing CO2 bulk density. Neutron diffraction experiments on the same clay sample measured interlayer spacing and composition. The results show that limited amounts of CO2 are sorbed into the interlayer region, leading to depression of the interlayer peak intensity and an increase of the d(001) spacing by ca. 0.5 . The density of CO2 in the clay pores is relatively stable over a wide range of CO2 pressures at a given temperature, indicating the formation of a clay-CO2 phase. At low pressure increasing CO2 adsorption with decreasing temperature is observed while the high-pressure sorption properties exhibit weak or no temperature dependence. Supercritical fluids, sorption phenomena, carbon dioxide, carbon sequestration, caprock integrity

  1. The Food We Eat: An Evaluation of Food Items Input into an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connelly, Kay

    The Food We Eat: An Evaluation of Food Items Input into an Electronic Food Monitoring Application participants in a chronic kidney disease (stage 5) population input food items into an electronic intake monitoring application. Participants scanned food item barcodes or voice recorded food items they consumed

  2. Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for Industry Energy Department, Northwest Food Processors Association Set Energy Efficiency Goals for...

  3. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  4. Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive...

  5. Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications Biomass Boiler for Food Processing Applications Biomass Boiler Uses a Combination of Wood Waste and Tire-Derived Fuel In 2011, the...

  6. Sedimentary and faunal analysis of a marginal marine section, the Stone City Member (middle eocene), Crockett Formation, Burleson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelms, Katherine Currier

    1979-01-01

    Diagram relating Miliolina-Rotaliina-Textulariina abundance to deltaic and other marginal marine environments 98 LIST OF FIGURES - Cont1nued F1 gure 15 Ratio of Textulari1na-Rotaliina-Nil1olina in samples from the Stone C1ty beds 16 Vertical... sediment packages and faunal assemblages may still be recognized. W. L. F1sher (1964) describes transgressive and regressive sediments from the Eocene of the Gulf Coast and characterizes dist1nctive groups of sediments which tend to occur in typical...

  7. SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    SUSTAINABILITY AND FOOD Anthropology Professors Maribel Alvarez Diane Austin Mamadou Baro Tim. Potential Helpful Minors Environmental Studies Environmental Sciences Nutritional Science Sustainable Built Environments Sustainable Plant Systems Potential Employers Documentary Films Government Jobs

  8. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  9. Fine particle clay catalysts for coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, May 9, 1992--August 8, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, E.S.

    1995-10-01

    An investigation of new methods for the production of mixed pillared clay catalysts and clay-supported catalysts and determination of their catalytic activities were continued in this quarter. To demonstrate the reproducibility of the preparative method for high activity iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite catalysts, a new batch of the catalyst was prepared and tested for hydrocracking activity with bibenzyl. This preparation gave conversion and product distribution similar to that reported previously. The mixed iron/alumina-pillared clay was also prepared using a pillaring solution that was aged for longer period of time. To determine the importance of the type of pillaring support in hydrocracking activity, iron/zirconia-pillared montmorillonite was prepared using the same technique as that for iron/alumina-pillared montmorillonite. The reaction of bibenzyl with the sulfided iron/zirconia-pillared catalyst gave a lower hydrocracking conversion than the iron/alumina-pillared catalyst. Addition of a second catalytic metal to the clay support was attempted to determine if a synergistic effect could improve liquefaction. Ferric nitrate and stannous chloride were added to the clay, but the resulting catalyst was relatively poor for hydrocracking and hydrogenation compared with ferric nitrate supported on the clay. New disposable iron catalysts with high acidity and surface area are desired for coal liquefaction. Synthetic iron aluminosilicates were prepared by methods similar to those used for the nickel-substituted synthetic mica montmorillonite (NiSMM) catalysts, which are very effective for hydrogenation and reforming of hydrocarbons. The iron aluminosilicate catalysts were tested for hydrocracking and hydrogenation of bibenzyl, naphthalene and pyrene. Pyrene hydrogenation was effectively catalyzed by the sulfided synthetic iron catalyst.

  10. GEOC Martial Taillefert Tuesday, April 09, 2013 130 Realtime sorption and precipitation of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    of nickel on clay minerals: An in situ QuickEXAFS investigation Matthew Siebecker1, mgs@udel.edu, Wei Li1 of nickel sorption on Alrich clay minerals utilizing QuickEXAFS spectroscopy and a custom built flow cell Chemical Interactions at the MineralWater Interface (01:00 PM 05:30 PM) Location: Morial Convention Center

  11. Sustainable Food and the Institute for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Sustainable Food and the California Institute for Rural Studies Sustainable Food and the Promise Studies Agriculture/Sustainable Food? 3 "E's" of sustainabilityStudies 221 G Street Suite 204 Davis, CA Davis, CA 530.756.6555 v 530.756.7429 f i i Fair conditions for agricultural and other food system

  12. Food Safety Policy General Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Safety Policy General Policy Statement St. Anne's College has a commitment to food safety. The College takes all reasonable precaution and exercises all due diligence to ensure that food which and maintain these standards, the College: Designates managers who have a special responsibility for food

  13. Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Sustainable Food & Bioenergy Systems This program is a unique, processing, distribution, and utilization of food and bioenergy. The degree focuses on ecologically sound, socially just, and economically viable farming methods, food and health, and related food and bioenergy

  14. Food Image Recognition with Deep Convolutional Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Food Image Recognition with Deep Convolutional Features Yoshiyuki KAWANO Department of Informatics food recognition accuracy greatly by integrating it with conventional hand-crafted image features accuracy and 92.00% as the top-5 accuracy for the 100-class food dataset, UEC-FOOD100, which outperforms

  15. Food Safety Regulations for Farmers'Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    safety regulations. Classification of a Farmers'Market Food safety issues are governed by the retail food for all retail food establishments,including farmers' markets; however,each local county health departmentFood Safety Regulations for Farmers'Markets Christa Hofmann and Jennifer Dennis Department

  16. Falls, Disability and Food Insecurity Present Challenges to Healthy Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Steven P.; Molina, L. Cricel; Jhawar, Mona

    2007-01-01

    increases food insecurity because functional limitations canadults food insecurity can also be caused by functional

  17. The Food Nutrition Link - Level II Leader Guide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Gayle

    1995-11-01

    This curriculum focuses on food buying, storage and preservation, and the nutritional value of convenience foods.

  18. Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

    2006-04-12

    It is well documented that aflatoxin contamination in foods presents significant economic and public health burdens worldwide. Aflatoxins, particularly aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), have been implicated in the etiology of disease and death in many parts...

  19. Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieseberg, Loren

    Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security Colin K Trust, 53115 Bonn, Germany; g CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security to the world's food supplies has been considered a potential threat to food security. However, changes

  20. Reward value of food pictures / 1 Pictures of Food Have Reward Value that Varies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chabris, Christopher F.

    Reward value of food pictures / 1 Pictures of Food Have Reward Value that Varies According RUNNING HEAD: Reward value of food pictures #12;Reward value of food pictures / 2 Abstract A stimulus pictures of food can be rewards for human subjects, with reward value operationalized as the physical

  1. Thermo-Hydrological-Mechanical Analysis of a Clay Barrier for Radioactive Waste Isolation: Probabilistic Calibration and Advanced Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dontha, Lakshman

    2012-07-16

    The engineered barrier system is a basic element in the design of repository to isolate high level radioactive waste (HLW). In this system, the clay barrier plays a prominent role in dispersing the heat generated from the waste, reduce the flow...

  2. A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history-dependent plastic potential function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history- dependent plastic and failure criteria are found to be strongly dependent on the principal stress rotation angle () and plastic work. A unique plastic potential function determined solely by the current stress state

  3. WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination. (Under the direction of David B. Kaber).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    ABSTRACT WRIGHT, MELANIE CLAY. The Effects of Automation on Team Performance and Team Coordination of automation in a number of work domains, including team environments. However, assessment of the effects of automation on teamwork has been primarily limited to the aviation domain (comparing early conventional

  4. An oribatid mite (Arachnida: Acari) from the Oxford Clay (Jurassic: Upper Callovian) of South Cave Station Quarry, Yorkshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selden, Paul A.; Baker, Anne S.; Phipps, Kenneth J.

    2008-01-01

    in mar- ine strata: evidence from the British Jurassic, including a review of the allochthonous vertebrate assemblage from the marine Kimmeridge Clay Formation (Upper Jurassic) of Great Britain. 47–83. In COLECTIVO ARQUEOLO´GICO-PALEON- TOLO´GICO SALENSE...

  5. Soil damping constants related to common soil properties in sands and clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Gary Clive

    1968-01-01

    SOIL D'c~. 'I'IIIG COESTAlxI. S PI', IslTED TO CO!~i'iOI& SOII. PRO& ERTIES J3I SAE1)S AND CL?"S A Thesis by Gary Olive G'boon Sr b':I' te'I to tho Gra=lu. . te Col lope of Texas Afxl Univcrsi ty in pert'al fulfillsent of the requirenent... for the Je;, ree of YiASTER Ol" SCIEI!CE August ISSS II. ';or Subject: Civil I:nSin er. nb SOIL DAMPING CONSTANTS REIATED TO COMMON SOIL PROPERTIES IN SANDS AND CLAYS A Thesis by Gary Clive Gibson Approved as to style and content by: (Head...

  6. The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

    2010-02-01

    Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

  7. FOOD 520 Advances in Food Analysis Instructor: Dr. Jerzy Zawistowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and government. The course is composed of lectures and hands-on laboratories. Outline Spectroscopy: fundamental of the Journal of Food Science in the preparation of lab reports. Evaluation Theory 60% · Midterm 20% · Final. Handbook of Enzymatic Methods of Analysis. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc. Hames, B.D. and Rickwood, D. (Eds

  8. Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil price? It does not relate to Mick' short stint at the London School of Economics for crude oil, that they attempted to control the price of crude on international markets. Their ability

  9. Food Environments Near Home and School Related to Consumption of Soda and Fast Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babey, Susan H; Wolstein, Joelle; Diamant, Allison L

    2011-01-01

    AM, Popkin BM. Trends in food locations and sources amongBM. Patterns and trends in food portion sizes, 1977-1998.Ludwig DS. Effects of fast-food consumption on energy intake

  10. Food deserts and access to fresh food in low-income San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puhl, Emily Theresa

    2011-01-01

    R. Kaufman (2003) “Exploring Food Purchase Behavior of Low-Do the Poor Still Pay More? Food Price Variations in Largeand Pavan Yadav. 2008. “Beyond Food Deserts: Measuring and

  11. Geography of urban food access : exploring potential causes of food deserts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Caitlin

    2012-01-01

    We believe we understand food deserts, but we do not. In the last decade the phenomenon of food deserts has been often discussed, and many solutions are proposed to alleviate food access issues in American cities. However, ...

  12. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for potato production in Kyrgyzstan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research, Walter Pett, and David Douches, Michigan State University. An IPM package is a set of practices

  13. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for open field tomato production in Uzbekistan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management. An IPM package is a set of practices and technologies that can be used in production to increase yield

  14. IPM packages deliver food security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    IPM packages deliver food security For the past 5 years IPM CRSP researchers have been developing Package for wheat production in Tajikistan Central Asia Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research State University; Dr. Anvar Jalilov, Tajik Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Tajikistan. An IPM package

  15. Cook food to proper temperature.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    and after handling or eating food; nafter playing with pets or visiting a zoo; nafter coughing, sneezing out of their mouths when they cough or sneeze. · Have the children touch something (table or chair. · Explain that if you wash your hands after coughing or sneezing in them, the germs will be washed away

  16. Project Management Plan Chinese Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igusa, Kiyoshi

    impact of this project? · Data management: How do we collect, preserve and sort all of the files? Which special equipment, facilities needed or wanted? According to http://project-management-knowledge.com/ weProject Management Plan Chinese Food According to NSF, the basic elements of a project management

  17. Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

  18. UC Global Food Initiative: UC ANR student fellows work on food insecurity, food communication and developing the next generation of Cooperative Extension experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Research news UC Global Food Initiative: UC ANRstudent fellows work on foodinsecurity, food communication and developing the next

  19. Global trends in agriculture and food systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    development * Corresponding author: Danish Research Centre for Organic Food and Farming (DARCOF), P.O. Box 501 Global trends in agriculture and food systems Marie Trydeman Knudsen*, Niels Halberg, Jørgen E .................................................................................16 Global trends in organic agriculture

  20. Energy Savings in Food Processing Dehumidification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turney, R. L.; Young, F. J.

    1994-01-01

    Food processors have the unique responsibility of maintaining environmental, process and sanitation standards for government and consumers. Usually the food plant is a large facility with many sources of contamination, all of which must...

  1. Control of Viral Contamination of Food and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cliver, Dean O.

    2009-01-01

    M. , & Sattar, S. A. (2000a). Contamination of foods by food2004). Norovirus cross-contamination during food handlingcoli in mussels after contamination and depu- ration.

  2. Food Decisions Among Working Latino Families in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawyer, Mirna Troncoso

    2015-01-01

    C. (2003). Personal and family food choice schemas of ruralevening meals. Scripts for food choice. Appetite, 51(3),parents' satisfaction with food-choice coping strategies.

  3. Theorizing Food Sharing Practices in a Junior High Classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Mary

    2013-01-01

    10.1177/0022487106296218 Theorizing Food Exchanges Conle,a psychosociology of food consumption. In C. Counihan &P. Van Estrik (Eds. ), Food, and culture: A reader (2 nd

  4. Metro Vancouver: Designing for Urban Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roehr, Daniel; Kunigk, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    urbanism, which would provide for the integration of sustainableurbanism and municipal supported agriculture: a new food system path for sustainable

  5. Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    174-1 Carbon Footprinting for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-174 and Natural Resources Carbon footprinting in the food industry is an activity that determines the greenhouse footprint for their processing facility and products. The importance of establishing a carbon footprint

  6. Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persistence of complex food webs in metacommunities Gesa A. B¨ohme 1 and Thilo Gross 2 1 Max of Engineering Mathematics, Bristol, UK Keywords: metacommunities, food webs, predator-prey interactions, geo diversity and food web complexity. Recently Pillai et al. proposed a simple modeling framework

  7. Modelling Food Webs B. Drossel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    Modelling Food Webs B. Drossel1 and A. J. McKane2,3 1 Institut f¨ur Festk¨orperphysik, TU Darmstadt, UK Abstract We review theoretical approaches to the understanding of food webs. After an overview of the available food web data, we discuss three different classes of models. The first class comprise static

  8. UNSTRUCTURED MARINE FOOD WEBS AND "POLLUTANT ANALOGUES"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by using real data. Let us first assume that in a food web each transfer of organic material (or energyUNSTRUCTURED MARINE FOOD WEBS AND "POLLUTANT ANALOGUES" JOHN D. ISAACS' ABSTRACT The several envi- ronments. The concentration factor found in the known and describable food chain of the Salton

  9. INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Aquatic food-webs' ecology: old and new challenges Andrea Belgrano Looking up ``aquatic food web'' on Google provides a dizzying array of eclectic sites and information (and disinformation!) to choose from. However, even within this morass it is clear that aquatic food-web research has

  10. Reducing Food Safety Risks in Community Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Reducing Food Safety Risks in Community Gardens Creating and maintaining community and school gardens has been identified as an effective strategy to increase healthy food awareness and consumption in the U.S. since 1990. In commercial food production, employing a set of risk-reduction steps -- known

  11. Food Policy November 28, August 20, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotze, Heike K.

    in only the Atrium hallways. Food waste should be placed in the appropriate waste container. Non1 Food Policy November 28, 2012 August 20, 2013 Head, Killam Memorial Library University Librarian The purpose of the Killam Memorial Library Food policy is to preserve our collections and facilities

  12. Angel Huerta Senior Food Service Worker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    , to keep food waste and costs to a minimum, saving the dept. approximately $4,000 to date. He worksAngel Huerta Senior Food Service Worker Resource Management and Planning: Early Childhood Education of all backgrounds, it participates in the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). The CACFP provides

  13. Public engagement initiative on food and drink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    .g. Gut flora E.g. Minimising food waste Global Context Growing, farming and Harvesting ProcessingPublic engagement initiative on food and drink #12;The Wellcome Trust is a global charitable initiative on food and drink 2 #12;We support the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical

  14. The University of British Columbia FOOD 521 -Advances in Food Biotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality, functional foods, and flavor manufacturing. Students will be assessed by mid-term and finalThe University of British Columbia FOOD 521 - Advances in Food Biotechnology Winter Term 2 (JAN: FOOD 521 is a topical course intended to provide an advanced understanding of key concepts and current

  15. FOOD 527G (3 credits) HACCP Food Safety Management System Target Audience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FOOD 527G (3 credits) HACCP Food Safety Management System Target Audience The course is designed primarily for the MFS (Master of Food Science) students. However, this course would also be beneficial for other Food Science graduate students (M.Sc. and Ph.D.). Course Description The HACCP (Hazard Analysis

  16. Food, Glorious Food Mary-Slater Linn & Jeffrey Nystuen with Chef Chandra Longsaravane getting ready to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nystuen, Jeffrey A.

    35 Food, Glorious Food Mary-Slater Linn & Jeffrey Nystuen with Chef Chandra Longsaravane getting. How different would the food be from Thailand? Would there be unique flavors and products? Let's prowl the food markets, try the street stalls, verify the recommendations of the guidebook. We signed up

  17. S:Sensory&Food Mechanisms for Sensing Fat in Food in the Mouth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    S:Sensory&Food Quality Mechanisms for Sensing Fat in Food in the Mouth Presented at the Symposium Pleasure and Beyond" held at the Institute of Food Technologists 2011 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, La., U show that the pleasantness of food texture is represented in the orbitofrontal cortex. These findings

  18. University Food Permit For Serving Food or Refreshments on University Property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    University Food Permit For Serving Food or Refreshments on University Property Not Required for Events When All Food is Provided or Catered by University Dining Services (The nature of your event may require that you provide additional details or information on request) Authorization for serving food

  19. Food ProtectionTrends,Vol. 25, No. 12, Pages 981990 2005, International Association for Food Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food ProtectionTrends,Vol. 25, No. 12, Pages 981­990 Copyright© 2005, International Association for Food Protection 6200 Aurora Ave., Suite 200W, Des Moines, IA 50322-2864 Factors Impacting Food Workers' and Managers' Safe Food Preparation Practices: A Qualitative Study LAURA R. GREEN1* and CAROL SELMAN2 1 Health

  20. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  1. Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Effect of Residence Time on Ni-Sorption Mechanisms on Clay and Oxide Minerals: An X-ray Absorption minerals is typically fast initially, then the rates gradually diminish. In the literature the decline

  2. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  3. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Capillary suction-time tests on selected clays and shales. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.M.

    1989-05-01

    Shale stability has been an ongoing problem in the drilling of oil wells. The Capillary Suction Time test is simple and easy to use, allowing operators to conduct the test at the rigsite. However because of difficulty in reproducing results, the test should be used only qualitatively. The CST, along with the Methylene Blue, Specific Surface Area and Ensilin tests, accurately predicts shale swelling and dispersion. The tests have the added advantage of being able to be conducted relatively quickly. These tests could be carried out at the rigsite while the drilling is taking place. The experiments conducted also demonstrated the usefulness of KCL as an inhibitor of shale swelling and dispersion. From the CST data, it can be seen that KCL concentrations as low as 0.5% are effective in controlling the swelling of Phillips Ekofisk, Phillips Andrews County, Texaco Mississippi Canyon and Pierre Texaco. However a greater concentration of KCL is required to inhibit the swelling of Gold Seal Bentonite, Standard Arizona, Standard Wyoming and Standard Texas. It is recommended that more concentrations of KCL be tested of the high swelling clays to determine the minimum concentration required to inhibit swelling and dispersion.

  5. Food Safety for Tailgate Parties and Picnics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2001-10-22

    , diarrhea, nausea, headaches and maybe even vomiting, can result from the improper handling of foods. The bacteria that cause foodborne illness grow at temper- atures between 40 and 140 degrees F. This is called the ?danger zone.? Foods prepared for outdoor... eating can fall into the danger zone even when the weather is cool. What foods are risky? Almost any food can be a source of hazardous bacteria, but the most hazardous foods are moist and contain protein. This includes meats, poultry, fish, seafood, eggs...

  6. 4-H Favorite Foods Unit 1. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Maeona; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances; Tribble, Marie

    1958-01-01

    Lettuce leaves or other greens 1. Wash lettuce or other greens. Place in refrigerator. 2. Wash apples and celery. Drain. Chop celery as shown. See drawing for how to dice apples. Put in large mixing bowl. 3. Add nuts. 4. Blend mayonnaise and cream... safely. 8. Learn the best way to wash dishes and clean up the kitchen. 0 Learn to eat the foods listed on the Texas Food Standard. Keep your food record up to date. Exhibit one food you learned to cook at favorite food show. Kitchen Tips for 4-H...

  7. The Role of Food in American Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Hannah; Heiman, Kelly; Kimmel, Wes; Barnard, Julia; Holmes, Tyler

    2010-06-11

    Potawatomi managed to resist missionization and a subsequent loss of identity. Additionally, by behav- ing in this manner, the Potawatomi men preserved their culturally sanctioned role in food production. The male food responsibility was centered on hunting... stream_size 170307 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name The Role of Food.pdf.txt stream_source_info The Role of Food.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 The Role of Food...

  8. Power Outage 1.Stop serving food and beverages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LESSON1 Power Outage 1.Stop serving food and beverages. Notify customers. 2.Do two things food. Emergency Readiness for Food Workers #12;LESSON1 Power Outage 5.Food being held cold: Discard

  9. Ordinary Food Spaces in a Global City: Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Megan Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Megan Kathleen. “Ordinary Food Places in a Global City: Hongotherinfo/110318_food_supply_faq/e_foods upply_faq.pdf .Megan Kathleen. “Ordinary Food Places in a Global City: Hong

  10. Students' Perceptions of Food and Factors That Influence Purchasing Decisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lindsay Marie

    2013-06-06

    When it comes to food, college students need help selecting healthy food choices. Students are presented with many options to purchase food at grocery stores and restaurants and many of these options include organic food. ...

  11. Ordinary Food Spaces in a Global City: Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, Megan Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    food consumption and food waste. She is currently working tothe food from the wholesale market, become waste once theirwaste-paper-hits-scavengers Accessed 17/1/2013. Blake, Megan Kathleen. “Ordinary Food

  12. Vaginal mesh grafts and the Food and Drug Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostergard, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    and the Food and Drug Administration Donald R. Ostergardthe food and drug administration's (FDA) 510(k) process of

  13. Investigation of two-phase flow phenomena associated with corrosion in an SF/HLW repository in Opalinus Clay, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senger, R.; Marschall, P.; Finsterle, S.

    2008-08-04

    Gas generation from corrosion of the waste canisters and gas accumulation in the backfilled emplacement tunnels is a key issue in the assessment of long-term radiological safety of the proposed repository for spent fuel and high-level waste (SF/HLW) sited in the Opalinus Clay formation of Northern Switzerland. Previous modeling studies indicated a significant pressure buildup in the backfilled emplacement tunnels for those sensitivity runs, where corrosion rates were high and the permeability of the Opalinus Clay was very low. As an extension to those studies, a refined process model of the canister corrosion phenomena has been developed, which accounts not only for the gas generation but also for the water consumption associated with the chemical reaction of corrosion of steel under anaerobic conditions. The simulations with the new process model indicate, that with increasing corrosion rates and decreasing host-rock permeability, pressure buildup increased, as expected. However, the simulations taking into account water consumption show that the pressure buildup is reduced compared to the simulation considering only gas generation. The pressure reduction is enhanced for lower permeability of the Opalinus Clay and for higher corrosion rates, which correspond to higher gas generations rates and higher water consumption rates. Moreover, the simulated two-phase flow patterns in the engineered barrier system (EBS) and surrounding Opalinus Clay show important differences at late time of the gas production phase as the generated gas continues to migrate outward into the surrounding host rock. For the case without water consumption, the water flow indicates overall downward flow due to a change in the overall density of the gas-fluid mixture from that based on the initially prescribed hydrostatic pressure gradient. For the case with water consumption, water flow converges toward the waste canister at a rate corresponding to the water consumption rate associated with the corrosion reaction. The water flow toward the canister is maintained even for very low permeabilities of the Opalinus clay, sustaining the anaerobic corrosion of the steel canister.

  14. Structural evaluation of WIPP disposal room raised to Clay Seam G.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Byoung Yoon (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Holland, John F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-01

    An error was discovered in the ALGEBBRA script used to calculate the disturbed rock zone around the disposal room and the shear failure zone in the anhydrite layers in the original version. To correct the error, a memorandum of correction was submitted according to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Quality Assurance program. The recommended course of action was to correct the error, to repeat the post-process, and to rewrite Section 7.4, 7.5, 8, and Appendix B in the original report. The sections and appendix revised by the post-process using the corrected ALGEBRA scripts are provided in this revision. The original report summarizes a series of structural calculations that examine effects of raising the WIPP repository horizon from the original design level upward 2.43 meters. Calculations were then repeated for grid changes appropriate for the new horizon raised to Clay Seam G. Results are presented in three main areas: (1) Disposal room porosity, (2) Disturbed rock zone characteristics, and (3) Anhydrite marker bed failure. No change to the porosity surface for the compliance re-certification application is necessary to account for raising the repository horizon, because the new porosity surface is essentially identical. The disturbed rock zone evolution and devolution are charted in terms of a stress invariant criterion over the regulatory period. This model shows that the propagation of the DRZ into the surrounding rock salt does not penetrate through MB 139 in the case of both the original horizon and the raised room. Damaged salt would be expected to heal in nominally 150 years. The shear failure does not occur in either the upper or lower anhydrite layers at the moment of excavation, but appears above and below the middle of the pillar one day after the excavation. The damaged anhydrite is not expected to heal as the salt in the DRZ is expected to.

  15. Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu

    2014-01-21

    We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ?5?nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265??A–280??A with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 10{sup 6}–7.4 × 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD}?=?0.68?V corresponding to 10?nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

  16. Covered Product Category: Hot Food Holding Cabinets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for hot food holding cabinets, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  17. Ethanol: Producting Food, Feed, and Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 joint quarterly Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Todd Sneller (Nebraska Ethanol Board) discussed the food versus fuel issue.

  18. The Future of Food Information Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kline, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    internet) and transparency (providing a detailed description of every food item’s history).s history through the use of a computer and internet access.

  19. The effect of sources of nitrogen on nitrate formation and nitrogen uptake by cotton plants growing on Miller clay loam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Zilmar Ziller

    1958-01-01

    LIB RARV A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS THE EFFECT OF SOURCES OF NITROGEN ON NITRATE FORMATION AND NITROGEN UPTAKE HX COTTON PIANTS GROWXNG ON MILLER CIAY LOAN A Thesis ZXINAR ZXLLER NARCOS AAS Submitted, to the Graduate School of the Agricultural... ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ 66 APPEEDIXt ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 73 Tables l. Treatments Used in the Study. 2 Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller Clay (0-6 ') on the 10th of July as Affected. by Rate and Source of' Nitrogen, Avexage oi' Two Repli- Nitrate Content (ppm) of Miller...

  20. Twitter Food Photo Mining and Analysis for One Hundred Kinds of Foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Twitter Food Photo Mining and Analysis for One Hundred Kinds of Foods Keiji Yanai and Yoshiyuki-shi, Tokyo 182-8585 Japan {yanai,kawano-y}@mm.inf.uec.ac.jp Abstract. So many people post photos as well mining for specific kinds of photos, we describe food photo mining from the Twitter stream. To collect

  1. packaged foods followed food labeling changes that went into effect in 2006.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    packaged foods followed food labeling changes that went into effect in 2006.1 Further labeling for a product labeled zero trans fat to have close to 0.5 g of trans fat per serving, we are unaware of any pub packaged foods would elimi- nate these differences and would help persons who may only have access

  2. Title: Energy, Water and Food: A Preliminary Conversation with the Food and Agriculture Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Title: Energy, Water and Food: A Preliminary Conversation with the Food and Agriculture for attendees) to discuss a topic high on the agenda for FAO entitled "Energy, Water and Food". The FAO visitors Feldman Shelley rf12 DSOC Holst-Warhaft Gail glh3 MAE *Gomez Miguel mig7 AEM *Parrish Colin crp3 BAKERI

  3. LOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    Sustainable production and consumption has risen up the political agenda over the last ten years, to becomeLOCAL ORGANIC FOOD: THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION By Gill Seyfang CSERGE Working Paper EDM 04-09 #12;Local Organic Food: The Social Implications of Sustainable Consumption By Gill

  4. The Sodium Content of Your Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1982-01-01

    ............................ ............................. Pear nectar Pineapple juice .......................... Prune juice .............................. ................ Mineral Water. imported Tea ............................. Hot brewed .............................. Hot instant... .................................... Condiments, fats and oils 2t ........ Sodium Content of Selected Non-prescription Drugs 2t The Sodium Content of Your Food Extension food and nutrition specialists, The Texas A&M University System. Introduction Sodium is a mineral element necessary...

  5. Energy Efficiency -FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY SEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    -based research to advance innovation in resource use efficiency in coupled water-energy systems. The successfulEnergy Efficiency - FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY SEARCH PLAN PAGE 8 OF 10 Approved 11 Efficiency University of California, Davis Title: Assistant Professor Water-Energy Efficiency in Food Science

  6. SCIENCE AT THE CROSSROADS Genetically Modified Foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Stuart A.

    SCIENCE AT THE CROSSROADS Genetically Modified Foods and the Attack on Nature Stuart A. NewmanBy:[Newman,StuartA.]At:16:493July2009 #12;about, genetically modified (GM) food as scientifically ignorant, economically and Arpad Pusztai, ``Effect of Diets Containing Genetically Modified Potatoes Expressing galanthus nivalis

  7. FOOD FISH FACTS Crassostrea virginica Crassostrea ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 FOOD FISH FACTS OYSTERS Crassostrea virginica Crassostrea ~ Although no one knows how many centuries 0 y s t e r s have been enjoyed as food, it is known that oyster farming has been practiced on the same principle as a vacuum cleaner. Suction dredges are very efficient in carrying oysters and other

  8. E:FoodEngineering& PhysicalProperties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, John

    E:FoodEngineering& PhysicalProperties JFS E: Food Engineering and Physical Properties Ultrasonic pressure or under vacuum (to minimize bubble nucleation). Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation (nominally were evident in both air-mixed and vacuum-mixed doughs, suggesting that ultrasound was sensitive

  9. Twitter Food Photo Mining and Analysis for One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanai, Keiji

    Twitter Food Photo Mining and Analysis for One Hundred Kinds of Foods Pacific-Rim Conf-Communications, Tokyo, Japan #12;Twitter Realtime Food Photo Mining System (mm.cs.uec.ac.jp/tw/) ·What kinds of foods analysis #12;Twitter Food Photo Mining ·Twitter Photos represent the current state of the world ! ·Mining

  10. Be a Food Detective Grades 9-12: T-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    Be a Food Detective Grades 9-12: T-1 Be a Food Detective Overview Students will explore the exciting area of food and nutrition and answer specific questions about prepared food products, such as, what a food is made from, the source of its ingredients, and how the ingredients were grown. Suggested

  11. Collection Policy: FOOD SCIENCE Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Chemistry 3. Food Microbiology 4. Food Engineering 5. Dairy Science 6. Food Processing Waste Technology 7Collection Policy: FOOD SCIENCE Subject Scope | Priority Tables | Other policies . . . 1.0 TEACHING, RESEARCH AND EXTENSION PROGRAMS 1.1 Mission and emphases of the department Food Science activity at Cornell

  12. Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2007, Pages 661666 Factors Related to Food Worker Hand Hygiene Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    661 Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2007, Pages 661­666 Factors Related to Food Worker 37247; 4Connecticut Department of Public Health, Food Protection Program, Division of Environmental To identify factors related to food worker hand hygiene practices, we collected (i) observational data on food

  13. Central Coast consumers want more food-related information, from safety to ethics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Phil

    2006-01-01

    of food packaging or food waste. Several participants notedwas grown and the fate of food waste. Preferred information

  14. Master of Arts in History International program: Food History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einmahl, Uwe

    approach consumption, marketing and production of food from an economic, historical, sociological and traditions in food production and consumption. Environment, economy, and beliefs caused the emergence of geographically and socially diverse systems in the production, distribution and consumption of food

  15. Food and Beverage (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Food and Beverage (2010 MECS) Food and Beverage (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Food and Beverage Sector (NAICS 311, 312) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA...

  16. Quantifying the causes of the global food commodity price crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, G; Rajagopal, D; Timilsina, G; Zilberman, D

    2014-01-01

    63 p. [17] Timmer C. Causes of high food prices. MandaluyongD. Quantifying the causes of the global food commodity priceCarter C, Rausser G, Smith A. Causes of the food price boom.

  17. Food Finders Drive Organized - - Purdue University - West Lafayette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $author.value

    2015-11-11

    Nov 11, 2015 ... The Math Office Staff teamed up this year to host a FOOD FINDERS food drive to help those less fortunate during the Holiday Season! The food ...

  18. Food Allergies Form Office of Conferences & Special Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Deming

    1 Food Allergies Form Office of Conferences & Special Events University to complete this form if the camper does not have a food allergy or special: *FOOD ALLERGY (S)/INTOLERANCES: Please provide medical documentation describing

  19. The Food System and a Role for Ecological Ethics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreisman, Isaac de Araujo

    2012-01-01

    2012/07/08/ business/organic-food-purists-worry-about-big-To Inherit the Earth. Oakland, CA: Food First Books, 2003.in Chiapas. Oakland, CA: Food First Books, 2005 (3 rd Ed. ).

  20. Food Preferences of the Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Kristie E.; Bizo, Lewis A.; Starkey, Nicola J.

    2013-01-01

    J. T. (1953). Quantity of food ingested as a measure ofE. (1978). Aspects of the food and nutrition of the brush-Kelling, A. S. (2011). Food preference, keeper ratings, and

  1. Examining Obesogenic Behavior Through the Lens of the Food Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolstein, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    SH, Wolstein J, Diamant AL. Food Environments Near Home andto Consumption of Soda and Fast Food. Los Angeles, CA: UCLAin Access to Healthy  Foods in the U.S.  American Journal 

  2. An Energy Conservation Program in the Food Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farner, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    General Foods Corporation is one of the largest food manufacturing companies in the United States. It's brand names are well known, covering a wide range of food products. Maxwell House coffee, Post cereals, Birds Eye ...

  3. Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2005-09-30

    or uncertain, reduce your risk of getting sick by buying food that doesn?t require refrigeration or prepara- tion. Suggested Food Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss ? Ready-to-eat canned/pouched meats/meals (e.g., tuna, chicken, spaghetti... or gas commonly occurs during storms or other natural disasters. However, power loss may continue for weeks after the storm has passed, especially if an area has been damaged by floods or high winds. If you are in an area where power is limited...

  4. Explore the Genetic Frontier: Labeling Foods Derived from Biotechnology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy; Hawkins, Carole

    2002-10-19

    Today's food labels provide consumers with nutrition information. This publication discusses the content of labels on foods derived from biotechnology and the agencies that regulate such labeling....

  5. Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry - Presentation by Frito-Lay North America, June 2011 Combustion Turbine CHP System for Food Processing Industry -...

  6. 10/31/2011 1 Nutrition, Food Security and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    . conditional cash transfers, seed technology, education) and food security, nutrition, and poverty reduction policy and how these policies and programs directly or indirectly affect food security, poverty

  7. Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage Industry - Fact Sheet, 2014 Flexible Distributed Energy and Water from Waste for the Food and Beverage...

  8. CHP SYSTEM AT FOOD PROCESSING PLANT INCREASES RELIABILITY AND...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP SYSTEM AT FOOD PROCESSING PLANT INCREASES RELIABILITY AND REDUCES EMISSIONS - CASE STUDY, 2015 CHP SYSTEM AT FOOD PROCESSING PLANT INCREASES RELIABILITY AND REDUCES EMISSIONS -...

  9. THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THRESHOLD RADIOACTIVITY FOR BULK FOOD SAMPLES BY GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY...

  10. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Find the...

  11. Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food & Beverage Industry - Presentation by GE Global Research, June 2011 Flexible Distributed Energy & Water from Waste for the Food &...

  12. EM 9036 August 2011 Ensuring Food Safety in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ....................................10 Water as a Food........................................................................13, see the OSU Extension Catalog: https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/em9036 #12;2 Acidified food

  13. (Re)Imagining Food Systems: From Chariy to Solidarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kordi, Hussin

    2013-01-01

    The Progressive Increase of Food Waste in America and ItsThe Progressive Increase of Food Waste in America and Its

  14. Ebeling: Handbook of Indian Foods and Fibers of Arid America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Mark Q

    1987-01-01

    and bordering mountains. Insects as a food resource are alsoFriedrich S. 1951 Insects as Human Food: A Chapter in the

  15. ANTH. 199: CONSUMING AGENDAS: FOOD AND SOCIAL ACTIVISM* PROFESSOR INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of people who go hungry in the U.S. at the same time? 5. What is GMO food? Does GMO food affect our health

  16. TOWARD A SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF FOOD USE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shifflett, Peggy A.; Nyberg, Kenneth L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper focuses on the social construction offood use patterns through the dialectical moments of externalisation, objectiuation, and internalization. The major emphasis is on the situational, intersubjective, and symbolic dimensions of food use...

  17. Inst. Of Food Tech- Linda Dugger 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The influence of parents and peers on adolescent body hics. composition, nutrient intake, and food preference was the focus of this study. Major influences on the adolescent are important to uncover, so that positive health ...

  18. Electron Beam--21st Century Food Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vestal, Andy

    2003-03-07

    This publication explains electron beam irradiation technology to consumers, industry professionals and government officials. Electron beam irradiation is a method of treating food and other products for pathogens that ...

  19. A systems approach to food accident analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helferich, John D

    2011-01-01

    Food borne illnesses lead to 3000 deaths per year in the United States. Some industries, such as aviation, have made great strides increasing safety through careful accident analysis leading to changes in industry practices. ...

  20. Dehulling cottonseed for use in food products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wink, Robert Earl

    1972-01-01

    DEHULLING COTTONSEED FOR USE IN FOOD PRODUCTS A Thesis by ROBERT EARL WINK, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering DEHULLING COTTONSEED FOR USE IN FOOD PRODUCTS A Thesis by ROBERT EARL WINK, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of C tt (Member) (Head of Depa (Member) August 1972 ABSTRACT Dehulling Cottonseed...

  1. THE BANDEIRANTES STONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    By the time he came up for air, his lungs were set to implode. Three hours of this and he was ready to give up and let the sea take his body, along with the crystal ...

  2. Quarrying and Mining (Stone)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloxam, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Geological Survey of Norway Special Publication 12.Geological Survey of Norway. American Geological InstituteGeological Survey of Norway. (INCO-CT-2005- 015416-Project

  3. Stone & Cedar Cabin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1934-01-01

    operation ..................................................................................... 215 6.3 Types of CAES ................................................................................................... 216 6.3.1 CAES in salt and hard rock...

  4. Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12:18 pm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Can Next-Generation Reactors Power a Safe Nuclear Futur By Clay Dillow Posted 03.17.2011 at 12 of nuclear reactors are designed to prevent exactly what we old Fukushima Daiichi plant. Which is good the world rush to reconsider their nuclear plans, nuclear experts look toward a future of smaller, safer

  5. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides the critical link between the short-term understanding from laboratory and field tests, and the prediction of repository performance over repository time frames and scales. One common recommendation is that experiments be designed to permit the appropriate scaling in the models. There is a large contrast in the physical and chemical properties between the Cast Stone waste package and the IDF backfill and surrounding sediments. Cast Stone exhibits low permeability, high tortuosity, low carbonate, high pH, and low Eh whereas the backfill and native sediments have high permeability, low tortuosity, high carbonate, circumneutral pH, and high Eh. These contrasts have important implications for flow, transport, and reactions across the Cast Stone – backfill interface. Over time with transport across the interface and subsequent reactions, the sharp geochemical contrast will blur and there will be a range of spatially-distributed conditions. In general, COC mobility and transport will be sensitive to these geochemical variations, which also include physical changes in porosity and permeability from mineral reactions. Therefore, PA modeling must address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Section 2 of this document reviews past Hanford PAs and SRS Saltstone PAs, which to date have mostly relied on the lumped parameter COC release conceptual models for TSPA predictions, and provides some details on the chosen values for the lumped parameters. Section 3 provides more details on the hierarchical modeling strategy and processes and mechanisms that control COC release. Section 4 summarizes and lists the key parameters for which numerical values are needed to perform PAs. Section 5 provides brief summaries of the methods used to measure the needed parameters and references to get more details.

  6. Roadmap for Process Heating Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vessel Molds and cores Natural gas Powder (metal and non- metal) Pulp and paper Resin Sludge and waste materials Stone and clay Aging Aluminizing ...

  7. What Do Emissions Markets Deliver and to Whom? Evidence from Southern California’s NOx Trading Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith; Holland, Stephen P.; Mansur, Erin T

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum Refining Stone, Clay, and Glass Products Primary Metal Industries Electric and Gas Services Variables for control facilities median zip code income (

  8. Making Food, Producing Sustainability Many contemporary approaches to environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Tapan S.

    sustainability, sustainable HCI, agriculture, fishery, food production, permaculture, urban agriculture ACM

  9. Rural Food Security in Tigray, Ethiopia: Policy Impact Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rural Food Security in Tigray, Ethiopia: Policy Impact Evaluation Tagel Gebrehiwot March, 2008 #12;Rural Food Security in Tigary, Ethiopia: Policy Impact Evaluation by Tagel Gebrehiwot Thesis submitted on the effectiveness of food security policy in ensuring rural food security and poverty reduction in Tigray region

  10. FOOD 510 Course Syllabus 2014w (1) Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOOD 510 Course Syllabus 2014w (1) Instructor: Professor Eunice Li-Chan, Ph.D. Room 212, Food. Course Description and Objectives This course examines key concepts, current issues and advances in food science that are pertinent to professionals working in food industry, academia, and government. Given

  11. griculture must be transformed. Although global food production is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    `greenmanures',theeconomiccostof producingfoodinthiswayandtheneteffecton greenhouse-gasemissions6 .Inaddition,farming genetically modified crops is widely thoughtA griculture must be transformed. Although global food production is increasing, today's farming, food security (people's access to food and the qual- ity of that food), human health, and economic

  12. FRE 306: Global Food Markets Fall Term 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    markets such as the introduction of genetically modified foods and the increased importance of food safetyFRE 306: Global Food Markets Fall Term 2008 Instructor: Rick Barichello Rm 339 MacMillan Building Telephone: 822-3473 E-Mail: richard.barichello@ubc.ca Learning Objectives: o Understanding of how food

  13. Quantity Food Production Instructor: Jim Vernere Teaching Assistant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    knowledge and empathy of the responsibilities and duties of the food production manager and gain skill food is cooked and stored. 2. Develop further knowledge of the factors which affect food composition, preservation, processing, and service. 4. Understand principles of food service safety and accident prevention

  14. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    environmental idealism, and functional food collection andthey can be functional money-savers and food producers,

  15. West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Delivers Food for 700 Families

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees at West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) helped collect and deliver 114,843 pounds of food, including 360 turkeys, to nine food pantries in the West Valley area, just in time to benefit about 700 families in need during the holidays.

  16. Preparing for a Water Emergency A tool for food processors, food manufacturers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    an emergency shut-down procedure for a water supply emergency? Have employees been trained and havePreparing for a Water Emergency A tool for food processors, food manufacturers, and other large volume water users to be better prepared for water shortage and contamination emergencies Good business

  17. Traces of natural radionuclides in animal food

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merli, Isabella Desan; Guazzelli da Silveira, Marcilei A.; Medina, Nilberto H.

    2014-11-11

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials are present everywhere, e.g., in soil, air, housing materials, food, etc. Therefore, human beings and animals receive internal exposure from radioactive elements inside their bodies through breathing and alimentation. Gamma radiation has enough energy to remove an electron from the atom and compromise the rearrangement of electrons in the search for a more stable configuration which can disturb molecule chemical bonding. Food ingestion is one of the most common forms of radioisotopes absorption. The goal of this work is the measurement of natural gamma radiation rates from natural radioisotopes present in animal food. To determine the concentration of natural radionuclides present in animal food gamma-ray spectrometry was applied. We have prepared animal food samples for poultry, fish, dogs, cats and cattle. The two highest total ingestion effective doses observed refers to a sample of mineral salt cattle, 95.3(15) ?Sv/year, rabbit chow, with a value of 48(5) ?Sv/year, and cattle mineral salt, with a value of 69(7) ?Sv/year, while the annual total dose value from terrestrial intake radionuclide is of the order of 290 ?Sv/year.

  18. The Food Safety Knowledge Level of Certified Food Managers Who Attended Two Self-Selected Training Courses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payton, Larry Sean

    2013-05-30

    through the use of a food safety knowledge test instrument. The scope of the study was to explore the level of food safety knowledge of two self-selected certified food managers in Texas. Sixty-five percent (65.6%) of the certified food managers were...

  19. N:\\redesign\\guides\\Food Technology-Food Engineering.doc 1 A Beginning Finding Aid to Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    N:\\redesign\\guides\\Food Technology-Food Engineering.doc 1 A Beginning Finding Aid to Materials in the IIT Archives Related to Food Technology Index of IIT Archives Acc. No. 1998.149/News (Press) Releases. of Rangoon, Burma 2/1950 Milton E. Parker, director of food engineering program at IIT discusses pest control

  20. Food Allergy Disclaimer UMD Dining makes every attempt to identify ingredients that may cause reactions in people with food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Food Allergy Disclaimer UMD Dining makes every attempt to identify ingredients that may cause reactions in people with food allergies. We make every effort to instruct our food production staff on the severity of food allergies. In addition we label items with possible allergencontaining ingredients

  1. Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 69, No. 10, 2006, Pages 24172423 Copyright , International Association for Food Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2417 Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 69, No. 10, 2006, Pages 2417­2423 Copyright ©, International Association for Food Protection Food Worker Hand Washing Practices: An Observation Study LAURA R. GREEN,1 Buford Highway, Atlanta, Georgia 30341; 3Food Division, Metro Public Health Department, 311 23rd Avenue

  2. Abstract Food caching birds hide food and recover the caches when supplies are less abundant. There is, however,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Abstract Food caching birds hide food and recover the caches when supplies are less abundant the food remained there) to predominantly eating them. Re-caching remained constant across the three trials · Corvids · Pilfering · Scrub-jay Introduction Many birds and mammals hide food caches for future con

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ubc Food System Project: Food Waste Management The Hot Beverage Cup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Food Waste Management ­ The Hot Beverage Cup Vinci Ching, Paul Gazzola, Karen Juzkow, Kenrick Kan, Tina of a project/report". #12;AGSC 450 UBC FOOD SYSTEM PROJECT: FOOD WASTE MANAGEMENT ­ THE HOT BEVERAGE CUP GROUPUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Ubc Food System Project

  4. Sediment diagenesis, fossil preservation, and depositional environment in the Stone City/Lower Cook Mountain transgression (Middle Eocene, southeast Texas): a test of chemical taphofacies in the rock record 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Charles Anthony

    1994-01-01

    sediments, and there is a great need to test the taphofacies concept on the rock record. The taphofacies concept has been tested in the Stone City/Cook Mountain formations, middle Eocene, in Southeast Texas. The strata consist of brown shales, pelleted green...

  5. Efficiency of clay-TiO2 nanocomposites on the photocatalytic eliminationof a model hydrophobic air pollutant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kibanova, Daria; Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Clay-supported TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially improve the performance of air treatment technologies via enhanced adsorption and reactivity of target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, a bench-top photocatalytic flow reactor was used to evaluate the efficiency of hectorite-TiO2 and kaolinite-TiO2, two novel composite materials synthesized in our laboratory. Toluene, a model hydrophobic VOC and a common indoor air pollutant, was introduced in the air stream at realistic concentrations, and reacted under UVA (gamma max = 365 nm) or UVC (gamma max = 254 nm) irradiation. The UVC lamp generated secondary emission at 185 nm, leading to the formation of ozone and other short-lived reactive species. Performance of clay-TiO2 composites was compared with that of pure TiO2 (Degussa P25), and with UV irradiation in the absence of photocatalyst under identical conditions. Films of clay-TiO2 composites and of P25 were prepared by a dip-coating method on the surface of Raschig rings, which were placed inside the flow reactor. An upstream toluene concentration of ~;;170 ppbv was generated by diluting a constant flow of toluene vapor from a diffusion source with dry air, or with humid air at 10, 33 and 66percent relative humidity (RH). Toluene concentrations were determined by collecting Tenax-TA (R) sorbent tubes downstream of the reactor, with subsequent thermal desorption -- GC/MS analysis. The fraction of toluene removed, percentR, and the reaction rate, Tr, were calculated for each experimental condition from the concentration changes measured with and without UV irradiation. Use of UVC light (UV/TiO2/O3) led to overall higher reactivity, which can be partially attributed to the contribution of gas phase reactions by short-lived radical species. When the reaction rate was normalized to the light irradiance, Tr/I gamma, the UV/TiO2 reaction under UVA irradiation was more efficient for samples with a higher content of TiO2 (P25 and Hecto-TiO2), but not for Kao-TiO2. In all cases, reaction rates peaked at 10percent RH, with Tr values between 10 and 50percent higher than those measured under dry air. However, a net inhibition was observed as RH increased to 33percent and 66percent, indicating that water molecules competed effectively with toluene for reactive surface sites and limited the overall photocatalytic conversion. Compared to P25, inhibition by co-adsorbed water was less significant for Kao-TiO2 samples, but was more dramatic for Hecto-TiO2 due to the high water uptake capacity of hectorite.

  6. The availability of healthy food options in fast food outlets in six rural counties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Jennifer Sue

    2009-05-15

    contributors to a predisposition for positive energy balance. 7, 8 The two broad categories of environmental factors that have been identified as contributors to energy imbalance are the availability of energy-dense foods and a reduction in work... in calories consumed from away-from home versus home-prepared food. 37 Unfortunately, many of the foods designed for convenience are nutrient-poor, energy-dense and may allow for over-consumption of calories. 37, 38 A major focus has been placed...

  7. FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Randy

    FOOD SUSTAINABILITY REPORT QUEEN'S HOSPITALITY SERVICES May 2008 #12;In recent years, a sustainability movement has taken root at Queen's. The impacts of the movement can be seen across campus sustainability position within the their student government ­The AMS, The Engineer Society open the Tea Room

  8. Reducing Food Safety Risks in Community Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    as good agricultural practices (GAPs) -- has been pointed to by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are also applicable to community and school gardens. The steps presented in this guide are practical of the final products. Good agricultural practices are the basic environmental and operational conditions

  9. THE NORTH CAROLINA FOOD PROCESSING INITIATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    THE NORTH CAROLINA FOOD PROCESSING INITIATIVE Manufacturing jobs for North Carolina Bringing manufacturing back to N.C. In 2014, the North Carolina General Assembly funded this initiative to diversify development in communities across North Carolina and the globe. We will grow jobs From innovations that can

  10. Mathematics: Food, Soil, Water, Air, Free Speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russo, Bernard

    this death rate compares to that of hunter-gatherers going after woolly mammoths, but it is not comforting or transplants. Less dramatic, but nevertheless impactful, say in the United States, are "western diet" related another outbreak of food borne disease with some hospitalizations and deaths. This time it is Escherichia

  11. Toward an integration of landscape and food web ecology: The dynamics of spatially subsidized food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polis, Gary A.; Anderson, Wendy B.; Holt, Robert D.

    1997-01-01

    We focus on the implications of movement, landscape variables, and spatial heterogeneity for food web dynamics. Movements of nutrients, detritus, prey, and consumers among habitats are ubiquitous in diverse biomes and can ...

  12. Inedible Producers in Food Webs: Controls on Stoichiometric Food Quality and Composition of Grazers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Spencer R.; Leibold, Mathew A.; Lytle, David A.; Smith, Val H.

    2006-05-01

    Ecological stoichiometry and food web theories focus on distinct mechanisms that shape communities. These mechanisms, however, likely interact in ways that neither theory alone addresses. To illustrate, we show how a model ...

  13. Thermal and mechanical properties of palm oil-based polyurethane acrylate/clay nanocomposites prepared by in-situ intercalative method and electron beam radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salih, A. M.; Ahmad, Mansor Bin; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Dahlan, Khairul Zaman Hj Mohd; Tajau, Rida; Mahmood, Mohd Hilmi; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan

    2014-02-12

    Palm oil based-polyurethane acrylate (POBUA)/clay nanocomposites were prepared via in-situ intercalative polymerization using epoxidized palm oil acrylate (EPOLA) and 4,4' methylene diphenyl diisocyante (MDI). Organically modified Montmorillonite (ODA-MMT) was incorporated in EPOLA (1, 3 and 5%wt), and then subjected to polycondensation reaction with MDI. Nanocomposites solid films were obtained successfully by electron beam radiation induced free radical polymerization (curing). FTIR results reveal that the prepolymer was obtained successfully, with nanoclay dispersed in the matrix. The intercalation of the clay in the polymer matrix was investigated by XRD and the interlayer spacing of clay was found to be increased up to 37 Å, while the structure morphology of the nanocomposites was investigated by TEM and SEM. The nanocomposites were found to be a mixture of exfoliated and intercalated morphologies. The thermal stability of the nanocomposites was significantly increased by incorporation of nanoclay into the polymer matrix. DSC results reveal that the Tg was shifted to higher values, gradually with increasing the amount of filler in the nanocomposites. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of the nanocomposites showed remarkable improvement compared to the neat POBUA.

  14. {sup 31}P NMR study of the complexation of TBP with lanthanides and actinides in solution and in a clay matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartzell, C.J.

    1994-07-24

    Goal was to use NMR to study TBP/lanthanide complexes in the interlayer or on edge sites of clays. Work in this laboratory yielded details of the complexation of Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} with TBP in hexane solution; this information is crucial to interpretation of results of NMR studies of the complexes exchanged into clays. The solution {sup 31}P-chemical shift values were improved by repeating the studies on the lanthanide salts dissolved directly into neat TBP. NMR studies of these neat solutions of the Eu(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex and the Pr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}3TBP-complex show that the {sup 31}P chemical shift remains relatively constant for TBP: lanthanide ratios below 3: 1. At higher ratios, the chemical shift approaches that of free TBP, indicating rapid exchange of TBP between the free and complexed state. Exchange of these complexes into the clay hectorite yielded discrete {sup 31}P-NMR signals for the Eu{lg_bullet}TBP complex at -190 ppm and free TBP at -6 ppm. Adsorption of the Pr{lg_bullet}TBP complex yielded broad signals at 76 ppm for the complex and -6 ppm for free TBP. There was no evidence of exchange between the incorporated complex and the free TBP.

  15. Be Prepared with a 3-day Emergency Food Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    should be used or expiration dates. Low- acid canned goods (meat, poultry, fish, gravy, stew, soups (over 100 degrees) and freezing temperatures are harmful to canned goods. (The Food Keeper, Food

  16. Pumpkin Power: Turning Food Waste into Energy | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    food waste and deliver it to EBMUD's anaerobic digesters. Inside these giant tanks, bacteria break down the food waste and release methane gas as a byproduct. EBMUD captures this...

  17. Fast food in a Chinese provincial city: a comparative analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Haiying

    2006-08-16

    More than a decade ago American fast food entered the Chinese market. Since then the number of fast food and organized chain restaurants in China has multiplied. Chinese consumers, especially those who live in large urban areas, have accepted...

  18. China's food production under water and land limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoisungwan, Piyatida

    2010-01-01

    The future availability of the natural resources (water and land) needed for food production is highly uncertain. Evidence shows diminishing natural resources and growing food demand throughout many parts of the world. ...

  19. Zambia's food system: multiple sites of power and intersecting governances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, Caryn N

    2010-11-26

    on economic restructuring and the way supermarkets and agribusiness firms increasingly transform African food economies. This thesis is an empirically grounded research endeavour that presents insights about key dynamics in the domestic food system in urban...

  20. Distant harvest : the production and price of organic food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherburne, Morgan (Morgan L.)

    2010-01-01

    Organic food is growing in popularity, enjoying a 15 to 20% increase in sales, yearly, since about 1997, according to the Organic Trade Association. Organic produce makes up about 2% of the United States' total food sales ...

  1. Food Safety for Tailgate Parties and Picnics (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2001-10-22

    Certain foods are a health risk when prepared ahead of time and taken to outdoor parties. One key to food safety is keeping perishables at the proper temperature and knowing the time limit for serving them....

  2. Food Science and Human Nutrition Graduate Program Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Food Science and Human Nutrition Graduate Program Handbook Department of Food Science and Human........................................................................... 12 2.10. Use of Hazardous Materials.............................................................. 14 3.4. Selection of the Major Professor

  3. Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences Sustainable Food and Farming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    · Turfgrass Science and Management 2013 - 20142013 - 2014 HandbookHandbook stockbridge.cns.umass.edu/ #12· Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences · Sustainable Food and Farming · Sustainable Horticulture ....................................................................... 7 Sustainable Food and Farming

  4. Slow Food in a Fat Society: Satisfying Ethical Appetites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxson, Heather Anne

    Slow Food in a Fat Society Using historian Hillel Schwartz's utopian conception of a "fat society" as inspiration, this essay considers the potential contribution of the Slow Food movement to American notions of dietary ...

  5. The economic and financial feasibility of food innovation centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowley, Alison (Alison Rita)

    2015-01-01

    A Food Innovation Center (FIC) is an enclosed commercial space comprising a mix of complementary uses pertaining to locally-operated food growing, production, processing, testing, distribution, and sale. These uses include ...

  6. A center for food, Kowloon City, Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Kwan Yue, 1979-

    2005-01-01

    Modern day living limits us from understanding and seeing where our food comes from and how it was planted, grown, and manufactured. As we become more and more conscious about our diets, our relationship to food is more ...

  7. Food as Exposure: Nutritional Epigenetics and the Molecular Politics of Eating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landecker, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    of supplements and functional foods, or renewed attention tois added to many “functional foods” such as nutrition bars.frame in which many functional foods operate: consumers are

  8. The Food Nutrition Link--Level III Nutrition for the Health of It 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielamowicz, Mary K.; Cooksey, Dymple C.; Hall, Charles R.

    1995-11-03

    4-H members in the level three food project learn about nutrients, foods of different cultures, and careers in the food industry....

  9. Food site residence time and female competitive relationships in wild gray-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chancellor, Rebecca L.; Isbell, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    times. However, bark, a food with a long site residence timeranking females may benefit from higher food and energyintake rates when food site residence times are long. These

  10. Have Your City and Eat It Too: Los Angeles and the Urban Food Renaissance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarr, Alexander Robert

    2015-01-01

    and  live  out  the  urban  food  renaissance  in  Los  Works  Cited   “About:  Slow  Food  Los  Angeles. ”  2015.   Slow  Food  Los  Angeles.   http://slowfoodla.com/

  11. The Internationalization of Alternative Food Networks: Farmers' Markets, Community Gardens, and Agricultural Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cody, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Eds. ), Alternative Food Geographies: Representation and498. Alkon, A. H. , & Mares T. M. (2012). Food sovereigntyin US food movements: radical visions and neoliberal

  12. Food insecurity may be linked to childhood obesity in low-income Mexican-American families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Pat B; Lamp, Cathi; Nicholson, Yvonne; Krathwohl, Sarah; Hudes, Mark; Townsend, Marilyn

    2007-01-01

    with their level of cur- rent food security. Thirty-who had experienced past food insecurity were obese (BMIportions selected by food-insecure mothers. † Statistically

  13. Food as Exposure: Nutritional Epigenetics and the Molecular Politics of Eating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landecker, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    by Hannah Landecker Food as Exposure Nutritional Epigeneticsnot been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Thisany disease. ” Conventional foods as well as nutritional

  14. Decolonizing our plates : analyzing San Diego and vegans of color food politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Marilisa Cristina

    2011-01-01

    vegetables and fruits, genetically modified foods, having nothat produce genetically modified foods, such as a Februaryorganic, non-genetically modified, and slow foods (Slocum

  15. Low-income consumers, though less aware of genetically modified foods, are concerned and want labels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Nicelma J.

    2003-01-01

    sentiment about genetically modified food. Pew Initia- tiveless aware of genetically modified foods, are concerned andattitudes about genetically modified foods have been

  16. The effects of background adaptation and food availability on habitat preference of Corythoichthys flavofasciatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Neetha

    2012-01-01

    ADAPTATION AND FOOD AVAILABILITY ON HABITAT PREFERENCE OFchoice is related to the availability of food, presence ofbackground adaptation, food availability, or a combination

  17. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Predation and Food Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Predation and Food Webs *Preliminary draft, please and Food Webs Specific Language Changes NOAA Fisheries recommends the following new language in the Habitat of non-native predators including abundance, diel and temporal distributions, and food web interactions

  18. Policy on Food Allergy Accommodations for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a wide variety of items from which students may select. The dining hall also offers a gluten free and nut with special diets. We also serve soy and lactose free milk. In addition, there is a hot gluten and nut fee-contamination, including a freezer for gluten free foods and one for nut free foods 5. Special foods available on a daily

  19. MMU Sustainable Food Policy Statement Purpose of Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , glass, cardboard, aluminium and oil in all outlets and look to compost food waste as technology becomes and actively manage food waste at a production level and through the promotion of events such as Love Food, Hate Waste. Encourage suppliers to reduce packaging. We will embrace the University Waste Strategy

  20. Environmental controls on food web regimes: A fluvial perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Mary Eleanor

    of functional relationships that link environments, fluxes and food web interactions to understand howEnvironmental controls on food web regimes: A fluvial perspective Mary E. Power Department Abstract Because food web regimes control the biomass of primary producers (e.g., plants or algae

  1. Models of food web evolution Alan J. McKane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    Models of food web evolution Alan J. McKane Barbara Drossel While it is often possible to model of possible networks. Here we argue, in the context of food webs, that it is necessary to go beyond simply depending on the states of the local constituents. In the case of food webs, where the constituents

  2. Food web structure and the evolution of ecological communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKane, Alan

    Food web structure and the evolution of ecological communities Christopher Quince1 , Paul G. Higgs2 the population dynamics of the species for any structure of the food web. The equations account for competition of speciations and extinctions, and on the statistical properties of the food webs that are generated

  3. Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanette, Liana

    Food-supplementing parents reduces their sons' song repertoire size Liana Zanette1,*, Michael, Canada Food-supplemented parents typically produce more offspring, as numerous experiments on vertebrate, with implications concerning the adult quality of offspring, although few experiments have addressed whether food-supplementing

  4. University of Washington Bothell Food and Beverage Internal Approval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    University of Washington Bothell Food and Beverage Internal Approval PLEASE OBTAIN PRIOR APPROVAL FROM BUDGET AND PLANNING "Food approval code definitions are described at http://www.washington.washington.edu/fm/food-approval (this section is mandatory, if not filled out properly it could delay

  5. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu1 Anna Nagurney 2 1 Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN October 6-9, 2013 Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 1 / 41 #12 Program. Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 2 / 41 #12;This talk is based on the paper: Yu, M

  6. CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    CONSULTATION RESPONSE Wellcome Trust response to Sustainable Food March 2011 Page 1 of 2 House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee: Sustainable Food Inquiry Response by the Wellcome Trust March 2011 Introduction 1. The relationship between food security and climate change is complex and an increasing priority

  7. Food price inflation and children's schooling Michael Grimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Food price inflation and children's schooling Michael Grimm Institute of Social Studies, The Hague the impact of food price inflation on parental decisions to send their children to school. Moreover, I use the fact that food crop farmers and cotton farmers were exposed differently to that shock to estimate

  8. 2003 UBC FOOD SYSTEM COLLABORATIVE PROJECT: SUMMARY OF FINDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003 UBC FOOD SYSTEM COLLABORATIVE PROJECT: SUMMARY OF FINDINGS Kristina Bouris Campus Sustainability Office September 12, 2003 The UBC Food Systems Project is a collaborative project between Development Studies (UBC SEEDS) program of the UBC Campus Sustainability Office, UBC Food and Beverage

  9. Food Stamp Challenge By Bill Menke, November 3, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    Food Stamp Challenge By Bill Menke, November 3, 2013 Co-parishioner Laurie Hilton suggested that I and the other members of the Palisades Presbyterian Church live for a week on the thirty-five dollars that Food of my low budget of five dollars per day. I purchased most of my food at a local supermarket, in walking

  10. FNH302ChemAnalysisModule Food Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FNH302ChemAnalysisModule 2013w 1 FNH 302 Food Analysis Module I - Analysis of Chemical Composition Description: Principles of and procedures for the analysis of the chemical components of food including of the major food components (moisture, ash, nitrogen or protein, lipid, carbohydrate) Introduction

  11. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu Department Research 224(2) (2013) pp 273-282. Abstract: In this paper, we develop a network-based food supply chain- corporates food deterioration through the introduction of arc multipliers, with the inclusion

  12. FOOD SCIENCE & HUMAN NUTRITION http://foodsciencehumannutrition.umaine.edu/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    FOOD SCIENCE & HUMAN NUTRITION http://foodsciencehumannutrition.umaine.edu/ Program of Study Students Research Facilities Financial Aid Applying Correspondence The School of Food and Agriculture is the only university program in Maine to offer both bachelor and graduate education in food science, human

  13. Global Food Security Strategic Plan 2011-2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Global Food Security Strategic Plan 2011-2016 Updated November 2013 #12;All images used summary 1 2. Introduction 2 3. Vision 2 4. Context 3 Global food security drivers and challenges 4 5. The Global Food Security programme 6 i Operating principles 6 ii Partners and affiliates 6 iii Added value

  14. DISTRIBUTION OF PHTHALATE MONOESTERS IN AN AQUATIC FOOD WEB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION OF PHTHALATE MONOESTERS IN AN AQUATIC FOOD WEB by Maggie L. McConnell B: Distribution of Phthalate Monoesters in an Aquatic Food Web Report No.: 426 Examining Committee in organisms of an aquatic food web were investigated. A field study was conducted in False Creek, Vancouver

  15. Food sensitizes C. elegans avoidance behaviours through acute dopamine signalling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    Food sensitizes C. elegans avoidance behaviours through acute dopamine signalling Marina Ezcurra1 at NOVUM, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden Many behavioural states are modulated by food avail of an external food source enhances avoidance responses to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH neurons

  16. Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 -W2009 Term 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Land, Food & Community III LFS 450 - W2009 Term 2 Wednesdays 2:00-5:00 pm Classrooms: MCML 166-822-9607 UBC Food System Project Coordinator Sophia Baker-French sophiabakerfrench@yahoo.com Teaching Office, Campus and Community Planning Additional Resource Persons: Art Bomke, Agroecology, Food

  17. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu1 Anna Nagurney 2 1 Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA May 9-12, 2014 Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 1 / 43 #12 Program. Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 2 / 43 #12;This talk is based on the paper: Yu, M

  18. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title. · Developed to streamline wetland delineation process and promote consistency between the Clean Water Act and the Food Security Act. #12;1994 National Food Security Act Manual Procedures · Provided NRCS staff policy

  19. February 2011 1906: Pure Food & Drugs Act regulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    February 2011 #12; 1906: Pure Food & Drugs Act ­ regulated adultered/misbranded food & drugs 1938: Food, Drugs, & Cosmetics Acts ­ required premarket review for safety 1962: FDCA Amendments ­ the birth for investigations of new drugs, including a requirement for informed consent #12; 21 CFR 312 Subpart A ­ general

  20. SEA MUSSELS AND DOGFISH .AS FOOD By Irving A. Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to waste. With our rapidly increasing population the capacity of the soil to produce enough foodSEA MUSSELS AND DOGFISH .AS FOOD J1. By Irving A. Field U. S. Fisheries Laboratory, Woods Hole AS FOOD. .Jl By IRVING A. FIELD, U. S. Fisheries Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass. ~ Of the two sources

  1. FRE 460/503 Economics of Food Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    restrictions 11. Environment and Food (Handbook ch 34) 11-1 Waste and Foodmiles 11-2 Vegetarianism, OrganicsFRE 460/503 Economics of Food Consumption Winter 2014 Instructor: Dr. Carol A McAusland 337 Mac-class experiments -- 3% Text: The Oxford Handbook of the Economics of Food Consumption and Policy (abbreviated

  2. Supplier Selection for Supply Chains in the Processed Food Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Supplier Selection for Supply Chains in the Processed Food Industry Pedro Amorima,, Eduardo Curcioa an integrated framework for deciding about the supplier selection for supply chains in the processed food-stage stochastic mixed-integer programming model for the supplier selection in the process food industry

  3. Traceability, Product Recalls, Industry Reputation and Food Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    and for an industry using collective action to set rules and standards. Key words: Food safety, product recallTraceability, Product Recalls, Industry Reputation and Food Safety Sebastien Pouliot, Daniel A recalls, industry reputation and food safety S´ebastien Pouliot and Daniel A. Sumner November 17, 2010

  4. Food for fuel: The price of ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01

    Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

  5. Consumer's Guide: Preventing Food-borne Illness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extension Food and Nutrition Specialists

    2008-12-22

    , whichwillkillthebacteriathatcausefood-borne illness. ? Chillperishablefoodsandleftoversassoon aspossibleto40degreesForbelow. Shopping for safety Whenshoppingforfood,addperishablefoods ?meats,poultry,fish,eggs,milkproducts,and refrigeratorandfreezeritems.... USDAFoodSafetyandInspectionService.April2006. http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Foodborne Illness_What_Consumers_Need_to_Know/index. asp Spring Clean Your Way to a Safer Kitchen.Partnership forFoodSafetyEducation.2006. http...

  6. Food waste management using an electrostatic separator with corona discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Koonchun; Teh, Pehchiong; Lim, Sooking

    2015-05-15

    In Malaysia, municipal solid waste contains a high portion of organic matters, typically contributed by food waste. It is estimated that about 45% of the municipal waste are food waste, followed by the non-food waste such as plastics, metals, glass and others. Food waste, while being properly sorted and contamination free from non-food waste, can be reused (e.g. fertiliser) instead of being landfilled. Therefore, recycling of food waste is crucial not only from the view point of waste management, but also with respect to the reduction of resource losses and greenhouse gases emission. A new waste separation process involved food particles, non-food particles and electrostatic discharge was investigated in this study. The empirical results reveal that the corona electrostatic separation is an environmental-friendly way in recovering foods from municipal waste. The efficiency of the separator, under same operating conditions, varies with the particle size of the food and non-food particles. The highest efficiency of 82% is recorded for the particle sizes between 1.5 and 3.0?mm.

  7. Effects of Biofuel Policies on World Food Insecurity -- A CGE Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jiamin

    2012-02-14

    The food vs. fuel debate has heated up since the 2008 global food crisis when major crop prices dramatically increased. Heavily subsidized biofuel production was blamed for diverting food crops from food production and ...

  8. Project Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    City Studio, City of Vancouver Identify Local Food Waste Market and Food Canada 2014 Summer Games on Campus: Sustainable Food Materials & Waste ProceduresProject Organization name Project title 1 Centre for Sustainable Food

  9. The City Feeds the Poor: The Struggle for Sustainable Food Systems in San Francisco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Paula Kay

    2012-01-01

    of the Inspector General. (2002). Audit report, food andof the Inspector General. (2005). Audit report, food and

  10. Freshwater Crustaceans as an Aboriginal Food Resource in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrikson, Lael S; Yohe, Robert M II; Newman, Margaret E; Druss, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Sutton, Mark Q. 1988 Insects as Food: Aboriginal Entomophogybody coverings. Insects, a common food source in western

  11. Whole Building Efficiency for Whole Foods: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Doebber, I.; Hirsch, A.

    2013-02-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnered with Whole Foods Market under the Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program to design and implement a new store in Raleigh, North Carolina. The result was a design with a predicted energy savings of 40% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and 25% energy savings over their standard design. Measured performance of the as-built building showed that the building did not achieve the predicted performance. A detailed review of the project several months after opening revealed a series of several items in construction and controls items that were not implemented properly and were not fully corrected in the commissioning process.

  12. Food Options | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »FirstCurrent Science Create aFood Options

  13. United Natural Foods | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) JumpGTZ ClimateFeed Jump to:Foods Jump to: navigation,

  14. Trade My Food | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown of Skiatook,1993) JumpInformationMy Food

  15. Food Options | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |FinalIndustrialFollowing the Technical Career PathFood

  16. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  17. Response of rice to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen applied at various stages of plant growth on limed and unlimed Beaumont and Lake Charles clays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, William Blalock, III

    1962-01-01

    and Patna1k (1 ) partially support th1s explanation. They found that lime at ths rate of one percent of the weight of the so11 increased mineralisat1on of nitrogen, but most of the n1trogen in their tests accumulated as ammonia rather than nitrate under...RESPONSE OF RICE TO AMMONIUM AND NITRATE NITROGEN APPLIED AT VARIOUS STAGES OF PLANT GROWTH ON LIMED AND UNLINED BEAUNONT AND LAKE CHARLES CLAYS A Thesis By William B. Gay, III Submitted to the Graduate Sohool of the Agricultural...

  18. The genome of wine yeast Dekkera bruxellensis provides a tool to explore its food-related properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piskur, Jure

    2012-01-01

    of Food Science, Brewing Science Program, University ofof Food Science, Brewing Science Program, University of

  19. Food Newsletter Summary July 2013 Scotland Food and You survey published

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddharthan, Advaith

    attitudes towards the decontamination of meat and the use of freezing to reduce campylobacter in chicken. Food Navigator Insect protein `similar to conventional meat' The crude protein content in several edible insect species is similar to that in conventional meat products according to a new study from

  20. Cholesterol-Lowering Foods Tasty, functional foods help you lower cholesterol naturally.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Morgan Griffin Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD WebMD Feature Do you want a diet to lower cholesterol? We Harris, DrPH, RD, spokeswoman, American Dietetic Association. U.S. Food and Drug Administration web site. American Dietetic Association web site. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute web site. American Heart