Sample records for focus area greenhouse

  1. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  2. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  3. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  4. CEES - Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearchCASL Symposium: Celebrating the Past - VisualizingFocus Areas

  5. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  6. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  7. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  8. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note: Since the FlickrFluorimeter FluorimeterFocus

  9. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  10. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  11. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  12. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  13. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  14. The Business Role Focus Area From a business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coopers, Sony, Teijin, Umicore and Weyerhaeuser. The Business Role Focus Area aims to engage, equip and mobilize

  15. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  16. Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

  17. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  18. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  19. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Robert W.

    2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

  20. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  1. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  2. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  3. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  4. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.

  5. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary.

  6. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

  7. Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

  8. Tanks Focus Area FY98 midyear technical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Brouns, T.M.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) serves as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s national technology and solution development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. In total, 17 technologies and technical solutions were selected for review. The purpose of each review was to understand the state of development of each technology selected for review and to identify issues to be resolved before the technology or technical solution progressed to the next level of maturity. The reviewers provided detailed technical and programmatic recommendations and comments. The disposition of these recommendations and comments and their impact on the program is documented in this report.

  9. Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Site Needs Assessment FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This is the fifth edition of the TFA site needs assessment. As with previous editions, this edition serves to provide the basis for accurately defining the TFA program for the upcoming fiscal year (FY), and adds definition to the program for up to 4 additional outyears. Therefore, this version distinctly defines the FY 2000 progrti and adds further definition to the FY 2001- FY 2004 program. Each year, the TFA reviews and amends its program in response to site users' science and technology needs.

  10. An overview of the Nuclear Materials Focus Area research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBERSON,GARY D.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; OSBORNE,KEN K.; RANDALL,VIRGINIA

    2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) is responsible for providing comprehensive needs identification, integration of technology research and development activities, and technology deployment for stabilization, packaging, and interim storage of surplus nuclear materials within the DOE complex. The NMFA was chartered in April 1999 by the Office of Science and Technology (OST), an organizational component of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). OST manages a national program to conduct basic and applied research, and technology development, demonstration, and deployment assistance that is essential to completing a timely and cost-effective cleanup of the DOE nuclear weapons complex. DOE/EM provides environmental research results, as well as cleanup technologies and systems, to meet high-priority end-user needs, reduce EM's major cost centers and technological risks, and accelerate technology deployments. The NMFA represents the segment of EM that focuses on technological solutions for re-using, transforming, and disposing excess nuclear materials and is jointly managed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office and the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  11. Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

  12. Tanks Focus Area FY 1996 Site Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites--Hanford, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River Sites. The process is iterative and involves four steps: (1) identify and validate tank technology needs at these four sites, (2) define a technical program that responds to these needs, (3) select specific tasks and schedules that accomplish program objectives, and (4) develop integrated teams to carry out selected tasks. This document describes the first of these four steps: identification of sites` tank technology needs. This step concentrates solely on needs identification, collection, and validation. Funding requirements and specific scope of responsive technical activities are not considered until later steps in program definition. This year, the collection and validation of site needs were accomplished through written input from the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs). The TFA recognizes the importance of a continuing solid partnership with the sites through the STCG and DOE as well as contractor users and, therefore, ensured site participation and close coordination throughout the process.

  13. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by four major US Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). This document describes the TFA`s process of collecting site needs, analyzing them, and creating technical responses to the sites. It also summarizes the information contained within the TFA needs database, portraying information provided by four major DOE sites with tank waste problems. The overall TFA program objective is to deliver a tank technology program that reduces the current cost, and the operational and safety risks of tank remediation. The TFA`s continues to enjoy close, cooperative relationships with each site. During the past year, the TFA has fostered exchanges of technical information between sites. These exchanges have proven to be healthy for all concerned. The TFA recognizes that site technology needs often change, and the TFA must be prepared not only to amend its program in response, but to help the sites arrive at the best technical approach to solve revised site needs.

  14. Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

  15. The Mixed Waste Focus Area: Status and accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, J.E. [Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho Operations Office; Williams, R.E. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area began operations in February of 1995. Its mission is to provide acceptable technologies that enable implementation of mixed waste treatment systems developed in partnership with end-users, stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA will develop, demonstrate, and deliver implementable technologies for treatment of mixed waste within the DOE complex. Treatment refers to all post waste-generation activities including sampling and analysis, characterization, storage, processing, packaging, transportation, and disposal. The MWFA`s mission arises from the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act. Each DOE site facility that generates or stores mixed waste prepared a plan, the Site Treatment Plan, for developing treatment capacities and treating that waste. Agreements for each site were concluded with state regulators, resulting in Consent Orders providing enforceable milestones for achieving treatment of the waste. The paper discusses the implementation of the program, its status, accomplishments and goals for FY1996, and plans for 1997.

  16. SLAC Science Focus Area | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDNTM7/31/13SLAC Science Focus

  17. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations - IACT Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In AboutInINNOVATIONMetalsIACT

  18. Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management processes for municipalities - A comparative review focusing on Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted due to waste management in the cities of developing countries is predicted to rise considerably in the near future; however, these countries have a series of problems in accounting and reporting these gases. Some of these problems are related to the status quo of waste management in the developing world and some to the lack of a coherent framework for accounting and reporting of greenhouse gases from waste at municipal level. This review summarizes and compares GHG emissions from individual waste management processes which make up a municipal waste management system, with an emphasis on developing countries and, in particular, Africa. It should be seen as a first step towards developing a more holistic GHG accounting model for municipalities. The comparison between these emissions from developed and developing countries at process level, reveals that there is agreement on the magnitude of the emissions expected from each process (generation of waste, collection and transport, disposal and recycling). The highest GHG savings are achieved through recycling, and these savings would be even higher in developing countries which rely on coal for energy production (e.g. South Africa, India and China) and where non-motorized collection and transport is used. The highest emissions are due to the methane released by dumpsites and landfills, and these emissions are predicted to increase significantly, unless more of the methane is captured and either flared or used for energy generation. The clean development mechanism (CDM) projects implemented in the developing world have made some progress in this field; however, African countries lag behind.

  19. Seed 2012 is Office: 593 0370, Frontier or focus areas of the of Faculty and Staff Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botte, Gerardine G.

    Seed 2012 is Office: 593 0370, Frontier or focus areas of the of Faculty and Staff in the Third Frontier Technology Commercialization Framework. Proposed projects should be allied to focus areas included in the Third Frontier Program or focus areas of the University System of chseed

  20. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  1. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  2. A Program to Stabilize Nuclear Materials as Managed by the Plutonium Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Kenley (Kenley Consulting); B. Scott; B. Seidel (ANL-W); D. Knecht (LMITCO); F. Southworth; K. Osborne (DOE-ID); N. Chipman; T. Creque

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the program to stabilize nuclear materials, consistent with the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure. The program is managed by the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area, which defines and manages technology development programs to stabilize nuclear materials and assure their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area (PFA) activities includes non-weapons plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA provides solutions to site-specific and complex wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. Our paper describes an important programmatic function of the Department of Energy nuclear materials stabilization program, including the tie-in of policy to research needs and funding for the nuclear materials disposition area. The PFA uses a rigorous systems engineering determination of technology needs and gaps, under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Panel, consisting of complex-wide experts. The Research and Development planning provides an example for other waste areas and should be of interest to Research and Development managers. The materials disposition maps developed by the PFA and described in this paper provide an evaluation of research needs, data gaps and subsequent guidance for the development of technologies for nuclear materials disposition. This paper also addresses the PFA prioritization methodology and its ability to forecast actual time to implementation.

  3. Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

  4. Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

  5. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  6. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  7. Mixed waste focus area integrated master schedule (current as of May 6, 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with the participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) mixed wastes. In support of this mission, the MWTA produced the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report, Phase I Volume 1, January 16, 1996, which identified a prioritized list of 30 national mixed waste technology deficiencies. The MWFA is targeting funding toward technology development projects that address the current list of deficiencies. A clear connection between the technology development projects and the EM-30 and EM-40 treatment systems that they support is essential for optimizing the MWFA efforts. The purpose of the Integrated Master Schedule (IMS) is to establish and document these connections and to ensure that all technology development activities performed by the MWFA are developed for timely use in those treatment systems. The IMS is a list of treatment systems from the Site Treatment Plans (STPs)/Consent Orders that have been assigned technology development needs with associated time-driven schedules, Technology deficiencies and associated technology development (TD) needs have been identified for each treatment system based on the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of the waste targeted for the treatment system. The schedule, the technology development activities, and the treatment system have been verified through the operations contact from the EM-30 organization at the site.

  8. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  9. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  10. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  11. Mixed Waste Focus Area integrated technical baseline report, Phase 1: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet the Department`s commitments for treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes. The mission of the MWFA is to provide acceptable treatment systems, developed in partnership with users and with participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators, that are capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste. These treatment systems include all necessary steps such as characterization, pretreatment, and disposal. To accomplish this mission, a technical baseline is being established that forms the basis for determining which technology development activities will be supported by the MWFA. The technical baseline is the prioritized list of deficiencies, and the resulting technology development activities needed to overcome these deficiencies. This document presents Phase I of the technical baseline development process, which resulted in the prioritized list of deficiencies that the MWFA will address. A summary of the data and the assumptions upon which this work was based is included, as well as information concerning the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) mixed waste technology development needs. The next phase in the technical baseline development process, Phase II, will result in the identification of technology development activities that will be conducted through the MWFA to resolve the identified deficiencies.

  12. EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

  13. TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50 or OST).

  14. TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE`s technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50).

  15. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Cotton City, New Mexico Coordinates Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlem...

  16. Greenhouse Gas Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect."

  17. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11Large area avalanche photodiodeIon

  18. From Petascale to Exascale: Eight Focus Areas of R&D Challenges for HPC Simulation Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmeyer, R; Still, C; Schulz, M; Ahrens, J; Hemmert, S; Minnich, R; McCormick, P; Ward, L; Knoll, D

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming models bridge the gap between the underlying hardware architecture and the supporting layers of software available to applications. Programming models are different from both programming languages and application programming interfaces (APIs). Specifically, a programming model is an abstraction of the underlying computer system that allows for the expression of both algorithms and data structures. In comparison, languages and APIs provide implementations of these abstractions and allow the algorithms and data structures to be put into practice - a programming model exists independently of the choice of both the programming language and the supporting APIs. Programming models are typically focused on achieving increased developer productivity, performance, and portability to other system designs. The rapidly changing nature of processor architectures and the complexity of designing an exascale platform provide significant challenges for these goals. Several other factors are likely to impact the design of future programming models. In particular, the representation and management of increasing levels of parallelism, concurrency and memory hierarchies, combined with the ability to maintain a progressive level of interoperability with today's applications are of significant concern. Overall the design of a programming model is inherently tied not only to the underlying hardware architecture, but also to the requirements of applications and libraries including data analysis, visualization, and uncertainty quantification. Furthermore, the successful implementation of a programming model is dependent on exposed features of the runtime software layers and features of the operating system. Successful use of a programming model also requires effective presentation to the software developer within the context of traditional and new software development tools. Consideration must also be given to the impact of programming models on both languages and the associated compiler infrastructure. Exascale programming models must reflect several, often competing, design goals. These design goals include desirable features such as abstraction and separation of concerns. However, some aspects are unique to large-scale computing. For example, interoperability and composability with existing implementations will prove critical. In particular, performance is the essential underlying goal for large-scale systems. A key evaluation metric for exascale models will be the extent to which they support these goals rather than merely enable them.

  19. Mixed Waste Focus Area mercury contamination product line: An integrated approach to mercury waste treatment and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, G.A. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Conley, T.B.; Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is tasked with ensuring that solutions are available for the mixed waste treatment problems of the DOE complex. During the MWFA`s initial technical baseline development process, three of the top four technology deficiencies identified were related to the need for amalgamation, stabilization, and separation/removal technologies for the treatment of mercury and mercury-contaminated mixed waste. The focus area grouped mercury-waste-treatment activities into the mercury contamination product line under which development, demonstration, and deployment efforts are coordinated to provide tested technologies to meet the site needs. The Mercury Working Group (HgWG), a selected group of representatives from DOE sites with significant mercury waste inventories, is assisting the MWFA in soliciting, identifying, initiating, and managing efforts to address these areas. Based on the scope and magnitude of the mercury mixed waste problem, as defined by HgWG, solicitations and contract awards have been made to the private sector to demonstrate amalgamation and stabilization processes using actual mixed wastes. Development efforts are currently being funded under the product line that will address DOE`s needs for separation/removal processes. This paper discusses the technology selection process, development activities, and the accomplishments of the MWFA to date through these various activities.

  20. The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

  1. Focus Area 2 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf Flash2006-14.pdfattachment.pdf6.pdf5.pdfFluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting2 -

  2. Focus Area 3 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf Flash2006-14.pdfattachment.pdf6.pdf5.pdfFluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting2 -3 -

  3. Focus Area 5 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf Flash2006-14.pdfattachment.pdf6.pdf5.pdfFluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting2 -3 -5

  4. Focus Area Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf Flash2006-14.pdfattachment.pdf6.pdf5.pdfFluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting2 -3

  5. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849| OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

  6. Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On-Road Mobile Sources Project for the Houston-Galveston Area Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methodology for Assessing Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Assessing Mitigation Options for On reductions in GHG, and b) use analytical tools/methods to assess the emissions reductions possible through and prioritized based on factors such as cost effectiveness, potential for emission reductions, and applicability

  7. Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Greenhouse Gases Greenhouse Gases Executive Order 13514 requires Federal agencies to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate...

  8. Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  9. AREA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionofDepartmentNo.7-052 ofFocusAREA FAQ #

  10. Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas...

  11. Where do California's greenhouse gases come from?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Last March, more than two years after California passed legislation to slash greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientist Marc Fischer boarded a Cessna loaded with air monitoring equipment and crisscrossed the skies above Sacramento and the Bay Area. Instruments aboard the aircraft measured a cocktail of greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide from fossil fuel use, methane from livestock and landfills, CO2 from refineries and power plants, traces of nitrous oxide from agriculture and fuel use, and industrially produced other gases like refrigerants. The flight was part of the Airborne Greenhouse Gas Emissions Survey, a collaboration between Berkeley Lab, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California, and UC Davis to pinpoint the sources of greenhouse gases in central California. The survey is intended to improve inventories of the states greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn will help scientists verify the emission reductions mandated by AB-32, the legislation enacted by California in 2006.

  12. Chapter 22 Greenhouse Gases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water vapor (the most abundant GHG) accounts for the largest percentage of the greenhouse effect. However, water vapor concentrations fluctuate regionally, and human activity...

  13. Final Focus Area Selection Report 255 Fuller Road, Suite 274, Albany, NY 12203 USA (518) 437-8661 / Fax: (518) 437-8659

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing facilities. Wind plant capacity factors were calculated by matching wind map-derived resource statistics with a generic turbine power curve reflecting current megawatt-scale wind technologies. 2 for Task 2 (Selection of Focus Areas) of the Energy Commission project "Wind Energy Resource Modeling

  14. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford Tank Initiative: Applications to the AX tank farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates five technical areas for stabilization of decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the Hanford Site AX Farm. The investigations are part of a preliminary evacuation of end-state options for closure of the AX Tanks. The five technical areas investigated are: (1) emplacement of cementations grouts and/or other materials; (2) injection of chemicals into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing); (3) emplacement of grout barriers under and around the tanks; (4) the explicit recognition that natural attenuation processes do occur; and (5) combined geochemical and hydrological modeling. Research topics are identified in support of key areas of technical uncertainty, in each of the five areas. Detailed cost-benefit analyses of the technologies are not provided. This investigation was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during FY 1997 by tank Focus Area (EM-50) funding.

  15. Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to inventory and manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Learn about: Basics: Read an overview of greenhouse gases Federal...

  16. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  18. The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Greenhouse Effect without Feedbacks #12;Three Pillars Behind Climate Change! #12;1. Global. Greenhouse Gases have been on the increase. #12;3. The Greenhouse effect is a powerful theory that explains! natural greenhouse effect! · an empirical introduction #12;Moral of the story: The doubling of CO2 causes

  19. Assess Site Factors That Affect Employee Commuting Options for Greenhouse Gas Profile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After establishing an employee commuting behavior baseline for evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, analyze the specific characteristics of the agency's major worksites to help determine which alternative commute methods and work arrangements are viable and what types of strategies may be most effective for promoting those alternatives. It is recommended that worksite-level data collection focus on worksites with the: Largest number of employees, or clusters of worksites with large employee populations in an area with diverse commuting infrastructure options (e.g., Washington, DC, metropolitan area) Greatest proportion of total commute emissions Highest commuting emissions per person than agency average.

  20. Focus Areas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA52Attachment1.pdf MoreInterim GuidanceU.S.(RFI):Strike |

  1. The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

  2. Interagency Pilot of Greenhouse Gas Accounting Tools: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Kandt, A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) and Tongass National Forest (Tongass) partnered with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct a pilot study of three greenhouse gas (GHG) inventorying tools.

  3. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per square meter about it.But nobody does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we

  4. GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    GLOBAL WARMING THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz September 22, 2004 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL does anything about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something

  5. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate at the carbon cycle #12;However, #12;Greenhouse Effect is Complex #12;PLANETARY ENERGY BALANCE G+W fig 3-5

  6. 2, 289337, 2002 Greenhouse effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 2, 289­337, 2002 Greenhouse effect and climate stability V. G. Gorshkov and A. M. Makarieva water vapour concentration, dependence of the planetary greenhouse effect on atmospheric water content to dynamic singularities in the physical temperature-dependent behaviour of the greenhouse effect. We

  7. METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible -Laser Focus World http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-47/issue-8/world-news/metamaterials-large-area-printed-3d-negative-index-metamaterial-is-flexible.html[8/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible - Laser Focus World-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative, with the advent of a printing process that produces large-area 3D multilayer optical NIMs --8.7 Ă? 8.7 cm square

  8. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  9. Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies are required to inventory and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change.

  10. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

  11. Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program was suspended May 2011. It was a mechanism by which corporations, government agencies, individuals, voluntary organizations, etc., could report to the Energy Information Administration, any actions taken that have or are expected to reduce/avoid emissions of greenhouse gases or sequester carbon.

  12. Geothermal carbon dioxide for use in greenhouses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunstall, M.G. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand); Graeber, G. [Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal fluids often contain carbon dioxide, which is a very effective growth stimulant for plants in greenhouses. Studies have shown that as CO{sub 2} concentration is increased from a normal level of 300 ppm (mmol/kmol) to levels of approximately 1000 ppm crop yields may increase by up to 15% (Ullmann`s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, 1989). It is suggested that geothermal greenhouse heating offers a further opportunity for utilization of the carbon dioxide present in the fluid. The main difficulty is that plants react adversely to hydrogen sulphide which is invariably mixed, at some concentration, with the CO{sub 2} from geothermal fluids. Even very low H{sub 2}S concentrations of 0.03 mg/kg can have negative effects on the growth of plants (National Research Council, 1979). Therefore, an appropriate purification process for the CO{sub 2} must be used to avoid elevated H{sub 2}S levels in the greenhouses. The use of adsorption and absorption processes is proposed. Two purification processes have been modelled using the ASOEN PLUS software package, using the Geothermal Greenhouses Ltd. Operation Kawerau New Zealand and an example. A greenhouse area of 8,000 m{sup 2}, which would create a demand for approximately 20 kg CO{sub 2} per hour, was chosen based on a proposed expansion at Kawerau. The Kawerau operation currently takes geothermal steam (and gas) from a high temperature 2-phase well to heat an area of 1650 m{sup 2}. Bottled carbon dioxide is utilized at a rate of about 50 kg per day, to provide CO{sub 2} levels of 800 mg/kg when the greenhouse is closed and 300 to 350 mg/kg whilst venting. In England and the Netherlands, CO{sub 2} levels of 1000 mg/kg are often used (Ullmann`s Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry, 1989) and similar concentrations are desired at Kawerau, but current costs of 0.60 NZ$/kg for bottled CO{sub 2} are too high (Foster, 1995).

  13. Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on measuring and reporting Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions from freight transport This guidance provides clear instructions on calculating the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from freight and report your greenhouse gas emissions', by providing more specific information and examples relating

  14. Greenhouse Gas Management Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Program fact sheet highlighting federal requirements for GHG emissions management, FEMP services to help agencies reduce emissions, and additional resources. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) assists Federal agencies with managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. GHG management entails measuring emissions and understanding their sources, setting a goal for reducing emissions, developing a plan to meet this goal, and implementing the plan to achieve reductions in emissions. FEMP provides the following services to help Federal agencies meet the requirements of inventorying and reducing their GHG emissions: (1) FEMP offers one-on-one technical assistance to help agencies understand and implement the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance and fulfill their inventory reporting requirements. (2) FEMP provides training, tools, and resources on FedCenter to help agencies complete their annual inventories. (3) FEMP serves a leadership role in the interagency Federal Working Group on Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting that develops recommendations to the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for the Federal Greenhouse Gas Accounting and Reporting Guidance. (4) As the focus continues to shift from measuring emissions (completing inventories) to mitigating emissions (achieving reductions), FEMP is developing a strategic planning framework and resources for agencies to prioritize among a variety of options for mitigating their GHG emissions, so that they achieve their reduction goals in the most cost-effective manner. These resources will help agencies analyze their high-quality inventories to make strategic decisions about where to use limited resources to have the greatest impact on reducing emissions. Greenhouse gases trap heat in the lower atmosphere, warming the earth's surface temperature in a natural process known as the 'greenhouse effect.' GHGs include carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). Human activities have caused a rapid increase in GHG concentrations. This rising level contributes to global climate change, which contributes to environmental and public health problems.

  15. LEDs for Energy Efficient Greenhouse Lighting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Devesh; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light energy is an important factor for plant growth. In regions where the natural light source, i.e. solar radiation, is not sufficient for growth optimization, additional light sources are being used. Traditional light sources such as high pressure sodium lamps and other metal halide lamps are not very efficient and generate high radiant heat. Therefore, new sustainable solutions should be developed for energy efficient greenhouse lighting. Recent developments in the field of light source technologies have opened up new perspectives for sustainable and highly efficient light sources in the form of light-emitting diodes, i.e. LEDs, for greenhouse lighting. This review focuses on the potential of LEDs to replace traditional light sources in the greenhouse. In a comparative economic analysis of traditional vs. LED lighting, we show that the introduction of LEDs allows reduction of the production cost of vegetables in the long-run of several years, due to the high energy efficiency, low maintenance cost and lon...

  16. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO[sub 2] and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

  17. Resources on Greenhouse Gas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    resources for reporting annual greenhouse gas activities. FedCenter Greenhouse Gas Inventory Reporting Website: Features additional information, training, and tools to assist...

  18. Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Agency Progress Toward Reduction Targets Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals FY 2011 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals FY 2010...

  19. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  20. Asia-wide emissions of greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqi, T.A. [East-West Center, Honolulu, HI (United States). Program on Environment

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions of principal greenhouse gases (GHGs) from Asia are increasing faster than those from any other continent. This is a result of rapid economic growth, as well as the fact that almost half of the world`s population lives in Asian countries. In this paper, the author provides estimates of emissions of the two principal greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}), from individual countries and areas. Recent literature has been reviewed for emission estimates for individual sources, such as carbon dioxide from cement manufacture, and methane from rice fields. There are very large uncertainties in many of these estimates, so several estimates are provided, where available. The largest anthropogenic source of CO{sub 2} emissions is the use of fossil fuels. Energy consumption data from 1992 have been used to calculate estimated emissions of CO{sub 2} from this source. In view of the ongoing negotiations to limit future greenhouse gas emissions, estimates of projected CO{sub 2} emissions from the developing countries of Asia are also provided. These are likely to be 3 times their 1986 levels by 2010, under business as usual scenarios. Even with the implementation of energy efficiency measures and fuel switching where feasible, the emissions of CO{sub 2} are likely to double within the same time period.

  1. Ahimsa Media -For Educators -The Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect: Extension Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Ahimsa Media - For Educators - The Greenhouse Effect The Greenhouse Effect: Extension Activity. Clean up and restore a natural habitat. http://www.ahimsamedia.com/lessonGreenhouseEffect.htm (1 of 5

  2. The Greenhouse Effect Does Exist!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebel, Jochen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In particular, without the greenhouse effect, essential features of the atmospheric temperature profile as a function of height cannot be described, i.e., the existence of the tropopause above which we see an almost isothermal temperature curve, whereas beneath it the temperature curve is nearly adiabatic. The relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed temperature curve is explained and the paper by Gerlich and Tscheuschner [arXiv:0707.1161] critically analyzed. Gerlich and Tscheuschner called for this discussion in their paper.

  3. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Lab Directors, . .

    2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise in greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel combustion and industrial and agricultural activities has aroused international concern about the possible impacts of these emissions on climate. Greenhouse gases--mostly carbon dioxide, some methane, nitrous oxide and other trace gases--are emitted to the atmosphere, enhancing an effect in which heat reflected from the earth's surface is kept from escaping into space, as in a greenhouse. Thus, there is concern that the earth's surface temperature may rise enough to cause global climate change. Approximately 90% of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources come from energy production and use, most of which are a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels. On a per capita basis, the United States is one of the world's largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions, comprising 4% of the world's population, yet emitting 23% of the world's greenhouse gases. Emissions in the United States are increasing at around 1.2% annually, and the Energy Information Administration forecasts that emissions levels will continue to increase at this rate in the years ahead if we proceed down the business-as-usual path. President Clinton has presented a two-part challenge for the United States: reduce greenhouse gas emissions and grow the economy. Meeting the challenge will mean that in doing tomorrow's work, we must use energy more efficiently and emit less carbon for the energy expended than we do today. To accomplish these goals, President Clinton proposed on June 26, 1997, that the United States ''invest more in the technologies of the future''. In this report to Secretary of Energy Pena, 47 technology pathways are described that have significant potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The present study was completed before the December 1997 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and is intended to provide a basis to evaluate technology feasibility and options to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These technology pathways (which are described in greater detail in Appendix B, Technology Pathways) address three areas: energy efficiency, clean energy, and carbon sequestration (removing carbon from emissions and enhancing carbon storage). Based on an assessment of each of these technology pathways over a 30-year planning horizon, the directors of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) national laboratories conclude that success will require pursuit of multiple technology pathways to provide choices and flexibility for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Advances in science and technology are necessary to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the United States while sustaining economic growth and providing collateral benefits to the nation.

  4. Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

  5. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulkerson, W.

    1991-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dahlem Conference on controlling CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere focused on research needs broadly defined. The RD D needs discussed tended to be social-institutional rather than technically oriented perhaps because of the propensity of most attendees, but many important ideas emerged, including those related to questions on technology adoption by both developed, emerging, or transition economics. The European attendees appeared to be strongly devoted to reducing emissions, and doing it soon using efficiency improvement and ultimately renewables. The importance of efficiency improvement was universally accepted, but the extent to which it can be relied upon is a major uncertainty for everyone except the most zealous. There was no detailed discussion of what could be done to encourage the more rapid adoption of renewables. Most attendees seemed to have discounted nuclear, but, at any rate, the problems of reviving nuclear worldwide were not discussed in detail.

  6. Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article Correction to “Carbon sequestration and greenhouseCor- rection to “Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas1 ] In the paper “Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas

  7. Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archer, Steven R.

    Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

  8. Federal Greenhouse Gas Inventories and Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program provides performance data illustrating federal agency progress in meeting the greenhouse gas reduction targets established under Executive Order (E.O.) 13514, as well as the comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories as reported by federal agencies.

  9. Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change/stern_re- view_report.cfm. (2006). RGGI.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI): An Initia­ tive of theGreenhouse Gas Initia­ tive (RGGI). Currently, Connecticut,

  10. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Act requires the Department of the Environment to publish and update an inventory of statewide greenhouse gas emissions for calendar year 2006 and requires...

  11. Greenhouse Gas Program Overview (Revised) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Greenhouse Gas program, including Federal requirements, FEMP services, and contacts.

  12. Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Protection Agency, Danish Energy Authority and Danish Ministry of Finance. The consultancy reportDanish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4

  13. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Science Honor Society Center Moriches High School Center about how this drug affects brain chemistry. #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;Everybody talks about about it. ­ Mark Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something about it. What

  14. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Atmospheric Sciences Division CSSP Lecture July 27, 2005 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Twain­ Mark Twain Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something about it. What are we doing

  15. RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESEARCH ROADMAP FOR GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY METHODS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Consulting · Riitta Pipatti, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Dennis Rolston Agency · Fabian Wagner, IPCC Task Force on National Greenhouse Gas Inventories · Wilfried Winiwarter

  16. In Focus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In About |ImagingIn Case ofIn

  17. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

  18. Identification of remediation needs and technology development focus areas for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Project at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Site Restoration Technology Program Office; Valdez, J.M.; Khan, M.A. [IT Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Project has been tasked with the characterization, assessment, remediation and long-term monitoring of contaminated waste sites at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). Many of these sites will require remediation which will involve the use of baseline technologies, innovative technologies that are currently under development, and new methods which will be developed in the near future. The Technology Applications Program (TAP) supports the ER Project and is responsible for development of new technologies for use at the contaminated waste sites, including technologies that will be used for remediation and restoration of these sites. The purpose of this report is to define the remediation needs of the ER Project and to identify those remediation needs for which the baseline technologies and the current development efforts are inadequate. The area between the remediation needs and the existing baseline/innovative technology base represents a technology gap which must be filled in order to remediate contaminated waste sites at SNL/NM economically and efficiently. In the first part of this report, the remediation needs of the ER Project are defined by both the ER Project task leaders and by TAP personnel. The next section outlines the baseline technologies, including EPA defined Best Demonstrated Available Technologies (BDATs), that are applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. This is followed by recommendations of innovative technologies that are currently being developed that may also be applicable at SNL/NM ER sites. Finally, the gap between the existing baseline/innovative technology base and the remediation needs is identified. This technology gap will help define the future direction of technology development for the ER Project.

  19. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Anderson, Diana

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

  20. Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions and non-CO? combustion effects from alternative jet fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratton, Russell William

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term viability and success of a transportation fuel depends on both economic and environmental sustainability. This thesis focuses specifically on assessing the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and non-CO ...

  1. Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf Flash2006-14.pdfattachment.pdf6.pdf5.pdfFluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting2 -31 -

  2. Summary of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C.Green River, Utah,Tuba City,'1Dearof Weldon

  3. Property:Focus Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to:FirstWellTemp Jump to:Name Jumpallowed

  4. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Atmospheric Sciences Division CSSP Lecture July 30, 2002 . . . IS TO PUT TWO PEOPLE IN IT! #12;YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0 CO2 of carbon a year in the form of carbon dioxide. #12;YOUR CONTRIBUTION TO THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT At half

  5. Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked...

  6. Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagriculture’s future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

  8. Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section sets state goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050.

  9. Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model AgencyCompany Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Focus Area: GHG Inventory Development Topics: Analysis Tools...

  10. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Greenhouse gases andGreenhouse gases and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    in gas turbinecombustion in gas turbine HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Effect of COEffect-depleting gases ·· COCO22 removal for gas purificationremoval for gas purification ·· COCO22 removal for greenhouse gas emissions reductionremoval for greenhouse gas emissions reduction ·· Other greenhouse gases

  11. Montenegro Greenhouse Ornamental Production Workshop October 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    Montenegro Greenhouse Ornamental Production Workshop October 2007 Heiner Lieth Plant Sciences of Montenegro is promotion of the their greenhouse flower production industry. At the time when the program was planned it was unknown what level of interest and expertise would be available on-site in Montenegro. Thus

  12. A Novel Paradigm in Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    emission [1, 2]. Moreover, water vapor is also a naturally occurring greenhouse gas and accounts for the largest percent- age of the greenhouse effect, between 36% and 66% in terms of radiation absorbance. Water). Yet the radiative importance of water vapor is less than that of CO2, CH4, and N2O, because

  13. Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping the "Greenhouse Effect"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping ­ the "Greenhouse Effect" Goals ­ to look is the same as a 1.8 degree F change. #12;Last time - Greenhouse effect demo Selective absorption. Greenhouse

  14. Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current objective of the project Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases'' is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

  15. Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change in NEPA Reviews Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and...

  16. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigerati...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol...

  17. Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States Federal Register Notice for Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas...

  18. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions June 29, 2012 -...

  19. Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia Jump to: navigation, search Name Knowledge Partnership for Measuring Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Asia...

  20. Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

  1. Integrated Energy and Greenhouse Gas Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spates, C. N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Climate Change legislation on the horizon, the need to integrate energy reduction initiatives with greenhouse gas reduction efforts is critical to manufactures competitiveness and financial strength going forward. MPC has developed...

  2. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting Program for greenhouse gases is part of an attempt by the U.S. Government to develop innovative, low-cost, and nonregulatory approaches to limit emissions of greenhouse gases. It is one element in an array of such programs introduced in recent years as part of the effort being made by the United States to comply with its national commitment to stabilize emissions of greenhouse gases under the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions of greenhouse gases.

  3. Greenhouse Gas Inventory and Registry (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to establish a method for collecting emissions estimates from producers of greenhouse gases. Reporting is mandatory for some entities, and the...

  4. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Planning for Business Travel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business travel is among the largest sources of Scope 3 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions accounted for by Federal agencies. For some agencies, business travel can represent up to 60% of Scope 3...

  5. Example minor programs in Environmental Engineering 1) Energy focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    ; for breadth) 3 CEE 173A Energy Resources (A) 5 CEE 176A Energy Efficient Buildings (W; w/lab) 4 CEE 176B to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions (S) 3 2) Sustainability focus CEE 64 Air Pollution: Urban Smog to Global a Student Workforce for Sustainability (W) 3 CEE 142A Creating Sustainable Development (W) 3 CEE 173A Energy

  6. Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/5/2013 1 Carbon Emissions Primer Symposium on Greenhouse Gas andSymposium on Greenhouse Gas) · Simple, somewhat inflexible · Do not price emissions directly Carbon taxes · Use market forces Council June 4, 2013 Portland, OR 1 CO2 Chemistry 1 molecule of CO 1 atom carbon1 molecule of CO2 = 1 atom

  7. Movement out of focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlewine, Michael Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the consequences of overt and covert movement on association with focus. The interpretation of focus-sensitive operators such as only and even depends on the presence of a focused constituent ...

  8. Voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program, required by Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, records the results of voluntary measures to reduce, avoid, or sequester greenhouse gas emissions. In 1998, 156 US companies and other organizations reported to the Energy information Administration that, during 1997, they had achieved greenhouse gas emission reductions and carbon sequestration equivalent to 166 million tons of carbon dioxide, or about 2.5% of total US emissions for the year. For the 1,229 emission reduction projects reported, reductions usually were measured by comparing an estimate of actual emissions with an estimate of what emissions would have been had the project not been implemented.

  9. Greenhouse of the future. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavin, B. III

    1998-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This greenhouse of the future is located at the Center for Regenerative Studies (CRS) at Cal Poly Pomona. The building design was driven by desired environmental conditions. The primary objective was to keep the interior space warm during winter for the breeding of fish and other greenhouse activities, especially in the winter. To do this, a highly insulating envelope was needed. Straw bales provide excellent insulation with an R-value of approximately 50 and also help solve the environmental problems associated with this agricultural waste product. A summary of the construction progress, construction costs and operating costs are included.

  10. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    27–29 in T. Wirth, editor. Inventory of U.S. greenhouse gasfor national greenhouse gas inventories. Volume 2.National Greenhouse Gas Inventories Programme Task Force

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ammassalik area east Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Danish Meteorological Institute, Summary: in this area is caused by increased 12;greenhouse effect. Changes in storminess are inter- linked with changes... the geostrophic wind...

  12. Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG UNIVERSITYGHG Report - FY10 3 Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people Oil: Amber Sams · Enterprise Rent-A-Car: Davion Reese · First Student: Brian Maxwell · Good Company

  13. Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program #12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many - First Student: Brian Maxwell - Carson Oil: Gena Conner Government Organizations - Baker County: Jason

  14. 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton University Reports Contents 2 Key Achievements 7 Greenhouse Gas Reduction Campus Energy was established in 2008, the University has invested $5.3 million in energy-savings projects, resulting in annual of a 5.2-megawatt solar collector field. · Audit the remaining 20 of the top 50 energy- consuming

  15. Proof of the Atmospheric Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Arthur P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently advanced argument against the atmospheric greenhouse effect is refuted. A planet without an infrared absorbing atmosphere is mathematically constrained to have an average temperature less than or equal to the effective radiating temperature. Observed parameters for Earth prove that without infrared absorption by the atmosphere, the average temperature of Earth's surface would be at least 33 K lower than what is observed.

  16. Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June #12;#12;Acknowledgments Due to the broad scope of this inventory, a large number of people from many, geothermal, tidal or sea currents etc. (7) "OUS Method" refers to the inventory for FY07 that is similar

  17. Improving UK greenhouse gas emission estimates using tall tower observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howie, James Edward

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere play an important role in regulating surface temperatures. The UK is signatory to international agreements that legally commit the UK to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, and ...

  18. Energy and Greenhouse Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E.; Plevin, Richard J.; Jones, Andrew D.; Nemet, Gregory F.; Delucchi, Mark A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Environmental impact of greenhouse tomato production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Environmental impact of greenhouse tomato production in France Thierry Boulard Abstract The environmental impact of greenhouse pro- duction in France is poorly documented. Environmental production under polytunnel. Environmental impacts where assessed by life cycle analysis. Analyses were

  20. [Page Intentionally Left Blank] Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    ..........................................................................11 4.2 Conventional Jet Fuel from Crude Oil2 June #12;[Page Intentionally Left Blank] #12;Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Alternative .......................................5 3.1 Life cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

  1. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz The GREENS MENS Assistant Secretary for Foreign Affairs #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Energy per

  2. Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Grant Program is funded by the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Projects Fund, established by the Act to Amend Title 7 of the Delaware Code Relating to a...

  3. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1991--30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. This project will address: The regional and seasonal details of the expected climatic changes; how rapidly will these changes occur; how and when will the climatic effects of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases be first detected; and the relationships between greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and changes caused by other external and internal factors. The present project addresses all of these questions. Many of the diverse facets of greenhouse-gas-related climate research can be grouped under three interlinked subject areas: modeling, first detection and supporting data. This project will include the analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulation Models (GCMs).

  4. Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipparone, L.

    1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

  5. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics Version 4 Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects . . . 3 Contents Abstract 2 1 Introduction 6 1.1 Problem background

  6. 1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism whereby absorbed solar system of the Earth is endowed with a moderately strong greenhouse effect that is characterized by non CO2. There is a strong feedback contribution to the greenhouse effect by water vapor and clouds

  7. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT AND YOUR FAMILY'S CONTRIBUTION TO IT Stephen E. Schwartz Rotary Club of Patchogue November 9, 2005 http://www.ecd.bnl.gov/steve/schwartz.html #12;#12;THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT #12 Now with the greenhouse effect, we ARE doing something about it. What are we doing? #12;370 360 350

  8. Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Graduate Opportunities in Atmospheric Modeling to Understand Greenhouse Gas Emissions University://www.atmos.utah.edu/) seeks multiple graduate students to study greenhouse gas emissions associated with urban development greenhouse gas emissions. Samples of guiding questions as part of the projects include: · What can explain

  9. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric greenhouse gases Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to longwave radiation 12;Greenhouse Gases Polyatomic molecules... the greenhouse effect ... Source: Frierson, Dargan - Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of...

  11. Solar energt focusing means

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubota, J.

    1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient solar focusing means being hollow and in semi-cylindrical or arcuate shape, the surface has such fine menisci as to act like convex lenses to focus solar rays towards the center of the focusing body, irrespective of the position of the sun, where a solar energy conversion device is located and further acts to disperse light reflected thereonto from the solar energy conversion device. The focusing body can assume several shapes and thus can be used for roofing of a building, such as a house, or the like, and still be aesthetically pleasing.

  12. Program Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal energy—a relatively untapped domestic energy resource from the heat of the earth—represents a reliable and nearly inexhaustible energy source, with greatly reduced greenhouse gas...

  13. Renewable portfolio standards, Greenhouse gas reduction, and Long-Line transmission investments in the WECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Arne; Orans, Ren; Allen, Doug; Moore, Jack; Woo, C.K.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New, long-distance transmission lines to remote areas with concentrations of high-quality renewable resources can help western states meet the challenges of increasing renewable energy procurement and reducing greenhouse gas emissions more cost-effectively than reliance on local resources alone. The approach applied here to the Western Electricity Coordinating Council is useful for an initial determination of the net benefits of long-line transmission between regions with heterogeneous resource quality. (author)

  14. Focus on Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin Focus on Energy supports statewide programs that promote energy efficiency and renewable energy*. The program was initially created by Act 9 of 1999 as a public benefit fund (PBF), which...

  15. ARM - Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX News GangesListGreenhouse Effect

  16. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Greenhouse Gas Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and Resources NREL resourceEnergy Systems IntegrationGreenhouse

  17. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

  18. Lightning Dock KGRA, New Mexico's Largest Geothermal Greenhouse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Largest Geothermal Greenhouse, Largest Aquaculture Facility, and First Binary Electrical Power Plant. Geo-Heat Center Bulletin. 23:37-41. Related Geothermal Exploration Activities...

  19. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of...

  20. Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy AgencyCompany Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy, Land Topics:...

  1. Verifying Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Methods to Support International Climate Agreements AgencyCompany Organization: Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Sector: Energy, Land...

  2. Energy Department Assisting Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Launch of Low Greenhouse Gas-Emitting Jet Fuels Crow Nation Students Participate in Algae Biomass Research Project Secretary Chu Announces 100 Million for Advanced Research...

  3. DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    greenhouse gas emissions - the technology component of a comprehensive U.S. approach to climate change. The technologies developed under the Climate Change Technology program...

  4. CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews CEQ Issues Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration of...

  5. Greenhouse Gas Guidance and Reporting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to meet Federal goals and mitigate climate change. Federal Guidance Read the White House Council on Environmental Quality's...

  6. South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings AgencyCompany Organization...

  7. Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finalize Historic National Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gases and Improve Fuel Economy for Cars and Trucks Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Finalize...

  8. The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Purchased Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: GHG Emissions from Purchased Electricity AgencyCompany...

  9. Energy Efficiency and Greenhouse Gases | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through a measurable reduction of energy intensity. Energy efficiency evaluations and initiatives are implemented on the...

  10. Analysis of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Tax Proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metcalf, Gilbert E.

    The U.S. Congress is considering a set of bills designed to limit the nation’s greenhouse gas (GHG)

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmenta...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goods Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions Impacts of Liberalizing Trade in Environmental Goods AgencyCompany...

  12. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies...

  13. NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

  14. The Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of a variety of vehicle, fuel, and technology choices. Overview Measures the petroleum displacement and greenhouse gas emissions of medium and heavy-duty vehicles and...

  15. Fact #589: September 21, 2009 Proposed Fuel Economy and Greenhouse...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    national standards for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). The standards would apply to model year 2012 - 2016 passenger cars and light...

  16. Survey Employees to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Profile for Commuting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile for employee commuting, data on behavior and attitudes are best collected through an agency-wide survey.

  17. Federal Agency Progress Toward Greenhouse Gas Reduction Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel spreadsheet shows overall government and federal agency reductions in scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and in indirect scope 3 GHG emissions categories.

  18. Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency...

  19. The Marginal Damage Costs of Different Greenhouse Gases: An Application of FUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Anthoff, David; Rose, Steven K.; Tol, Richard

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use FUND 3.8 to estimate the social cost of four greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and sulphur hexafluoride emissions. The damage potential for each gas—the ratio of the social cost of the non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas to the social cost of carbon dioxide—is also estimated. The damage potentials are compared to several metrics, focusing in particular on the global warming potentials, which are frequently used to measure the trade-off between gases in the form of carbon dioxide equivalents. We find that damage potentials could be significantly higher than global warming potentials. This finding implies that previous papers have underestimated the relative importance of reducing non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emissions from an economic damage perspective. We show results for a range of sensitivity analyses: carbon dioxide fertilization on agriculture productivity, terrestrial feedbacks, climate sensitivity, discounting, equity weighting, and socioeconomic and emissions scenarios. The sensitivity of the results to carbon dioxide fertilization is a primary focus as it is an important element of climate change that has not been considered in much of the previous literature. We estimate that carbon dioxide fertilization has a large positive impact that reduces the social cost of carbon dioxide with a much smaller effect on the other greenhouse gases. As a result, our estimates of the damage potentials of methane and nitrous oxide are much higher compared to estimates that ignore carbon dioxide fertilization. As a result, our base estimates of the damage potential for methane and nitrous oxide that include carbon dioxide fertilization are twice their respective global warming potentials. Our base estimate of the damage potential of sulphur hexafluoride is similar to the one previous estimate, both almost three times the global warming potential.

  20. Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

  1. Sagittal focusing Laue monochromator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong; Zhong (Stony Brook, NY), Hanson; Jonathan (Wading River, NY), Hastings; Jerome (Stanford, CA), Kao; Chi-Chang (Setauket, NY), Lenhard; Anthony (Medford, NY), Siddons; David Peter (Cutchogue, NY), Zhong; Hui (Coram, NY)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray focusing device generally includes a slide pivotable about a pivot point defined at a forward end thereof, a rail unit fixed with respect to the pivotable slide, a forward crystal for focusing x-rays disposed at the forward end of the pivotable slide and a rearward crystal for focusing x-rays movably coupled to the pivotable slide and the fixed rail unit at a distance rearward from the forward crystal. The forward and rearward crystals define reciprocal angles of incidence with respect to the pivot point, wherein pivoting of the slide about the pivot point changes the incidence angles of the forward and rearward crystals while simultaneously changing the distance between the forward and rearward crystals.

  2. Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

  3. STRATEGIC FOCUS: Sustainable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to apply sustain- ability principles to building and design, transportation and other fields, to green, presented an ecologically-sustainable sanitation system developed for a small hospital in northern Haiti1010 STRATEGIC FOCUS: Sustainable Systems Biology doctoral student Tanya Lubansky uses quan

  4. Conservation Focus and Executive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Focus and Executive Summary Background Power Committee Walla Walla May 12, 2009 #12;Northwest Power and Conservation Council Conditions Facing the Region and Conservation Council Resource Alternatives · Increased cost-effective efficiency potential ­ Technological

  5. Estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects: A Costa Rican Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, Christopher; Sathaye, Jayant; Sanchez Azofeifa, G. Arturo

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the Clean Development Mechanism proposed under the Kyoto Protocol is to serve as an effective means for combating global climate change, it will depend upon reliable estimates of greenhouse gas benefits. This paper sketches the theoretical basis for estimating the greenhouse gas benefits of forestry projects and suggests lessons learned based on a case study of Costa Rica's Protected Areas Project, which is a 500,000 hectare effort to reduce deforestation and enhance reforestation. The Protected Areas Project in many senses advances the state of the art for Clean Development Mechanism-type forestry projects, as does the third-party verification work of SGS International Certification Services on the project. Nonetheless, sensitivity analysis shows that carbon benefit estimates for the project vary widely based on the imputed deforestation rate in the baseline scenario, e.g. the deforestation rate expected if the project were not implemented. This, along with a newly available national dataset that confirms other research showing a slower rate of deforestation in Costa Rica, suggests that the use of the 1979--1992 forest cover data originally as the basis for estimating carbon savings should be reconsidered. When the newly available data is substituted, carbon savings amount to 8.9 Mt (million tones) of carbon, down from the original estimate of 15.7 Mt. The primary general conclusion is that project developers should give more attention to the forecasting land use and land cover change scenarios underlying estimates of greenhouse gas benefits.

  6. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Atmospheric CO2 concentrations during ancient greenhouse climates were similar to those predicted atmospheric CO2 concentrations (½CO2atm) during Earth's ancient greenhouse episodes is essential for accurately predicting the response of future climate to elevated CO2 levels. Empirical estimates of ½CO2atm

  7. PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PG&E's Renewable Portfolio Standard & Greenhouse Gas Compliance Fong Wan Senior Vice President, Energy Procurement 9/5/13 California Power Markets Symposium #12;1. PG&E Renewable Portfolio Standard 2. AB32 and Greenhouse Gas Legislation Outline #12;PG&E's Electric Generation Portfolio *Note: Other

  8. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

  9. Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    LETTERS Satellite measurements of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from tropospheric ozone HELEN M of 0.48±0.14 W m-2 between 45 S and 45 N. This estimate of the clear-sky greenhouse effect from

  10. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. CO2 emissions sources. U.S. CO2 transportation emissions sources by mode. #12;Center% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCsTransportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge

  11. New Evidence of an Enhanced Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benestad, Rasmus E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state of earth's climate is constrained by well-known physical principles such as energy balance and the conservation of energy. Increased greenhouse gas concentrations affect the atmospheric optical depth, and physical consistency implies that changes in the energy transfer in terms of infra-red light must be compensated by other means of energy flow. Here, a simple heuristic and comprehensive model is used to interpret new aspects of real-world data. It is shown that trends in tropospheric overturning activity and the estimated altitude where earth's bulk heat loss should place are two independent indicators of climate change. There has been increased vertical overturning in the middle and upper parts of the troposphere since 1995 on a global scale. Greater overturning compensates for reduced radiative energy transfer associated with increased optical depth. An increased optical depth is also expected to raise the altitude from where planetary bulk heat loss takes place according to the heuristic model,...

  12. Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigel, Southworth, and Meyer 1 Calculators for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Public Transit Agency Vehicle Fleet Operations ABSTRACT This paper reviews calculation tools available for quantifying the greenhouse gas emissions associated with different types

  13. Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

  14. Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Greenhouse gas emissions of biofuels, Improving Life Cycle Assessments by taking into account local.......................................................................................................................................................14 Chapter 1 Biofuels, greenhouse gases and climate change 1 Introduction

  15. Painter Greenhouse Guidelines Contact: All emails regarding facilities, facilities equipment, supplies at facilities, or watering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , supplies at facilities, or watering concerns to both the greenhouse manager, Shane Merrell Greenhouses is supplemented by heating and cooling from the main Painter Building. The smaller Painter

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous greenhouse species Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Of Physics Version 4... Gerlich and Ralf D. Tscheuschner Abstract The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that many authors... to zero, the atmospheric greenhouse conjecture is...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcings Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 12 European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A System in Transition* Summary: European Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading: A...

  18. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis, November 2012 U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis, November 2012 The report ranks...

  19. U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis thumbenergyuselossemissionslg.gif How...

  20. First Direct Observation of CO2's Greenhouse Effect at the Earth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Direct Observation of Carbon Dioxide's Increasing Greenhouse Effect at Earth's Surface First Direct Observation of Carbon Dioxide's Increasing Greenhouse Effect at Earth's...

  1. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korecko, J.; Jirka, V. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Sourek, B. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University of Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerveny, J. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Institute of Physical Biology, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the eighties of the 20th century, various types of linear glass rasters for architectural usage have been developed in the Czech Republic made by the continuous melting technology. The development was focused on two main groups of rasters - active rasters with linear Fresnel lenses in fixed installation and with movable photo-thermal and/or photo-thermal/photo-voltaic absorbers. The second group are passive rasters based on total reflection of rays on an optical prism. During the last years we have been working on their standardization, exact measuring of their optical and thermal-technical characteristics and on creation of a final product that could be applied in solar architecture. With the project supported by the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic we were able to build an experimental greenhouse using these active and passive optical glass rasters. The project followed the growing number of technical objectives. The concept of the greenhouse consisted of interdependence construction - structural design of the greenhouse with its technological equipment securing the required temperature and humidity conditions in the interior of the greenhouse. This article aims to show the merits of the proposed scheme and presents the results of the mathematical model in the TRNSYS environment through which we could predict the future energy balance carried out similar works, thus optimizing the investment and operating costs. In this article description of various technology applications for passive and active utilization of solar radiation is presented, as well as some results of short-term and long-term experiments, including evaluation of 1-year operation of the greenhouse from the energy and interior temperature viewpoints. A comparison of the calculated energy flows in the greenhouse to real measured values, for verification of the installed model is also involved. (author)

  2. Focus in Ecuadorian Quechua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shireman, Joshua

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the adverb utkata, “quickly,” is unfocused. In (4), it is focused. (3) njuka utkata at?ku-ta kati-rka-ni. 1sg quickly dog-ACC chase-PAST-1sg “I quickly chased the dog.” (4) njuka utkata-mi at?ku-ta kati-rka-ni. 1sg quickly-FOC dog...-ACC chase-PAST-1sg “I quickly chased the dog.” 1 I would like to acknowledge our Quechua consultant Rosa-Maria Masaquiza along with Dr. Harold Torrence and our Field Methods class in the spring...

  3. Strategic Focus Points

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate Characterization of Advanced HighEnergyFocus

  4. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus

  5. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus6,

  6. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk Municipal Comm Jump(EC-LEDS)

  7. RESEARCH ARTICLE A Greenhouse Gas Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    - servation competitions to energy efficiency projects to renewable-energy installations such as wind focused on recycling of wastes such as paper, glass, and plastics. Recently attention to sustainability

  8. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Robert W.; Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Nickola, Cheryl L.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

  9. TFA Tanks Focus Area midyear review report FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder-Smith

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with EM's office of Science and Technology (OST), the TFA is committed to assessing the maturity of technology development projects and ensuring their readiness for implementation and subsequent deployment. The TFA conducts an annual Midyear Review to document the status of ongoing projects, reaffirm and document user commitment to selected projects, and to improve the effective deployment of technology by determining and documenting the readiness of selected projects to move ahead. Since 1995, OST has used a linear technology maturation model that spans through seven defined stages of maturity, from basic research to implementation. Application of this Stage/Gate model to technology development resulted in prescriptive and somewhat cumbersome review procedures, resulting in limited and inconsistent use. Subsequently, in February 2000, OST issued revised guidance in an effort to streamline the technology tracking and review process. While the new OST guidance reinforces peer review requirements and the use of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) for independent reviews, it also implements a simplified Gate model. The TFA is now responsible for providing auditable documentation for passing only three stages of technology maturity: ready for research (Gate 0); ready for development (Gate 2); ready for demonstration (Gate 5). The TFA Midyear Review is a key element in the overall review procedure, as the tracking evidence for all active projects is required to be available at this time. While the Midyear Report contains an overview of the status of all TFA reviews and projects, not all the reviews were conducted during the Midyear Review. The TFA used a phased approach to accomplish the Midyear Review requirements.

  10. WORKSHOP THEMES The workshop will focus on the following areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , policy makers and engineers from India and USA over the past 20 years and explore how these lessons can the Transportation Sector ­ Issues and Challenges b) Planning and Policy Solutions for Reducing Transportation Hall Central Road Research Institute New Delhi, 110020, India Registration Deadline: 7th January, 2011

  11. Polyethylene macroencapsulation - mixed waste focus area. OST reference No. 30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lead waste inventory throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex has been estimated between 17 million and 24 million kilograms. Decontamination of at least a portion of the lead is viable but at a substantial cost. Because of various problems with decontamination and its limited applicability and the lack of a treatment and disposal method, the current practice is indefinite storage, which is costly and often unacceptable to regulators. Macroencapsulation is an approved immobilization technology used to treat radioactively contaminated lead solids and mixed waste debris. (Mixed waste is waste materials containing both radioactive and hazardous components). DOE has funded development of a polyethylene extrusion macroencapsulation process at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) that produces a durable, leach-resistant waste form. This innovative macroencapsulation technology uses commercially available single-crew extruders to melt, convey, and extrude molten polyethylene into a waste container in which mixed waste lead and debris are suspended or supported. After cooling to room temperature, the polyethylene forms a low-permeability barrier between the waste and the leaching media.

  12. Mixed waste focus area technical baseline report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its overall program, the MWFA uses a national mixed waste data set to develop approaches for treating mixed waste that cannot be treated using existing capabilities at DOE or commercial facilities. The current data set was originally compiled under the auspices of the 1995 Mixed Waste Inventory Report. The data set has been updated over the past two years based on Site Treatment Plan revisions and clarifications provided by individual sites. The current data set is maintained by the MWFA staff and is known as MWFA97. In 1996, the MWFA developed waste groupings, process flow diagrams, and treatment train diagrams to systematically model the treatment of all mixed waste in the DOE complex. The purpose of the modeling process was to identify treatment gaps and corresponding technology development needs for the DOE complex. Each diagram provides the general steps needed to treat a specific type of waste. The NWFA categorized each MWFA97 waste stream by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. Appendices B through F provide the complete listing of waste streams by waste group, treatment train, and process flow. The MWFA97 waste strewn information provided in the appendices is defined in Table A-1.

  13. wumrc.engin.umich.edu Research Focus Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Samantha

    ) 3D printing of custom orthoses and prostheses, (3) assistive and rehabilitation devices and others many with simulator, do one, teach one" with the goal to improve patient safety · Use 3D printing

  14. NOAA Selects Muskegon Lake as Habitat Focus Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the lumber era, several other industries were based there including chemical and petrochemical companies, foundries, a coal-fired power plant, and a paper mill. Muskegon Lake has suffered water quality concerns

  15. Animated simulation of greenhouse internal transport using Siman/Cinema

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, W.; Ting, K.C.; Giacomelli, G.A. (Rutgers--the State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (USA). Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on an animated computer model developed using a simulation language Sinman/Cinema to simulate greenhouse internal transport systems. The model can be used as a tool to study the performance of materials handling operations within a greenhouse. The potential bottleneck of a transport system can be visually detected on the computer monitor. Statistical analyses on the system parameters, such as the status and utilization of machines, workers and waiting lines, and throughput time of an operation, are performed during the simulation. From these data, the interaction between machines and workers within a greenhouse system can be studied.

  16. An Application of Phase Change Technology in a Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y.; Chen, C.; Guo, H.; Yue, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials and Solar Cells, 1998,51: 401?411 [2] Yang Chun, Ge Xinshi, Cheng Shuxia. A theoretical and experimental study of the heat transfer problems in the greenhouse. Acta Energiae Solaris ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Envelope Technologies... Energiae Solaris Sinica, 2003,24,6(12): 789-794. (In Chinese) [4] J.G.Pieters, J.M.Deltour. Modelling solar energy input in greenhouses. Solar Energy,1999,67: 119?130 [5] Mathala J. Gupta, Pitam Chandra. Effect of greenhouse design parameters...

  17. Estonian greenhouse gas emissions inventory report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punning, J.M.; Ilomets, M.; Karindi, A.; Mandre, M.; Reisner, V. [Inst. of Ecology, Tallinn (Estonia); Martins, A.; Pesur, A. [Inst. of Energy Research, Tallinn (Estonia); Roostalu, H.; Tullus, H. [Estonian Agricultural Univ., Tartu (Estonia)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely accepted that the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere due to human activities would result in warming of the Earth`s surface. To examine this effect and better understand how the GHG increase in the atmosphere might change the climate in the future, how ecosystems and societies in different regions of the World should adapt to these changes, what must policymakers do for the mitigation of that effect, the worldwide project within the Framework Convention on Climate Change was generated by the initiative of United Nations. Estonia is one of more than 150 countries, which signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. In 1994 a new project, Estonian Country Study was initiated within the US Country Studies Program. The project will help to compile the GHG inventory for Estonia, find contemporary trends to investigate the impact of climate change on the Estonian ecosystems and economy and to formulate national strategies for Estonia addressing to global climate change.

  18. Estimating Policy-Driven Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trajectories in California: The California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenblatt, Jeffery B.

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A California Greenhouse Gas Inventory Spreadsheet (GHGIS) model was developed to explore the impact of combinations of state policies on state greenhouse gas (GHG) and regional criteria pollutant emissions. The model included representations of all GHG- emitting sectors of the California economy (including those outside the energy sector, such as high global warming potential gases, waste treatment, agriculture and forestry) in varying degrees of detail, and was carefully calibrated using available data and projections from multiple state agencies and other sources. Starting from basic drivers such as population, numbers of households, gross state product, numbers of vehicles, etc., the model calculated energy demands by type (various types of liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels, electricity and hydrogen), and finally calculated emissions of GHGs and three criteria pollutants: reactive organic gases (ROG), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and fine (2.5 ?m) particulate matter (PM2.5). Calculations were generally statewide, but in some sectors, criteria pollutants were also calculated for two regional air basins: the South Coast Air Basin (SCAB) and the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Three scenarios were developed that attempt to model: (1) all committed policies, (2) additional, uncommitted policy targets and (3) potential technology and market futures. Each scenario received extensive input from state energy planning agencies, in particular the California Air Resources Board. Results indicate that all three scenarios are able to meet the 2020 statewide GHG targets, and by 2030, statewide GHG emissions range from between 208 and 396 MtCO2/yr. However, none of the scenarios are able to meet the 2050 GHG target of 85 MtCO2/yr, with emissions ranging from 188 to 444 MtCO2/yr, so additional policies will need to be developed for California to meet this stringent future target. A full sensitivity study of major scenario assumptions was also performed. In terms of criteria pollutants, targets were less well-defined, but while all three scenarios were able to make significant reductions in ROG, NOx and PM2.5 both statewide and in the two regional air basins, they may nonetheless fall short of what will be required by future federal standards. Specifically, in Scenario 1, regional NOx emissions are approximately three times the estimated targets for both 2023 and 2032, and in Scenarios 2 and 3, NOx emissions are approximately twice the estimated targets. Further work is required in this area, including detailed regional air quality modeling, in order to determine likely pathways for attaining these stringent targets.

  19. Greenhouse gas emissions from contrasting beef production systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Patricia

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture has been reported to contribute a significant amount of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere among other anthropogenic activities. With still more than 870 million people in the world suffering from under-nutrition ...

  20. Biochar amendment and greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Sean Daniel Charles

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of biochar amendment on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and to elucidate the mechanisms behind these effects. I investigated the suppression of soil carbon dioxide ...

  1. Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

    The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23...

  2. Cogeneration Leads to Major Aquaculture and Greenhouse Development in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercer, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing waste heat from thermal electric or hydro-electric power stations offers substantial energy and cost savings to both the salmon aquaculture and greenhouse industries in Canada. Projects successfully demonstrating this technology have led...

  3. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  4. Secretary of Energy Memorandum on DOE Greenhouse Gas Emission...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to a low-carbon economy. We must also lead by example in reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with our own operations and facilities. On October 5,2009, the...

  5. Comparing the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies dealing with global warming require a measure of the effects of the emissions of greenhouse gases that create different magnitudes of instantaneous radiative forcing and have different lifetimes. The Global Warming ...

  6. Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

  7. Fiscal Year 2012 Greenhouse Gas Inventory: Government Totals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel spreadsheet shows scope 1, 2, and 3 greenhouse gas inventories reported by federal agencies in fiscal year 2012. It includes emissions from sources not subject to the reduction targets.

  8. Detection of Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climatic Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, P.D.; Wigley, T.M.L.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to assemble and analyze instrumental climate data and to develop and apply climate models as a basis for (1) detecting greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change, and (2) validation of General Circulation Models.

  9. Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep cuts in household greenhouse gas emissions Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National University Ph 61 2 6125 5905 Andrew.blakers@anu.edu.au Web: http

  10. Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ......

  11. Reliable Muddle: Transportation Scenarios for the 80% Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal for 2050 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Webster, K.

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation describing transportation scenarios for meeting the 2050 DOE goal of reducing greenhouse gases by 80%.

  12. Uncertainties in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Advanced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kara G. Cafferty; Erin M. Searcy; Long Nguyen; Sabrina Spatari

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) cellulosic biofuel mandates, the United States will require an annual domestic supply of about 242 million Mg of biomass by 2022. To improve the feedstock logistics of lignocellulosic biofuels and access available biomass resources from areas with varying yields, commodity systems have been proposed and designed to deliver on-spec biomass feedstocks at preprocessing “depots”, which densify and stabilize the biomass prior to long-distance transport and delivery to centralized biorefineries. The harvesting, preprocessing, and logistics (HPL) of biomass commodity supply chains thus could introduce spatially variable environmental impacts into the biofuel life cycle due to needing to harvest, move, and preprocess biomass from multiple distances that have variable spatial density. This study examines the uncertainty in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn stover logisticsHPL within a bio-ethanol supply chain in the state of Kansas, where sustainable biomass supply varies spatially. Two scenarios were evaluated each having a different number of depots of varying capacity and location within Kansas relative to a central commodity-receiving biorefinery to test GHG emissions uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulation was used to estimate the spatial uncertainty in the HPL gate-to-gate sequence. The results show that the transport of densified biomass introduces the highest variability and contribution to the carbon footprint of the logistics HPL supply chain (0.2-13 g CO2e/MJ). Moreover, depending upon the biomass availability and its spatial density and surrounding transportation infrastructure (road and rail), logistics HPL processes can increase the variability in life cycle environmental impacts for lignocellulosic biofuels. Within Kansas, life cycle GHG emissions could range from 24 to 41 g CO2e/MJ depending upon the location, size and number of preprocessing depots constructed. However, this range can be minimized through optimizing the siting of preprocessing depots where ample rail infrastructure exists to supply biomass commodity to a regional biorefinery supply system

  13. Monitoring and Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk Municipal Comm Jump(EC-LEDS)Potential in

  14. Editorial Focus Editorial Focus: Going with the Wnt? Focus on "Hyperaldosteronism,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Armin

    Editorial Focus Editorial Focus: Going with the Wnt? Focus on "Hyperaldosteronism, hypervolemia in mice and humans. Upon binding of these lipid-modified glycopeptides to their plasma membrane receptors complex to the plasma membrane, which leads to degradation of the complex and release of Ă?

  15. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the sixth annual report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases. It covers emissions over the period 1990--1996, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1997. Chapter one summarizes some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect. Important recent developments in global climate change activities are discussed, especially the third Conference of the Parties to the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was held in December of 1997 in Kyoto, Japan. Chapters two through five cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons and related gases, respectively. Chapter six describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Six appendices are included in the report. 96 refs., 38 tabs.

  16. Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

  17. Detection of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change. Progress report, 1 December 1992--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Jones, P.D.

    1993-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aims of the US Department of Energy`s Carbon Dioxide Research Program are to improve assessments of greenhouse-gas-induced climatic change and to define and reduce uncertainties through selected research. The main research areas covered by this proposal are (b), First Detection and (c) Supporting Data. The project will also include work under area (a), Modeling: specifically, analysis of climate forcing factors, the development and refinement of transient response climate models, and the use of instrumental data in validating General Circulating Models (GCMs).

  18. Ultrasonic inspection apparatus and method using a focused wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gieske, John H. (Albuquerque, NM); Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Walkington, Phillip D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic pulse echo inspection apparatus and method for detecting structural failures. A focus lens is coupled to the transducer to focus the ultrasonic signal on an area to be inspected and a stop is placed in the focus lens to block selected ultrasonic waves. Other waves are not blocked and are transmitted through the structure to arrive at interfaces therein concurrently to produce an echo response with significantly less distortion.

  19. Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jian-yu

    Cleaning Membranes with Focused Ultrasound Beams for Drinking Water Treatment Jian-yu Lu1 , Xi Du2: jilu@eng.utoledo.edu Abstract ­ Traditional methods for water treatment are not effective to remove to clean a large membrane area needed for a typical water treatment plant. In this paper, a focused

  20. Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/5/2013 1 Regional GHG Emissions O tlook Greenhouse Gas and the Regional Power System Symposium Regional GHG Emissions ­ Outlook June 4, 2013 Steven Simmons CO2 Emission Outlook for the Pacific NW (ID-MT- OR-WA) Key Factors that determine Emissions Levels 1 Demand & Conservation 50 60 70 2 1. Demand

  1. Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    when the need is discovered, but a good preventive maintenance program will reduce the number. This fact sheet will emphasize corrective and preventive maintenance procedures for ventilation, evaporativeAE26 Maintenance Guide for Greenhouse Ventilation, Evaporative Cooling Heating Systems1 D. E

  2. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

  3. II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed biofuels production. GHG policies18 that create a carbon price either through an emissions trading system or directly by taxing GHG emissions also generate increased demand for biofuels. They do so by raising

  4. U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective and Research Associate, respectively, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. Seniority of Authorship is shared. This research was supported by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station through

  5. CO2 levels during the greenhouse of the Paleocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    to reconstruct CO2 concentrations during this period of global warming 56 million years ago. 56 million year oldCO2 levels during the greenhouse of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) Francesca A. Mc, Boulder #12;Estimating paleopCO2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Meter Level, start

  6. Land Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    emissions of California crude and in situ oil sands production (crude refineryLand Use Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Conventional Oil Production and Oil Sands S O N I A Y E H and Alberta as examples for conventional oil production as well as oil sands production in Alberta

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics Over the last thirty years, hundreds and utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. ~40 g CO2

  8. An Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions-Weighted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Analysis ­ Greenhouse Gas Emissions Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai`i And University of Hawai`i Economic Research, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

  9. Most people now understand the necessity to reduce greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everest, Graham R

    ? Reducing your authority's per capita carbon emissions can require costly planning, engagement, recording in the community to pledge energy-saving actions to help them reach their carbon reduction ambition greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). Action by Local Authorities will be criticalinachievingthe

  10. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: How Do They Add Up?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    regulations, aimed, for instance, at altering electricity fuel choice, household energy use, and automotive California is implementing a broad portfolio of regulations aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, many of these policies, if undertaken without the cooperation of neighboring states may result

  11. Soil science Disinfection of drain water in greenhouses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil science Disinfection of drain water in greenhouses using a wet condensation heater C Steinberg November 1994) Summary — A wet condensation heater has been modified to disinfect drain water were introduced into the disinfection circuit above the heater. Water was checked downstream

  12. The Agricultural Sector and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Model (ASMGHG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    ...................................................................................37 3.5.1.1 Direct Carbon Emissions Through Fossil Fuel Use.....................38 3.5.1.2 Indirect.5.2.2 Production of Fossil Fuel Substitutes...........................................49 3.5.2.3 Conversion Taxes and Sequestration Subsidies...............................66 3.8.2.4 Special Greenhouse Gas

  13. Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Determining Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Hydrogen Infrastructure and Fuel Cell of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen

  14. Atmospheric Modelling of Greenhouse Gases and Air Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    . Increase in mixing height (h) entrains (draws in) air from above the box #12Atmospheric Modelling of Greenhouse Gases and Air Quality John C. Lin Courtenay Strong University of Utah: February 20th, 2013 Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Utah #12;Outline ·CO2 ó Air

  15. ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CO2) emission reduction estimates were obtained for each of the measures. The package of measures the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions-makers will require estimates of both the potential emission reductions and the costs or benefits associated

  16. What's the Greenhouse Effect? The earth is surrounded by a blanket of gases. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    #12;What's the Greenhouse Effect? · The earth is surrounded by a blanket of gases. This blanket and climate change result from the greenhouse effect. #12;What's the Problem? · Eradica@on of en

  17. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels: A Framework for Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Farrell, Alexander E; Plevin, Richard J; Jones, Andrew; Nemet, Gregory F; Delucchi, Mark

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Wang, M. (2001) "Energy & Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biofuels Fuels and MotorLifecycle Analysis of Biofuels." Report UCD-ITS-RR-06-08.

  18. Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

  19. Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing comparable greenhouse Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Climate and Planets http:icp.giss.nasa.gov The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in Summary: http:icp.giss.nasa.gov The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse...

  1. The Essential Role of State Enforcement in the Brave New World of Greenhouse Gas Emission Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogoshian, Matt; Alex, Ken

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    greenhouse gas emissions trading market, the Regionalwith respect to emissions trading markets. 23 We must have a

  2. The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  4. Synthesis of focusing-and-deflection columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilagyi, M.; Mui, P.H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Szilagyi and Szep have demonstrated that focusing lenses of high performances can be constructed from a column of circular plate electrodes. Later, Szilagyi modified that system to include dipole, quadrupole, and octupole components by partitioning each plate into eight equal sectors. It has already been shown that the additional quadrupole components can indeed bring about substantial improvements in the focusing of charged particle beams. In this article, that design procedure is expanded to construct columns capable of both focusing and deflecting particle beams by just introducing additional dipole components. In this new design, the geometry of the system remains unchanged. The only extra complication is the demand for more individual controls of the sector voltages. Two sample designs, one for negative ions and one for electrons, are presented showing that in both cases a {plus_minus}2.3 mrad diverging beam can be focused down to a spot of less than 50 nm in radius over a scanning circular area of radius 0.25 mm. The details of the two systems are given in Sec. IV along with the source conditions. The performance of the negative ion system is found to be comparable to the published data. For the relativistic electron system, the interaction of individual components to reduce various aberrations is investigated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  5. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  6. On the scattering-greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    On the scattering-greenhouse effect of CO2 ice clouds R. T. Pierrehumbert C. Erlick Department in J. Atmos. Sci. #12;Scattering Greenhouse Effect on Early Mars Page 2 Abstract We offer some remarks on the greenhouse effect due to high clouds which reflect thermal infrared radiation, but do not absorb or emit it

  7. Attribution of the presentday total greenhouse effect Gavin A. Schmidt,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attribution of the presentday total greenhouse effect Gavin A. Schmidt,1 Reto A. Ruedy,1 Ron L to the presentday global greenhouse effect are among the most misquoted statistics in public discussions of climate though the magnitude of the total greenhouse effect is significantly larger than the initial radiative

  8. Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    Teaching Energy Balance using Round Numbers: A Quantitative Approach to the Greenhouse Effect, 2003 Abstract The idea of energy balance used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming and astronomy curricula. The idea of energy balance is used to explain the greenhouse effect and global warming

  9. mARUS37, 207--213 (1979) Ammonia Photolysisand the Greenhouse Effect in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    mARUS37, 207--213 (1979) Ammonia Photolysisand the Greenhouse Effect in the Primordial Atmosphere mixing ratio of am- monia of 10-5 or greater would provide a sufficient greenhouse effect to keep of longwave radiation NH3 could pro- duce a substantial "greenhouse effect" and maintain a surface temperature

  10. Emissions of Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases From the Production and Use of Transportation Fuels and Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 GREENHOUSE GASES FROM THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ELECTRICITYCO2 GREENHOUSE GASES FROM THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ELECTRICITY

  11. Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification of the global land-based hydrological cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent intensification. Scha¨r (2008), Combined surface solar brightening and increasing greenhouse effect support recent

  12. Statistical Mechanics with focus on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Statistical Mechanics with focus on Liquids, Solutions and Colloidal Systems Course contents A. Foundations of statistical mechanics Classical dynamics ­ Hamilton's and Liouville's equations The concept statistics. Ideal fermion or boson gases. ­ Bose-Einstein condensation. The relationship between

  13. FINDYOUR FOCUS. 184 degree programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ) forensic and investigative science psychology environmental protection sport management physics public has 350+ student organizations, including the Fashion Business Association, Society of Women EngineersFINDYOUR FOCUS. #12;184 degree programs Including: mechanical engineering (Travis's choice

  14. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  15. Testimony to the US Senate on the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This testimony was presented on January 28, 1987 at the hearing on ''The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion,'' United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Subcommittee on Environmental Protection and Subcommittee on Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances. The testimony concerns the observed global warming that has occurred over the past 100 years. How this temperature record was obtained is summarized and the details of the record described, with particular reference to the most recent decades and to the differences between the records for Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The record is compared with the predicted warming over the same period due to the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The projected warming over the next 70 years is compared with global temperature changes that have occurred over the past few million years. (ACR)

  16. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2988 the Congress requested DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. This report presents the results of that study. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity), and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiactively important gases. Topics discussed include: energy and environmental technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, fossil energy production and electricity generation technologies, nuclear energy technology, renewable energy technologies, energy storage, transmission, and distribution technology, transportation, technology, industrial technology, residential and commercial building technology, greenhouse gas removal technology, approaches to restructuring the demand for energy.

  17. Emissions Of Greenhouse Gases From Rice Agriculture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Aslam K. Khalil

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project produced detailed data on the processes that affect methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice agriculture and their inter-relationships. It defines the shifting roles and potential future of these gases in causing global warming and the benefits and tradeoffs of reducing emissions. The major results include: 1). Mechanisms and Processes Leading to Methane Emissions are Delineated. Our experiments have tested the standard model of methane emissions from rice fields and found new results on the processes that control the flux. A mathematical mass balance model was used to unravel the production, oxidation and transport of methane from rice. The results suggested that when large amounts of organic matter are applied, the additional flux that is observed is due to both greater production and reduced oxidation of methane. 2). Methane Emissions From China Have Been Decreasing Over the Last Two Decades. We have calculated that methane emissions from rice fields have been falling in recent decades. This decrease is particularly large in China. While some of this is due to reduced area of rice agriculture, the bigger effect is from the reduction in the emission factor which is the annual amount of methane emitted per hectare of rice. The two most important changes that cause this decreasing emission from China are the reduced use of organic amendments which have been replaced by commercial nitrogen fertilizers, and the increased practice of intermittent flooding as greater demands are placed on water resources. 3). Global Methane Emissions Have Been Constant For More Than 20 Years. While the concentrations of methane in the atmosphere have been leveling off in recent years, our studies show that this is caused by a near constant total global source of methane for the last 20 years or more. This is probably because as some anthropogenic sources have increased, others, such as the rice agriculture source, have fallen. Changes in natural emissions appear small. 4). Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Rice Fields Increase as Methane Emissions Drop. Inundated conditions favor anaerobic methane production with high emission rates and de-nitrification resulting in modest nitrous oxide emissions. Under drier conditions such as intermittent flooding, methane emissions fall and nitrous oxide emissions increase. Increased nitrogen fertilizer use increases nitrous oxide emissions and is usually accompanied by reduced organic matter applications which decreases methane emissions. These mechanisms cause a generally inverse relationship between methane and nitrous oxide emissions. Reduction of methane from rice agriculture to control global warming comes with tradeoffs with increased nitrous oxide emissions. 5). High Spatial Resolution Maps of Emissions Produced. Maps of methane and nitrous oxide emissions at a resolution of 5 min × 5 min have been produced based on the composite results of this research. These maps are necessary for both scientific and policy uses.

  18. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Hydropower Reservoirs: FY2011 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Mosher, Jennifer J [ORNL; Mulholland, Patrick J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Phillips, Jana Randolph [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify the net emissions of key greenhouse gases (GHG) - notably, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} - from hydropower reservoirs in moist temperate areas within the U.S. The rationale for this objective is straightforward: if net emissions of GHG can be determined, it would be possible to directly compare hydropower to other power-producing methods on a carbon-emissions basis. Studies of GHG emissions from hydropower reservoirs elsewhere suggest that net emissions can be moderately high in tropical areas. In such areas, warm temperatures and relatively high supply rates of labile organic matter can encourage high rates of decomposition, which (depending upon local conditions) can result in elevated releases of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}. CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} emissions also tend to be higher for younger reservoirs than for older reservoirs, because vegetation and labile soil organic matter that is inundated when a reservoir is created can continue to decompose for several years (Galy-Lacaux et al. 1997, Barros et al. 2011). Water bodies located in climatically cooler areas, such as in boreal forests, could be expected to have lower net emissions of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} because their organic carbon supplies tend to be relatively recalcitrant to microbial action and because cooler water temperatures are less conducive to decomposition.

  19. Independent Oversight Focused Program Review, Argonne National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Focused Program Review, Argonne National Laboratory-West - May 2001 Independent Oversight Focused Program Review, Argonne National Laboratory-West - May 2001 May 2001 Focused...

  20. Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesinger, M. E.

    2001-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 5 years of NSF grant ATM 95-22681 (Research on Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Climate Change, $1,605,000, 9/15/1995 to 8/31/2000) we have performed work which we are described in this report under three topics: (1) Development and Application of Atmosphere, Ocean, Photochemical-Transport, and Coupled Models; (2) Analysis Methods and Estimation; and (3) Climate-Change Scenarios, Impacts and Policy.

  1. The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs Danish consumption and emissions, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption and emissions, 2007 Tomas Sander Poulsen AND EMISSION OF F-GASES 7 1.1.1 Consumption 7 1.1.2 Emission 7 1.1.3 Trends in total GWP contribution from F 21 4 EMISSION OF F-GASES 23 4.1.1 Emissions of HFCs from refrigerants 23 4.1.2 Emissions of HFCs from

  2. Using Coupled Harmonic Oscillators to Model Some Greenhouse Gas Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Clark Kendrick C.; Maquiling, Joel T. [Department of Physics, Ateneo de Manila University, Katipunan Avenue, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Common greenhouse gas molecules SF{sub 6}, NO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and CO{sub 2} are modeled as harmonic oscillators whose potential and kinetic energies are derived. Using the Euler-Lagrange equation, their equations of motion are derived and their phase portraits are plotted. The authors use these data to attempt to explain the lifespan of these gases in the atmosphere.

  3. Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, John Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Comm!ttee) (Robert E. Pettit) (Member) (David id. Reed) (Member) "7~+ (Grant Yest) (Head of. Depart tment) Deceriber 1983 ABSTRACT Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production. IDecember 1983) John... iviichael Brown B. S, East Texas State University. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr . A . E . Nightingale . Isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, T. hamatum, and Gliocladium spp. capable of inhibiting the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, which may cause...

  4. Simple model of photo acoustic system for greenhouse effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukuhara, Akiko; Ogawa, Naohisa

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simple theoretical basis for photo acoustic (PA) system for studying infrared absorption properties of greenhouse gases is constructed. The amplitude of sound observed in PA depends on the modulation frequency of light pulse. Its dependence can be explained by our simple model. According to this model, sound signal has higher harmonics. The theory and experiment are compared in third and fifth harmonics by spectrum analysis. The theory has the analogy with electric circuits. This analogy helps students for understanding the PA system.

  5. Idaho National Laboratory FY12 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Frerichs

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

  6. Idaho National Laboratory's FY11 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Frerichs

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho.

  7. Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section will help agencies to determine the most visible alternatives to single occupancy vehicle (SOV) commuting at the agencies major worksites establish the number of employees that may reasonably switch to non-SOV methods and estimate the resulting impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at their worksites. Learn how to: Identify relevant alternatives and supporting strategies Evaluate potential adoption of alternatives Estimate the GHG emission impact

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions control by economic incentives: Survey and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Kosobud, R.F.; Quinn, K.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a survey of issues and concerns raised in recent literature on the application of market-based approaches to greenhouse effect policy with an emphasis on tradeable emission permits. The potential advantages of decentralized decision-making -- cost-effectiveness or allocation efficiency, stimulation of innovations, and political feasibility are discussed. The potential difficulties of data recording, monitoring, enforcement, and of creating viable emission permit contracts and markets are examined. Special attention is given to the problem of designing a greenhouse effect policy that is cost-effective over time, a problem that has been given little attention to date. Proposals to reduce or stabilize greenhouse gas emission (especially CO{sub 2}) in the short run require high carbon tax rates or permit prices and impose heavy adjustment costs on the fossil fuel industry. A more cost-effective time path of permit prices is proposed that achieves the same long-run climate change stabilization goals. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1990, with annual updates thereafter. This report is the fifth annual update, covering national emissions over the period 1989--1995, with preliminary estimates of emissions for 1996. The estimates contained in this report have been revised from those in last year`s report. Emissions estimates for carbon dioxide are reported in metric tons of carbon; estimates for other gases are reported in metric tons of gas. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapter 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes. Five appendixes are included with this report. 216 refs., 11 figs., 38 tabs.

  11. New charm results from FOCUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianco, Stefano; /Frascati

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS are reported: Dalitz plot analysis, semileptonic form factor ratios and excited meson spectroscopy. The author reports on three new results from the photoproduction experiment FOCUS: the first Dalitz plot analysis of charm meson decays using the K-matrix approach[ 1], new measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {delta}(1020) {mu}{sup +}{nu} form factor ratios [2], and new measurements on L=1 excited meson spectroscopy [3], i.e., precise measurements of the masses and widths of the D*{sub 2}{sup +} and D*{sub 2}{sup 0} mesons, and evidence for broad states decaying to D{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} (the first such evidence in D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}). The data for this paper were collected in the Wideband photoproduction experiment FOCUS during the Fermilab 1996-1997 fixed-target run.

  12. Finding beam focus errors automatically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

  13. Independent Oversight Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - January 2001 Independent Oversight Focused Safety Management Evaluation, Idaho...

  14. Winter 2010 EVENTS FOCUS: RUSSIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Winter 2010 EVENTS FOCUS: RUSSIA Tue, Jan 12, 4-5:30 pm WCED/CREES/Ford School Lecture. "U.S.-Russia Relations: Status of the `Reset'." John Beyrle, U.S. Ambassador to Russia. Co-sponsors: International Policy and literature, Oberlin College. Wed, Feb 3, 12-1:30 pm CREES Brown Bag. "Nostalgia in Post-Socialist Russia

  15. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  16. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  17. Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranda, Eduardo Reck

    Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation This resource guide aims to provide useful, detailed, high quality sources of information on biodiversity and conservation for students in Higher and Further into biodiversity and government bodies trying to implement conservation measures, but there are many others

  18. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  19. Climate change : enhanced : recent reductions in China's greenhouse gas emissions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.; Jiang, K.; Hu, X.; Sinton, J. E.; Zhang, X.-Q.; Xu, D.; Jacobson, M. Z.; Hansen, J. E.; Decision and Information Sciences; Energy Research Inst.; LBNL; Chinese Academy of Forestry; Stanford Univ.; NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the most recent energy and other statistical data, we have estimated the annual trends in China's greenhouse gas emissions for the period 1990 to 2000. The authors of this Policy Forum calculate that CO2 emissions declined by 7.3% between 1996 and 2000, while CH4 emissions declined by 2.2% between 1997 and 2000. These reductions were due to a combination of energy reforms, economic restructuring, forestry policies, and economic slowdown. The effects of these emission changes on global mean temperatures are estimated and compared with the effects of concurrent changes in two aerosol species, sulfate and black carbon.

  20. Plant water use in a greenhouse: theory and measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaer, Yacoub Adib

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature, and the storage tank temperature if applicable. The external transport coefficient for water vapor between crop and air was considered constant in the SG79 model, equivalent to a -1 resistance of 250 s m . The leaf resistance is made to vary... with the predicted water use by the SG79 model. A description of this test follows. The Lysimeters Four lysimeters of about 0. 02 m , made from plastic pots were 2 installed in the turf growing in the test greenhouse and were weighed every two hours during...

  1. Technology Opportunities to Reduce U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as the technology basis of a needed national climate change technology strategy, with the confidence that a strong technology R&D program will deliver a portfolio of technologies with the potential to provide very substantial greenhouse gas emission reductions along with continued economic growth. Much more is needed to define such a strategy, including identification of complementary deployment policies and analysis to support the seeping and prioritization of R&D programs. A national strategy must be based upon governmental, industrial, and academic partnerships.

  2. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6 | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshortGeothermalGoGreen Engineering andGreenGreenhouse

  3. SciTech Connect: "Greenhouse Effect"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systems controller systemsisSchedules SchedulesSciPy IPython3dGreenhouse

  4. Milgro No. 3 Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH JumpSprings, Vermont:is a town inInformation Greenhouse

  5. ARM - Amount of Greenhouse Gases in the Global Atmosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |NovemberARMContactsARM Engineering andPlansAmount of Greenhouse

  6. The best use of biomass? Greenhouse gas lifecycle analysis of predicted pyrolysis biochar systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, James A R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Life cycle analysis is carried out for 11 predicted configurations of pyrolysis biochar systems to determine greenhouse gas balance, using an original spreadsheet model. System… (more)

  7. Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

  8. Investigation of greenhouse gas reduction strategies by industries : an enterprise systems architecting approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanthullu Athmaram, Kumaresh Babu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores an enterprise systems architecting approach to investigate the greenhouse gas reduction strategies followed by industries, especially for automotive industry and Information Technology industry. The ...

  9. Lead Section Grower Four Star Greenhouse has been producing high quality garden products since

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products since 1977 and is the largest partner/supplier of the nationally recognized Greenhouse's Mission Statement in all job related functions. Minimum Qualifications: 1

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution greenhouse Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution greenhouse Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Syllabus for EK 335: Introduction to...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aggressive city greenhouse-gas Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    noted earlier, the majority of aviation emissions... a significant impact on the greenhouse effect.29 Concern regarding ... Source: George Mason University, Center for Air...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual greenhouse gas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory, bo Akademi University, Collection: Fossil Fuels ; Physics 49 THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Summary: . D. Keeling ICE CORES SIPLE STATION ANTARCTICA...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric greenhouse effect Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atmospheric greenhouse effect Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Question...

  14. 2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    2005 Inventory of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ascribable to the University of Washington October 2007....................................................................................................................4 Corporate vs. Geographic Inventories...........................................................................4 Inventory Protocol

  15. Transitional strategies for the reduction of "greenhouse gas" emission in the United States electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Burt L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental issues have become increasingly important in the political arena, particularly with growing concern over the "greenhouse effect," a potential global climatic warming caused by increases in anthropogenic ...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - agroecosystem greenhouse gas Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Research and Demonstration Project Summary: rates of energy return, greater soil carbon sequestration, and reduced greenhouse gas emissions... and belowground pools and...

  17. Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type.

  18. Focus on rotary drill rigs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schivley, G.P. Jr.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the drill rig, focusing on the rotary drill rigs. There are two principal drilling methods - rotary and percussion. In certain situations, percussion drilling is the most practical method, but for most applications, rotary drilling using the rotary-tricone bit with either steel-toothed cones or carbide inserts, is the common and accepted drilling technique. There are four principal reasons for a rotary drill rig: to provide power to the rotary-tricone bit; to provide air to clean the hole; to provide a life-support system for the rotary-tricone bits; and, to provide a stable and efficient platform from which to drill the hole.

  19. Focus Series | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfFletcher E.FloridaMarch 12,Focus

  20. Limiting net greenhouse gas emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R A; Watts, E C; Williams, E R [eds.] [eds.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988, Congress requested that DOE produce a study on carbon dioxide inventory and policy to provide an inventory of emissions sources and to analyze policies to achieve a 20% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 5 to 10 years and a 50% reduction in 15 to 20 years. Energy and environmental technology data were analyzed using computational analysis models. This information was then evaluated, drawing on current scientific understanding of global climate change, the possible consequences of anthropogenic climate change (change caused by human activity) and the relationship between energy production and use and the emission of radiatively important gases. Topics discussed include: state of the science in estimating atmosphere/climate change relationships, the potential consequences of atmosphere/climate change, us greenhouse emissions past and present, an approach to analyzing the technical potential and cost of reducing US energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, current policy base and National Energy Strategy actions, fiscal instruments, regulatory instruments, combined strategies and instruments, macroeconomic impacts, carbon taxation and international trade, a comparison to other studies.

  1. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

  2. The impact of municipal solid waste treatment methods on greenhouse gas emissions in Lahore, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Chuadhry, Muhammad Nawaz [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of existing municipal solid waste management to emission of greenhouse gases and the alternative scenarios to reduce emissions were analyzed for Data Ganj Bukhsh Town (DGBT) in Lahore, Pakistan using the life cycle assessment methodology. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 people living in 232,024 dwellings. Total waste generated is 500,000 tons per year with an average per capita rate of 0.84 kg per day. Alternative scenarios were developed and evaluated according to the environmental, economic, and social atmosphere of the study area. Solid waste management options considered include the collection and transportation of waste, collection of recyclables with single and mixed material bank container systems (SMBCS, MMBCS), material recovery facilities (MRF), composting, biogasification and landfilling. A life cycle inventory (LCI) of the six scenarios along with the baseline scenario was completed; this helped to quantify the CO{sub 2} equivalents, emitted and avoided, for energy consumption, production, fuel consumption, and methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. LCI results showed that the contribution of the baseline scenario to the global warming potential as CO{sub 2} equivalents was a maximum of 838,116 tons. The sixth scenario had a maximum reduction of GHG emissions in terms of CO{sub 2} equivalents of -33,773 tons, but the most workable scenario for the current situation in the study area is scenario 5. It saves 25% in CO{sub 2} equivalents compared to the baseline scenario.

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results...

  4. OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR THE ANIMAL GENOMICS FOCUS GROUP (as of Sept 12 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernest, Holly

    OPERATING PROCEDURES FOR THE ANIMAL GENOMICS FOCUS GROUP (as of Sept 12 2008) OBJECTIVES The Animal Genomics (AG) focus group within the Genetics Graduate Group (GGG) will bring together faculty who are active in this area of research to enhance the training opportunities in this area. Animal Genomics

  5. A Greenhouse-Gas Information System: Monitoring and Validating Emissions Reporting and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonietz, Karl K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimotakis, Paul E. [JPL/CAL Tech; Rotman, Douglas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Walker, Bruce C. [Sandia National Laboratory

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This study and report focus on attributes of a greenhouse-gas information system (GHGIS) needed to support MRV&V needs. These needs set the function of such a system apart from scientific/research monitoring of GHGs and carbon-cycle systems, and include (not exclusively): the need for a GHGIS that is operational, as required for decision-support; the need for a system that meets specifications derived from imposed requirements; the need for rigorous calibration, verification, and validation (CV&V) standards, processes, and records for all measurement and modeling/data-inversion data; the need to develop and adopt an uncertainty-quantification (UQ) regimen for all measurement and modeling data; and the requirement that GHGIS products can be subjected to third-party questioning and scientific scrutiny. This report examines and assesses presently available capabilities that could contribute to a future GHGIS. These capabilities include sensors and measurement technologies; data analysis and data uncertainty quantification (UQ) practices and methods; and model-based data-inversion practices, methods, and their associated UQ. The report further examines the need for traceable calibration, verification, and validation processes and attached metadata; differences between present science-/research-oriented needs and those that would be required for an operational GHGIS; the development, operation, and maintenance of a GHGIS missions-operations center (GMOC); and the complex systems engineering and integration that would be required to develop, operate, and evolve a future GHGIS.

  6. Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

  7. Uncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    analyses involving coal. Greenhouse gas emissions from fuel use and methane releases at coal mines, fuel.5 million metric tons of methane emissions. Close to 95% of domestic coal was consumed by the electricityUncertainty in Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from United States Coal Aranya Venkatesh

  8. enhancing greenhouse gas "sinks," such as forests). The report identifies strategies that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to limit greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., through energy efficiency and low carbon energy sources). At the current rate of U.S. emissions (roughly 7 Gt CO2-eq per year), the proposed budget would be "spent" well and natural ecosys- tems around the world. The largest overall source of greenhouse gas emissions

  9. Truck Stop Electrification as a Strategy To Reduce Greenhouse Gases, Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truck Stop Electrification as a Strategy To Reduce Greenhouse Gases, Fuel Consumption and Pollutant, Schneider, Lee, Bubbosh 2 ABSTRACT Extended truck idling is a very large source of fuel wastage, greenhouse, most long-haul truck drivers idle their vehicles for close to 10 hours per day to operate heating

  10. Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gasEconomic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider emissions. However, subsidies are needed to make agricultural biofuel production economically feasible

  11. Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;Should a vehicle fuel economy standard be combined with an economy-wide greenhouse gas emissions constraint? Implications for energy and climate

  12. Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

  13. Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop 4493 g CO2 eq?m22 over 15 years of energy cane production. Cultivation of energy cane on former pasture Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop. PLoS ONE 8(8): e72019. doi

  14. Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere of anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere such as CO2, CH4, N2O and CFCs. The CO2 emissions to reflect, adsorb and emit the solar energy. However, the continuous emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere

  15. Flow focusing in unsaturated fracture networks: A numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Liu, Hui-Hai

    2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical modeling study is presented to investigate flow-focusing phenomena in a large-scale fracture network, constructed using field data collected from the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed repository site for high-level nuclear waste. The two-dimensional fracture network for an area of 100 m x 150 m contains more than 20,000 fractures. Steady-state unsaturated flow in the fracture network is investigated for different boundary conditions and rock properties. Simulation results indicate that flow paths are generally vertical, and that horizontal fractures mainly provide pathways between neighboring vertical paths. In addition to fracture properties, flow-focusing phenomena are also affected by rock-matrix permeability, with lower matrix permeability leading to a high degree of flow focusing. The simulation results further indicate that the average spacing between flow paths in a layered system tends to increase and flow tends to becomes more focused, with depth.

  16. Advancing Development and Greenhouse Gas Reductions in Vietnam's Wind Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilello, D.; Katz, J.; Esterly, S.; Ogonowski, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy development is a key component of Vietnam's Green Growth Strategy, which establishes a target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from domestic energy activities by 20-30 percent by 2030 relative to a business-as-usual scenario. Vietnam has significant wind energy resources, which, if developed, could help the country reach this target while providing ancillary economic, social, and environmental benefits. Given Vietnam's ambitious clean energy goals and the relatively nascent state of wind energy development in the country, this paper seeks to fulfill two primary objectives: to distill timely and useful information to provincial-level planners, analysts, and project developers as they evaluate opportunities to develop local wind resources; and, to provide insights to policymakers on how coordinated efforts may help advance large-scale wind development, deliver near-term GHG emission reductions, and promote national objectives in the context of a low emission development framework.

  17. Rapid setting of portland cement by greenhouse carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Knox, L.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the work by Berger et al. on rapid setting of calcium silicates by carbonation, a method of high-volume capture of CO{sub 2} in portland cement has been developed. Typically, 10--24 wt. % of CO{sub 2} produced by the calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering, may be captured, and the set cement acquires most of its full strength in less than a day. The approach will have economic advantages in fabrication of precast structures, in emergency development of infrastructure during natural disasters, and in defense applications. Moreover, it will help the cement industry comply with the Clean Air Act of 1990 by sequestering the greenhouse carbon dioxide.

  18. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User Facilities

  19. Research Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearch Areas Our Vision National User

  20. Institute on Climate and Planets http://icp.giss.nasa.gov/ The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    http://icp.giss.nasa.gov/ The Role of the Atmosphere and Greenhouse Effect in Determining the Surface. This process is the natural greenhouse effect. The earths surface receives solar energy and energy reradiated

  1. Modelization of helio-thermal converters : application to the greenhouse effect P. Gallet, F. Papini and A. Ropke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    169 Modelization of helio-thermal converters : application to the greenhouse effect P. Gallet, F surface - greenhouse effect association is discussed as an example. Revue Phys. Appl. 18 (1983) 169

  2. Analysis of air pollution and greenhouse gases. Initial studies, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, C.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current objective of the project ``Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases`` is to develop a study of emissions and emission sources that could easily be linked to models of economic activity. Initial studies were conducted to evaluate data currently available linking activity rates and emissions estimates. The emissions inventory developed for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) presents one of the most comprehensive data sets, and was chosen for our initial studies, which are described in this report. Over 99% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 98% of the NO{sub x} emission and 57% of the VOC emissions from area sources are related to fuel combustion. The majority of emission from these sources are generated by the transportation sector. Activity rates for area sources are not archived with the NAPAP inventory; alternative derivations of these data will be part of the future activities of this project. The availability and completeness of the fuel heat content data in the NAPAP inventory were also studied. Approximately 10% of the SO{sub 2} emissions, 13% of the NO{sub x} emissions and 46% of the VOC emissions are generated by sources with unavailable data for fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content. Initial estimates of pollutant emission rate per unit fuel heat content were generated. Future studies for this project include the derivation of activity rates for area sources, improved explanations for the default fuel parameters defined in the NAPAP inventory and the development of links to data bases of economic activity.

  3. Insights from EMF Associated Agricultural and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Murray, Brian; Kim, Man-Keun; Lee, Heng-Chi; Sands, Ronald D.; Schneider, Uwe

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment modeling (IAM) as employed by the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) generally involves a multi-sector appraisal of greenhouse gas emission (GHGE) mitigation alternatives and climate change effects typically at the global level. Such a multi-sector evaluation encompasses potential climate change effects and mitigative actions within the agricultural and forestry (AF) sectors. In comparison with many of the other sectors covered by IAM, the AF sectors may require somewhat different treatment due to their critical dependence upon spatially and temporally varying resource and climatic conditions. In particular, in large countries like the United States, forest production conditions vary dramatically across the landscape. For example, some areas in the southern US present conditions favorable to production of fast growing, heat tolerant pine species, while more northern regions often favor slower-growing hardwood and softwood species. Moreover, some lands are currently not suitable for forest production (e.g., the arid western plains). Similarly, in agriculture, the US has areas where citrus and cotton can be grown and other areas where barley and wheat are more suitable. This diversity across the landscape causes differential GHGE mitigation potential in the face of climatic changes and/or responses to policy or price incentives. It is difficult for a reasonably sized global IAM system to reflect the full range of sub-national geographic AF production possibilities alluded to above. AF response in the face of climate change altered temperature precipitation regimes or mitigation incentives will likely involve region-specific shifts in land use and agricultural/forest production. This chapter addresses AF sectoral responses in climate change mitigation analysis. Specifically, we draw upon US-based studies of AF GHGE mitigation possibilities that incorporate sub-national detail drawing largely on a body of studies done by the authors in association with EMF activities. We discuss characteristics of AF sectoral responses that could be incorporated in future IAM efforts in climate change policy.

  4. Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

  5. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black and white photographs provide a partial record of some excavations, including trenches, building basements, and material lay-down yards. Estimates of excavation depth and width can be made, but these estimates are not accurate enough to pinpoint the exact location where the disturbedhmdisturbed interface is located (e.g., camera angles were such that depths and/or widths of excavations could not be accurately determined or estimated). In spite of these limitations, these photographs provide essential information. Aerial and historic low-level photographs have captured what appears to be backfill throughout much of the eastern portion of the 300 Area-near the Columbia River shoreline. This layer of fill has likely afforded some protection for the natural landscape buried beneath the fill. This assumption fits nicely with the intermittent and inadvertent discoveries of hearths and stone tools documented through the years in this part of the 300 Area. Conversely, leveling of sand dunes appears to be substantial in the northwestern portion of the 300 Area during the early stages of development. o Project files and engineer drawings do not contain information on any impromptu but necessary adjustments made on the ground during project implementation-after the design phase. Further, many projects are planned and mapped but never implemented-this information is also not often placed in project files. Specific recommendations for a 300 Area cultural resource monitoring strategy are contained in the final section of this document. In general, it is recommended that monitoring continue for all projects located within 400 m of the Columbia River. The 400-m zone is culturally sensitive and likely retains some of the most intact buried substrates in the 300 Area.

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae, Calvin Ng, Joseph Pateman University of British Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae Calvin Ng Joseph Pateman March. This investigation deals with the viability of building a waste heat powered greenhouse on the roof of the new SUB

  7. A. Gershunov R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gershunov Ă? R. Roca Coupling of latent heat flux and the greenhouse effect by large Abstract Coupled variability of the greenhouse effect (GH) and latent heat flux (LHF) over the tropical of convection) form regions of strong greenhouse effect in tropical convergence zones while subtropical high

  8. AMPLIFIED GREENHOUSE EFFECT SHAPING NORTH INTO SOUTH A new study published in Nature Climate Change reports decreasing temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    AMPLIFIED GREENHOUSE EFFECT SHAPING NORTH INTO SOUTH A new study published in Nature Climate Change. A greenhouse effect initiated by increased atmospheric concentration of heat-trapping gasses, such as water greenhouse effect. This amplified warming in the North, roughly above the border between Canada and the USA

  9. CHAPTER 7. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT We examine in this chapter the role played by atmospheric gases in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    113 CHAPTER 7. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT We examine in this chapter the role played by atmospheric of the surface known as the greenhouse effect. As we will see, trapping of terrestrial radiation by naturally accumulated in the atmosphere over the past decades and added to the greenhouse effect (Figure 7-1). Figure 7

  10. Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points Module 1, Lesson 1: CO2 and the Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Effect 1 Climate Insights 101 Questions and Discussion Points Module 1, Lesson 1: CO2 and the Greenhouse Effect Available at http://pics.uvic.ca/education/climate-insights-101 1. CO2 and the Greenhouse Effect Questions: How did the term "greenhouse effect" originate? Why did it stick in the public imagination? Why

  11. Improved focusing-and-deflection columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mui, P.H.; Szilagyi, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our earlier design procedures for constructing quadrupole columns are further expanded to include octupole corrector units and ``octupole`` deflectors with no third-order harmonics. The additional complications are finer partitioning of the plates and increased number of voltage controllers. Two sample designs, one having only the additional octupole deflectors and one having both the deflectors and the correctors, are presented and compared to our previous quadrupole system. The additional octupole components are shown to be capable of increasing the current density from 30% to more than 300% for a four-plate system, designed to focus and scan the electron beam over a circular area of 0.25 mm radius. The electron beam is assumed to have an initial divergence of {plus_minus}2.3 mrad, an initial energy of 6 kV, a total energy spread of 1 eV, and a final acceleration of 30 keV. These systems are then slightly reoptimized for a superficial comparison with the commercially available column by Micrion Corporation. The numerical results indicate a potential for substantial improvements, demonstrating the power of this design procedure. Finally, a discussion is presented on how the individual components can interact with each other to reduce the various aberrations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  12. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  13. Demonstration Results From Greenhouse Heating with Liquified Wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, Philip; Parish, Don; Cooper, Jerome

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A boiler fuel known as Lignocellulosic Boiler Fuel (LBF) was developed at the Department of Forest Products, Mississippi State University for potential application for heating agricultural buildings. LBF was field tested to heat green houses in cooperation with Natchez Trace Greenhouses (NTG) located in Kosciusko, Mississippi. MSU modified an idled natural gas boiler located at NTG to combust the LBF. Thirty gallons of bio-oil were produced at the MSU Bio-oil Research Laboratory. The bio-oil was produced from the fast-pyrolysis of southern pine (15 gal) and white oak (15 gal) feedstocks and subsequently upgraded by a proprietary process. Preliminary field testing was conducted at (NTG). The LBF was produced from each wood species was tested separately and co-fed with diesel fuel to yield three fuel formulations: (1) 100% diesel; (2) 87.5% LBF from southern pine bio-oil co-fed with 12.5% diesel and (3) 87.5% LBF from white oak co-fed with 12.5% diesel fuel formulations. Each fuel formulation was combusted in a retrofit NTG boiler. Fuel consumption and water temperature were measured periodically. Flue gas from the boiler was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The 100% diesel fuel increased water temperature at a rate of 4 ���°F per min. for 35 min. to achieve the target 140 ���°F water temperature increase. The 87.5% pine LBF fuel cofed with 12.5%) diesel attained the 140 ���°F water temperature increase in 62 min. at a rate of 2.3 ���°F per min. The 87.5% white oak LBF fuel co-fed with 12.5% diesel reached the 140 ���°F water temperature increase in 85 min. at a rate of 1.6 ���°F per min. Fuel that contained 87.5% pine LBF co-fed with 12.5% diesel yielded nitrogen and oxygen at a ratio of 5.3 and carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at a ratio of 22.2. Fuel formulations that contained 87.5% white oak LBF co-fed with 12.5% diesel yielded nitrogen and oxygen at a ratio of 4.9 and carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at a ratio of 16.4. Neither the pine LBF nor the white oak LBF fuel showed any measureable methane emissions from the NTG boiler flue gas. These results indicate a viable potential for mildly upgraded bio-oil to become an alternative fuel source for greenhouse operations.

  14. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Sustainable ForestManagement: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye (Ed.), Jayant; Makundi (Ed.), Willy; Goldberg (Ed.),Beth; Andrasko (Ed.), Ken; Sanchez (Ed.), Arturo

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Workshop on Sustainable Forest Management: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 29-31, 1996. The main objectives of the workshop were to: (1) assemble key practitioners of forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) or carbon offset projects, remote sensing of land cover change, guidelines development, and the forest products certification movement, to offer presentations and small group discussions on findings relevant to the crucial need for the development of guidelines for monitoring and verifying offset projects, and (2) disseminate the findings to interested carbon offset project developers and forestry and climate change policy makers, who need guidance and consistency of methods to reduce project transaction costs and increase probable reliability of carbon benefits, at appropriate venues. The workshop brought together about 45 participants from developed, developing, and transition countries. The participants included researchers, government officials, project developers, and staff from regional and international agencies. Each shared his or her perspectives based on experience in the development and use of methods for monitoring and verifying carbon flows from forest areas and projects. A shared sense among the participants was that methods for monitoring forestry projects are well established, and the techniques are known and used extensively, particularly in production forestry. Introducing climate change with its long-term perspective is often in conflict with the shorter-term perspective of most forestry projects and standard accounting principles. The resolution of these conflicts may require national and international agreements among the affected parties. The establishment of guidelines and protocols for better methods that are sensitive to regional issues will be an important first step to increase the credibility of forestry projects as viable mitigation options. The workshop deliberations led to three primary outputs: (1) a Workshop Statement in the JI Quarterly, September, 1996; (2) the publication of a series of selected peer-reviewed technical papers from the workshop in a report of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. 40501); and (3) a special issue of the journal ''Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change'', Kluwer Academic Publishers. The outputs will be distributed to practitioners in this field and to negotiators attending the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) deliberations leading up to the Third conference of Parties in Kyoto, in December 1997.

  15. Federal, state and utility roles in reducing new building greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.; Shankle, D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Boulin, J. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will explore the role of implementation of building energy codes and standards in reducing US greenhouse gas emissions. It will discuss the role of utilities in supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency in improving the efficiency of new buildings. The paper will summarize Federal policies and programs that improve code compliance and increase overall greenhouse gas emission reductions. Finally, the paper will discuss the role of code compliance and the energy and greenhouse gas emission reductions that have been realized from various Federal, State and utility programs that enhance compliance.

  16. The role of heat storage in the soil in the energy balance of a greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadler, Edward John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Oepartvient y I'a/Tiber I l'lay 1978 ABSTRACT THE ROLE OF HEPT STORAGE IN THE SOIi IN THE ENERGY BALANCE OF A GREENHOUSE. (Hay 1978) Edward John Sadler, B. S. , University of Hissouri Chairman of Advisory Committee: Or. C . H . ii. van Bavel A number o... f simulation models of greenhouses have been developed, but the authors differ in their opinion of the significance of the heat, storaae and its effects on the physical environment ins. ide the greenhouse. These opinions are reflected...

  17. Profile of the Department of Design Engineering and the Focus on New Research Areas May 2014 Department of Design Engineering: Profile and Focus on New Research Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    areincreasingly becoming producers (or `prosumers' or `co- designers'). They are now involved in the development

  18. In-Situ Microbial Conversion of Sequestered Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A R; Mukhopadhyay, M; Balin, D F

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project are to use microbiological in situ bioconversion technology to convert sequestered or naturally-occurring greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, into methane and other useful organic compounds. The key factors affecting coal bioconversion identified in this research include (1) coal properties, (2) thermal maturation and coalification process, (3) microbial population dynamics, (4) hydrodynamics (5) reservoir conditions, and (6) the methodology of getting the nutrients into the coal seams. While nearly all cultures produced methane, we were unable to confirm sustained methane production from the enrichments. We believe that the methane generation may have been derived from readily metabolized organic matter in the coal samples and/or biosoluble organic material in the coal formation water. This raises the intriguing possibility that pretreatment of the coal in the subsurface to bioactivate the coal prior to the injection of microbes and nutrients might be possible. We determined that it would be more cost effective to inject nutrients into coal seams to stimulate indigenous microbes in the coal seams, than to grow microbes in fermentation vats and transport them to the well site. If the coal bioconversion process can be developed on a larger scale, then the cost to generate methane could be less than $1 per Mcf

  19. Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D. [Kazakh Scientific-Research Hydrometeorlogical Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan)] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory's FY13 Greenhouse Gas Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Frerichs

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic approach to account for the production and release of certain gases generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gases of interest are those that climate science has identified as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. This report details the methods behind quantifying INL’s GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only the large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  1. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  2. Southeast Idaho Area Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

  3. area protein patterning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reifenberger, Ronald G. 64 STUDY: SHIFTS IN SETTLEMENT PATTERNS IN THE KYZIL AREA, CHELYABINSK DISTRICT. by CiteSeer Summary: The following paper focuses on the transitional...

  4. GLOBAL HYDRLOGIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE MID-CRETACEOUS GREENHOUSE CLIMATE (APTIAN-ALBIAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Marina B.

    2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse climate in the Aptian-Albian through the perspective of the global hydrologic cycle. Stable isotopic compositions of pedogenic and exposure surface carbonates presented ...

  5. Modeling & learning from the design recommendations for California's Greenhouse Gas Cap-and-Trade System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Chester, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change has become a Major issue beginning with our generation. Governments the world over are now recognizing that industry cannot continue to pollute in a business-as-usual manner. Emitting Greenhouse gases has a ...

  6. A Strategy for a Global Observing System for Verification of National Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    With the risks of climate change becoming increasingly evident, there is growing discussion regarding international treaties and national regulations to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Enforcement of such agreements ...

  7. Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once a Federal agency identifies the various strategic opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for vehicles and mobile equipment, it is necessary to evaluate the associated costs of adopting each strategy.

  8. Greenhouse gas emissions from cultivation of energy crops may affect the sustainability of biofuels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambus, Per

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Agro-biofuels are expected to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases because CO2 emitted during the combustion of the biofuels has recently been taken from the… (more)

  9. Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas and Energy Analyses of Algae Biofuels Production Transportation Energy The Issue Algae biofuels directly address the Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research fuels more carbonintensive than conventional biofuels. Critics of this study argue that alternative

  10. Reproduced with pennission from Nature COMMENTARY Cooling the greenhouse with bioenergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reproduced with pennission from Nature COMMENTARY Cooling the greenhouse with bioenergy D. o. Hall combustionwould be once more. The technology for making markets, it is well-suited for energy ap- compensatedfor

  11. Incentive-based approaches for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions : issues and prospects for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shreekant.

    As a consequence of the flexibility mechanisms incorporated in the Kyoto Protocol, incentive-based policies such as emissions trading and the clean development mechanism are being widely discussed in the context of greenhouse ...

  12. Carbon Prices and Automobile Greenhouse Gas Emissions: The Extensive and Intensive Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knittel, Christopher Roland

    The transportation sector accounts for nearly one third of the United States' greenhouse gas emissions. While over the past number of decades, policy makers have avoided directly pricing the externalities from vehicles, ...

  13. What are greenhouse gases? Many chemical compounds in the atmosphere act as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Michigan State University, 2 Michigan State University Extension Climate Change and Agriculture Fact Sheet greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide over the past 2000 years. Data are from ice core

  14. Quantifying emissions of greenhouse gases from South Asia through a targeted measurement campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesan, Anita Lakshmi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N20) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) are powerful greenhouse gases with global budgets that are well-known but regional distributions that are not adequately constrained for the purposes of ...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - alleviating greenhouse effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.3 Summary: Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Question 1.3 What is the Greenhouse Effect? The Sun... by the atmosphere, including clouds, and reradiated back to Earth....

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - attached greenhouses Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.3 Summary: Frequently Asked Questions Frequently Asked Question 1.3 What is the Greenhouse Effect? The Sun... by the atmosphere, including clouds, and reradiated back to Earth....

  17. Greenhouse Gas Mitigation as a Structural Change and Policies that Offset Its Depressing Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babiker, Mustafa H.M.

    The current economic modeling of emissions limitations does not embody economic features that are likely to be particularly important in the short term, yet the politics of limiting greenhouse gas emissions are often ...

  18. Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

  19. Field Guide to the Insects, Mites and Mollusks of Nursery, Floral and Greenhouse Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouge, Dawn H.; Smith, Kirk A.; Wilkerson, Don

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This field guide provides excellent photo identification keys for numerous pests and beneficials found in nursery, greenhouse and floral crops. The text includes a physical description, examples of damage and information on the life cycle of each...

  20. Title: Net Energy Ratio and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of a Biogas Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Wolfgang

    of a Biogas Power Plant Author: W. Bauer Author Affiliation: Department and greenhouse gas analysis for a 1.45 MW (0.71 MW electrical) biogas power plant

  1. Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated.

  2. Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused, and Contractor-Focused Data...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Effective, Customer-Focused and Contractor-Focused Data Tracking Systems, July 24, 2014, Call Slides and Discussion Summary....

  3. Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

  4. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildland fire detection and burned area in the United Wildland fires can be an important source of greenhouse gases as well as black carbon emissions that have of climate response to fire emissions compared to other emission sources of GHG, aerosols, and black carbon

  5. Potential effects of clean coal technologies on acid precipitation, greenhouse gases, and solid waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasing, T.J.; Miller, R.L.; McCold, L.N.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) was initially funded by Congress to demonstrate more efficient, economically feasible, and environmentally acceptable coal technologies. Although the environmental focus at first was on sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) because their relationship to acid precipitation, the CCTDP may also lead to reductions in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions and in the volume of solid waste produced, compared with conventional technologies. The environmental effects of clean coal technologies (CCTs) depend upon which (if any) specific technologies eventually achieve high acceptance in the marketplace. In general, the repowering technologies and a small group of retrofit technologies show the most promise for reducing C0{sub 2} emissions and solid waste. These technologies also compare favorably with other CCTs in terms of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} reductions. The upper bound for CO{sup 2} reductions in the year 2010 is only enough to reduce global ``greenhouse`` warming potential by about 1%. However, CO{sub 2} emissions come from such variety of sources around the globe that no single technological innovation or national policy change could realistically be expected to reduce these emissions by more than a few percent. Particular CCTs can lead to either increases or decreases in the amount of solid waste produced. However, even if decreases are not achieved, much of the solid waste from clean coal technologies would be dry and therefore easier to dispose of than scrubber sludge.

  6. Greenhouse space allocation in the ornamental foliage industry in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krafka, Brenda Dea Lang

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GREENHOUSE SPACE ALLOCATION IN THE ORNAMENTAL FOLIAGE INDUSTRY IN THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS A Thesis by BRENDA DEA LANG KRAFKA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics GREENHOUSE SPACE ALLOCATION IN THE ORNAMENTAL FOLIAGE INDUSTRY IN THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY OF TEXAS A Thesis by BRENDA DEA LANG KRAFKA Approved as to style and content by...

  7. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1985--1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth`s capacity to support life depends on the moderating influences of gases that envelop the planet and warm its surface and protect it from harmful radiation. These gases are referred to as ``greenhouse gases.`` Their warming capacity, called ``the greenhouse effect,`` is essential to maintaining a climate hospitable to all plant, animal, and human life. In recent years, however, there has been increasing concern that human activity may be affecting the intricate balance between the Earth`s absorption of heat from the sun and its capacity to reradiate excess heat back into space. Emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities may be an important mechanism that affects global climate. Thus, research is intensifying to improve our understanding of the role human activities might play in influencing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. On the basis of scientific findings of the past few decades, the US Government and the international community at large are now taking steps toward stabilizing greenhouse gas emissions. This report contributes to that process. Mandated by Congress this report provides estimates of US emissions of the principal greenhouse gases--carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, chlorofluorcarbons, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane volatile organic compounds. Estimates are for the period 1985 to 1990. Preliminary estimates for 1991 have also been included, whenever data were available.

  8. The Runaway Greenhouse: implications for future climate change, geoengineering and planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate climate emergency is a "runaway greenhouse": a hot and water vapour rich atmosphere limits the emission of thermal radiation to space, causing runaway warming. Warming ceases only once the surface reaches ~1400K and emits radiation in the near-infrared, where water is not a good greenhouse gas. This would evaporate the entire ocean and exterminate all planetary life. Venus experienced a runaway greenhouse in the past, and we expect that Earth will in around 2 billion years as solar luminosity increases. But could we bring on such a catastrophe prematurely, by our current climate-altering activities? Here we review what is known about the runaway greenhouse to answer this question, describing the various limits on outgoing radiation and how climate will evolve between these. The good news is that almost all lines of evidence lead us to believe that is unlikely to be possible, even in principle, to trigger full a runaway greenhouse by addition of non-condensible greenhouse gases such as carbon diox...

  9. Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management - A South African perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level.

  10. Mexico joins the venture: Joint Implementation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imaz, M.; Gay, C.; Friedmann, R.; Goldberg, B.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint Implementation (JI) and its pilot phase of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) are envisioned as an economic way of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper draws upon the Mexican experience with AIJ to identify Mexican concerns with AIJ/JI and proposed solutions to these. Three approved Mexican AIJ projects (Ilumex, Scolel Te, and Salicornia) are described in detail. The Ilurnex project promotes the use of compact fluorescent lamps in Mexican homes of the States of Jalisco and Nuevo Leon, to reduce electric demand. Scolel Te is a sustainable forest management project in Chiapas. Salicornia examines the potential for carbon sequestration with a Halophyte-based crop irrigated with saline waters in Sonora. These three projects are reviewed to clarify the issues and concerns that Mexico has with AIJ and JI and propose measures to deal with them. These initial Mexican AIJ projects show that there is a need for creation of standard project evaluation procedures, and criteria and institutions to oversee project design, selection, and implementation. Further JI development will be facilitated by national and international clarification of key issues such as additionality criteria, carbon-credit sharing, and valuation of non-GHG environmental and/or social benefits and impacts for AIJ projects. Mexico is concerned that JI funding could negatively impact official development assistance or that OECD countries will use JI to avoid taking significant GHG mitigation actions in their own countries. The lack of carbon credit trading in the AIJ stage must be removed to provide useful experience on how to share carbon credits. National or international guidelines are needed to ensure that a portion of the carbon credits is allocated to Mexico.

  11. Multiple Tenure/Tenure-Track Faculty Positions Software Engineering Focus: CyberSecurity and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Multiple Tenure/Tenure-Track Faculty Positions Software Engineering Focus: CyberSecurity and Big to cybersecurity and big data. Outstanding candidates from all areas of software engineering and computer science

  12. Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  13. Design and Materials The Design area is a rapidly growing research area aimed at furthering the development of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Design and Materials Design The Design area is a rapidly growing research area aimed at furthering the development of competitive products and systems. Research in this department focuses on design theories, design methodologies

  14. Objective: Determine the energy use of two greenhouse insulation technologies (a bubble insulation system and an energy/shade screen) retrofitted into plastic covered greenhouses, and compare the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    compared to the unimproved house. The bubble insulation system was more energy efficient than the other two roughly twice the savings stated above. Novel Approaches to Improve Energy Efficiency in Northern New system and an energy/shade screen) retrofitted into plastic covered greenhouses, and compare

  15. An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Afforestation, Forest management, Biofuels, Ag soil, Animals, Fertilization, Rice, Grassland expansion, Manure of Biofuel strategies Examine the dynamics of mitigation strategies #12;PolicyPolicy ContextContext U

  16. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  17. FOCUS July 2000 1 The Departments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    , professor of civil engineering, gives a lesson on bedrock bioremediation at a haz- ardous waste site) was spilled at the site years ago when Pease was an Air Force Base. Engineering on the Rocks Nancy KinnerFOCUS July 2000 1 The Departments asdfghjk The Departments FOCUS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

  18. Harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silberberg, Yaron

    Harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses Dan Oron and Yaron Silberberg of harmonic generation with temporally focused ultrashort pulses are explored both theoreti- cally and experimentally. Analyzing the phase-matching conditions for harmonic generation we find a corre- spondence

  19. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  20. Wildlife Management Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain areas of the State are designated as wildlife protection areas and refuges; new construction and development is restricted in these areas.

  1. Comparisons of type and volume of growth media and two cropping systems for production of greenhouse tomatoes Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, John Darryl

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are rela- tively high. This is perhaps the major justification for the commercial greenhouse industry in the United States. Greenhouse tomato production is an intensive cultural practice with large labor requirements. In recent years, the cost.... and J. L. Robertson. 1974. Production, marketing, and economic trends in the greenhouse tomato industry. Purdue Univ. ~A r. ~Ex . Sta. Rea. Bull. 908. 22. U. S. D. A. Consumer and Marketing Service. 1966. United States Standards for Grades...

  2. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  3. Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States, 1987--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to prepare a report on aggregate US national emissions of greenhouse gases for the period 1987--1992, with annual updates thereafter. This is the third annual update report,covering national emissions over the period 1987--1993, with preliminary estimates of US carbon dioxide and halocarbon emissions for 1994. Calculating national aggregate emissions(or ``national inventories``) of greenhouse gases is a recently developed form of intellectual endeavor. Greenhouse gas emissions are rarely measured directly or reported to statistical agencies. Thus, to prepare emissions inventories usually requires inferring emissions indirectly from information collected for other purposes. Both the available information and the inferences drawn may be of varying reliability. Chapter 1 of this report briefly recapitulates some background information about global climate change and the greenhouse effect and discusses important recent developments in global climate change activities. Chapters 2 through 6 cover emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons, and criteria pollutants, respectively. Chapter 7 describes potential sequestration and emissions of greenhouse gases as a result of land use changes.

  4. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1#22; m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  5. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Lykke, Keith R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Lill, Thorsten B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  6. Chapter Four Assessing the Air Pollution, Greenhouse Gas, Air Quality, and Health Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Many states and localities are exploring or implementing clean energy policies to achieve greenhouse gas (GHG) and criteria air pollutant1 emission reductions. Document map • Chapter one

  7. Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

  8. Closing the Gap: Using the Clean Air Act to Control Lifecycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Energy Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagan, Colin R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inherently, natural gas combustion produces significantlygas turbines were fuel gas combustion devices and that theyof greenhouse gas emissions released during combustion. 5 0

  9. Greenhouse gas performance standards: From each according to his emission intensity or from each according to his emissions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. Stephen P Holland. Emissions taxes versus intensityindustry’s greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental Research2008. John CV Pezzey. Emission taxes and tradeable permits a

  10. Focused shock spark discharge drill using multiple electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moeny, William M. (Albuquerque, NM); Small, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark discharge focused drill provided with one pulse forming line or a number of pulse forming lines. The pulse forming line is connected to an array of electrodes which would form a spark array. One of the electrodes of each of the array is connected to the high voltage side of the pulse forming line and the other electrodes are at ground potential. When discharged in a liquid, these electrodes produce intense focused shock waves that can pulverize or fracture rock. By delaying the firing of each group of electrodes, the drill can be steered within the earth. Power can be fed to the pulse forming line either downhole or from the surface area. A high voltage source, such as a Marx generator, is suitable for pulse charging the lines.

  11. Wildlife Management Areas (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Certain sites in Florida are designated as wildlife management areas, and construction and development is heavily restricted in these areas.

  12. The plasma focus as a thruster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Richard Lee

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for low propellant weight, high efficiency propulsion systems is a glaring need for various space missions. This thesis presents the thrust modeling of the Dense Plasma Focus plasma motion phases. It also contrasts some of the engineering...

  13. Ballistic dispersion in temperature gradient focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    regime is the most familiar regime in microfluidic systems, an oft-overlooked regime is that of purely kinematic (or ballistic) dispersion. In most microfluidic systems, this dispersion regime is transient systems. Keywords: microfluidics; temperature gradient focusing; kinematic dispersion; Taylor

  14. Micro free-flow isoelectric focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Jacob William

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To unravel the complexity of cellular systems, protein prefractionation tools can be used to reduce cell lysate complexity and increase assay sensitivity. Rapid free flow isoelectric focusing (FF-IEF) is achieved in a ...

  15. |Research Focus Statistical decision theory and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Laurence T.

    |Research Focus Statistical decision theory and evolution Laurence T. Maloney Department recent articles by Geisler and Diehl use Bayesian statistical decision theory to model the co, an advantage that ultimately translates into `reproductive success'. The balance between predator and prey

  16. Idaho National Laboratory’s Greenhouse Gas FY08 Baseline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennifer D. Morton

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory is a systematic attempt to account for the production and release of certain gasses generated by an institution from various emission sources. The gasses of interest are those which have become identified by climate science as related to anthropogenic global climate change. This document presents an inventory of GHGs generated during fiscal year (FY) 2008 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored entity, located in southeastern Idaho. Concern about the environmental impact of GHGs has grown in recent years. This, together with a desire to decrease harmful environmental impacts, would be enough to encourage the calculation of a baseline estimate of total GHGs generated at INL. Additionally, INL has a desire to see how its emissions compare with similar institutions, including other DOE national laboratories. Executive Order 13514 requires that federal agencies and institutions document reductions in GHG emissions in the future, and such documentation will require knowledge of a baseline against which reductions can be measured. INL's FY08 GHG inventory was calculated according to methodologies identified in federal GHG guidance documents using operational control boundaries. It measures emissions generated in three Scopes: (1) INL emissions produced directly by stationary or mobile combustion and by fugitive emissions, (2) the share of emissions generated by entities from which INL purchased electrical power, and (3) indirect or shared emissions generated by outsourced activities that benefit INL (occur outside INL's organizational boundaries but are a consequence of INL's activities). This inventory found that INL generated a total of 113,049 MT of CO2-equivalent emissions during FY08. The following conclusions were made from looking at the results of the individual contributors to INL's baseline GHG inventory: (1) Electricity (including the associated transmission and distribution losses) is the largest contributor to INL's GHG inventory, with over 50% of the CO2e emissions; (2) Other sources with high emissions were stationary combustion (facility fuels), waste disposal (including fugitive emissions from the onsite landfill and contracted disposal), mobile combustion (fleet fuels), employee commuting, and business air travel; and (3) Sources with low emissions were wastewater treatment (onsite and contracted), fugitive emissions from refrigerants, and business ground travel (in personal and rental vehicles). This report details the methods behind quantifying INL's GHG inventory and discusses lessons learned on better practices by which information important to tracking GHGs can be tracked and recorded. It is important to note that because this report differentiates between those portions of INL that are managed and operated by the Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) and those managed by other contractors, it includes only that large proportion of Laboratory activities overseen by BEA. It is assumed that other contractors will provide similar reporting for those activities they manage, where appropriate.

  17. Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions from hydropower complexes on large rivers in Eastern Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; O'Toole, Amanda C.; Niehus, Sara E.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water bodies, such as freshwater lakes, are known to be net emitters of carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). In recent years, significant greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from tropical, boreal, and mid-latitude reservoirs have been reported. At a time when hydropower is increasing worldwide, better understanding of seasonal and regional variation in GHG emissions is needed in order to develop a predictive understanding of such fluxes within man-made impoundments. We examined power-producing dam complexes within xeric temperate locations in the northwestern United States. Sampling environments on the Snake (Lower Monumental Dam Complex) and Columbia Rivers (Priest Rapids Dam Complex) included tributary, mainstem, embayment, forebay, and tailrace areas during winter and summer 2012. At each sampling location, GHG measurement pathways included surface gas flux, degassing as water passed through dams during power generation, ebullition within littoral embayments, and direct sampling of hyporheic pore-water. Measurements were also carried out in a free-flowing reach of the Columbia River to estimate unaltered conditions. Surface flux resulted in very low emissions, with reservoirs acting as a sink for CO2 (up to –262 mg m-2 d-1, which is within the range previously reported for similarly located reservoirs). Surface flux of methane remained below 1 mg CH4 m-2d-1, a value well below fluxes reported previously for temperate reservoirs. Water passing through hydroelectric projects acted as a sink for CO2 during winter and a small source during summer, with mean degassing fluxes of –117 and 4.5 t CO2 d-1, respectively. Degassing of CH4 was minimal, with mean fluxes of 3.1 × 10-6 and –5.6 × 10-4 t CH4 d-1 during winter and summer, respectively. Gas flux due to ebullition was greater in coves located within reservoirs than in coves within the free flowing Hanford Reach–and CH4 flux exceeded that of CO2. Methane emissions varied widely across sampling locations, ranging from 10.5 to 1039 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, with mean fluxes of 324 mg CH4 m-2 d-1in Lower Monumental Dam reservoir and 482 mg CH4 m-2d-1 in the Priest Rapids Dam reservoir. The magnitude of methane flux due to ebullition was unexpectedly high, and falls within the range recently reported for other temperate reservoirs around the world, further suggesting that this methane source should be considered in estimates of global greenhouse gas emissions. Methane flux from sediment pore-water within littoral embayments averaged 4.2 mg m-2 d-1 during winter and 8.1 mg m-2 d-1 during summer, with a peak flux of 19.8 mg m-2d-1 (at the same location where CH4 ebullition was also the greatest). Carbon dioxide flux from sediment pore-water averaged approximately 80 mg m-2d-1 with little difference between winter and summer. Similar to emissions from ebullition, flux from sediment pore-water was higher in reservoirs than in the free flowing reach.

  18. Two-axis sagittal focusing monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Edwin G; Stelmach, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray focusing device and method for adjustably focusing x-rays in two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The device and method can be operated remotely using two pairs of orthogonal benders mounted on a rigid, open frame such that x-rays may pass through the opening in the frame. The added x-ray flux allows significantly higher brightness from the same x-ray source.

  19. The Functionality of Focus: An Investigation into the Interactive Effects of Leader Focus and Team Interdependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Thomas

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    this issue, I introduce a multi-dimensional construct, called leader focus, to explain how leaders meet team needs by focusing their efforts on teamwork or taskwork (i.e., person-task focus) as well as different relational entities in the team (i.e., entity...

  20. Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cragg, Michael; Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.; Kahn, Matthew

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would ?free ride? and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of ?pro-green? votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representative’s ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

  1. Strategies for the Commercialization and Deployment of Greenhouse Gas Intensity-Reducing Technologies and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New technologies will be a critical component--perhaps the critical component--of our efforts to tackle the related challenges of energy security, climate change, and air pollution, all the while maintaining a strong economy. But just developing new technologies is not enough. Our ability to accelerate the market penetration of clean energy, enabling, and other climate-related technologies will have a determining impact on our ability to slow, stop, and reverse the growth in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Title XVI, Subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) directs the Administration to report on its strategy to promote the commercialization and deployment (C&D) of GHG intensity-reducing technologies and practices. The Act also requests the Administration to prepare an inventory of climate-friendly technologies suitable for deployment and to identify the barriers and commercial risks facing advanced technologies. Because these issues are related, they are integrated here within a single report that we, representing the Committee on Climate Change Science and Technology Integration (CCCSTI), are pleased to provide the President, the Congress, and the public. Over the past eight years, the Administration of President George W. Bush has pursued a series of policies and measures aimed at encouraging the development and deployment of advanced technologies to reduce GHG emissions. This report highlights these policies and measures, discusses the barriers to each, and integrates them within a larger body of other extant policy. Taken together, more than 300 policies and measures described in this document may be viewed in conjunction with the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program's (CCTP's) Strategic Plan, published in September 2006, which focuses primarily on the role of advanced technology and associated research and development (R&D) for mitigating GHG emissions. The CCTP, a multi-agency technology planning and coordination program, initiated by President Bush, and subsequently authorized in EPAct2005, is responsible for preparing this report on behalf CCCSTI. This report systematically examines the market readiness of key technologies important to meeting climate change mitigation goals. It assesses the barriers and business risks impeding their progress and greater market application. Importantly, by documenting the hundreds of Federal policies, programs, regulations, incentives, and other activities that are in effect and operating today to address these barriers, it provides a broad context for evaluating the adequacy of current policy and the potential need, if any, for additional measures that might be undertaken by government or industry. Finally, it draws conclusions about the current situation, identifies gaps and opportunities, and suggests analytical principles that should be applied to assess and formulate policies and measures to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of these technologies.

  2. Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials This report provides information about the Theory Focus...

  3. SEATTLE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AND MINISTRY What Skills are Developed and/or Focus Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    'overlapwithMDiv MDiv · HistoricalTheology · Hermeneutics of SacredText · Religious Education · God, Creation &Trinity

  4. Focused evaluation of selected remedial alternatives for the underground test area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County in southern Nevada, was the location of 928 nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. Of the total tests, 824 were nuclear tests performed underground. This report describes the approach taken to determine whether any specific, proven, cost-effective technologies currently exist to aid in the removal of the radioactive contaminants from the groundwater, in the stabilization of these contaminants, and in the removal of the source of the contaminants.

  5. SCIENCE PLAN AND PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM SCIENCE --SCIENTIFIC FOCUS AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Earth system models. Integration of biophysical, biochemical, physiological, and ecological processes

  6. Laboratory Scientific Focus Area Guidance | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman, 1960 The Ernest OrlandoJohn B.JorgeLaboratory Scientific

  7. Response of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets to Multi-Millennial Greenhouse Warming in the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    Response of the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets to Multi-Millennial Greenhouse Warming of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to sustained multi-millennial greenhouse warming. Use was made of fully polar regions. This leads to an almost complete disintegration of the Greenland ice sheet after 3

  8. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse reliance on fossil fuels. Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) and wind power represent two practical Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Canada by Brett Kerrigan B.Eng., Carleton University

  9. Final Report to the Joseph Hill Foundation: Calorespirometry: a novel approach to predicting energy requirements of greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    Final Report to the Joseph Hill Foundation: Calorespirometry: a novel approach to predicting energy January 24, 2008 Greenhouse heating requires considerable energy for nearly all greenhouse flower crops. The combination of high energy costs and strong competition has caused a number of flower growers to go out

  10. Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biogenic greenhouse gas emissions linked to the life cycles of biodiesel derived from European determinants of life cycle emissions of greenhouse gases linked to the life cycle of biodiesel from European rapeseed and Brazilian soybeans. For biodiesel from European rapeseed and for biodiesel from Brazilian

  11. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  12. Identification of optimum potassium nutrition of greenhouse plants grown in recirculating subirrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blessington, Trisha R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of this research was to determine the optimum potassium nutrition of greenhouse plants grown in recirculating subirrigation. New Guinea impatiens 'Ovation Salmon Pink Swirl' were grown in recirculating subirrigation trays using 0 -12 mM K, with constant 1.5 mM P...

  13. TECHNICAL REPORTS The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 1396 The greenhouse gas (GHG) impact of composting a range of potential by composting and GHG emissions during composting. The primary carbon credits associated with composting are through CH4 avoidance when feedstocks are composted instead of landfilled (municipal solid waste

  14. 2007-No54-BoilingPoint Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    2007-No54-BoilingPoint Theme Health and Greenhouse Gas Impacts of Biomass and Fossil Fuel Energy of fossil-fuel energy systems. These scenarios are analysed for various environmental and health impacts from fossil fuels and other energy sources reported by IEA []. In all of these countries except Kenya

  15. Post Doctoral Research Fellowship Simulating the greenhouse gas emission from boreal region reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases from northern boreal reservoirs as part of a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research modified the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the exchange of CO2 between boreal by the creation of reservoirs for the production of hydro-electricity. We have recently developed a water column

  16. Lecture 3 week 2/3 2012: Solar radiation, the greenhouse, global heat engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....cycles of cold and warm climate. Averaged over the globe, sunlight falling on Earth in July (aphelion) is indeedLecture 3 week 2/3 2012: H 222c Solar radiation, the greenhouse, global heat engine http://en.wikipedia.org/ #12;#12;The 3 streams of this course (see syllabus) 1.Energy forms of energy concentrated, dilute

  17. Project Information Form Project Title Working toward a policy framework for reducing greenhouse gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Provided (by each agency or organization) US DOT $37,874 Total Project Cost $37,874 Agency ID or ContractProject Information Form Project Title Working toward a policy framework for reducing greenhouse of Research Project This white paper is concerned with a preliminary investigation of the extent to which

  18. SMARTTool Greenhouse Gas Inventory Report Reporting Entity: University of Northern British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Reporting Year: Calendar Year 2010 Greenhouse Gases in Tonnes Measure Quantity CO2 CH4 N2O tCO2e1 Scope 1.30 Emissions from Biomass Total Biomass Emissions 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.83 Total Emissions, Calendar Year 2010 5

  19. ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

  20. Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W been proposed as viable bioenergy crops because of their potential to yield harvest- able biomass-senescence harvests are a more effective means than maximizing yield potential. Keywords: bioenergy, feedstocks, GHG

  1. IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMproved Assessment of the Greenhouse gas balance of bioeNErgy pathways (IMAGINE) Evaluation - ENERBIO Livrable D4.1 : GHG balances of bioenergy pathways Mars 2012 Nathalie GAGNAIRE, Benoît GABRIELLE sources by bioenergy mostly hinges on the uncertainty on the magnitude of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions

  2. Response to Comment on "Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical and Projected Nuclear Power"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Response to Comment on "Prevented Mortality and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Historical, and properly (sustain- ably) designed biomass energy (e.g., see ref 3). This is rooted in the fact that wind production by 2022 following Japan's Fukushima nuclear accident. Despite a major, laudable expansion of wind

  3. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  4. Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production on Greenhouse Gas on recycled paper #12;1 Potential Direct and Indirect Effects of Global Cellulosic Biofuel Production. Melillo*, John M. Reilly§ , and Sergey Paltsev§ Abstract The production of cellulosic biofuels may have

  5. Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the Stratosphere Due to Increasing Airplane Traffic, Effects On the Environment Katta G. Murty Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering University of Michigan, Ann to tremendous increases in the construction of huge airport facilities, the development of large jumbo

  6. Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Scaling Behavior of the Life Cycle Energy of Residential Buildings and Impacts on Greenhouse Gas the single-family detached homes ana- lyzed. Figure A shows that the energy used on-site during the construction phase of a single story 1,500 ft2 home corresponds to 5.10% the total energy used in the life

  7. ESTIMATING THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHICS AND AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON GREENHOUSE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinga, Bruce

    McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng Department of Civil Engineering University of Transportation Engineers to be held May 12-15, 2002 in Ottawa Ontario #12;1 Estimating the Impact of Demographics and Automotive Technologies on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ryan McNally, MASc Candidate Bruce Hellinga, PhD, PEng

  8. Determine Vehicle Usage and Refueling Trends to Minimize Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Once a Federal agency has identified its most important mobile greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources overall, it can work with individual sites to determine vehicle usage and refueling trends. Agencies can compare the results of this analysis to internal standards and requirements to identify GHG mitigation opportunities for assets that are underperforming or underutilized.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass haĂ?1 yrĂ?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  10. Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzey, Jack

    Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final abatement, using the first multi-party model to include both tax-versus-trading under uncertainties of an emissions tax over emissions (permit) trading in handling abatement-cost uncertainties, from that shown

  11. Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imamoglu, Atac

    LETTERS Greenhouse-gas emission targets for limiting global warming to 2 6C Malte Meinshausen1. Frame6,7 & Myles R. Allen7 More than 100 countries have adopted a global warming limit of 2 6C or below levels in 2050 are robust indicators of the probability that twenty-first century warming will not exceed

  12. The hydrogen energy economy: its long-term role in greenhouse gas reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    The hydrogen energy economy: its long-term role in greenhouse gas reduction Geoff Dutton, Abigail for Climate Change Research Technical Report 18 #12;The Hydrogen Energy Economy: its long term role 2005 This is the final report from Tyndall research project IT1.26 (The Hydrogen energy economy: its

  13. Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Greenhouse gas emissions from alternative futures of deforestation and agricultural management climate. We examine scenarios of deforestation and postclearing land use to estimate the future (2006.8 to 15.9 Pg CO2-equivalents (CO2-e) from 2006 to 2050. Deforestation is the largest source of green

  14. The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    The Elephant in the Room Presentation to the Saskatchewan Greenhouse and Vegetable Growers Association of Saskatchewan November 14, 2009, by MIKE FURI, Branch Manager Manitoba/Saskatchewan Wholesale Division TGP, Saskatchewan Director Canadian Produce Marketing Association #12;Goals & Benefits · To reduce

  15. Sulfur-induced greenhouse warming on early Mars Sarah Stewart Johnson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    and 500 mbar CO2 with varying abundances of H2O and sulfur volatiles (H2S and SO2 mixing ratios of 10Ă?3Sulfur-induced greenhouse warming on early Mars Sarah Stewart Johnson,1 Michael A. Mischna,2 melting model, we obtain a high sulfur solubility, approximately 1400 ppm, in Martian mantle melts. We

  16. Quantitative analysis of factors affecting greenhouse gas emissions at institutions of higher education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    States, emissions from buildings comprise 40% of energy consumption and carbon emissions, not including to have 10 times more effect on emissions per square meter than space such as classroom and office, while to the institution's own greenhouse gas emission reductions, energy and water conservation, and other sustainability

  17. Greenhouse and Field Nursery Evaluation for Potato Common Scab Tolerance in a Tetraploid Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Greenhouse and Field Nursery Evaluation for Potato Common Scab Tolerance in a Tetraploid Population J. Driscoll & J. Coombs & R. Hammerschmidt & W. Kirk & L. Wanner & D. Douches # Potato Association of America 2009 Abstract Potato common scab (Streptomyces scabies (Thaxt.) Waksman & Henrici) is a major

  18. Greenhouse and Field Nursery Evaluation for Potato Common Scab Tolerance in a Tetraploid Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Greenhouse and Field Nursery Evaluation for Potato Common Scab Tolerance in a Tetraploid Population January 2009 # Potato Association of America 2009 Abstract Potato common scab (Streptomyces scabies (Thaxt.) Waksman & Henrici) is a major disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), due to the unmarketability

  19. Assessing the fuel Use and greenhouse gas emissions of future light-duty vehicles in Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishimura, Eriko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is of great concern in Japan, as well as elsewhere, such as in the U.S. and EU. More than 20% of GHG emissions in Japan come from the transportation sector, and a more than 70% ...

  20. The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technologies. · Coal Conversion Technologies. Coal-based power generation technologies were analyzed in detail1 The Future of Coal in a Greenhouse Gas Constrained World Howard Herzog1 , James Katzer1 1 M coal can make to the growing world energy demand during a period of increasing concern about global

  1. Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

  2. Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 Energy, environmental and greenhouse gas effects of using alternative fuels in cement to an increase of AF use from 8.7% to 20.9% of the total energy consumption. 2. One of the alternative fuels used cement industry produces about 3.3 billion tonnes of cement annually. Cement production is energy

  3. Economic Implications of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Abstract The world of biofuels. However, such options can be competitive with domestic food production. In a free trade arena of effects that would be observed due to the simplifying cost assumptions, indicate compliance causes supply

  4. Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implemented in Canada, what would be the response of the industrial sector in terms of energy consumptionHybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application for modeling industrial energy consumption, among them a series of environmental and security externalities

  5. 8 Prospects for Biological Carbon Sinks in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 Prospects for Biological Carbon Sinks in Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading Systems John Reilly1. With emissions trading, emitters who found they could cheaply reduce their emissions might have allowances- ing Australia, Canada, Japan and Russia. This group also pushed strongly for inter- national emissions

  6. Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Greenhouse Gas Management Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    19f Integrated Chemical Complex and Cogeneration Analysis System: Energy Conservation and Cogeneration Analysis System is an advanced technology for energy conservation and pollution prevention, Beaumont, TX 77710, hopperjr@hal.lamar.edu, yawscl@hal.lamar.edu Key words; Energy Conservation, Greenhouse

  7. Trombe walls and green-houses : an analytical approach to long-term performances analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    589 Trombe walls and green-houses : an analytical approach to long-term performances analysis V. We, then, determine their explicit expression for two cases of passive systems : Trombe walls elements : in particular a Trombe wall and a green- house (Figs la and 1 b). However, in principle, our

  8. A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ERG/200806 A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and the differences between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a graphical technique. This paper presents a graphical technique for illustrating the relationship between energy security

  9. Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    Life Cycle Analysis on Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas Supporting Information 1. GHG Emissions Estimation for Production of Marcellus Shale Gas 1.1 Preparation of Well Pad estimate from Columbia University shows the size of a multi-well pad of Marcellus Shale averages 20

  10. GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Donna

    GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

  11. Greenhouse Emission Reductions and Natural Gas Vehicles: A Resource Guide on Technology Options and Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orestes Anastasia; NAncy Checklick; Vivianne Couts; Julie Doherty; Jette Findsen; Laura Gehlin; Josh Radoff

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate and verifiable emission reductions are a function of the degree of transparency and stringency of the protocols employed in documenting project- or program-associated emissions reductions. The purpose of this guide is to provide a background for law and policy makers, urban planners, and project developers working with the many Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission reduction programs throughout the world to quantify and/or evaluate the GHG impacts of Natural Gas Vehicle (NGVs). In order to evaluate the GHG benefits and/or penalties of NGV projects, it is necessary to first gain a fundamental understanding of the technology employed and the operating characteristics of these vehicles, especially with regard to the manner in which they compare to similar conventional gasoline or diesel vehicles. Therefore, the first two sections of this paper explain the basic technology and functionality of NGVs, but focus on evaluating the models that are currently on the market with their similar conventional counterparts, including characteristics such as cost, performance, efficiency, environmental attributes, and range. Since the increased use of NGVs, along with Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFVs) in general, represents a public good with many social benefits at the local, national, and global levels, NGVs often receive significant attention in the form of legislative and programmatic support. Some states mandate the use of NGVs, while others provide financial incentives to promote their procurement and use. Furthermore, Federal legislation in the form of tax incentives or procurement requirements can have a significant impact on the NGV market. In order to implement effective legislation or programs, it is vital to have an understanding of the different programs and activities that already exist so that a new project focusing on GHG emission reduction can successfully interact with and build on the experience and lessons learned of those that preceded it. Finally, most programs that deal with passenger vehicles--and with transportation in general--do not address the climate change component explicitly, and thus there are few GHG reduction goals that are included in these programs. Furthermore, there are relatively few protocols that exist for accounting for the GHG emissions reductions that arise from transportation and, specifically, passenger vehicle projects and programs. These accounting procedures and principles gain increased importance when a project developer wishes to document in a credible manner, the GHG reductions that are achieved by a given project or program. Section four of this paper outlined the GHG emissions associated with NGVs, both upstream and downstream, and section five illustrated the methodology, via hypothetical case studies, for measuring these reductions using different types of baselines. Unlike stationary energy combustion, GHG emissions from transportation activities, including NGV projects, come from dispersed sources creating a need for different methodologies for assessing GHG impacts. This resource guide has outlined the necessary context and background for those parties wishing to evaluate projects and develop programs, policies, projects, and legislation aimed at the promotion of NGVs for GHG emission reduction.

  12. Focusing on moving targets through scattering samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Changhuei

    . http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OPTICA.1.000227 1. INTRODUCTION Focusing light through highly scattering-2536/14/040227-06$15/0$15.00 © 2014 Optical Society of America Research Article Vol. 1, No. 4 / October 2014 / Optica 227 #12

  13. User-Focused Data Management Alon Halevy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halevy, Alon

    User-Focused Data Management Alon Halevy Google IUI 2009 Sanibel Island, Florida #12;Database on the world's water resources ­See circleofblue.org ·All the documentation about the Boeing 777 ·The Corie Curve Benefit Investment (time, cost) Dataspaces Data integration solutions ? #12;Reusing Human

  14. IN-FOCUSIN-FOCUS Letters&Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    wastewater to prevent toxic heavy metals from infiltrating the water supply. Failure to do so incurs heavy2013May IN-FOCUSIN-FOCUS Letters&Science Chemists' invention helps companies reduce water pollution that change how they react to light based on how much metal is in the surrounding water. Light is sent down

  15. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stutz, Roger A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are isclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters.

  16. Focused ion beam micromilling and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, B.C.; Stutz, R.A.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrahigh vacuum focused ion beam micromilling apparatus and process are disclosed. Additionally, a durable data storage medium using the micromilling process is disclosed, the durable data storage medium capable of storing, e.g., digital or alphanumeric characters as well as graphical shapes or characters. 6 figs.

  17. Course Focus HORT 225: Landscape Graphics I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Course Focus HORT 225: Landscape Graphics I By Rebekah VanWieren The last words I include unique graphic representation styles. The course begins by looking at the diversity of work of the course is spent learning and exploring the various graphic communication tools used to visualize

  18. Research Article Dielectrophoretic focusing of particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

    to DC electric field ratio on particle trajectories and velocity variations through the micro- channel achieved by using hydrodynamic filtration [23, 24], hydro- phoresis [25, 26], DC dielectrophoresis [27 focusing of particles in a micro- channel constriction using DC-biased AC electric fields. We acknowledge

  19. Policy message A narrow focus on conventional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    often prevents improvement of sanitation in poor settlements. n Simple, affordable, effective techPolicy message n A narrow focus on conventional sanitation technologies and top- down planning studies featured here were conducted in: Lao PDR, Tanzania, and Nepal Local solutions for sanitation Urban

  20. arXiv:1311.0292v1[astro-ph.EP]1Nov2013 Runaway greenhouse effect on exomoons due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Rory

    arXiv:1311.0292v1[astro-ph.EP]1Nov2013 Runaway greenhouse effect on exomoons due to irradiation to experience a runaway greenhouse effect. Results. Planetary illumination from a 13-Jupiter-mass planet onto