Sample records for focus area clean

  1. Clean Cities: Chicago Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  3. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  4. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  5. Strategic Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Clean Energy Research Areas | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  7. Clean Cities: Detroit Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Environmental Health & Safety, UC Irvine TITLE: CLEAN AREAS IN RESEARCH LABS (Non-Clinical)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    . Relocate all hazardous materials use and storage from the Clean Area and maintain separation distance an adequate separation of the Clean Area from hazardous operations is not possible, splash is focused upon the adequacy of separation of the proposed Clean Area from areas in which hazardous materials

  9. Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince George’s County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

  10. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  11. Focus Areas | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAM DOE O 413.2B Admin ChgFocus Areas Focus

  12. Tanks focus area. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

  13. Plutonium focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) in October 1995. The PFA {open_quotes}...provides for peer and technical reviews of research and development in plutonium stabilization activities...{close_quotes} In addition, the PFA identifies and develops relevant research and technology. The purpose of this document is to focus attention on the requirements used to develop research and technology for stabilization, storage, and preparation for disposition of nuclear materials. The PFA Technology Summary presents the approach the PFA uses to identify, recommend, and review research. It lists research requirements, research being conducted, and gaps where research is needed. It also summarizes research performed by the PFA in the traditional research summary format. This document encourages researchers and commercial enterprises to do business with PFA by submitting research proposals or {open_quotes}white papers.{close_quotes} In addition, it suggests ways to increase the likelihood that PFA will recommend proposed research to the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG) of DOE.

  14. International prospects for clean coal technologies (Focus on Asia)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallaspy, D.T. [Southern Energy, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to propose Asia as a focus market for commercialization of CCT`s; describe the principles for successful penetration of CCT`s in the international market; and summarize prospects for CCT`s in Asia and other international markets. The paper outlines the following: Southern Company`s clean coal commitment; acquisition of Consolidated Electric Power Asia (CEPA); the prospects for CCT`s internationally; requirements for CCT`s widespread commercialization; CEPA`s application of CCT`s; and gas turbine power plants as a perfect example of a commercialization driver.

  15. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Funding for Nationwide Student-Focused Clean Energy Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    entrepreneurs, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced 2 million in available funding for the National University Clean Energy Business Challenge. This nationwide...

  18. Clean Cities: Alamo Area Clean Cities (San Antonio) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Contaminant plumes containment and remediation focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM has established a new approach to managing environmental technology research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE. The Contaminant Plumes Containment and Remediation (Plumes) Focus Area is one of five areas targeted to implement the new approach, actively involving representatives from basic research, technology implementation, and regulatory communities in setting objectives and evaluating results. This document presents an overview of current EM activities within the Plumes Focus Area to describe to the appropriate organizations the current thrust of the program and developing input for its future direction. The Plumes Focus Area is developing remediation technologies that address environmental problems associated with certain priority contaminants found at DOE sites, including radionuclides, heavy metals, and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Technologies for cleaning up contaminants of concern to both DOE and other federal agencies, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other organics and inorganic compounds, will be developed by leveraging resources in cooperation with industry and interagency programs.

  20. Mixed waste characterization, treatment & disposal focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (referred to as the Mixed Waste Focus Area or MWFA) is to provide treatment systems capable of treating DOE`s mixed waste in partnership with users, and with continual participation of stakeholders, tribal governments, and regulators. The MWFA deals with the problem of eliminating mixed waste from current and future storage in the DOE complex. Mixed waste is waste that contains both hazardous chemical components, subject to the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and radioactive components, subject to the requirements of the Atomic Energy Act. The radioactive components include transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW). TRU waste primarily comes from the reprocessing of spent fuel and the use of plutonium in the fabrication of nuclear weapons. LLW includes radioactive waste other than uranium mill tailings, TRU, and high-level waste, including spent fuel.

  1. FY 2000 Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area for the past year.

  2. Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

  3. Radioactive tank waste remediation focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EM`s Office of Science and Technology has established the Tank Focus Area (TFA) to manage and carry out an integrated national program of technology development for tank waste remediation. The TFA is responsible for the development, testing, evaluation, and deployment of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in the underground stabilize and close the tanks. The goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. Within the DOE complex, 335 underground storage tanks have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production and manufacturing. Collectively, thes tanks hold over 90 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste in sludge, saltcake, and as supernate and vapor. Very little has been treated and/or disposed or in final form.

  4. A cleaning energy area conception on Fenhe river valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guan, C. [Shanxi Environmental Protection Bureau (China)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fenhe river valley has a dense population, abundant resources and coal mining, coke making, metallurgy industry concentration. Therefore, it is a seriously pollute area. The paper puts forward a concept of building up a clean energy area through process improvement and change of energy structure to realize ecological economy. The analysis shows that the indigenous method used for coking produces serious pollution, the resource cannot be used comprehensively, the regular machinery coke has a high investment in capital construction, but not much economic benefit. All are disadvantages for health and sustainable economic development. Also, this paper describes a LJ-95 machinery coke oven which has lower investment, higher product quality, less pollution, and higher economical benefit. LJ-95 coke oven will be the technical basis for construction of a clean energy area. The clean energy area concept for the Fenhe river valley consists of a coal gas pipeline network during the first phase and building electricity generation using steam turbines in the second phase.

  5. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Technology Analysis Group

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  6. The Business Role Focus Area From a business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coopers, Sony, Teijin, Umicore and Weyerhaeuser. The Business Role Focus Area aims to engage, equip and mobilize

  7. Preliminary investigation Area 12 fleet operations steam cleaning discharge area Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the characterization activities and findings of a former steam cleaning discharge area at the Nevada Test Site. The former steam cleaning site is located in Area 12 east of Fleet Operations Building 12-16. The characterization project was completed as a required condition of the ``Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit for the Discharge From Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Facility`` issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The project objective was to collect shallow soil samples in eight locations in the former surface discharge area. Based upon field observations, twelve locations were sampled on September 6, 1995 to better define the area of potential impact. Samples were collected from the surface to a depth of approximately 0.3 meters (one foot) below land surface. Discoloration of the surface soil was observed in the area of the discharge pipe and in localized areas in the natural drainage channel. The discoloration appeared to be consistent with the topographically low areas of the site. Hydrocarbon odors were noted in the areas of discoloration only. Samples collected were analyzed for bulk asbestos, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (Semi-VOCs), and gamma scan.

  8. Focus Research Areas 1. Fundamental Accelerator Physics: Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Focus Research Areas 1. Fundamental Accelerator Physics: Theory Importance Accelerator physics aspects. Pursuit of fundamental accelerator physics in this sense has contributed significantly to the advance of the accelerator physics knowledgebase during the last several decades, clarifying

  9. Tank Focus Area Pretreatment Program. FY 1995 Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M.I. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); McGinnis, C.P.; Wilkenson, W.T.; Hunt, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program management plan (PMP) describes the FY 1995 project plans for the Pretreatment Program of the Tank Focus Area. The Tank Focus Area is one of five areas of environmental concerns originally identified by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technology Development (EM-50). Projects in the Tank Focus Area relate to the remediation of liquid waste stored in underground storage tanks at various US Department of Energy sites. The Pretreatment Program is an organizational unit performing work within the Tank Focus Area. The function of the Pretreatment Program is to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate new technologies, with emphasis on separations. The 11 Pretreatment Program projects for FY 1995 are (1) Cesium Extraction Testing, (2) Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, (3) Hot Cell Studies, (4) Cesium Removal Demonstration, (5) Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration, (6) Crossflow Filtration, (7) Technical Interchange with CEA, (8) TRUEX Applications, (9) NAC/NAG Process Studies (conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory), (10) NAC/NAG Process and Waste Form Studies (conducted at Florida International University), and (11) Program Management. Section 2 of this PMP contains a separate subsection for each FY 1995 project. A brief description of the project, a schedule of major milestones, and a breakdown of costs are provided for each project. The PMP also contains sections that describe the project controls that are in place. Quality assurance, document control, the project management system, and the management organization are described in these sections.

  10. Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory This pamphlet summarizes the questions you or your neighbors raised about groundwater treatment systems National Laboratory have been listening to the concerns of the community about groundwater

  11. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  12. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  13. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Robert W.

    2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the Tanks Focus Area (TFA's) process of collecting, analyzing, and responding to high-level radioactive tank waste science and technology needs developed from across the DOE complex in FY 2000. The document also summarizes each science and technology need, and provides an initial prioritization of TFA's projected work scope for FY 2001 and FY 2002.

  14. Service Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 -No Service will be provided.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Level 0 ­ Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: Hazardous Material, mechanical, storage, issue, stockService Levels and Associated Cleaning Areas Service Level 0 - No Service will be provided. Service Level 1- Includes all rooms/areas categorized as: offices, copy, file, mail, hallways, vestibules

  15. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  16. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  17. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  18. Our Future. Energy Independence...It's Up To Us. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure for the Hawaii Clean Energy (HCEI) Initiative that estabishes the new HCEI brand and highlights two focus areas for achieving Hawaii's clean energy goals: conserve and convert.

  19. Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

  20. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  1. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). During the past year, the TFA established a link with DOE's Fernald site to exchange, on a continuing basis, mutually beneficial technical information and assistance.

  2. Mixed Waste Focus Area: Department of Energy complex needs report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.

    1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) at the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a new approach in August of 1993 to environmental research and technology development. A key feature of this new approach included establishment of the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA). The mission of the MWFA is to identify, develop, and implement needed technologies such that the major environmental management problems related to meeting DOE`s commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can be addressed, while cost-effectively expending the funding resources. To define the deficiencies or needs of the EM customers, the MWFA analyzed Proposed Site Treatment Plans (PSTPs), as well as other applicable documents, and conducted site visits throughout the summer of 1995. Representatives from the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60) at each site visited were requested to consult with the Focus Area to collaboratively define their technology needs. This report documents the needs, deficiencies, technology gaps, and opportunities for expedited treatment activities that were identified during the site visit process. The defined deficiencies and needs are categorized by waste type, namely Wastewaters, Combustible Organics, Sludges/Soils, Debris/Solids, and Unique Wastes, and will be prioritized based on the relative affect the deficiency has on the DOE Complex.

  3. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE`s national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure.

  4. Radioactive Tank Waste Remediation Focus Area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1991, DOE`s Office of Technology Development created the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID), to develop technologies for tank remediation. Tank remediation across the DOE Complex has been driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements with individual sites. In 1994, the DOE Office of Environmental Management created the High Level Waste Tank Remediation Focus Area (TFA; of which UST-ID is now a part) to better integrate and coordinate tank waste remediation technology development efforts. The mission of both organizations is the same: to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat, concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to both the public and regulators. The TFA has focused on four DOE locations: the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) near Idaho Falls, Idaho, the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina.

  5. Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Site Needs Assessment FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RW Allen

    1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by five major U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This is the fifth edition of the TFA site needs assessment. As with previous editions, this edition serves to provide the basis for accurately defining the TFA program for the upcoming fiscal year (FY), and adds definition to the program for up to 4 additional outyears. Therefore, this version distinctly defines the FY 2000 progrti and adds further definition to the FY 2001- FY 2004 program. Each year, the TFA reviews and amends its program in response to site users' science and technology needs.

  6. Tanks Focus Area FY98 midyear technical review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlahta, S.N.; Brouns, T.M.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) serves as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s national technology and solution development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. In total, 17 technologies and technical solutions were selected for review. The purpose of each review was to understand the state of development of each technology selected for review and to identify issues to be resolved before the technology or technical solution progressed to the next level of maturity. The reviewers provided detailed technical and programmatic recommendations and comments. The disposition of these recommendations and comments and their impact on the program is documented in this report.

  7. An overview of the Nuclear Materials Focus Area research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROBERSON,GARY D.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; OSBORNE,KEN K.; RANDALL,VIRGINIA

    2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) is responsible for providing comprehensive needs identification, integration of technology research and development activities, and technology deployment for stabilization, packaging, and interim storage of surplus nuclear materials within the DOE complex. The NMFA was chartered in April 1999 by the Office of Science and Technology (OST), an organizational component of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). OST manages a national program to conduct basic and applied research, and technology development, demonstration, and deployment assistance that is essential to completing a timely and cost-effective cleanup of the DOE nuclear weapons complex. DOE/EM provides environmental research results, as well as cleanup technologies and systems, to meet high-priority end-user needs, reduce EM's major cost centers and technological risks, and accelerate technology deployments. The NMFA represents the segment of EM that focuses on technological solutions for re-using, transforming, and disposing excess nuclear materials and is jointly managed by the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office and the DOE Idaho Operations Office.

  8. Tanks focus area site needs assessment FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites - Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The process is iterative and involves six steps: (1) Site needs identification and documentation, (2) Site communication of priority needs, (3) Technical response development, (4) Review technical responses, (5) Develop program planning documents, and (6) Review planning documents. This document describes the outcomes of the first two steps: site needs identification and documentation, and site communication of priority needs. It also describes the initial phases of the third and fourth steps: technical response development and review technical responses. Each site`s Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) was responsible for developing and delivering priority tank waste needs. This was accomplished using a standardized needs template developed by the National STCG. The standard template helped improve the needs submission process this year. The TFA received the site needs during December 1996 and January 1997.

  9. Tanks Focus Area FY 1996 Site Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tanks Focus Area`s (TFA`s) mission is to manage an integrated technology development program that results in the application of technology to safely and efficiently accomplish tank waste remediation across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks technology development needs expressed by four DOE tank waste sites--Hanford, Idaho, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River Sites. The process is iterative and involves four steps: (1) identify and validate tank technology needs at these four sites, (2) define a technical program that responds to these needs, (3) select specific tasks and schedules that accomplish program objectives, and (4) develop integrated teams to carry out selected tasks. This document describes the first of these four steps: identification of sites` tank technology needs. This step concentrates solely on needs identification, collection, and validation. Funding requirements and specific scope of responsive technical activities are not considered until later steps in program definition. This year, the collection and validation of site needs were accomplished through written input from the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs). The TFA recognizes the importance of a continuing solid partnership with the sites through the STCG and DOE as well as contractor users and, therefore, ensured site participation and close coordination throughout the process.

  10. Tanks Focus Area site needs assessment FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the process used by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to analyze and develop responses to technology needs submitted by four major US Department of Energy (DOE) sites with radioactive tank waste problems, and the initial results of the analysis. The sites are the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and Savannah River Site (SRS). This document describes the TFA`s process of collecting site needs, analyzing them, and creating technical responses to the sites. It also summarizes the information contained within the TFA needs database, portraying information provided by four major DOE sites with tank waste problems. The overall TFA program objective is to deliver a tank technology program that reduces the current cost, and the operational and safety risks of tank remediation. The TFA`s continues to enjoy close, cooperative relationships with each site. During the past year, the TFA has fostered exchanges of technical information between sites. These exchanges have proven to be healthy for all concerned. The TFA recognizes that site technology needs often change, and the TFA must be prepared not only to amend its program in response, but to help the sites arrive at the best technical approach to solve revised site needs.

  11. Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

  12. EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

  13. Residential and Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing in California Rooftop Solar Challenge Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This version of the report updates the original report published in March 2013. It identifies and describes the current state of residential and commercial property assessed clean energy (PACE) financing programs in California. The report discusses the Improvement Act of 1911, the Mello-Roos Act of 1982, the different philosophies cities have adopted in implementing PACE financing, and various PACE program structures. It also discusses the first implementation of PACE by cities that used their charter authority to create programs under the Mello-Roos Act of 1982 before the enactment of AB 811 and SB 555.1. This report focuses on PACE as a mechanism to increase the amount of rooftop solar systems installed, but also recognizes that these programs provide an effective means to finance energy and water efficiency projects. The updated report provides new information on California’s Residential PACE Loss Reserve Program, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, program requirements, and program performance.

  14. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance Testing: Tanks Focus Area Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Jiricka, Antonin; Smith, Donald E.; Lorier, Troy H.; Reamer, Irene A.; Schulz, Rebecca L.

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Immobilizing low-activity waste (LAW) stored at Hanford site will result in approximately 200 000 m3 of waste glass. It must be demonstrated that this glass can adequately retain radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. A study is being performed to determine the effect of glass composition on its capability to withstand the conditions in the Hanford site burial scenario. To predict the long-term corrosion behavior of waste glass, it is necessary to study the composition and properties of alteration products. The vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) were selected as the methods to accelerate the corrosion process and to form alteration products. VHT and PCT was performed on 75 glasses, of which 45 were designed to systematically vary the composition. VHTs were conducted at temperatures ranging from 90?C to 300?C. Alteration rates for most glasses are being determined at 200?C. Selected glasses were tested at different temperatures to determine the effect of temperature on the assemblage of alteration products and the apparent alteration rates. PCTs were performed at a glass surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) of 2000 m-1 for 7 d and at a S/V of 20 000 m-1 for 10, 100, 1000, 5000, and 10000 h all at 90?C.

  15. Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Poore III, Willis P [ORNL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis identifies candidate locations, in a broad sense, where there are high concentrations of federal government agency use of electricity, which are also suitable areas for near-term SMRs. Near-term SMRs are based on light-water reactor (LWR) technology with compact design features that are expected to offer a host of safety, siting, construction, and economic benefits. These smaller plants are ideally suited for small electric grids and for locations that cannot support large reactors, thus providing utilities or governement entities with the flexibility to scale power production as demand changes by adding additional power by deploying more modules or reactors in phases. This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights to assist the federal government in meeting federal clean energy goals.

  16. A stakeholder involvement approach to evaluate and enhance technology acceptance: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development`s Plume Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Stein, S.L. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Division, Richland, WA (United States); Serie, P.J. [Environmental Issues Management, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) faces a major challenge in cleaning up its contaminated sites throughout the United States. One major area of concern is the plumes in soil and ground water which are contaminated with a myriad of different pollutants. DOE recently organized its plume-related problems into the Plume Focus Area. The mission of the Plume Focus Area is to enhance the deployment of innovative technologies for containing and cleaning up contaminant plumes in ground water and soil at all DOE sites. Environmental cleanup priorities for soil and ground water plumes are being defined and technology users have the challenge of matching current and innovative technologies to those priorities. By involving a range of stakeholders in the selection, demonstration, and evaluation of new technologies, the deployment of these technologies can be enhanced. If new plume cleanup technologies are to be deployable, they must improve on today`s baseline technologies. The Sites` Coordination Team (SCT) of the Plume Focus Area develops and supports the implementation of methods for stakeholder involvement throughout the multiple steps that define focus area activities. Site-specific teams are being formed to carry out the strategy at each site, and the teams will work through Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) at each location. The SCT is responsible for identifying the site-specific stakeholder involvement teams, training the team members, preparing needed national-level guidance and strategies, helping the teams tailor a strategy for their particular site that meets the overall needs of the focus area, and facilitating inter-site coordination. The results will be used to develop national technology acceptance reports on the innovative technologies being funded and evaluated under the Plume Focus Area.

  17. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Electronics Systems Research Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Sensors &...

  18. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization report - area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 6 North and South Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEPs) are historic disposal units located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) which has been required by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to characterize the site under the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit for the NTS and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 265.

  20. A Program to Stabilize Nuclear Materials as Managed by the Plutonium Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Kenley (Kenley Consulting); B. Scott; B. Seidel (ANL-W); D. Knecht (LMITCO); F. Southworth; K. Osborne (DOE-ID); N. Chipman; T. Creque

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the program to stabilize nuclear materials, consistent with the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) plan, Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure. The program is managed by the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area, which defines and manages technology development programs to stabilize nuclear materials and assure their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of the Plutonium Stabilization and Disposition Focus Area (PFA) activities includes non-weapons plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA provides solutions to site-specific and complex wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. Our paper describes an important programmatic function of the Department of Energy nuclear materials stabilization program, including the tie-in of policy to research needs and funding for the nuclear materials disposition area. The PFA uses a rigorous systems engineering determination of technology needs and gaps, under the guidance of a Technical Advisory Panel, consisting of complex-wide experts. The Research and Development planning provides an example for other waste areas and should be of interest to Research and Development managers. The materials disposition maps developed by the PFA and described in this paper provide an evaluation of research needs, data gaps and subsequent guidance for the development of technologies for nuclear materials disposition. This paper also addresses the PFA prioritization methodology and its ability to forecast actual time to implementation.

  1. Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

  2. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  3. Cyclododecane as support material for clean and facile transfer of large-area few-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capasso, A.; Leoni, E.; Dikonimos, T.; Buonocore, F.; Lisi, N. [ENEA, Materials Technology Unit, Surface Technology Laboratory, Casaccia Research Centre, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); De Francesco, M. [ENEA, Technical Unit for Renewable Energies Sources, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy); Lancellotti, L.; Bobeico, E. [ENEA, Portici Research Centre, P.le E. Fermi 1, 80055 Portici (Italy); Sarto, M. S.; Tamburrano, A.; De Bellis, G. [Research Center on Nanotechnology Applied to Engineering of Sapienza (CNIS), SSNLab, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of chemical vapor deposited graphene is a crucial process, which can affect the quality of the transferred films and compromise their application in devices. Finding a robust and intrinsically clean material capable of easing the transfer of graphene without interfering with its properties remains a challenge. We here propose the use of an organic compound, cyclododecane, as a transfer material. This material can be easily spin coated on graphene and assist the transfer, leaving no residues and requiring no further removal processes. The effectiveness of this transfer method for few-layer graphene on a large area was evaluated and confirmed by microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and four-point probe measurements. Schottky-barrier solar cells with few-layer graphene were fabricated on silicon wafers by using the cyclododecane transfer method and outperformed reference cells made by standard methods.

  4. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  5. Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

  6. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  7. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. T. Urbon

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning site is located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (Figure 1). This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 23, 2001. Because of questionable representativeness and precision of the results, the site was resampled on June 12, 2001. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the December 1997 Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1997). If after six years the rate of degradation appears to be so slow that the greatest concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) present at the site would not decay within 30 years of the site closure, the site will be reevaluated with consideration to enriching the impacted soil at the site to enhance the degradation process. A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report, samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in TPH concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, the data results from 2000 were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2001 consisted of the following: Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2); Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]); Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs; and Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  8. Identification of Selected Areas to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals Using Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, R. J. [ORNL; Mays, G. T. [ORNL; Omitaomu, O. A. [ORNL; Poore, W. P. [ORNL

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in late 2008, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) responded to ongoing internal and external studies addressing key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development and refinement of Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion (OR-SAGE), a tool to support power plant siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of geographic information systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The basic premise requires the development of exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability criteria for evaluating sites for a given siting application, such as siting small modular reactors (SMRs). For specific applications of the tool, it is necessary to develop site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) that encompass a number of key benchmarks that essentially form the site environmental characterization for that application. These SSEC might include population density, seismic activity, proximity to water sources, proximity to hazardous facilities, avoidance of protected lands and floodplains, susceptibility to landslide hazards, and others.

  9. US Department of Energy mixed waste characterization, treatment, and disposal focus area technical baseline development process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, J.A.; Gombert, D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) created the Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal Focus Area (MWFA) to develop and facilitate implementation of technologies required to meet its commitments for treatment of mixed wastes under the Federal Facility Compliance Act (FFCA), and in accordance with the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Mixed wastes include both mixed low-level waste (MLLW) and mixed transuranic (MTRU) waste. The goal of the MWFA is to develop mixed waste treatment systems to the point of implementation by the Environmental Management (EM) customer. To accomplish this goal, the MWFA is utilizing a three step process. First, the treatment system technology deficiencies were identified and categorized. Second, these identified needs were prioritized. This resulted in a list of technical deficiencies that will be used to develop a technical baseline. The third step, the Technical Baseline Development Process, is currently ongoing. When finalized, the technical baseline will integrate the requirements associated with the identified needs into the planned and ongoing environmental research and technology development activities supported by the MWFA. Completion of this three-step process will result in a comprehensive technology development program that addresses customer identified and prioritized needs. The MWFA technical baseline will be a cost-effective, technically-defensible tool for addressing and resolving DOE`s mixed waste problems.

  10. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  11. TFA Tank Focus Area - multiyear program plan FY98-FY00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 80 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE`s Office of Environmental Management`s (EM`s) national technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE`s technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across organizations that fund tank technology development EM, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50).

  12. TFA Tanks Focus Area Multiyear Program Plan FY00-FY04

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BA Carteret; JH Westsik; LR Roeder-Smith; RL Gilchrist; RW Allen; SN Schlahta; TM Brouns

    1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major radioactive waste tank remediation problem with hundreds of waste tanks containing hundreds of thousands of cubic meters of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Approximately 68 tanks are known or assumed to have leaked contamination to the soil. Some of the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in a safe condition and eventually remediated to minimize the risk of waste migration and/or exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. However, programmatic drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Science and technology development investments are required to reduce the technical and programmatic risks associated with the tank remediation baselines. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) was initiated in 1994 to serve as the DOE Office of Environmental Management's (EM's) national technology development program. for radioactive waste tank remediation. The national program was formed to increase integration and realize greater benefits from DOE's technology development budget. The TFA is responsible for managing, coordinating, and leveraging technology development to support DOE's five major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina), and West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) (New York). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank with safety integrated into all the functions. The TFA integrates program activities across EM organizations that fund tank technology development, including the Offices of Waste Management (EM-30), Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and Science and Technology (EM-50 or OST).

  13. Abstract--The integration of variable renewable generation sources continues to be a significant area of focus for power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by this variability, wind generation often requires additional balancing resources to compensate for the variability of additional wind generation into the Northwest Power Pool. It quantifies the number of vehicles required area of focus for power system planning. Renewable portfolio standards and initiatives to reduce

  14. Clean Coal Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's clean coal R&D is focused on developing and demonstrating advanced power generation and carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies for existing facilities and new fossil-fueled...

  15. Clean Transportation Internship Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clean Transportation Internship Description The NC Solar Center at North Carolina State University to other ongoing projects by focusing on time-sensitive tasks. While the main thrust of this internship

  16. Technical program plan for the transitioning, decommissioning, and final disposition focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hundreds of aging nuclear materials processing facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Complex are now being shut down and deactivated. These facilities, situated throughout the United States, will require a monumental effort to clean up safely and with minimal environmental insult. Current cleanup technologies tend to be labor intensive and expensive, they produce an unacceptably large volume of waste, and they expose workers to radioactive and other hazardous substances. This document describes an emerging program designed to develop and demonstrate new technical approaches to the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program for DOE`s nuclear materials processing facilities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the program seeks to integrate the strengths of DOE`s technical, managerial, and systems engineering capabilities with those of industry, universities, and other government agencies. Once developed, these technologies will help to provide US industry with a competitive edge in the worldwide market that exists for improved environmental restoration and D&D services.

  17. Joint China-United States Report for Year 1 Insulation Materials and Systems Project Area Clean Energy Research Center Building Energy Efficiency (CERC-BEE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Song, Bo [China Academy of Building Research; Zhang, Sisi [China Academy of Building Research

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November of 2009, the presidents of China and the U.S. announced the establishment of the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). This broad research effort is co-funded by both countries and involves a large number of research centers and universities in both countries. One part of this program is focused on improving the energy efficiency of buildings. One portion of the CERC-BEE was focused on building insulation systems. The research objective of this effort was to Identify and investigate candidate high performance fire resistant building insulation technologies that meet the goal of building code compliance for exterior wall applications in green buildings in multiple climate zones. A Joint Work Plan was established between researchers at the China Academy of Building Research and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Efforts in the first year under this plan focused on information gathering. The objective of this research program is to reduce building energy use in China via improved building insulation technology. In cold regions in China, residents often use inefficient heating systems to provide a minimal comfort level within inefficient buildings. In warmer regions, air conditioning has not been commonly used. As living standards rise, energy consumption in these regions will increase dramatically unless significant improvements are made in building energy performance. Previous efforts that defined the current state of the built environment in China and in the U.S. will be used in this research. In countries around the world, building improvements have typically followed the implementation of more stringent building codes. There have been several changes in building codes in both the U.S. and China within the last few years. New U.S. building codes have increased the amount of wall insulation required in new buildings. New government statements from multiple agencies in China have recently changed the requirements for buildings in terms of energy efficiency and fire safety. A related issue is the degree to which new standards are adopted and enforced. In the U.S., standards are developed using a consensus process, and local government agencies are free to implement these standards or to ignore them. For example, some U.S. states are still using 2003 versions of the building efficiency standards. There is also a great variation in the degree to which the locally adopted standards are enforced in different U.S. cities and states. With a more central process in China, these issues are different, but possible impacts of variable enforcement efficacy may also exist. Therefore, current building codes in China will be compared to the current state of building fire-safety and energy-efficiency codes in the U.S. and areas for possible improvements in both countries will be explored. In particular, the focus of the applications in China will be on green buildings. The terminology of 'green buildings' has different meanings to different audiences. The U.S. research is interested in both new, green buildings, and on retrofitting existing inefficient buildings. An initial effort will be made to clarify the scope of the pertinent wall insulation systems for these applications.

  18. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 14, No. 2, September 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biannual newsletter focused on the nationwide accomplishments and activities of the Clean Cities program.

  19. Hanford Immobilized LAW Product Acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area Testing Data Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, John D.; Jiricka, Antonin; McGrail, B. Peter; Jorgensen, Benaiah M.; Smith, Donald E.; Allen, Benjamin R.; Marra, James C.; Peeler, David K.; Brown, Kevin G.; Reamer, I. A.; Ebert, W. L.

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix of 55 glasses was developed and tested with the aim to identify the impact of glass composition on the long-term corrosion behavior and to develop an acceptable low-activity waste glass composition region. Of the 55 glasses, 45 were designed to systematically vary the glass composition and 10 were selected because large and growing databases on their corrosion characteristics had accumulated. The performance of these 55 glasses in the vapor-phase hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) were characterized. VHT's were performed at temperatures between 150?C and 300?C for times up to 280 days; preliminary corrosion rates and type of alteration products were identified. PCTs were performed at 90?C with glass surface area's to solution volumes (S/V) of 2000 m-1 for 7 days and S/V of 20 000 m-1 for 10 h, 100 h, and 1000 h. The corrosion extents by PCT were determined as functions of time from solution composition analyses.

  20. From Petascale to Exascale: Eight Focus Areas of R&D Challenges for HPC Simulation Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springmeyer, R; Still, C; Schulz, M; Ahrens, J; Hemmert, S; Minnich, R; McCormick, P; Ward, L; Knoll, D

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming models bridge the gap between the underlying hardware architecture and the supporting layers of software available to applications. Programming models are different from both programming languages and application programming interfaces (APIs). Specifically, a programming model is an abstraction of the underlying computer system that allows for the expression of both algorithms and data structures. In comparison, languages and APIs provide implementations of these abstractions and allow the algorithms and data structures to be put into practice - a programming model exists independently of the choice of both the programming language and the supporting APIs. Programming models are typically focused on achieving increased developer productivity, performance, and portability to other system designs. The rapidly changing nature of processor architectures and the complexity of designing an exascale platform provide significant challenges for these goals. Several other factors are likely to impact the design of future programming models. In particular, the representation and management of increasing levels of parallelism, concurrency and memory hierarchies, combined with the ability to maintain a progressive level of interoperability with today's applications are of significant concern. Overall the design of a programming model is inherently tied not only to the underlying hardware architecture, but also to the requirements of applications and libraries including data analysis, visualization, and uncertainty quantification. Furthermore, the successful implementation of a programming model is dependent on exposed features of the runtime software layers and features of the operating system. Successful use of a programming model also requires effective presentation to the software developer within the context of traditional and new software development tools. Consideration must also be given to the impact of programming models on both languages and the associated compiler infrastructure. Exascale programming models must reflect several, often competing, design goals. These design goals include desirable features such as abstraction and separation of concerns. However, some aspects are unique to large-scale computing. For example, interoperability and composability with existing implementations will prove critical. In particular, performance is the essential underlying goal for large-scale systems. A key evaluation metric for exascale models will be the extent to which they support these goals rather than merely enable them.

  1. #CleanTechNow

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  2. #CleanTechNow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past four years, America's clean energy future has come into sharper focus. Yesterday's visionary goals are now hard data -- tangible evidence that our energy system is undergoing a transformation. The Energy Department's new paper "Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Four Clean Energy Technologies" highlights these changes and shows how cost reductions and product improvements have sparked a surge in consumer demand for wind turbines, solar panels, electric cars and super efficient lighting.

  3. The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

  4. CEES - Focus Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactivity. These approaches, enabled by the Center's deep cross-cutting capabilities of characterization, theory and materials synthesis, will lead to new approaches to control...

  5. Focus Area 2 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE Acquisition GuideEnergyFluorescent2 -

  6. Focus Area 3 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE Acquisition GuideEnergyFluorescent2 -3

  7. Focus Area 5 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE Acquisition GuideEnergyFluorescent2 -35

  8. Focus Area Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE Acquisition GuideEnergyFluorescent2

  9. Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

  10. Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallinan, Kevin; Menart, James; Gilbert, Robert

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Infrastructure Educational Initiative represents a collaborative effort by the University of Dayton, Wright State University and Sinclair Community College. This effort above all aimed to establish energy related programs at each of the universities while also providing outreach to the local, state-wide, and national communities. At the University of Dayton, the grant has aimed at: solidfying a newly created Masterâ??s program in Renewable and Clean Energy; helping to establish and staff a regional sustainability organization for SW Ohio. As well, as the prime grantee, the University of Dayton was responsible for insuring curricular sharing between WSU and the University of Dayton. Finally, the grant, through its support of graduate students, and through cooperation with the largest utilities in SW Ohio enabled a region-wide evaluation of over 10,000 commercial building buildings in order to identify the priority buildings in the region for energy reduction. In each, the grant has achieved success. The main focus of Wright State was to continue the development of graduate education in renewable and clean energy. Wright State has done this in a number of ways. First and foremost this was done by continuing the development of the new Renewable and Clean Energy Masterâ??s Degree program at Wright State . Development tasks included: continuing development of courses for the Renewable and Clean Energy Masterâ??s Degree, increasing the student enrollment, and increasing renewable and clean energy research work. The grant has enabled development and/or improvement of 7 courses. Collectively, the University of Dayton and WSU offer perhaps the most comprehensive list of courses in the renewable and clean energy area in the country. Because of this development, enrollment at WSU has increased from 4 students to 23. Secondly, the grant has helped to support student research aimed in the renewable and clean energy program. The grant helped to solidify new research in the renewable and clean energy area. The educational outreach provided as a result of the grant included activities to introduce renewable and clean energy design projects into the Mechanical and Materials Engineering senior design class, the development of a geothermal energy demonstration unit, and the development of renewable energy learning modules for high school students. Finally, this grant supported curriculum development by Sinclair Community College for seven new courses and acquisition of necessary related instrumentation and laboratory equipment. These new courses, EGV 1201 Weatherization Training, EGV 1251 Introduction to Energy Management Principles, EGV 2301 Commercial and Industrial Assessment, EGV 2351 LEED Green Associate Exam Preparation, EGV 2251 Energy Control Strategies, EGV Solar Photovoltaic Design and Installation, and EGV Solar Thermal Systems, enable Sinclair to offer complete Energy Technology Certificate and an Energy Management Degree programs. To date, 151 students have completed or are currently registered in one of the seven courses developed through this grant. With the increasing interest in the Energy Management Degree program, Sinclair has begun the procedure to have the program approved by the Ohio Board of Regents.

  11. Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Cities works to reduce U.S. reliance on petroleum in transportation by establishing local coalitions of public- and private-sector stakeholders across the country.

  12. Clean Cities: Clean Cities-Georgia coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast CleanChicago AreaClean

  13. Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

  14. Advancing Clean Energy Use in Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's work in Mexico over the last ten years has focused on clean energy technology activities that support the government of Mexico's development goals.

  15. Steam vacuum cleaning. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective remediation technologies for use in the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of nuclear facilities. The baseline technology currently used for washing debris is a high-pressure water cleaning (HPWC) system. The system used at the FEMP is the Hotsy{reg_sign} Model 550B HPWC. Although the HPWC technology has functioned satisfactorily, improvements are being sought in areas related to reduced liquid waste volume, increased productivity, increased washing effectiveness, and decreased airborne contamination. An innovative technology that offers potential improvements in these areas is a steam vacuum cleaning (SVC) system that integrates high-pressure steam cleaning with a vacuum recovery sub-system that simultaneously collects dislodged contaminants thereby reducing airborne contamination. The SVC system selected for demonstration at the FEMP was the Kelly{trademark} Decontamination System shown. This report provides comparative performance and cost analyses between the Hotsy HPWC system and the Kelly Decontamination System. Both technologies were demonstrated at the FEMP site located at Fernald, Ohio from July 29, 1996 through August 15, 1996. The demonstrations were conducted at the FEMP Plant 1 as part of the LSTD project sponsored by the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the US DOE`s Office of Science and Technology.

  16. CLEAN AIR | FEDEX | NATIONAL CLEAN ENERGY SUMMIT | CLEAN ENERGY...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    | NATIONAL CLEAN ENERGY SUMMIT | CLEAN ENERGY ACT | ENERGY INDEPENDENCE | FREDRICK SMITH | OIL | RENEWABLE ENERGY Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate...

  17. Clean Coal Program Research Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Baxter; Eric Eddings; Thomas Fletcher; Kerry Kelly; JoAnn Lighty; Ronald Pugmire; Adel Sarofim; Geoffrey Silcox; Phillip Smith; Jeremy Thornock; Jost Wendt; Kevin Whitty

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although remarkable progress has been made in developing technologies for the clean and efficient utilization of coal, the biggest challenge in the utilization of coal is still the protection of the environment. Specifically, electric utilities face increasingly stringent restriction on the emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}, new mercury emission standards, and mounting pressure for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, an environmental challenge that is greater than any they have previously faced. The Utah Clean Coal Program addressed issues related to innovations for existing power plants including retrofit technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) or green field plants with CCS. The Program focused on the following areas: simulation, mercury control, oxycoal combustion, gasification, sequestration, chemical looping combustion, materials investigations and student research experiences. The goal of this program was to begin to integrate the experimental and simulation activities and to partner with NETL researchers to integrate the Program's results with those at NETL, using simulation as the vehicle for integration and innovation. The investigators also committed to training students in coal utilization technology tuned to the environmental constraints that we face in the future; to this end the Program supported approximately 12 graduate students toward the completion of their graduate degree in addition to numerous undergraduate students. With the increased importance of coal for energy independence, training of graduate and undergraduate students in the development of new technologies is critical.

  18. Laser surface cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivella, E.C.; Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination of contaminated metal and material recycle, two of 31 priority needs identified by the D&D focus group, are the most promising applications for laser ablation within the DOE complex. F2 Associates has developed a robotic laser ablation system that is capable of high contamination rates, waste volume reduction, surface pore cleaning, and real-time characterization of materials. It is being demonstrated that this system will be the most cost-effective technology for metal decontamination and material recycle.

  19. Clean Cities Internships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Cities offers internships through the Clean Cities University Workforce Development Program, which unites Clean Cities coalitions with students interested in changing the future of onroad...

  20. Final Focus Area Selection Report 255 Fuller Road, Suite 274, Albany, NY 12203 USA (518) 437-8661 / Fax: (518) 437-8659

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing facilities. Wind plant capacity factors were calculated by matching wind map-derived resource statistics with a generic turbine power curve reflecting current megawatt-scale wind technologies. 2 for Task 2 (Selection of Focus Areas) of the Energy Commission project "Wind Energy Resource Modeling

  1. Department of Energy Announces Third Grant for U.S.-China Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by the University of Michigan to advance technologies for clean vehicles and one led by West Virginia University to focus on the next generation of clean coal technologies,...

  2. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  3. IDEA Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Robert

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Clean Energy Application Centers were launched with a goal of focusing on important aspects of our nation’s energy supply including Efficiency, Reliability and Resiliency. Clean Energy solutions based on Combined Heat & Power (CHP), District Energy and Waste Heat Recovery are at the core of ensuring a reliable and efficient energy infrastructure for campuses, communities, and industry and public enterprises across the country. IDEA members which include colleges and universities, hospitals, airports, downtown utilities as well as manufacturers, suppliers and service providers have long-standing expertise in the planning, design, construction and operations of Clean Energy systems. They represent an established base of successful projects and systems at scale and serve important and critical energy loads. They also offer experience, lessons learned and best practices which are of immense value to the sustained growth of the Clean Energy sector. IDEA has been able to leverage the funds from the project award to raise the visibility, improve the understanding and increase deployment CHP, District Energy and Waste Heat Recovery solutions across the regions of our nation, in collaboration with the regional CEAC’s. On August 30, 2012, President Obama signed an Executive Order to accelerate investments in industrial energy efficiency (EE), including CHP and set a national goal of 40 GW of new CHP installation over the next decade IDEA is pleased to have been able to support this Executive Order in a variety of ways including raising awareness of the goal through educational workshops and Conferences and recognizing the installation of large scale CHP and district energy systems A supporting key area of collaboration has involved IDEA providing technical assistance on District Energy/CHP project screenings and feasibility to the CEAC’s for multi building, multi-use projects. The award was instrumental in the development of a first-order screening/feasibility tool for these types of community energy projects. The Excel based tool incorporates hourly climate based building loads data to arrive at the composite energy demand for the district and compares the Net Present Value (NPV) of the costs of CHP/DE alternatives. This tool has been used to provide assistance to several projects in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Intermountain and Pacific Regions. The tool was disseminated to the CEACs and supplemented by a Training Webinar and a How to Guide IDEA produced a US Community Energy Development Guide to support mayors, planners, community leaders, real estate developers and economic development officials who are interested in planning more sustainable urban energy infrastructure, creating community energy master plans and implementing CHP/ District Energy systems in cities, communities and towns. IDEA has collected industry data and provided a comprehensive data set containing information on District Energy installations in the US. District energy systems are present in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Of the 597 systems 55% were DE alone while the remainder was some combination of CHP, district heating, and district cooling. District energy systems that do not currently involve electric generation are strong near-term candidates for the adoption of CHP due to the magnitude of their aggregated thermal load. This data has helped inform specific and targeted initiatives including technical assistance provided by the CEAC’s for EPA’s Boiler MACT Compliance by large District Heating System boilers. These outcomes have been greatly enabled by the close coordination and collaboration with DOE CEAC leadership and with the eight regional US DOE Clean Energy Application Centers and the award’s incremental funding has allowed IDEA to leverage our resources to be an effective champion for Clean Energy.

  4. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of...

  5. Improved Hydrogen Gas Getters for TRU Waste Transuranic and Mixed Waste Focus Area - Phase 2 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, Mark Lee

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha radiolysis of hydrogenous waste and packaging materials generates hydrogen gas in radioactive storage containers. For that reason, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits the flammable gas (hydrogen) concentration in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) containers to 5 vol% of hydrogen in air, which is the lower explosion limit. Consequently, a method is needed to prevent the build up of hydrogen to 5 vol% during the storage and transport of the TRUPACT-II containers (up to 60 days). One promising option is the use of hydrogen getters. These materials scavenge hydrogen from the gas phase and irreversibly bind it in the solid phase. One proven getter is a material called 1,4-bis (phenylethynyl) benzene, or DEB. It has the needed binding rate and capacity, but some of the chemical species that might be present in the containers could interfere with its ability to remove hydrogen. This project is focused upon developing a protective polymeric membrane coating for the DEB getter material, which comes in the form of small, irregularly shaped particles. This report summarizes the experimental results of the second phase of the development of the materials.

  6. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a routine revision of a general fact sheet that describes the Clean Cities partnership efforts and includes a list of Clean Cities coordinators.

  7. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  8. CT Clean Energy Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Communities program, offered by the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority and the Connecticut Energy Efficiency Fund, offers incentives for communities that pledge their...

  9. FACT SHEET: U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation Announcements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    years in each of the three areas of the Center's work: buildings energy efficiency, clean coal and clean vehicles. An official CERC logo was unveiled and the website was launched...

  10. International Clean Energy Coalition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  11. Clean coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li [Ohio State University, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

  12. Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    workshop, along with anonymous notes of the workshop and focus group. Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity Workshop More Documents &...

  13. CONSULTANT REPORT The National Center for a Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSULTANT REPORT The National Center for a Clean Energy Workforce: A Scoping Study FEBRUARY 2011 researched several options for the development of a National Center for the Clean Energy Workforce (NCCEW a clean energy economy rooted in a skilled workforce with broad access to good green jobs, which focus

  14. Combined plasma/liquid cleaning of substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM); Henins, Ivars (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for cleaning substrates. A substrate is held and rotated by a chuck and an atmospheric pressure plasma jet places a plasma onto predetermined areas of the substrate. Subsequently liquid rinse is sprayed onto the predetermined areas. In one embodiment, a nozzle sprays a gas onto the predetermined areas to assist in drying the predetermined areas when needed.

  15. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  16. Bioenergy & Clean Cities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's Bioenergy Technologies Office and the Clean Cities program regularly conduct a joint Web conference for state energy office representatives and Clean Cities coordinators. The Web conferences...

  17. Clean Energy Portfolio Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2011, Indiana enacted SB 251, creating the Clean Energy Portfolio Standard (CPS). The program sets a voluntary goal of 10% clean energy by 2025, based on the amount of electricity supplied...

  18. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 86 active coalitions.

  19. What is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 86 active coalitions.

  20. METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible -Laser Focus World http://www.laserfocusworld.com/articles/print/volume-47/issue-8/world-news/metamaterials-large-area-printed-3d-negative-index-metamaterial-is-flexible.html[8/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible - Laser Focus World-area printed 3D negative-index metamaterial is flexible METAMATERIALS: Large-area printed 3D negative, with the advent of a printing process that produces large-area 3D multilayer optical NIMs --8.7 × 8.7 cm square

  1. Clean Cities: Connecticut Southwestern Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoastColumbia-Willamette

  2. High Efficiency, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B2

  3. Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

  4. Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report takes a broad look at the status of local clean energy policies in the United States to develop a better understanding of local clean energy policy development and the interaction between state and local policies. To date, the majority of clean energy policy research focuses on the state and federal levels. While there has been a substantial amount of research on local level climate change initiatives, this is one of the first analyses of clean energy policies separate from climate change initiatives. This report is one in a suite of reports analyzing clean energy and climate policy development at the local, state, and regional levels.

  5. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

  6. What is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities fact sheet describe this DOE program, which deploys alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  7. Cleaning on a Shoestring.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    clean well. Chromium should be rinsed well and dried with a soft cloth. For stubborn spots, rub with a paste of whiting and household ammonia. Rinse and polish with a soft cloth. ~ J 7 References "Low-Cost Cleaning Products Recipes for Home Use...DOC , TA24S.7 873 0.1293 CLEANING ON A SHOESTRING Extension Home Management Specialists The Texas A&M University System Cleaning on a shoestring can be approached two ways - from the standpoint of time or money. It is possible to create your...

  8. Clean Coal Projects (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation directs the Virginia Air Pollution Control Board to facilitate the construction and implementation of clean coal projects by expediting the permitting process for such projects.

  9. Clean Cities Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    were funded to increase availability and awareness of alternative fuels and advanced technology vehicles. Clean Cities 11 * Tucson Coalition - moves Christmas tree across US...

  10. Clean Cities: Clean Fuels Ohio coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast CleanChicagoCleanFuels

  11. Clean Cities: Iowa Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowa Clean

  12. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  13. Clean Cities Coordinator Awards (Fact sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Clean Cities publication regarding the Clean Cities Coordinator Award winners announced at the 2004 Clean Cities Conference.

  14. 2013 Second Quarter Clean Energy/Clean Transportation Jobs Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enivronmental Entrepreneurs (E2) Clean Energy/Clean Transportation Jobs Report tracks clean energy job announcements from companies, elected officials, the media and other sources, to show how how...

  15. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  16. Clean Energy Finance Guide (Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Provides basic concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending and Loan Loss Reserve Funds. Author: U. S. Department of Energy Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured...

  17. ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Membranes for Clean Water Objective This project provides measurement solutions that probe the surface and internal structure of polymer membranes used in water purification, and correlate that structure to the transport of water and other species through the membrane. Our methods are focused

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Clean Coal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ManagementClean Coal Clean Coal The term clean coal refers to a number of initiatives that seek to reduce or eliminate the hazardous emission or byproducts that result from using...

  19. Clean Cities: Clean Cities Coachella Valley Region coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast CleanChicago Area

  20. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  1. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Energy ECIS and i-GATE: Innovation Hub Connects Clean Tech Small Business with Labs and State On February 20, 2013, in Partnership Getting connected with government...

  3. Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy: A Comparative Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar, held on Feb. 26, 2015, focused on a comparative analysis of program design elements of existing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs across the country.

  4. TAP Webinar: Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar, held on Feb. 26, 2015, focused on a comparative analysis of program design elements of existing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs across the country.

  5. Precision Cleaning Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

    2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

  6. Clean Energy Works (Oregon)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Energy Works began in 2009 as a pilot program run by the City of Portland. In 2010, the US department of Energy awarded $20 million to create a statewide nonprofit to expand the program...

  7. Clean Energy Procurement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subsequently, in 2009, the state embarked upon an initiative with the University System of Maryland, termed "Clean Energy Horizons," to contract for renewable energy through long-term power...

  8. Mississippi Clean Energy Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2010, the Mississippi Legislature enacted [http://billstatus.ls.state.ms.us/documents/2010/pdf/HB/1700-1799/HB1701S... HB 1701], establishing the Mississippi Clean Energy Initiative. This...

  9. Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate...

  10. Gasification: redefining clean energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet gives a comprehensive overview of how gasification is redefining clean energy, now and in the future. It informs the general public about gasification in a straight-forward, non-technical manner.

  11. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  12. What is Clean Cities? (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 87 coalitions.

  13. Clean Energy Jobs Plan Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    times as many jobs per dollar as gas, oil or coal. And dollars invested in clean energy tend to stay. Investment in clean technology is also growing. Clean tech investment in California reached $3.3 billionClean Energy Jobs Plan Introduction When I was governor, California was the world leader

  14. CLEAN ENERGY WORKFORCE TRAINING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CLEAN ENERGY WORKFORCE TRAINING PROGRAM $90 million Multi-agency initiative to: Identify clean energy workforce needs Build regional capacity in clean energy sector development Deliver industry relevant training for displaced workers and new workforce entrants #12;CLEAN ENERGY WORKFORCE TRAINING

  15. The Clean Tech Revolution: Why It's Real

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    2014 2015 Total Market Value ($ billions) #12;4/1/2011 4 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 $0.0 $5.0 $10 Clean tech is a global phenomenon Even the... #12;4/1/2011 6 What areas are hot? in home energy Gov't Standards Smart Grid & Utility Enhancements Green Building Materials Energy Storage: Cars

  16. Clean Cities: Central Coast Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast Clean Cities Coalition

  17. Clean Cities: Central Florida Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast Clean Cities

  18. Clean Cities: Centralina Clean Fuels coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast Clean

  19. Clean Cities: Denver Metro Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro Clean Cities Coalition The

  20. Clean Cities: East Tennessee Clean Fuels coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro Clean Cities

  1. Clean Cities: Empire Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro Clean

  2. Clean Cities: Granite State Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee Region

  3. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee RegionIndiana

  4. Clean Cities: Honolulu Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu Clean Cities

  5. Clean Cities: Kentucky Clean Cities Partnership coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowa

  6. Clean Cities: Long Beach Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowaLandLong

  7. Clean Cities: Los Angeles Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowaLandLongLos

  8. Clean Cities: Maine Clean Communities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonoluluMaine Clean

  9. Clean Cities: Northern Colorado Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern Colorado Clean Cities

  10. Clean Cities: Norwich Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern Colorado Clean

  11. Clean Cities: Ocean State Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern Colorado CleanOcean State

  12. Clean Cities: Palmetto State Clean Fuels coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern Colorado CleanOcean

  13. Clean Cities: Rogue Valley Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern ColoradoRogue Valley Clean

  14. Clean Cities: South Shore Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouth Shore Clean Cities

  15. Clean Cities: Southeast Florida Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouth Shore Clean

  16. Clean Cities: Southern Colorado Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouth ShoreColorado Clean

  17. Clean Cities: Tampa Bay Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouthTampa Bay Clean Cities

  18. Clean Cities: Treasure Valley Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouthTampa Bay Clean

  19. Clean Cities: Tucson Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouthTampa BayTucson Clean

  20. Funding for Nationwide Student-Focused Clean Energy Business Competitions |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFull Text Glossary Module10, SolarMat

  1. Clean Energy Technologies a Focus of Chemical Engineers' Annual Meeting |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJuneWasteDepartmentUtilitiesStephen| Department ofDepartment of

  2. Request for Information (RFI): Specific Clean Energy Manufacturing Focus

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues CellsReport on(DecemberSummaries:

  3. Northwest Region Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoding, David

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the Northwest Clean Energy Application Center (NW CEAC) is to promote and support implementation of clean energy technologies. These technologies include combined heat and power (CHP), district energy, waste heat recovery with a primary focus on waste heat to power, and other related clean energy systems such as stationary fuel cell CHP systems. The northwest states include AK, ID, MT, OR, and WA. The key aim/outcome of the Center is to promote and support implementation of clean energy projects. Implemented projects result in a number of benefits including increased energy efficiency, renewable energy development (when using opportunity fuels), reduced carbon emissions, improved facility economics helping to preserve jobs, and reduced criteria pollutants calculated on an output-based emissions basis. Specific objectives performed by the NW CEAC fall within the following five broad promotion and support categories: 1) Center management and planning including database support; 2) Education and Outreach including plan development, website, target market workshops, and education/outreach materials development 3) Identification and provision of screening assessments & feasibility studies as funded by the facility or occasionally further support of Potential High Impact Projects; 4) Project implementation assistance/trouble shooting; and 5) Development of a supportive clean energy policy and initiative/financing framework.

  4. Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and a Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency Technology Development for High Efficiency Clean Diesel Engines and a Pathway to 50% Thermal Efficiency Cost reduction is a key area of...

  5. Clean Coal Power Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doug Bartlett; Rob James; John McDermott; Neel Parikh; Sanjay Patnaik; Camilla Podowski

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the fifth quarterly Technical Progress Report submitted by NeuCo, Incorporated, under Award Identification Number, DE-FC26-04NT41768. This award is part of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (''CCPI''), the ten-year, $2B initiative to demonstrate new clean coal technologies in the field. This report is one of the required reports listed in Attachment B Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist, part of the Cooperative Agreement. The report covers the award period January 1, 2006 - March 31, 2006 and NeuCo's efforts within design, development, and deployment of on-line optimization systems during that period.

  6. Clean coal today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first issue of the Clean Coal Today publication. Each issue will provide project status reports, feature articles about certain projects and highlight key events concerning the US Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Projects described in this publication include: Colorado-Ute Electric Association Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project at Nucla, Colorado; Babcock and Wilcox coolside and limestone injection multistage burner process (dry sorbent injection); Coal Tech's Advanced Cyclone Combustor Project; and the TIDD pressurized fluidized bed combustor combined cycle facility in Brilliant, Ohio. The status of other projects is included.

  7. Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freihaut, Jim

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid Atlantic Clean Energy Application Center (MACEAC), managed by The Penn State College of Engineering, serves the six states in the Mid-Atlantic region (Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia) plus the District of Columbia. The goals of the Mid-Atlantic CEAC are to promote the adoption of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), Waste Heat Recovery (WHR) and District Energy Systems (DES) in the Mid Atlantic area through education and technical support to more than 1,200 regional industry and government representatives in the region. The successful promotion of these technologies by the MACEAC was accomplished through the following efforts; (1)The MACEAC developed a series of technology transfer networks with State energy and environmental offices, Association of Energy Engineers local chapters, local community development organizations, utilities and, Penn State Department of Architectural Engineering alumni and their firms to effectively educate local practitioners about the energy utilization, environmental and economic advantages of CHP, WHR and DES; (2) Completed assessments of the regional technical and market potential for CHP, WHR and DE technologies application in the context of state specific energy prices, state energy and efficiency portfolio development. The studies were completed for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland and included a set of incentive adoption probability models used as a to guide during implementation discussions with State energy policy makers; (3) Using the technical and market assessments and adoption incentive models, the Mid Atlantic CEAC developed regional strategic action plans for the promotion of CHP Application technology for Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland; (4) The CHP market assessment and incentive adoption model information was discussed, on a continuing basis, with relevant state agencies, policy makers and Public Utility Commission organizations resulting in CHP favorable incentive programs in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware; (5) Developed and maintained a MACEAC website to provide technical information and regional CHP, WHR and DE case studies and site profiles for use by interested stakeholders in information transfer and policy discussions; (6) Provided Technical Assistance through feasibility studies and on site evaluations. The MACEAC completed 28 technical evaluations and 9 Level 1 CHP analyses ; and (7) the MACEAC provided Technical Education to the region through a series of 29 workshops and webinars, 37 technical presentations, 14 seminars and participation in 13 CHP conferences.

  8. Clean Energy Policy Analyses: Analysis of the Status and Impact of Clean Energy Policies at the Local Level

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report aims to provide an initial overview of the current local clean energy policy landscape to develop a better understanding of the current policy environment and identify areas for further research.

  9. Energy and Transportation Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses in this area include advanced materials, battery manufacturing, robotics and automation, nanomanufacturing, separations technologies, and combined heat and power. More...

  10. What is Clean Cities? Clean Cities, March 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 86 active coalitions.

  11. What Is Clean Cities? Clean Cities, November 2009 (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 86 active coalitions.

  12. Clean Cities National Partner Awards: Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaRocque, T.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet briefly describes each of the 10 winners of the Clean Cities National Partner Awards.

  13. REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high aluminum sludge heels may be appropriate as a means of reducing oxalic acid usage. Reagents other than oxalic acid may also be needed for removing actinide elements from the tank heels. A systems engineering evaluation (SEE) was performed on the various alternative chemical cleaning reagents and organic oxidation technologies discussed in the literature review. The objective of the evaluation was to develop a short list of chemical cleaning reagents and oxalic acid destruction methods that should be the focus of further research and development. The results of the SEE found that eight of the thirteen organic oxidation technologies scored relatively close together. Six of the chemical cleaning reagents were also recommended for further investigation. Based on the results of the SEE and plan set out in the TTQAP the following broad areas are recommended for future study as part of the AECC task: (1) Basic Chemistry of Sludge Dissolution in Oxalic Acid: A better understanding of the variables effecting dissolution of sludge species is needed to efficiently remove sludge heels while minimizing the use of oxalic acid or other chemical reagents. Tests should investigate the effects of pH, acid concentration, phase ratios, temperature, and kinetics of the dissolution reactions of sludge components with oxalic acid, mineral acids, and combinations of oxalic/mineral acids. Real waste sludge samples should be characterized to obtain additional data on the mineral phases present in sludge heels. (2) Simulant Development Program: Current sludge simulants developed by other programs for use in waste processing tests, while compositionally similar to real sludge waste, generally have more hydrated forms of the major metal phases and dissolve more easily in acids. Better simulants containing the mineral phases identified by real waste characterization should be developed to test chemical cleaning methods. (3) Oxalic Acid Oxidation Technologies: The two Mn based oxidation methods that scored highly in the SEE should be studied to evaluate long term potential. One of the AOP's

  14. Clean Cities & Transportation Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials Webinar presentation on July 28, 2010 by Sandra Loi, project leader at the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), about the DOE Clean Cities program to promote the use of alternative fuels and reduce petroleum consumption.

  15. Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy processes that sharply reduce air emissions and other...

  16. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its National Partner awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  17. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

  18. Sustainable development with clean coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the opportunities available with clean coal technologies. Applications include new power plants, retrofitting and repowering of existing power plants, steelmaking, cement making, paper manufacturing, cogeneration facilities, and district heating plants. An appendix describes the clean coal technologies. These include coal preparation (physical cleaning, low-rank upgrading, bituminous coal preparation); combustion technologies (fluidized-bed combustion and NOx control); post-combustion cleaning (particulate control, sulfur dioxide control, nitrogen oxide control); and conversion with the integrated gasification combined cycle.

  19. SIMWyPES® Cleaning Cloths

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMWyPES cleaning cloths remove hazardous particulates from dry surfaces so well that the contaminants are undetectable....

  20. Clean Cities Education & Outreach Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Education Project (CTEP) Principal Investigator: Anne Tazewell North Carolina Solar Center North Carolina State University Clean Cities Education & Outreach Activities...

  1. CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    CONSORTIUM FOR CLEAN COAL UTILIZATION Call for Proposals Date of Issue: July 29, 2013 The Consortium for Clean Coal Utilization (CCCU) at Washington University in St. Louis was established in January of Clean Coal Utilization. The format may be a conference or workshop, or a seminar given by a leading

  2. Clean coal technology: Export finance programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Participation by US firms in the development of Clean Coal. Technology (CCT) projects in foreign countries will help the United States achieve multiple national objectives simultaneously--addressing critical goals related to energy, environmental technology, industrial competitiveness and international trade. US participation in these projects will result in an improved global environment, an improvement in the balance of payments and an increase in US jobs. Meanwhile, host countries will benefit from the development of economically- and environmentally-sound power facilities. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Public Law 101-549, Section 409) as supplemented by a requirement in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-486, Section 1331(f)) requires that the Secretary of Energy, acting through the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee Subgroup on Clean Coal Technologies, submit a report to Congress with information on the status of recommendations made in the US Department of Energy, Clean Coal Technology Export Programs, Report to the United States Congress, February 1992. Specific emphasis is placed on the adequacy of financial assistance for export of CCTS. This report fulfills the requirements of the Act. In addition, although this report focuses on CCT power projects, the issues it raises about the financing of these projects are also relevant to other CCT projects such as industrial applications or coal preparation, as well as to a much broader range of energy and environmental technology projects worldwide.

  3. LHC CLEANING EFFICIENCYWITH IMPERFECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracco, C; Redaelli, S; Weiler, T

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance reach of the LHC depends on the magnitude of beam losses and the achievable cleaning efficiency of its collimation system. The ideal performance reach for the nominal Phase 1 collimation system is reviewed. However, unavoidable imperfections affect any accelerator and can further deteriorate the collimation performance. Multiple static machine and collimator imperfections were included in the LHC tracking simulations. Error models for collimator jaw flatness, collimator setup accuracy, the LHC orbit and the LHC aperture were set up, based to the maximum extent possible on measurements and results of experimental beam tests. It is shown that combined “realistic” imperfections can reduce the LHC cleaning efficiency by about a factor 11 on average.

  4. Healy Clean Coal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Healy Clean Coal Project, selected by the U.S. Department of Energy under Round 111 of the Clean Coal Technology Program, has been constructed and is currently in the Phase 111 Demonstration Testing. The project is owned and financed by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA), and is cofunded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Construction was 100% completed in mid-November of 1997, with coal firing trials starting in early 1998. Demonstration testing and reporting of the results will take place in 1998, followed by commercial operation of the facility. The emission levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (S02), and particulate from this 50-megawatt plant are expected to be significantly lower than current standards.

  5. Gas cleaning system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, Richard Allen

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas cleaning system for removing at least a portion of contaminants, such as halides, sulfur, particulates, mercury, and others, from a synthesis gas (syngas). The gas cleaning system may include one or more filter vessels coupled in series for removing halides, particulates, and sulfur from the syngas. The gas cleaning system may be operated by receiving gas at a first temperature and pressure and dropping the temperature of the syngas as the gas flows through the system. The gas cleaning system may be used for an application requiring clean syngas, such as, but not limited to, fuel cell power generation, IGCC power generation, and chemical synthesis.

  6. Biosciences Division Media Mentions | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosciences Division Publications Newsletters Organizational Charts Research Highlights Media Mentions Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Supporting...

  7. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting Breakout Session Summary Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Midwest Regional Summit: Lightweighting...

  8. Clean Cities National Partner Awards (Fact sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Clean Cities publication regarding the National Partner Award winners announced at the 2004 Clean Cities Conference.

  9. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership, an initiative that helps large private fleets reduce petroleum use.

  10. Clean steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels.

  11. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

  12. Clean Slate 2 Revegetation and Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Anderson

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim clean-up of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at Clean Slate 2 located northwest of the Nevada Test Site on the Nellis Air Force Range. Surface soils at Clean Slate 2 were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Excavation of contaminated soils at Clean Slate 2 will follow procedures similar to those used during the cleanup of the Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1 sites. A maximum of approximately 33 cm (12 in) of the surface soils will be excavated and removed from the site. Near ground zero, where contamination levels are highest, approximately 2 m (7 ft) of soil may be removed. The maximum area to be excavated is estimated to be 18.4 hectares (45.4) acres. In addition to the disturbance associated with soil excavation, approximately 2.0 hectares (5.0) acres will be disturbed by the construction of staging areas and placement of support facilities. Short term stabilization consists of an application of a chemical soil stabilizer and long-term stabilizations involves the establishment of a permanent vegetative cover using selective native plant species, site preparation techniques, increasing organic matter and water holding capacity, irrigation to ensure seed germination and plant establishment. The cleanup site will be monitored to ensure success of revegetation and resuspension of soil particles is within established limits.

  13. Economy: Clean Energy and the Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Reducing energy demand and increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiatives—such as goals, standards, codes, funds, and programs—generate many benefits including: ••Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. ••Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. ••Increased economic prosperity. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on economic benefits. What are the economic benefits of clean energy? Clean energy initiatives, including those that advance energy efficiency, renewable energy and clean distributed generation can: ?Lower ? energy costs. ?Increase ? personal disposable income. ?Increase ? revenue for businesses. ?Increase ? income, employment, and output. ?Reduce ? fuel costs and new electric power plant construction costs. ?Reduce ? health care costs as a result of better air quality and public health. How do clean energy initiatives benefit the economy? ?Direct ? Economic Benefits: Companies that provide the equipment, technologies, and services needed to implement an initiative benefit from increased demand, which increases their revenue and their ability to hire more people. In the case of energy efficiency, consumers and companies both benefit by spending less money on electricity. ?Indirect ? Economic Benefits: Suppliers to clean energy equipment and service providers benefit as demand for their inputs and revenues increase. With higher demand, these suppliers may also hire more workers. ?Induced ? Economic Benefits: Income generated from the direct and indirect effects is spent in the regional economy, such as when employees use their paychecks to buy groceries, eat out, and entertain themselves, all of which support jobs in those sectors. What’s Inside: • Why assess the economic benefits of clean energy? • How can policy makers estimate the macroeconomic benefits of clean energy? • A Benefits Flash with quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in economic, air quality, and public health benefits. • Where to go for more information. Direct economic benefits of a wind initiative could increase: • Sales of wind turbines. • Revenue of local turbine manufacturers.

  14. Clean Energy and the Electric System: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Reducing energy demand and/ or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiatives—such as goals, standards, codes, funds and programs—can generate many benefits including: • Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. ••Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. ••Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on electric system benefits. What’s Inside: • Why assess electric system benefits? • How can state and local governments estimate potential electric system benefits? • Quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in direct energy benefits. • How to find more information. What are clean energy initiatives? Clean energy initiatives are policies and programs that state and local governments are using to save energy, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions, support electric system reliability and security, and improve economic development. Examples include: Energy efficiency policies that reduce demand for energy, such as: Building codes for energy efficiency in both commercial and residential buildings; energy efficiency portfolio standards; public benefit funds for energy efficiency; and appliance efficiency standards. Energy supply policies that increase the use of renewables and clean sources, such as: Clean distributed generation and net metering interconnection standards; output-based environmental regulations; public benefit funds for clean energy supply; combined heat and power; and renewable portfolio standards. Clean energy initiatives reduce demand for fossil-fuel powered electricity and increase electricity generated with clean, renewable energy, contributing to a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system. Specifically, energy efficiency and/or renewable energy are resources that can: Avoid costs typically associated with conventional generation, including: Fuel, variable operation, and maintenance costs; emissions allowances; costs of emission Greenhouse gas (GHG) related policies that measure or limit emissions, such as: GHG registries, mandatory GHG reporting; CO offset requirements;

  15. International Energy Agency: Focus on Asia Pacific FOCUS ON CLEAN COAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views or policy of the International Energy Agency or of its individual member countries. As this paper is a Work in Progress, designed to elicit comments and further debate, comments are welcome, directed to the author

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning focus area. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents details of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition research for development of new technologies sponsored by the Department of Energy. Topics discussed include; occupational safety, radiation protection, decontamination, remote operated equipment, mixed waste processing, recycling contaminated metals, and business opportunities.

  17. Focus Areas 1 and 4 Deliverables

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM Revised DOE Acquisition GuideEnergyFluorescent21 -

  18. Property:Focus Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property NameFirstWellDepthProperty Edit withBuilding

  19. Summary of Weldon Spring Site Focus Area

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV ProjectDear Mr.o fof

  20. Clean Cities: Las Vegas Regional Clean Cities coalition

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    for Las Vegas Regional Clean Cities coalition. Southern Nevada Fleet Association P.O. Box 336779 North Las Vegas, NV 89033 Search Coalitions Search for another coalition...

  1. Clean the Past

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2 PermitClean EnergyAnxiety and

  2. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Departmentof EnergyPublic LawEnergyEnhanced Chemical Cleaning

  3. ClEAN ENERGy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - April 2014Christopher SmithWin"City 25 ClEAN

  4. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Carter, Richard D. (Lee's Summit, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Powers, Michael T. (Santa Rosa, CA)

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  5. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  6. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  7. The development of Clean Coal Technology in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jie, Z.; Chu, Z.X. [North China Electrical Power Design Inst., Beijing (China)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resource conditions and energy structures of China determine that coal will continue to play a key role in the development of the electrical power industry in the coming years, thus it is necessary to develop clean coal technology in order to control the high consumption rate of energy and to control serious pollution. Clean coal technology focuses on improving the utilization rate of energy and on the control and reduction of emissions. Considering the condition of China, PC-FGD, supercritical units, CFBC, IGCC and PFBC-CC can be applied and developed under different conditions and in different periods with these technologies developing simultaneously and helping each other forward to improve clean coal technologies. China has broad development prospects and a large market for clean coal technologies. The authors hope to strengthen international exchange and cooperation in this field for the development of CCTs markets in China.

  8. Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Clean Combustion February 27, 2008 Tim Frazier Research & Technology 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Agenda Project Goals and Objectives Project Partners Technical...

  9. Enabling High Efficiency Clean Combustion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Clean Combustion 2008 Semi-Mega Merit Review Donald Stanton Research & Technology February 26 th , 2008 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or...

  10. Residential Clean Energy Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maryland's Residential Clean Energy Grant Program, administered by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA), provides financial incentives to homeowners that install solar water-heating systems or...

  11. Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: The Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund has issued its Five Year Strategic Plan. See the web site for details.

  12. Sustainable Electricity | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Analysis Advanced Components and Materials Systems Integration Energy Security Wind Geothermal Solar Energy-Water Resource Systems Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy...

  13. Connecting with Clean Tech CEO's

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Findings of CEO Roundtable discussions about how to drive economic development and job growth of the clean tech sector within the Sacramento Region.

  14. Clean coal technologies market potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B. (ed.)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

  15. Clean Cities National Partner Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities National Partner Award winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  16. Self-Cleaning CSP Collectors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet details the efforts of a Boston University-led team which is working on a DOE SunShot Initative project. The concentrated solar power industry needs an automated, efficient cleaning process that requires neither water nor moving parts to keep the solar collectors clean for maximum reflectance and energy output. This project team is working to develop a transparent electrodynamic screen as a self-cleaning technology for solar concentrators; cleaning is achieved without water, moving parts, or manual labor. Because of these features, it has a strong potential for worldwide deployment.

  17. Clean Cities Around the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides an update of Clean Cities International news, including successful activities, notable accomplishments, and plans for the future. It also includes background information.

  18. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Existing Building Energy Efficiency Analysis: November 17, 2009 - June 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, P.; Potes, A.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2009, the State of Hawaii enacted an Energy Efficiency Portfolio Standard (EEPS) with a target of 4,300 gigawatt hours (GWh) by 2030 (Hawaii 2009). Upon setting this goal, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative, Booz Allen Hamilton (BAH), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), working with select local stakeholders, partnered to execute the first key step toward attaining the EEPS goal: the creation of a high-resolution roadmap outlining key areas of potential electricity savings. This roadmap was divided into two core elements: savings from new construction and savings from existing buildings. BAH focused primarily on the existing building analysis, while NREL focused on new construction forecasting. This report presents the results of the Booz Allen Hamilton study on the existing building stock of Hawaii, along with conclusions on the key drivers of potential energy efficiency savings and on the steps necessary to attain them.

  19. Clean Cities: Ann Arbor Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLE POWERPropaneofAlamo AreaAnn

  20. Healy clean coal project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and a heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. Resulting emission levels of SO[sub 2], NO[sub x], and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New source Performance standards. During this past quarter, engineering and design continued on the boiler, combustion flue gas desulfurization (FGD), and turbine/generator systems. Balance of plant equipment procurement specifications continue to be prepared. Construction activities commenced as the access road construction got under way. Temporary ash pond construction and drilling of the supply well will be completed during the next quarter.

  1. Environmental issues affecting clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The author outlines what he considers to be the key environmental issues affecting Clean Coal Technology (CCT) deployment both in the US and internationally. Since the international issues are difficult to characterize given different environmental drivers in various countries and regions, the primary focus of his remarks is on US deployment. However, he makes some general remarks, particularly regarding the environmental issues in developing vs. developed countries and how these issues may affect CCT deployment. Further, how environment affects deployment depends on which particular type of clean coal technology one is addressing. It is not the author`s intention to mention many specific technologies other than to use them for the purposes of example. He generally categorizes CCTs into four groups since environment is likely to affect deployment for each category somewhat differently. These four categories are: Precombustion technologies such as coal cleaning; Combustion technologies such as low NOx burners; Postcombustion technologies such as FGD systems and postcombustion NOx control; and New generation technologies such as gasification and fluidized bed combustion.

  2. What's Possible for Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Building Efficiency 45 Concentrating Solar Power 59 Construction Materials 71 Geothermal 81 Nuclear 91 Plug authors and endorsers. Go to gigatonthrowdown.org for report downloads, supplemental material for clean energy technologies, and entrepreneurs can starting building the leading clean energy companies

  3. Commercialization of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharucha, N. [Dept. of Primary Industries and Energy, Canberra (Australia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The steps to commercialization are reviewed in respect of their relative costs, the roles of the government and business sectors, and the need for scientific, technological, and economic viability. The status of commercialization of selected clean coal technologies is discussed. Case studies related to a clean coal technology are reviewed and conclusions are drawn on the factors that determine commercialization.

  4. Air, Health, Clean Energy, and Related Economic Impacts: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Reducing energy demand and/or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiatives—such as goals, standards, codes, funds, and programs—can generate many benefits, including: ••Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. ••Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. ••Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brief is part of a series and focuses on environmental and human health benefits. State and local governments can analyze their clean energy initiatives using methods and tools described in EPA’s Assessing the

  5. Dr. Jeremy Martin Senior Scientist, Clean Vehicles Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    impacts of advanced vehicles, specifically hybrid-electric, plug-in electric, and fuel cell vehicles and advanced battery electric and fuel cell vehicles. UDEI Seminar March 19, 2014 10:30 a.m. 322 ISE Lab #12; and innovative clean fuels and advanced vehicles. Jeremy will focus on biomass based fuels, vehicle and fuel

  6. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  7. The Clean Energy Race | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Clean Energy Race The Clean Energy Race June 29, 2011 - 5:09pm Addthis Hybrid vehicles circle the track at Indianapolis Motor Speedway as part of the inaugural Clean Cities...

  8. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  9. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ti017ebron2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean Cities Learning Program Clean Cities Education & Outreach...

  10. Energy Department Technical Assistance Bolsters Tribal Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technical Assistance Bolsters Tribal Clean Energy Deployment Energy Department Technical Assistance Bolsters Tribal Clean Energy Deployment December 2, 2011 - 3:39pm Addthis The...

  11. clean energy manufacturing | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative The Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative is a strategic integration and commitment of manufacturing efforts across the DOE Office of Energy...

  12. baepgig-clean | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Feb 2003) Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Program: Combustion Engineering IGCC Repowering Project, Clean Energy...

  13. Analysis of Energy Saving in a Clean Room Air-conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Pei, J.; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature field, small supply air temperature difference, large airflow, but no reheater. As the design airflow rate of air conditioning system for cleaning mainly considered to meet the need of the cleanliness class, its air exchange rate was much... above, we had chosen a representative air-handling unit for the testing renovation of 2nd return air system. Cleaning area for this AHU was a capsule clean room with a hundred thousand cleanliness classes. Indoor controlled dry-bulb temperature...

  14. Text-Alternative Version of TAP Webinar: Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar, held on Feb. 26, 2015, focused on a comparative analysis of program design elements of existing Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) programs across the country.

  15. Clean Metal Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  16. The Cleaning of Mechanically Harvested Cotton.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, H. F. (Herbert F.); Jones, D. L. (Don. L.); Smith, H. P. (Harris Pearson)

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cleaning of. Mechanically Harvested Cotton H. P. SMITH, D. L. JONES and H. F. MILLER, JR. 3lank Page in Original Bulletin] Preface For many years cotton growers in the High Plains area have found that cotton harvested late in the season... contained an excessive amount of foreign matter, and that the quality of the cotton was much lower than that of cotton harvested early in the season. This bulletin gives the results of a study conducted at Lubbock and College Station to determine...

  17. Clean Energy Tax Credit (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Tax Credit is 0.85 cents for each kilowatt hour of electricity sold that was produced from a Maryland qualified energy resource during the 5-year period specified in the initial...

  18. Clean Energy Investment Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Opportunity Fund's Clean Energy Investment Program is a direct investment program created to promote the adoption of energy efficient and renewable energy (EE/RE) products and...

  19. Alternative and Clean Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is important to note that some applicants are only eligible to apply under some aspects of the program. Political subdivisions are only permitted to apply for loans or grants for Clean Energy...

  20. Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine...

  1. Foam Cleaning of Steam Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, C.; Curtis, G.; Horvath, J. W.

    The efficiency and power output of a steam turbine can be dramatically reduced when deposits form on the turbine blades. Disassembly and mechanical cleaning of the turbine is very time consuming and costly. Deposits can be removed from the turbine...

  2. Clean Water Partnership Law (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of the Clean Water Partnership Law is to provide financial and technical assistance to local governments for the protection, enhancement, and restoration of surface waters. However...

  3. Clean Energy Tax Credit (Personal)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''NOTE: Due to a high level of interest, the Clean Energy Tax Credit annual funding of $5 million for years 2012, 2013 and 2014 has been fully allocated to compensate applicants wait listed from...

  4. Clean Energy Solutions Center (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Ministerial launched the Clean Energy Solutions Center in April, 2011 for major economy countries, led by Australia and U.S. with other CEM partners. Partnership with UN-Energy is extending scope to support all developing countries: 1. Enhance resources on policies relating to energy access, small to medium enterprises (SMEs), and financing programs; 2. Offer expert policy assistance to all countries; 3. Expand peer to peer learning, training, and deployment and policy data for developing countries.

  5. Clean Energy-Environment State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    As states pursue their clean energy policies and programs, they can obtain assistance from a variety of federal programs, as described below. Cross-Cutting Programs Cross-cutting federal programs support planning, program development, and initiatives for both energy efficiency and clean energy supply measures. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) offer a variety of crosscutting programs, described below.

  6. Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegell, J. H.

    yiven in equations (7) and (8) results in the TFRE curves shown in Figure 6. In performing the calculations to compare chemical and mechanical cleaning, it is important to remember to include the value of the 20 MBtu/Hr heat lost between... MBtu/hr/day 20 Data From Operating Unit 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 ...., ........ ...................... ~.... ---- Time (Days) Figure 4. Comparison of Models for Heat Recovery ~ecay to Simulated Operating Data. MECHANICAL CLEANING W 100 MBtu...

  7. A Hybrid Gas Cleaning Process for Production of Ultraclean Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merkel, T.C.; Turk, B.S.; Gupta, R.P.; Cicero, D.C.; Jain, S.C.

    2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to develop technologies for cleaning/conditioning IGCC generated syngas to meet contaminant tolerance limits for fuel cell and chemical production applications. The specific goals are to develop processes for (1) removal of reduced sulfur species to sub-ppm levels using a hybrid process consisting of a polymer membrane and a regenerable ZnO-coated monolith or a mixed metal oxide sorbent; (2) removal of hydrogen chloride vapors to sub-ppm levels using an inexpensive, high-surface-area material; and (3) removal of NH3 with acidic adsorbents followed by conversion of this NH3 into nitrogen and water. Existing gasification technologies can effectively and efficiently convert a wide variety of carbonaceous feedstocks (coal, petcoke, resids, biomass, etc.) into syngas, which predominantly contains carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Unfortunately, the impurities present in these carbonaceous feedstocks are converted to gaseous contaminants such as H2S, COS, HCl, NH3, alkali macromolecules and heavy metal compounds (such as Hg) during the gasification process. Removal of these contaminants using conventional processes is thermally inefficient and capital intensive. This research and development effort is focused on investigation of modular processes for removal of sulfur, chlorine, nitrogen and mercury compounds from syngas at elevated temperature and pressures at significantly lower costs than conventional technologies.

  8. EIS-0516: Clean Path Energy Center Project; San Juan County, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EIS for the proposed interconnection of the Clean Path Energy Center Project to Western’s transmission system at the Shiprock Substation. The planned Clean Path Energy Center will consist of a 680 MW natural gas combined cycle power plant co-located with a 70 MW solar photovoltaic project.

  9. Analysis of Energy Saving in a Clean Room Air-conditioning System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, S.; Liu, J.; Pei, J.; Wang, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    above, we had chosen a representative air-handling unit for the testing renovation of 2nd return air system. Cleaning area for this AHU was a capsule clean room with a hundred thousand cleanliness classes. Indoor controlled dry-bulb temperature...

  10. Requirements and system design for a robot performing selective cleaning in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellström, Thomas

    ;ance, tree identification, and tool control. The proposed architecture is based on a hybrid between all cleaning is currently done motor-manually with brush-saws, and the cleaned area in 2001 amounted,9]. This trend indicates that there is not

  11. What is Clean Cities? May 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 87 coalitions.

  12. Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides information on Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative (CE+BFI). CE+BFI brings together public infrastructure finance agencies, clean energy public fund managers and institutional investors across the country to explore how to raise capital at scale for clean energy development through bond financing. Author: Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

  13. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 10, No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Official Publication of Clean Cities and the Alternative Fuels Data Center (Newsletter) volume 10, number 4

  14. Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy October, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy 1 October, 2012 Plugging Vehicles into Clean Energy Max-in electric vehicles and clean energy. Giving consumers options to offset energy and emissions associated briefly summarizes the relationship between clean energy and vehicle electrification and describes five

  15. Proceedings of the 21st DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference; Sessions 1--8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    First, M.W. [ed.] [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Air Cleaning Lab.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for the papers presented at the meeting on nuclear facility air cleaning technology in the following specific areas of interest: air cleaning technologies for the management and disposal of radioactive wastes; Canadian waste management program; radiological health effects models for nuclear power plant accident consequence analysis; filter testing; US standard codes on nuclear air and gas treatment; European community nuclear codes and standards; chemical processing off-gas cleaning; incineration and vitrification; adsorbents; nuclear codes and standards; mathematical modeling techniques; filter technology; safety; containment system venting; and nuclear air cleaning programs around the world. (MB)

  16. Clean coal technologies: A business report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book contains four sections as follows: (1) Industry trends: US energy supply and demand; The clean coal industry; Opportunities in clean coal technologies; International market for clean coal technologies; and Clean Coal Technology Program, US Energy Department; (2) Environmental policy: Clean Air Act; Midwestern states' coal policy; European Community policy; and R D in the United Kingdom; (3) Clean coal technologies: Pre-combustion technologies; Combustion technologies; and Post-combustion technologies; (4) Clean coal companies. Separate abstracts have been prepared for several sections or subsections for inclusion on the data base.

  17. The Governance of Clean Development Working Paper 004 March 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Development Working Paper Series Wine, fruit and emission reductions: CDM as development strategy in Chile development, particularly in the area of energy. This research programme is funded through the ESRC ClimateTJ E: jon.phillips@uea.ac.uk W: www.clean-development.com For further information on DEV

  18. Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes a reclamation plan for the short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with the cleanup of radionuclide contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site. This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. The results of reclamation trials at Area 11, Area 19 and more recently the reclamation demonstration plots at the Double Tracks cleanup site, have been summarized and incorporated into this reclamation and monitoring plan. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both the effectiveness and success of short-term and long-term soil stabilization. The Clean Slate 1 site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. The surface soils were contaminated as a result of the detonation of a device containing plutonium and depleted uranium using chemical explosives. Short-term stabilization consists of the application of a chemical soil stabilizer that is applied immediately following excavation of the contaminated soils to minimize Pu resuspension. Long-term stabilization is accomplished by the establishment of a permanent vegetation.

  19. 2 WHO'S WINNING THE CLEAN ENERGY RACE? WHO'S WINNING THE CLEAN ENERGY RACE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 WHO'S WINNING THE CLEAN ENERGY RACE? WHO'S WINNING THE CLEAN ENERGY RACE? Growth, Competition and Opportunity in the World's Largest Economies G-20 CLEAN ENERGY FACTBOOK #12;3 WHO'S WINNING THE CLEAN ENERGY the Clean Energy Race? was developed for public informational and educational purposes. It reviews

  20. Cleaning on a Shoestring.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCutcheon, Linda Flowers

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    store fuller's earth ............ drug or hardware store lacquer thinner ......... paint store lacquered spray ........ art or paint store linseed oil .............. paint store liquid water softener .... grocery store oxalic acid... brush won'~ do the job, try rubbing the joints lightly with c. ' folded piece of sandpaper. Or treat the area with a weak solution of water and oxalic acid. One caution: the acid solution is a severe treat ment which causes etching of the grout...

  1. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Stanton

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy's Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: (1) Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today's state-of-the-art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle; (2) Develop and design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements; (3) Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class; and (4) Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: (1) A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target; (2) An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system; (3) Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system; (4) Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle - Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine; (5) Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated; (6) The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing; (7) The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment; (8) The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment; (9) Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines); and (10) Key subsystems developed include - sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system. An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light-Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  2. Light Duty Efficient, Clean Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanton, Donald W

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Cummins has successfully completed the Light Duty Efficient Clean Combustion (LDECC) cooperative program with DoE. This program was established in 2007 in support of the Department of Energy’s Vehicles Technologies Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control initiative to remove critical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency, emissions compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light duty vehicles. Work in this area expanded the fundamental knowledge of engine combustion to new regimes and advanced the knowledge of fuel requirements for these diesel engines to realize their full potential. All of the following objectives were met with fuel efficiency improvement targets exceeded: 1. Improve light duty vehicle (5000 lb. test weight) fuel efficiency by 10.5% over today’s state-ofthe- art diesel engine on the FTP city drive cycle 2. Develop & design an advanced combustion system plus aftertreatment system that synergistically meets Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx and PM emissions standards while demonstrating the efficiency improvements. 3. Maintain power density comparable to that of current conventional engines for the applicable vehicle class. 4. Evaluate different fuel components and ensure combustion system compatibility with commercially available biofuels. Key accomplishments include: ? A 25% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system compared to the 10.5% target ? An 11% improvement in fuel efficiency was achieved with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreamtent system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 and SFTP II emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system ? Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions regulations were met with the advanced LDECC engine and no NOx aftertreatment, but SFTP II emissions regulations were not met for the US06 test cycle – Additional technical barriers exist for the no NOx aftertreatment engine ? Emissions and efficiency targets were reached with the use of biodiesel. A variety of biofuel feedstocks (soy, rapeseed, etc.) was investigated. ? The advanced LDECC engine with low temperature combustion was compatible with commercially available biofuels as evaluated by engine performance testing and not durability testing. ? The advanced LDECC engine equipped with a novel SCR aftertreatment system is the engine system architecture that is being further developed by the Cummins product development organization. Cost reduction and system robustness activities have been identified for future deployment. ? The new engine and aftertreatment component technologies are being developed by the Cummins Component Business units (e.g. fuel system, turbomachinery, aftertreatment, electronics, etc.) to ensure commercial viability and deployment ? Cummins has demonstrated that the technologies developed for this program are scalable across the complete light duty engine product offerings (2.8L to 6.7L engines) ? Key subsystems developed include – sequential two stage turbo, combustions system for low temperature combustion, novel SCR aftertreatment system with feedback control, and high pressure common rail fuel system An important element of the success of this project was leveraging Cummins engine component technologies. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 40% improvement in thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The 40% improvement is in-line with the current light duty vehicle efficiency targets set by the 2010 DoE Vehicle Technologies MYPP and supported through co-operative projects such as the Cummins Advanced Technology Powertrains for Light- Duty Vehicles (ATP-LD) started in 2010.

  3. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately ten percent of the energy consumed in U.S. commercial buildings is used by HVAC systems to condition outdoor ventilation air. Reducing ventilation rates would be a simple and broadly-applicable energy retrofit option, if practical counter measures were available that maintained acceptable concentrations of indoor-generated air pollutants. The two general categories of countermeasures are: 1) indoor pollutant source control, and 2) air cleaning. Although pollutant source control should be used to the degree possible, source control is complicated by the large number and changing nature of indoor pollutant sources. Particle air cleaning is already routinely applied in commercial buildings. Previous calculations indicate that particle filtration consumes only 10percent to 25percent of the energy that would otherwise be required to achieve an equivalent amount of particle removal with ventilation. If cost-effective air cleaning technologies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also available, outdoor air ventilation rates could be reduced substantially and broadly in the commercial building stock to save energy. The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel VOC air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. The minimum required VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50percent reduction in ventilation rate for air cleaning systems installed in the HVAC supply airstream is modest (generally 20percent or less).

  4. Clean Cities: Clean Communities of Western New York (Buffalo) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast CleanChicagoClean

  5. Clean Cities: Genesee Region Clean Communities (Rochester) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee Region Clean

  6. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 1, summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The South Coast Alternative Fuels Demonstration, called CleanFleet, was conducted in the Los Angeles area from April 1992 through September 1994. The demonstration consisted of 111 package delivery vans operating on five alternative fuels and the control fuel, unleaded gasoline. The alternative fuels were propane gas, compressed natural gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol with 15 percent RFG (called M-85), and electricity. This volume of the eight volume CleanFleet final report is a summary of the project design and results of the analysis of data collected during the demonstration on vehicle maintenance and durability, fuel economy, employee attitudes, safety and occupational hygiene, emissions, and fleet economics.

  7. Apparatus for attaching a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Killian, M.A.; Zollinger, W.T.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of an apparatus for connecting a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator so that the tool can be used in contaminated areas on horizontal, vertical and sloped surfaces. The apparatus comprises a frame and a handle, with casters on the frame to facilitate movement. The handle is pivotally and releasibly attached to the frame at a preselected position of a plurality of attachment positions. The apparatus is specifically configured for the KELLY VACUUM SYSTEM but can be modified for use with any standard mobile robot and cleaning tool.

  8. Apparatus for attaching a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Killian, Mark A. (102 Foxhunt Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Zollinger, W. Thor (3927 Almon Dr., Martinez, GA 30907)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for connecting a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator so that the tool can be used in contaminated areas on horizontal, vertical and sloped surfaces. The apparatus comprises a frame and a handle, with casters on the frame to facilitate movement. The handle is pivotally and releasibly attached to the frame at a preselected position of a plurality of attachment positions. The apparatus is specifically configured for the KELLY VACUUM SYSTEM but can be modified for use with any standard mobile robot and cleaning tool.

  9. Apparatus for attaching a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Killian, M.A.; Zollinger, W.T.

    1992-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for connecting a cleaning tool to a robotic manipulator so that the tool can be used in contaminated areas on horizontal, vertical and sloped surfaces. The apparatus comprises a frame and a handle, with casters on the frame to facilitate movement. The handle is pivotally and releasibly attached to the frame at a preselected position of a plurality of attachment positions. The apparatus is specifically configured for the Kelly Vacuum System but can be modified for use with any standard mobile robot and cleaning tool. 14 figs.

  10. Movement out of focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlewine, Michael Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates the consequences of overt and covert movement on association with focus. The interpretation of focus-sensitive operators such as only and even depends on the presence of a focused constituent ...

  11. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

  12. Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

  13. 4th Annual Clean Coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferriter John P

    Proceedings he emphasis of the Fourth Clean Coal Technology Conference wm the marketability of clean coal projects both domestically and abroad. The success rate of clean coal projects in the U.S. for coalfired electricity generation is a beacon to foreign governments that are working toward effectively using advanced NO, and SO2 technology to substantially reduce flue-gas emissions for a cleaner environment. There is a continuing dialogue between U.S. Government, North American private industry, and the electricity producing governmental ministries and the private sector abroad. The international community was well represented at this conference. The Administration is determined to move promising, near-term technologies from the public to the private sector a ~ well a8 into the international marketplace.

  14. Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Wilson

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

  15. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Energy Rebates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Doris, E.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report functions as a primer for renewable energy rebate programs. It highlights the impacts of specific renewable energy rebate programs on renewable energy markets around the country, as well as rebate program impacts on overarching energy policy drivers. It also discusses lessons learned, challenges, ideal applications, keys to success, and complementary and alternative policies. Results indicate that rebate programs can have a strong deployment impact on emerging renewable energy markets. This report focuses on renewable energy rebate programs, which are being analyzed as part of the State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project. SCEPA is being used to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states.

  16. Dealing with the Clean Water Act pending reauthorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses probable changes in the Clean Water Act that may affect federal facilities such as those under the DOE. These changes will be included in a reauthorization of the act. The author draws upon the 1992 National Water Quality Inventory Report to Congress as a source to identify changes in the focus of the reauthorized act on non-point source issues, watershed management, new enforcement mechanisms and an assortment of smaller issues that will have indirect effects on federal facilities.

  17. Carbon smackdown: visualizing clean energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Juan Meza

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final Carbon Smackdown match took place Aug. 9, 2010. Juan Meza of the Computational Research Division revealed how scientists use computer visualizations to accelerate climate research and discuss the development of next-generation clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and solar cells.

  18. Carbon smackdown: visualizing clean energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Juan Meza

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The final Carbon Smackdown match took place Aug. 9, 2010. Juan Meza of the Computational Research Division revealed how scientists use computer visualizations to accelerate climate research and discuss the development of next-generation clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and solar cells.

  19. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  20. Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing...

  1. Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators Energy Saver Heroes: Clean Cities Coordinators April 2, 2009 - 3:32pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean...

  2. Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financing Financing Structures Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs Property-Assessed Clean Energy Programs The property-assessed clean energy (PACE) model is an...

  3. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides contact information for program staff of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, as well as contact information for the nearly 100 local Clean Cities coalitions across the country.

  4. Climate VISION: Events - Advanced Clean Coal Workshop

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Secretary Kyle McSlarrow, DOE, and Jim Rogers, CEO Chairman, Cinergy 10:15 Break 10:30 Case Studies on Clean Coal Projects Case StudiesLessons Learned on Clean Coal Plants (to...

  5. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact information for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program staff and for the coordinators of the nearly 100 local Clean Cities coalitions across the country.

  6. Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanneschlager, R. E.

    Congress is currently debating amendments to the Clean Air Act which would strengthen and enhance the current Clean Air Act. The bill would guarantee a reduction of 10 million tons of sulfur dioxide from 1980 levels; would sharply reduce pollutants...

  7. Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean Coal Incentive Tax Credit provides for a property tax credit for new clean coal facilities constructed at a cost exceeding $150 million and used for the purposes of generating electricity....

  8. Clean Cities Web Sites and Web Tools

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Cities Web Sites and Web Tools Johanna Levene July 28, 2010 Innovation for Our Energy Future Fuel Economy fueleconomy.gov What vehicle? Clean Cities Web Site * Information...

  9. Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Clean Tennessee Energy Grant Program is to select and fund projects that best result in a reduction of emissions and pollutants identified below. The Clean Tennessee Energy...

  10. Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator Awards 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet recognizes the 2003 Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator awards winners and their outstanding efforts to promote alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The recipients will receive their awards at the Clean Cities Conference in Palm Springs, CA.

  11. Clean Cities Coalition and Coordinator's Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. S. DOE Clean Cities Program has awarded its Coalition awards for 2002, and the awards will be presented at the Clean Cities Conference in May 2002. This fact sheets describe the winners and their contributions.

  12. amplified genomic areas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to usually as "Solutions") offers 18 focus areas covering a wealth of genetics and genomics areas, Biotechnology Websites Summary: ") offers 18 focus areas covering a wealth of...

  13. Analysis of chemical coal cleaning processes. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six chemical coal cleaning processes were examined. Conceptual designs and costs were prepared for these processes and coal preparation facilities, including physical cleaning and size reduction. Transportation of fine coal in agglomerated and unagglomerated forms was also discussed. Chemical cleaning processes were: Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Ledgemont, Ames Laboratory, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (two versions), and Guth Process (KVB). Three of the chemical cleaning processes are similar in concept: PETC, Ledgemont, and Ames. Each of these is based on the reaction of sulfur with pressurized oxygen, with the controlling factor being the partial pressure of oxygen in the reactor. All of the processes appear technically feasible. Economic feasibility is less certain. The recovery of process chemicals is vital to the JPL and Guth processes. All of the processes consume significant amounts of energy in the form of electric power and coal. Energy recovery and increased efficiency are potential areas for study in future more detailed designs. The Guth process (formally designed KVB) appears to be the simplest of the systems evaluated. All of the processes require future engineering to better determine methods for scaling laboratory designs/results to commercial-scale operations. A major area for future engineering is to resolve problems related to handling, feeding, and flow control of the fine and often hot coal.

  14. What is Clean Cities? December 2010 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 87 active coalitions.

  15. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity Video Addthis Description Industrial...

  16. Advanced Clean Cars Zero Emission Vehicle Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Advanced Clean Cars Zero Emission Vehicle Regulation ZEV #12;Advanced Clean Cars ZEV Program 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Current Regulation -ZEVs Current Regulation -PHEVs Projected: PHEVs 15 infrastructure, the cars won't come · Complementary Policies to support ZEV regulation ­ Clean Fuels Outlet

  17. Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Economic Impact of the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 on the West Virginia Economy ........................................................................................................................ 1 American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines the impact of the American Clean Energy

  18. The National Workshop on Clean Energy Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Matthew

    The National Workshop on Clean Energy Education ENERGYLITERACY Recommendations and Strategies Full Report #12;THE NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON CLEAN ENERGY EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN OCTOBER 13, 2011 Full Report #12;#12;FOREWORD Clean energy education is an enabling foundation with far

  19. Clean Energy Solutions Center Services (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center (Solutions Center) helps governments, advisors and analysts create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. The Solutions Center partners with international organizations to provide online training, expert assistance, and technical resources on clean energy policy.

  20. Green Clean Day Planning Guide A practical guide for creating a successful Green Clean Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Green Clean Day Planning Guide A practical guide for creating a successful Green Clean Day A publication of U of M Waste Management Services July 2013 #12;Table of Contents What is a Green Clean Day? 2 Why have a Green Clean Day? 2 How Do We Get Started? 2 How Waste Management Services Can Help 2

  1. Clean Cities Designation Guide: A Resource for Developing, Implementing, and Sustaining Your Clean Cities Coalition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document serves as an instruction manual for developing, implementing, and running a Clean Cities coalition.

  2. Assistance Focus: Africa (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center Ask an Expert service connects governments seeking policy information and advice with one of more than 30 global policy experts who can provide reliable and unbiased quick-response advice and information. The service is available at no cost to government agency representatives from any country and the technical institutes assisting them. This publication presents summaries of assistance provided to African governments, including the benefits of that assistance.

  3. Communication in Home Area Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yubo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used in area like smart buildings, street light controls andbuilding. This section focuses on HAN design to address two smart

  4. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  5. ith America focused on energy alternatives and green living,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    W ith America focused on energy alternatives and green living, Oklahoma State University- Tulsa. His process to produce a clean, alternative energy source could significantly reduce the use of fossil it a very attractive alternative to solar energy technology. "Thermoelectric materials are so much less

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: U.S.-China Clean Energy Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -China Clean Energy Research Center-Clean Vehicles Consortium Sandia Participated in the 3rd Annual Technology Forum of the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center - Clean Vehicles...

  7. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  8. Sixth clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 1: Policy papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth Clean Coal Technology Conference focused on the ability of clean coal technologies (CCTs) to meet increasingly demanding environmental requirements while simultaneously remaining competitive in both international and domestic markets. Conference speakers assessed environmental, economic, and technical issues and identified approaches that will help enable CCTs to be deployed in an era of competing, interrelated demands for energy, economic growth, and environmental protection. Recognition was given to the dynamic changes that will result from increasing competition in electricity and fuel markets and industry restructuring, both domestically and internationally. Volume 1 contains 38 papers arranged under the following topical sections: International business forum branch; Keynote session; Identification of the issues; CCTs--Providing for unprecedented environmental concerns; Domestic competitive pressures for CCTs; Financing challenges for CCTs; New markets for CCTs; Clean coal for the 21st century: What will it take? Conclusions and recommendations. The clean coal technologies discussed include advanced pulverized coal-fired boilers, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), pressurized FBC, integrated gasification combined-cycle systems, pressurized pulverized coal combustion, integrated gasification fuel cell systems, and magnetohydrodynamic power generation.

  9. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic cleaning method for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  10. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  11. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, D.; Odell, C.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figures.

  12. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  13. Black Pine Engineering Wins Clean Energy Trust Clean Energy Challenge |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyandapproximately 10| Department ofClean Energy

  14. Clean Cities: Central Oklahoma Clean Cities (Oklahoma City) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast Clean CitiesCentral

  15. Clean Cities: Clean Communities of Central New York (Syracuse) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoast CleanChicago

  16. Clean Cities: Columbia-Willamette Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12 BONNEVILLECoastColumbia-Willamette Clean

  17. Clean Cities: East Bay Clean Cities coalition (Oakland)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro Clean Cities CoalitionBay

  18. Clean Cities: Eastern Pennsylvania Alliance for Clean Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro Clean Citiescoalition

  19. Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater Long

  20. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater

  1. Clean Cities: Houston-Galveston Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu Clean

  2. Clean Cities: Land of Enchantment Clean Cities (New Mexico) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowaLand of

  3. Clean Cities: Lone Star Clean Fuels Alliance (Central Texas) coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver MetroHonolulu CleanIowaLand

  4. Clean Cities: Southeast Louisiana Clean Fuels Partnership coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthernSouth Shore CleanLouisiana

  5. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The

  6. Materials Science Clean Room Facility at Tulane University (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altiero, Nicholas

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The project involves conversion of a 3,000 sq. ft. area into a clean room facility for materials science research. It will be accomplished in phases. Phase I will involve preparation of the existing space, acquisition and installation of clean room equipped with a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processing system, and conversion of ancillary space to facilitate the interface with the clean room. From a capital perspective, Phases II and III will involve the acquisition of additional processing, fabrication, and characterization equipment and capabilities.

  7. Solar energt focusing means

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsubota, J.

    1981-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient solar focusing means being hollow and in semi-cylindrical or arcuate shape, the surface has such fine menisci as to act like convex lenses to focus solar rays towards the center of the focusing body, irrespective of the position of the sun, where a solar energy conversion device is located and further acts to disperse light reflected thereonto from the solar energy conversion device. The focusing body can assume several shapes and thus can be used for roofing of a building, such as a house, or the like, and still be aesthetically pleasing.

  8. Sixth clean coal technology conference: Proceedings. Volume 2: Technical papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth Clean Coal Technology Conference focused on the ability of clean coal technologies (CCTs) to meet increasingly demanding environmental requirements while simultaneously remaining competitive in both international and domestic markets. Conference speakers assessed environmental, economic, and technical issues and identified approaches that will help enable CCTs to be deployed in an era of competing, interrelated demands for energy, economic growth, and environmental protection. Recognition was given to the dynamic changes that will result from increasing competition in electricity and fuel markets and industry restructuring, both domestically and internationally. Volume 2 contains 28 papers related to fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification for combined cycle power plants, the Liquid Phase Methanol Process, use of coal in iron making, air pollution control of nitrogen oxides, coke making, and hot gas cleanup.

  9. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  10. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Richard J. (McMurray, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  11. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  12. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  13. Clean Air Act, Section 309

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEAN AIR ACT § 309* §7609. Policy review (a)

  14. CLEAN Reports | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facilityin Charts Jump to:List Serve Jump to:CLEAN

  15. Clean Energy | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness andCUMediaClean

  16. Clean Edge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network Jump to: navigation,Edge

  17. Clean Currents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:Wind EnergyCielo Wind Power JumpClean

  18. Research Highlights | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipalResearchMaking SenseTitleWorkingClean

  19. Clean Markets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClay ElectricClean Edge Inc JumpHome

  20. Clean Vita | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformation SmyrnaNewClay ElectricClean Edge IncInformationVita

  1. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Provides an overview of Clean Cities National Clean Fleets Partnership (NCFP). The NCFP is open to large private-sector companies that have fleet operations in multiple states. Companies that join the partnership receive customized assistance to reduce petroleum use through increased efficiency and use of alternative fuels. This initiative provides fleets with specialized resources, expertise, and support to successfully incorporate alternative fuels and fuel-saving measures into their operations. The National Clean Fleets Partnership builds on the established success of DOE's Clean Cities program, which reduces petroleum consumption at the community level through a nationwide network of coalitions that work with local stakeholders. Developed with input from fleet managers, industry representatives, and Clean Cities coordinators, the National Clean Fleets Partnership goes one step further by working with large private-sector fleets.

  2. Enact legislation supporting residential property assessed clean energy financing (PACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Devashree

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Congress should enact legislation that supports residential property assessed clean energy (PACE) programs in the nation’s states and metropolitan areas. Such legislation should require the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to allow Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to purchase residential mortgages with PACE assessments while at the same time providing responsible underwriting standards and a set of benchmarks for residential PACE assessments in order to minimize financial risks to mortgage holders. Congressional support of residential PACE financing will improve energy efficiency, encourage job creation, and foster economic growth in the nation’s state and metropolitan areas.

  3. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities' National Clean Fleets Partnership establishes strategic alliances with large fleets to help them explore and adopt alternative fuels and fuel economy measures to cut petroleum use. The initiative leverages the strength of nearly 100 Clean Cities coalitions, nearly 18,000 stakeholders, and more than 20 years of experience. It provides fleets with top-level support, technical assistance, robust tools and resources, and public acknowledgement to help meet and celebrate fleets' petroleum-use reductions.

  4. Final report spent nuclear fuel retrieval system primary cleaning development testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketner, G.L.; Meeuwsen, P.V.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developmental testing of the primary cleaning station for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and canisters is reported. A primary clean machine will be used to remove the gross sludge from canisters and fuel while maintaining water quality in the downstream process area. To facilitate SNF separation from canisters and minimize the impact to water quality, all canisters will be subjected to mechanical agitation and flushing with the Primary Clean Station. The Primary Clean Station consists of an outer containment box with an internally mounted, perforated wash basket. A single canister containing up to 14 fuel assemblies will be loaded into the wash basket, the confinement box lid closed, and the wash basket rotated for a fixed cycle time. During this cycle, basin water will be flushed through the wash basket and containment box to remove and entrain the sludge and carry it out of the box. Primary cleaning tests were performed to provide information concerning the removal of sludge from the fuel assemblies while in the basin canisters. The testing was also used to determine if additional fuel cleaning is required outside of the fuel canisters. Hydraulic performance and water demand requirements of the cleaning station were also evaluated. Thirty tests are reported in this document. Tests demonstrated that sludge can be dislodged and suspended sufficiently to remove it from the canister. Examination of fuel elements after cleaning suggested that more than 95% of the exposed fuel surfaces were cleaned so that no visual evidence of remained. As a result of testing, recommendations are made for the cleaning cycle. 3 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Stress-free tank cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haimowitz, S.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fall of 1991, sludge buildup in a 690,000-bbl crude-oil storage tank caused measurement and loading problems for the Mobil Oil refinery in Paulsboro, N.J. Four ft of sludge had accumulated at the bottom of the tank, which holds oil prior to refining. Faced with operating and environmental constraints, Mobil cleaned the tank with Nalco 5601, a system made by Nalco Chemical Co., (Sugar Land, Texas). The system, which employs chemicals, water and heat, removed 58,000 bbl of sludge from the tank and recovered 37,500 bbl of oil from it without generating hazardous wastes. This oil contained only trace amounts of sediments and water, and was processed without requiring further treatment. Water was also recovered from the sludge: 11,000 bbl were treated biologically onsite. There were 3,700 bbl of solids remaining, which were left in the tank, as they only took up 4 in. and no longer affected level measurement. The system cleaned the tank in 10 days and recovered 99% of the oil in the sludge without generating hazardous wastes. The value of the recovered oil is $646,000, and Mobil estimates that its return on investment for the project is nearly 300%.

  6. Repowering with clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freier, M.D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Buchanan, T.L.; DeLallo, M.L.; Goldstein, H.N. [Parsons Power Group, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repowering with clean coal technology can offer significant advantages, including lower heat rates and production costs, environmental compliance, incremental capacity increases, and life extension of existing facilities. Significant savings of capital costs can result by refurbishing and reusing existing sites and infrastructure relative to a greenfield siting approach. This paper summarizes some key results of a study performed by Parsons Power Group, Inc., under a contract with DOE/METC, which investigates many of the promising advanced power generation technologies in a repowering application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and economic results of applying each of a menu of Clean Coal Technologies in a repowering of a hypothetical representative fossil fueled power station. Pittsburgh No. 8 coal is used as the fuel for most of the cases evaluated herein, as well as serving as the fuel for the original unrepowered station. The steam turbine-generator, condenser, and circulating water system are refurbished and reused in this study, as is most of the existing site infrastructure such as transmission lines, railroad, coal yard and coal handling equipment, etc. The technologies evaluated in this study consisted of an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor, several varieties of pressurized fluid bed combustors, several types of gasifiers, a refueling with a process derived fuel, and, for reference, a natural gas fired combustion turbine-combined cycle.

  7. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet contains contact information for program staff and coalition coordinators for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  8. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet contains contact information for program staff and coalition coordinators for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  9. What is Clean Cities? 2007 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities fact sheet describing this DOE program that deploys alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  10. Clean Cities Program Contacts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet contains contact information for program staff and coalition coordinators for the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  11. Clean Cities Fact Sheet: March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities fact sheet describe this DOE program, which deploys alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  12. Modeling of High Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Modeling of high efficiency clean combustion engines Daniel Flowers Salvador Aceves Tom Piggott Daniel Flowers, Salvador Aceves, Tom Piggott,...

  13. -UNIT NAME C-728 Motor Cleaning Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UNIT NUMBER 33 -UNIT NAME C-728 Motor Cleaning Facility -REGULATORY STATUS--3:.:::.0:..04(--u) -LOCATION North of C-720 (Map...

  14. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 10, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newsletter features articles on Clean Cities, such as coalition news, stakeholder success stories, and Technical Assistance projects. Industry news, EPAct updates, and new resources are also covered.

  15. Exploring the Business Link Opportunity: Transmission & Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Jennifer Weddle, Greenberg Traurig LLP Rapid Response Team for Transmission: Laura Smith Morton, DOE Energy Storage: Michael Stosser, Day Pitney LLP Centennial West Clean...

  16. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 10, No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newsletter features articles on Clean Cities, such as coalition news, stakeholder success stories, and Technical Assistance projects. Industry news, EPAct updates, and new resources are also covered.

  17. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weber, Frank J. (Sunol, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kiso, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cleaning process for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  18. Clean Energy On-Bill Financing (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    By April 1, 2014, the Energy Conservation Management Board and the Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) must consult with electric distribution companies and gas companies to...

  19. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative: Increasing American Competitive...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for a Clean Energy Manufacturing Innovation Institute related to composite materials and structures. The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National...

  20. Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal...

  1. MiniCLEAN Dark Matter Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    discrimination of the triplet-to-singlet light ratio. External backgrounds (surface radon progeny and fast neutrons) are rejected by self-shielding and fiducialization. MiniCLEAN...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: clean and affordable renewable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clean and affordable renewable power SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization On July 29, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

  3. Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards Clean Cities Regional Support & Petroleum Displacement Awards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

  4. What Is Clean Cities? Clean Cities Fact Sheet April 2009 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 86 active coalitions.

  5. University of Washington Focus the Nation Title: Where will we find the energy? Technological Solutions to Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    generation of clean energy technology" and making "the breakthroughs of tomorrow". While technological innovation is vital for developing clean energy, two Princeton researchers contend that current technologyUniversity of Washington Focus the Nation 1/31/2008 Title: Where will we find the energy

  6. CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 5, employee attitude assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experiences of couriers, operations managers, vehicle handlers (refuelers), and mechanics who drove and/or worked with alternative fuel vehicles, and the attitudes and perceptions of people with these experiences, are examined. Five alternative fuels studied in the CleanFleet project are considers& compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The three major areas of interest include comparative analysis of issues such as health, safety and vehicle performance, business issues encompassing several facets of station operations, and personal commentary and opinions about the CleanFleet project and the alterative fuels. Results of the employee attitude assessment are presented as both statistical and qualitative analysis.

  7. Ash reduction in clean coal spiral product circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P.

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The article describes the Derrick Corporation's Stack Sizer{trademark} technology for high capacity fine wet cleaning with long-lasting high open-area urethane screen panels. After field trials, a Stack Sizer fitted with a 100-micron urethane panel is currently processing approximately 40 stph of clean coal spiral product having about 20% ash at McCoy-Elkhorn's Bevin Branch coal preparation plant in Kentucky, USA. Product yield is about 32.5 short tons per hour with 10% ash. The material is then fed to screen bowl centrifuges for further processing. At Blue Diamond Coal's Leatherwood preparation plant similar Stacker Sizers are achieving the same results. 2 figs., 3 tabs., 2 photo.

  8. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  9. Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

  10. AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Clean Energy Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S.Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR™). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This presentation will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission energy plants.

  11. AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Clean Energy Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, Stephen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR{trademark}). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. This presentation will highlight the AVESTAR Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission energy plants.

  12. Inside this Issue Clean Sweep 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    (coal, aggregate, ore, etc.) are involved in commercial transactions where current weighing technologyInside this Issue Page Clean Sweep 1 This Month in History 1 Calendar 2 This Month in History on page 4) 1 Volume 2 Issue 5 August 29, 2011 Clean Sweep By John Barton Vast amounts of bulk materials

  13. Clean Cities 2010 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2010. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  14. Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

  15. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

  16. Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the petroleum savings and vehicle emissions reductions achieved by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program in 2011. The report also details other performance metrics, including the number of stakeholders in Clean Cities coalitions, outreach activities by coalitions and national laboratories, and alternative fuel vehicles deployed.

  17. Dislocation focus construction in Chinese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Lawrence Yam-Leung

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dislocation focus construction in Cantonese. MA thesis,London. Dislocation focus construction in Chinese Leung,SP Dislocation focus construction in Chinese (a) (b) (c) (

  18. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

  19. Clean coal technology programs: program update 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2006 is to provide an updated status of the DOE commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCTs). These demonstrations are performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII) and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2006 provides 1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation's energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation's most abundant energy resource - coal; 2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and 3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, with fact sheets for demonstration projects that are active, recently completed, withdrawn or ended, including status as of June 30 2006. 4 apps.

  20. Lightweighting Materials | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL conducts lightweight materials research in several areas: materials development, properties and manufacturing, computational materials science, and multi-material enabling...

  1. Biological Interfaces | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of renewable energy sources. The PMI SFA integrates expertise in the areas of plant genomics, fungal and bacterial research, fungal ecology, analytical tool development, and...

  2. Deliberate Science, Continuum Magazine: Clean Energy Innovation at NREL, Winter 2012 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on deliberate science.

  3. Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program...

  4. Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Finance Guide 12-1 March 2013 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEAN ENERGY FINANCE GUIDE Chapter 12. Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing Third Edition...

  5. Clean Energy Policy Analysis: Impact Analysis of Potential Clean Energy Policy Options for the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busche, S.; Doris, E.; Braccio, R.; Lippert, D.; Finch, P.; O'Toole, D.; Fetter, J.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides detailed analyses of 21 clean energy policy options considered by the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative working groups for recommendation to the 2010 Hawaii State Legislature. The report considers the impact each policy may have on ratepayers, businesses, and the state in terms of energy saved, clean energy generated, and the financial costs and benefits. The analyses provide insight into the possible impacts, both qualitative and quantitative, that these policies may have in Hawaii based on the experience with these policies elsewhere. As much as possible, the analyses incorporate Hawaii-specific context to reflect the many unique aspects of energy use in the State of Hawaii.

  6. accident area 1979-1992: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Medicine Websites Summary: Revisions to patient handling protocols Call Research Safety consult Clean upclear out area Other (SpecifyJohn Dempsey Hospital, UCHC Charge Nurse...

  7. Northeast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgeois, Tom

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    From October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2013 (“contract period”), the Northeast Clean Energy Application Center (“NE-CEAC”) worked in New York and New England (Connecticut, Rhode Island, Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine) to create a more robust market for the deployment of clean energy technologies (CETs) including combined heat and power (CHP), district energy systems (DES), and waste heat recovery (WHR) systems through the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers. CHP, DES, and WHR can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce electrical and thermal energy costs, and provide more reliable energy for users throughout the United States. The NE-CEAC’s efforts in the provision of technical assistance, education and outreach, and strategic market analysis and support for decision-makers helped advance the market for CETs in the Northeast thereby helping the region move towards the following outcomes: • Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and criteria pollutants • Improvements in energy efficiency resulting in lower costs of doing business • Productivity gains in industry and efficiency gains in buildings • Lower regional energy costs • Strengthened energy security • Enhanced consumer choice • Reduced price risks for end-users • Economic development effects keeping more jobs and more income in our regional economy Over the contract period, NE-CEAC provided technical assistance to approximately 56 different potential end-users that were interested in CHP and other CETs for their facility or facilities. Of these 56 potential end-users, five new CHP projects totaling over 60 MW of install capacity became operational during the contract period. The NE-CEAC helped host numerous target market workshops, trainings, and webinars; and NE-CEAC staff delivered presentations at many other workshops and conferences. In total, over 60 different workshops, conferences, webinars, and presentation were hosted or delivered during the contract period. The NE-CEAC also produced publically available educational materials such as CHP project profiles. Finally, the NE-CEAC worked closely with the relevant state agencies involved with CHP development. In New York, the NE-CEAC played an important role in securing and maintaining funding for CHP incentive programs administered by the New York State Energy Research Development Authority. NE-CEAC was also involved in the NYC Mayor's Office DG Collaborative. The NECEAC was also named a strategic resource for the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection’s innovative Microgrid Pilot Program.

  8. 5. annual clean coal technology conference: powering the next millennium. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference focuses on presenting strategies and approaches that will enable clean coal technologies to resolve the competing, interrelated demands for power, economic viability, and environmental constraints associated with the use of coal in the post-2000 era. The program addresses the dynamic changes that will result from utility competition and industry restructuring, and to the evolution of markets abroad. Current projections for electricity highlight the preferential role that electric power will have in accomplishing the long-range goals of most nations. Increase demands can be met by utilizing coal in technologies that achieve environmental goals while keeping the cost- per-unit of energy competitive. Results from projects in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program confirm that technology is the pathway to achieving these goals. The industry/government partnership, cemented over the past 10 years, is focused on moving the clean coal technologies into the domestic and international marketplaces. The Fifth Annual Clean Coal Technology Conference provides a forum to discuss these benchmark issues and the essential role and need for these technologies in the post-2000 era. This volume contains technical papers on: advanced coal process systems; advanced industrial systems; advanced cleanup systems; and advanced power generation systems. In addition, there are poster session abstracts. Selected papers from this proceedings have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  9. Study of Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on Nano-Structured Carbon Films using X-ray Photoelectron Study of Surface Cleaning Methods and Pyrolysis Temperature on...

  10. Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements - Chapter 6 Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements - Chapter 6 Clean...

  11. Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective (Chapter 8 of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective...

  12. Energy Department Awards $5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy Development, Energy Savings Energy Department Awards 5 Million to Spur Local Clean Energy Development, Energy Savings October 14, 2014 -...

  13. Quarterly Biomass Program/Clean Cities State Web Conference:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    feraci.pdf More Documents & Publications Quarterly Biomass ProgramClean Cities State Web Conference: May 6, 2010 Quarterly Biomass ProgramClean Cities State Web Conference: May...

  14. SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses May 24, 2012 - 5:10pm Addthis Green...

  15. Quarterly Biomass Program/Clean Cities States Web Conference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Biomass ProgramClean Cities States Web Conference: January 21, 2010 Quarterly Biomass ProgramClean Cities States Web Conference: January 21, 2010 Presentation from the...

  16. AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy...

  17. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Presentation from the U.S....

  18. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression Ignition Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engine Designs for Compression Ignition Engines Presentation from...

  19. Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High Efficiency While Avoiding Control Problems of HCCI Dilute Clean Diesel Combustion Achieves Low Emissions and High...

  20. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Applied low temperature combustion to the Navistar...

  1. Low-Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High-Efficiency Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Low-Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High-Efficiency Clean Combustion 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  2. High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Design for Compression Ignition Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006,...

  3. Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean Combustion 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

  4. Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion Advanced Combustion Technology to Enable High Efficiency Clean Combustion Summary of advanced combustion research at Cummins...

  5. Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines Computationally Efficient Modeling of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Engines...

  6. Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency Energy Department to Help Tribes Advance Clean Energy Projects and Increase Resiliency...

  7. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. tiarravt052ebert2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean...

  8. adopt clean technologies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    then his personal information must Walden, Eric 10 Energy Systems Engineering 1 Clean Coal Technologies Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Energy Systems Engineering 1 Clean...

  9. abundant efficient clean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Websites Summary: for India & US) workshop--December 8, 2012. Clean Coal Technology Projects updates on Consortium for Clean4th International Symposium on...

  10. Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for CHP - Presentation by Dresser Waukesha, June 2011 Ultra Clean and Efficient Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine for CHP...

  11. Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production...

  12. KAir Battery Wins Southwest Regional Clean Energy Business Plan...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition KAir Battery, a student team from Ohio State University, won the Southwest region of the Energy Department's National Clean...

  13. Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and Efficient Technologies Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and Efficient Technologies A brief created by...

  14. Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck Heavy Truck Clean Diesel (HTCD) Program: 2007 Demonstration Truck 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar Incorporated...

  15. aqueous parts cleaning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: This article describes CLEAN, an approach to the detection of low-energy solar neutrinos and neutrinos released from supernovae. The CLEAN concept is based on the...

  16. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    tiarravt043erickson2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation...

  17. Statement by Energy Secretary Steven Chu on New Clean Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Clean Energy Manufacturing Facility in Upstate New York Statement by Energy Secretary Steven Chu on New Clean Energy Manufacturing Facility in Upstate New York October 14, 2010...

  18. Raising Investment Funds for Clean Energy Programs & Working...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    purchase, and other clean energy mechanisms) Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Sectors (covers range of topics including credit enhancement,...

  19. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 11, No. 2 - April 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities Now is the official publication of the Clean Cities initiative. Articles include program-specific news, coalition news, industry news, and more.

  20. Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy Act Process Clean Air Act General Conformity Requirements and the National Environmental Policy...

  1. Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins Collaboration Road to Fuel Savings: Clean Diesel Trucks Gain Momentum with Nissan and Cummins...

  2. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 13, No.1 - February 2009 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities Now is the official newsletter of DOE's Clean Cities program. It includes articles on coalition activities, fleet and stakeholder success stories, and helpful resources.

  3. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 12, No. 2 - May 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Cities Now is the official newsletter of DOE's Clean Cities program. It includes articles on coalition activities, fleet and stakeholder success stories, and helpful resources.

  4. Structuring Credit Enhancements for Clean Energy Finance Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Structuring Credit Enhancements for Clean Energy Finance Programs (Text Version) Structuring Credit Enhancements for Clean Energy Finance Programs (Text Version) Below is a text...

  5. Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Games and activity book about energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies for kids....

  6. National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition - EERE Commercializati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Learn more about the Department of Energy's National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition structure, past finalists, and past...

  7. Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Securing America's Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet), Energy Efficiency & Renewable...

  8. Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements - Chapter 8 Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements -...

  9. Chapter 5. Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT U.S. DOE CLEAN ENERGY FINANCE GUIDE, THIRD EDITION DECEMBER 9, 2010 Chapter 5. Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured...

  10. Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements - Chapter 7 Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building Improvements -...

  11. Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Primer An overview of Commercial PACE programs, featuring an explanation of...

  12. Clean Energy Finance Guide for Residential and Commercial Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chapter 8 - 1 CLEAN ENERGY FINANCE GUIDE, THIRD EDITION DECEMBER 9, 2010 Chapter 8. Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective ...

  13. Secretary of Energy and Rep. Chabot Highlight Clean Coal and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Secretary of Energy and Rep. Chabot Highlight Clean Coal and Hydrogen Research and Tout America's Economic Growth in Ohio Secretary of Energy and Rep. Chabot Highlight Clean Coal...

  14. Obama Administration Announces Clean Coal Research Awards for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clean Coal Research Awards for Universities Across the Country Obama Administration Announces Clean Coal Research Awards for Universities Across the Country June 6, 2012 - 12:18pm...

  15. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes activities of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Program for the time of 1985-1995. Various clean coal technologies are described.

  16. Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Promoting a Green Economy through Clean Transportation Alternatives Town of Hempstead: Project Energy,...

  17. Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy Energy Department Launches Web Tool to Explore Pathways to Clean Energy Economy January 15, 2013 -...

  18. Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes - ORNL-FEERC Unregulated Emissions from High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Modes - ORNL-FEERC Poster presentation at...

  19. Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Combustion with Micro-Variable Circular-Orifice (MVCO) Fuel Injector and Adaptive PCCI Syngas Enhanced High Efficiency Low Temperature Combustion for Clean Diesel Engines...

  20. Special Delivery for Sustainability: Clean Cities Supports UPS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Special Delivery for Sustainability: Clean Cities Supports UPS in Expanding Natural Gas Operations Special Delivery for Sustainability: Clean Cities Supports UPS in Expanding...

  1. Evaluation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Combustion (HECC) Strategies for Meeting Future Emissions Regulations in Light-Duty Engines Evaluation of High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) Strategies for Meeting...

  2. EIS-0444: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy, LLC for the proposed Texas Clean Energy Project. The Project would use coal-based integrated gasification combined-cycle technology to generate electricity and...

  3. advanced surface cleaning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first-principles calculations Juarez L 13 Surface cleaning from laser-induced cavitation bubbles Claus-Dieter Ohl,a Physics Websites Summary: Surface cleaning from...

  4. Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Imagine a grid...

  5. Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

  6. Final Technical Report_Clean Energy Program_SLC-SELF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Glenn; Coward, Doug

    2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Technical Report for DOE's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, Award No. DE-EE0003813, submitted by St. Lucie County, FL (prime recipient) and the Solar and Energy Loan Fund (SELF), the program's third-party administrator. SELF is a 501(c)(3) and a certified Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). SELF is a community-based lending organization that operates the Clean Energy Loan Program, which focuses on improving the overall quality of life of underserved populations in Florida with an emphasis on home energy improvements and cost-effective renewable energy alternatives. SELF was launched in 2010 through the creation of the non-profit organization and with a $2.9 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block (EECBG) grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). SELF has its main office and headquarters in St. Lucie County, in the region known as the Treasure Coast in East-Central Florida. St. Lucie County received funding to create SELF as an independent non-profit institution, outside the control of local government. This was important for SELF to create its identity as an integral part of the business community and to help in its quest to become a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). This goal was accomplished in 2013, allowing SELF to focus on its mission to increase energy savings while serving markets that have struggled to find affordable financial assistance. These homeowners are most impacted by high energy costs. Energy costs are a disproportionate percentage of household expenses for low to moderate income (LMI) households. Electricity costs have been steadily rising in Florida by nearly 5% per year. Housing in LMI neighborhoods often includes older inefficient structures that further exacerbate the problem. Despite the many available clean energy solutions, most LMI property owners do not have the disposable income or equity in their homes necessary to afford the high upfront cost of energy retrofits. As a result, LMI property owners cannot achieve energy savings nor can they capture the assorted rebates and tax credits available for home energy improvements. Florida has one of the highest energy consumption rates in the country, in part due to high air conditioning use year-round, which has worsened with summer heat waves and record highs. Because the State has the 14th highest electricity rates nationwide, its residents greatly benefit from reducing their monthly energy costs. Reduced energy consumption by making energy-efficient improvements to buildings decreases the “carbon footprint” and provides environmental benefits and social good. Moreover, if Floridians save money on utilities, they can spend these savings on other things, boosting their local economy. Through its Clean Energy Loan Program, SELF is breaking down these barriers by helping LMI homeowners identify systemic solutions to their rising energy costs (through an energy audit performed by a state-certified energy rater) and then providing favorable financing to enable them to make these recommended home energy improvements. SELF’s clients are reducing their energy consumption by an average of 15-25%, depending on the types of improvements, and using the energy savings, rebates, and tax credits to help pay off the loans over time. Its clients are also enhancing their quality of life, making much-needed home improvements, and increasing the market value of their properties. The work performed for the program’s clients is also stimulating much-needed employment and economic development activity in the hardest hit job sector in Florida (i.e., the construction industry) and in geographic areas decimated by the recession and housing market collapse. SELF is a rare institution in that it joins social and financial missions, offering a helping hand to those without the means to find affordable financing. This supports the grant’s original project goal to become a leader and innovator in promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar technologies. S

  7. Midwest Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttica, John; Haefke, Cliff

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midwest Clean Energy Application Center (CEAC) was one of eight regional centers that promoted and assisted in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), waste heat to power (WHP), and district energy (DE) technologies and concepts throughout the United States between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. The key services the CEACs provided included: ? Market Opportunity Analyses – Supporting analyses of CHP market opportunities in diverse markets including industrial, federal, institutional, and commercial sectors. ? Education and Outreach – Providing information on the energy and non-energy benefits and applications of CHP to state and local policy makers, regulators, energy end-users, trade associations and others. Information was shared on the Midwest CEAC website: www.midwestcleanergy.org. ? Technical Assistance – Providing technical assistance to end-users and stakeholders to help them consider CHP, waste heat to power, and/or district energy with CHP in their facility and to help them through the project development process from initial CHP screening to installation. The Midwest CEAC provided services to the Midwest Region that included the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  8. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  9. potential energy Impacts of clean energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Amidst rising concerns about energy prices, the availability of reliable energy resources, air quality, and climate change, many states across the country are using clean energy policies to help meet their expanding electricity demand in a clean, low-cost, reliable manner. ??Nearly 40 states are using planning and incentive structures to promote clean energy within their own operations; ??More than 30 states have adopted a number of regulatory and market-based energy efficiency actions that increase investment in cost-effective energy efficiency by consumers, businesses, utilities, and public agencies; and ??More than 40 states have taken energy supply actions to support and encourage continued growth

  10. Clean Tech Now | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding RemovalCSSDepartmentDepartment ofCity andClean|CleanClean Tech

  11. Clean Venture 21 Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network JumpClean FuelsClean

  12. CleanFUEL USA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network JumpCleanCleanFUEL USA

  13. CleanLaunch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network JumpCleanCleanFUEL

  14. CleanTX Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network JumpCleanCleanFUELCleanTX

  15. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  16. Clean Energy Finance: Challenges and Opportunities of Early-Stage Energy Investing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heap, D.; Pless, J.; Aieta, N.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterized by a changing landscape and new opportunities, today's increasingly complex energy decision space will need innovative financing and investment models to appropriately assess risk and profitability. This report provides an overview of the current state of clean energy finance across the entire spectrum but with a focus on early stage investing, and it includes insights from investors across all investment classes. Further, this report aims to provide a roadmap with the mechanisms, limitations, and considerations involved in making successful investments by identifying risks, challenges, and opportunities in the clean energy sector.

  17. New Air Cleaning Strategies for Reduced Commercial Building Ventilation Energy ? FY11 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Destaillats, Hugo; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research carried out in this project focuses on developing novel volatile organic compounds (VOCs) air cleaning technologies needed to enable energy-saving reductions in ventilation rates. we targeted a VOC air cleaning system that could enable a 50% reduction in ventilation rates. In a typical commercial HVAC system that provides a mixture of recirculated and outdoor air, a VOC air cleaner in the supply airstream must have a 15% to 20% VOC removal efficiency to counteract a 50% reduction in outdoor air supply.

  18. Geothermal Power Plants — Meeting Clean Air Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal power plants can meet the most stringent clean air standards. They emit little carbon dioxide, very low amounts of sulfur dioxide, and no nitrogen oxides. See Charts 1, 2, and 3 below.

  19. Clean Air Act of Montana (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Clean Air Act of Montana is to achieve and maintain levels of air quality to "protect human health and safety and, to the greatest degree practicable, prevent injury to plant and...

  20. Clean Cities Annual Metrics Report 2009 (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Document provides Clean Cities coalition metrics about the use of alternative fuels; the deployment of alternative fuel vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and idle reduction initiatives; fuel economy activities; and programs to reduce vehicle miles driven.

  1. Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Clean energy manufacturer" is defined as a biofuel producer, a manufacturer of renewable energy or nuclear equipment/products, or "products used for energy conservation, storage, or grid efficie...

  2. Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Program (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2011, Virginia created the Clean Energy Manufacturing Incentive Grant Program. The program is meant to replace the [http://en.openei.org/wiki/Solar_Manufacturing_Incentive_Grant_%28SMIG%29...

  3. Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative Scenario Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Analysis of potential policy options to help the state reach the 70% Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) goal, including possible pathways to attain the goal based on currently available technology.

  4. Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    President Obama

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Obama announces more than $8 billion in loan guarantees for two new nuclear reactors as part of the Administration's commitment to providing clean energy and creating new jobs.

  5. Making Refinery Wastewater Clean | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refinery Wastewater Clean Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on...

  6. QER- Comment of ALLETE Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please accept the attached comments for docketing. These are submitted on behalf of ALLETE Clean Energy. If you have any questions or need anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me. Many thanks,

  7. CLEAN, CLEVER AND COMPETITIVE NORDIC ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -INTENSIVE INDUSTRIES ­ PROCESS OPTIMIZATION AND REDESIGN 25 NORDIC SOLUTIONS FOR CLEAN ENERGY PRODUCTION 27 SOLAR of environmentally friendly practices in the development of the society. Many small and medium size companies

  8. New venture commercialization of clean energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David S. (David Seth)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy technologies lower harmful emissions associated with the generation and use of power (e.g. CO2) and many of these technologies have been shown to be cost effective and to provide significant benefits to adopters. ...

  9. Local Option- Property Assessed Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment...

  10. Investing in Clean, Safe Nuclear Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    President Obama announces more than $8 billion in loan guarantees for two new nuclear reactors as part of the Administration's commitment to providing clean energy and creating new jobs.

  11. Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Clean Cities 2011 Annual Metrics Report Caley Johnson National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-7A30-56091 December 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the...

  12. Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  13. State perspectives on clean coal technology deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, T. [State of Illinois Washington Office, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    State governments have been funding partners in the Clean Coal Technology program since its beginnings. Today, regulatory and market uncertainties and tight budgets have reduced state investment in energy R and D, but states have developed program initiatives in support of deployment. State officials think that the federal government must continue to support these technologies in the deployment phase. Discussions of national energy policy must include attention to the Clean Coal Technology program and its accomplishments.

  14. THE 3R ANTHRACITE CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY Economical Conversion of Browncoal to Anthracite Type Clean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Someus

    pac i ties. The 3R An thra cite Clean Coal end prod uct and tech nol ogy may ad van ta geously be in

  15. ``How clean is clean`` in the United States federal and Washington State cleanup regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landau, H.G. [Landau Associates, Inc., Edmonds, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The enactment of legislation and promulgation of implementing regulations generally involves the resolution of conflicting goals. Defining ``How Clean is Clean?`` in federal and state cleanup laws, regulations, and policies is no exception. Answering the ``How Clean is Clean?`` question has resulted in the identification of some important and sometimes conflicting goals. Continuing resolution of the following conflicting goals is the key to effect cleanup of hazardous waste sites: Expediency vs. Fairness; Flexibility vs. Consistency; Risk Reduction vs. Risk Causation; and Permanence vs. Cost Effectiveness.

  16. What is Clean Cities? October 2011 (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Clean Cities program and includes the contact information for its 85 coalitions. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP), Clean Cities is a government-industry partnership that reduces petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. Clean Cities contributes to the energy, environmental, and economic security of the United States by supporting local decisions to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum. Established in 1993 in response to the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, the partnership provides tools and resources for voluntary, community-centered programs to reduce consumption of petroleum-based fuels. In nearly 100 coalitions, government agencies and private companies voluntarily come together under the umbrella of Clean Cities. The partnership helps all parties identify mutual interests and meet the objectives of reducing the use of petroleum, developing regional economic opportunities, and improving air quality. Clean Cities deploys technologies and practices developed by VTP. These include idle-reduction equipment, electric-drive vehicles, fuel economy measures, and renewable and alternative fuels, such as natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), electricity, hydrogen, biofuels, and biogas. Idle-reduction equipment is targeted primarily to buses and heavy-duty trucks, which use more than 2 billion gallons of fuel every year in the United States while idling. Clean Cities fuel economy measures include public education on vehicle choice and fuel-efficient driving practices.

  17. Department of Energy Announces Funding for Nationwide Student-Focused Clean

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclear EnergySouth Carolina | DepartmentMeetingEnergy

  18. Department of Energy Announces Funding for Nationwide Student-Focused Clean

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 ThisFinal ReportDevelopment |Projects | DepartmentEnergy

  19. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 8–10 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 2–3 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.2×10?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  20. Focus in Ecuadorian Quechua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shireman, Joshua

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the adverb utkata, “quickly,” is unfocused. In (4), it is focused. (3) njuka utkata at?ku-ta kati-rka-ni. 1sg quickly dog-ACC chase-PAST-1sg “I quickly chased the dog.” (4) njuka utkata-mi at?ku-ta kati-rka-ni. 1sg quickly-FOC dog...-ACC chase-PAST-1sg “I quickly chased the dog.” 1 I would like to acknowledge our Quechua consultant Rosa-Maria Masaquiza along with Dr. Harold Torrence and our Field Methods class in the spring...