Sample records for fly ash pile

  1. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  2. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, D.R.; Velenyi, L.J.; Pepera, M.A.; Dolhyj, S.R.

    1986-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  3. Activation of fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbin, David R. (New Castle, DE); Velenyi, Louis J. (Lyndhurst, OH); Pepera, Marc A. (Northfield, OH); Dolhyj, Serge R. (Parma, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is activated by heating a screened magnetic fraction of the ash in a steam atmosphere and then reducing, oxidizing and again reducing the hydrothermally treated fraction. The activated fly ash can be used as a carbon monoxide disproportionating catalyst useful in the production of hydrogen and methane.

  4. Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  5. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  6. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  7. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  8. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  9. Fly ash enhanced metal removal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

  10. Fly Ash Amendments Catalyze Soil Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amonette, James E.; Kim, Jungbae; Russell, Colleen K.; Palumbo, A. V.; Daniels, William L.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the effects of four alkaline fly ashes {Class C (sub-bituminous), Class F (bituminous), Class F [bituminous with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) products], and Class F (lignitic)} on a reaction that simulates the enzyme-mediated formation of humic materials in soils. The presence of FGD products completely halted the reaction, and the bituminous ash showed no benefit over an ash-free control. The sub-bituminous and lignitic fly ashes, however, increased the amount of polymer formed by several-fold. The strong synergetic effect of these ashes when enzyme is present apparently arises from the combined effects of metal oxide co-oxidation (Fe and Mn oxides), alkaline pH, and physical stabilization of the enzyme (porous silica cenospheres).

  11. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  12. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  13. Approaches to the petrographic characterization of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F.; Graham, U.M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enhanced understanding of fly ash properties provided by petrographic analysis, a level of detail chemical analysis cannot provide, will be essential in the upgrading and utilization of fly ash produced in boilers retrofitted to meet clean air standards. Howe et al estimated that over 25% of the fly ash produced in Kentucky in 1992 would not have met the Kentucky Department of Transportation limit of 3% loss-on-ignition (LOI) for class F fly ash used as a Portland cement admixture. The conversion of boilers to low-NO{sub x} emission units increases fly ash carbon, hence LOI, by 150-200% rendering the fly ash unsuitable for highway construction use in concrete. The preservation of fly ash`s market share will require increased attention to the removal of excess carbon from the fly ash. In this paper, we will discuss the basic components of fly ash. An example of the petrographic analysis of fly ash from a Kentucky power plant will be used to illustrate the partitioning of fly ash components by size, as well as within the fly ash collection system.

  14. Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

  15. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  16. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, James G. (Collegeville, PA); Mathur, Akshay (Tampa, FL); Simpson, James C. (Perkiomenville, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants.

  17. Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

  18. SINGLE ELEMENT TEST PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    : Fly-ash is a waste product produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It is often used. Introduction Fly-ash is a fine powdery material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. Fly-ash need to dispose fly-ash from these ponds. Fly-ash is often used as structural fill in order to dispose

  19. Mercury capture by distinct fly ash carbon forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Sakulpitakphon, T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon was separated from the fly ash from a Kentucky power plant using density gradient centrifugation. Using a lithium heterolpolytungstate high-density media, relative concentrations of inertinite (up to 85% vol.), isotropic carbon (up to 79% vol.), and anisotropic carbon (up to 76% vol.) were isolated from the original fly ash. Mercury concentration was lowest in the parent fly ash (which contains non-carbon components); followed by inertinite, isotropic coke, mixed isotropic-anisotropic coke fraction, and, with the highest concentration, the anisotropic coke concentrate. The latter order corresponds to the increase in BET surface area of the fly ash carbons. Previous studies have demonstrated the capture of mercury by fly ash carbon. This study confirms prior work demonstrating the varying role of carbon types in the capture, implying that variability in the carbon content influences the amount of mercury retained on the fly ash.

  20. Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  1. Process for the recovery of alumina from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murtha, M.J.

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in the lime-sinter process for recovering alumina from pulverized coal fly ash is disclosed. The addition of from 2 to 10 weight percent carbon and sulfur to the fly ash-calcium carbonate mixture increase alumina recovery at lower sintering temperatures.

  2. Properties of concrete containing wood/coal fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, D.M.; Larrimore, C.L.; Fouad, F.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities are increasingly interested in co-firing wood with coal in existing pulverized coal units. The co-firing technology is a means of developing a relatively low-cost renewable energy resource, as well as of supporting customers and community by making energy with biomass that might otherwise have been land-filled. However, recent changes in the ASTM C618 standard for fly ash as cement replacement restrict the definition of fly ash that includes non-coal sources. As a result, wood co-firing could affect the market for the fly ash, reducing ash sales revenue, increasing ash disposal costs, and overall substantially increasing the cost of the co-firing technology. In order to address concerns about the effect of wood ash/coal ash mixtures on concrete properties, a study was conducted by University of Alabama at Birmingham, Southern Company, EPRI, and the State of Alabama. This study compared the effects on properties of concrete made with fly ash from coal and made with fly ash from co-firing up to 30% wood with coal. Fly ashes from three plants were used, with two of the ashes from actual co-firing experience and the third an artificial blend of wood and coal ash. Concrete test cylinders were made of several cement/fly ash mixes, and enough were made to allow testing periodically over a one year time period. Test measurements included workability, setting time, air content, compressive and flexural strength, rapid chloride permeability and freeze thaw. It was concluded on the basis of these tests that the wood ash content had no detrimental effect on the plastic and hardened properties of the concrete.

  3. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  4. Fluidization characteristics of power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. [MS Thesis; 40 references

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, C.T.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the continuing research on aluminum recovery from fly ash by HiChlor process, a plexiglass fluidization column system was constructed for measurement of fluidization parameters for power-plant fly ashes and fly ash-charcoal mixtures. Several bituminous and subbituminous coal fly ashes were tested and large differences in fluidization characteristics were observed. Fly ashes which were mechanically collected fluidized uniformly at low gas flow rates. Most fly ashes which were electrostatically precipitated exhibited channeling tendency and did not fluidize uniformly. Fluidization characteristics of electrostatically collected ashes improve when the finely divided charcoal powder is added to the mixture. The fluidization of the mixture was aided initially by a mechanical stirrer. Once the fluidization had succeeded, the beds were ready to fluidize without the assistance of a mechanical action. Smooth fluidization and large bed expansion were usually observed. The effects of charcoal size and aspect ratio on fluidization characteristics of the mixtures were also investigated. Fluidization characteristics of a fly ash-coal mixture were tested. The mixture fluidized only after being oven-dried for a few days.

  5. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

    1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  6. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  7. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  8. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  9. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  10. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  11. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

  12. Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    Dechlorination ability of municipal waste incineration fly ash for polychlorinated phenols Leona incineration fly ash at 200 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. Thermodynamic calculations have been carried out ash produced by municipal waste incineration (MWI) have clearly demonstrated that MWI fly ash can

  13. Studies of fly ash using thermal analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hanxu; Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Sisk, B. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved thermoanalytical methods have been developed that are capable of quantitative identification of various components of fly ash from a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustion system. The thermogravimetric procedure developed can determine quantities of H{sub 2}O, Ca(OH){sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4} and carbonaceous matter in fly ash with accuracy comparable to more time-consuming ASTM methods. This procedure is a modification of the Mikhail-Turcotte methods that can accurately analyze bed ash, with higher accuracy regarding the greater amount of carbonaceous matter in fly ash. In addition, in conjunction with FTIR and SEM/EDS analysis, the reduction mechanism of CaSO{sub 4} as CaSO{sub 4} + 4H{sub 2} = CaS + 4H{sub 2}O has been confirmed in this study. This mechanism is important in analyzing and evaluating sulfur capture in fluidized-bed combustion systems.

  14. Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

  15. High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

  16. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  17. RESEARCH NEEDS IN MINERAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in electric power plants. It is captured by either mechanical separators, electrostatic. 2.0 Research Needs Concerning Fly Ash Utilization 2.1 CLSM Fly Ash Slurry Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), as classified by ACI Committee 229, have been produced using fly ash slurry [9

  18. TRACE ELEMENTS LEACHING FROM ORGANIC SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON FLY ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    and Se for organic soil-HCFA mixtures. Keywords: organic soil, fly ash, coal combustion products, CCPs INTRODUCTION Fly ash is a silt-size particulate collected by air pollution control systems at coal fly ashes (HCFAs) generally are disposed in landfills (Hodges and Keating 1999). However, many HCFAs

  19. Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

  20. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic [Institute for Biological Research 'Sinisa Stankovic,' Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Ecology

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  1. Maintaining and Improving Marketability of Coal Fly Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is produced when coal is consumed by power plants Fly ash can be used beneficially in numerous applications-fired power plants work to create cleaner skies, they'll likely fill up landfills with millions more tons.05 0.05 #12;6 Challenge: Mercury Controls One approach to reducing mercury emissions from power plants

  2. Clay formation and metal fixation during weathering of coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zevenbergen, C.; Bradley, J.P.; Reeuwijk, L.P. Van; Shyam, A.K.; Hjelmar, O.; Comans, R.N.J.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enormous and worldwide production of coal fly ash cannot be durably isolated from the weathering cycle, and the weathering characteristics of fly ash must be known to understand the long-term environmental impact. The authors studied the weathering of two coal fly ashes and compared them with published data from weathered volcanic ash, it's closest natural analogue. Both types of ash contain abundant aluminosilicate glass, which alters to noncrystalline clay. However, this study reveals that the kinetics of coal fly ash weathering are more rapid than those of volcanic ash because the higher pH of fresh coal fly ash promotes rapid dissolution of the glass. After about 10 years of weathering, the noncrystalline clay content of coal fly ash is higher than that of 250-year-old volcanic ash. The observed rapid clay formation together with heavy metal fixation imply that the long-term environmental impact of coal fly ash disposal may be less severe and the benefits more pronounced than predicted from previous studies on unweathered ash. Their findings suggest that isolating coal fly ash from the weathering cycle may be counterproductive because, in the long-term under conditions of free drainage, fly ash is converted into fertile soil capable of supporting agriculture.

  3. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, John W. (Belle Mead, NJ); Wecharatana, Methi (Parsippany, NJ); Jaturapitakkul, Chai (Bangkok, TH); Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E. (late of Livingston, NJ)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  4. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  5. Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    in the United States generate 80 million tons of fly ash as a by-product each year, primarily from coal combustion [1]. Fly ash is typically disposed in landfills, but it is preferred to convert fly ashUse of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung

  6. Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyung Jun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash at 90days ............... 38 5-13 Stress Strain Curve of 6% CaCl2+10% Fly Ash at 90days ............... 39 5-14 Stress Strain Curve of 4% CaCl2+15% Fly Ash at 90days ............... 39 5-15 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy... (E-SEM) of Class F Fly Ash ................................................................................. 40 5-16 Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (E-SEM) of Control Soil after 7 Days of Curing...

  7. Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

  8. Geotechnical properties of fly and bottom ash mixtures for use in highway embankments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.; Prezzi, M.; Salgado, R. [Korean Institute for Water & Environment, Taejon (Republic of Korea). Dam Safety Research Center

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Class F fly ash and bottom ash are the solid residue byproducts produced by coal-burning electric utilities. They are usually disposed of together as a waste in utility disposal sites with a typical disposal rate of 80% fly ash and 20% bottom ash. Direct use of these materials in construction projects consuming large volumes of materials, such as highway embankment construction, not only provides a promising solution to the disposal problem, but also an economic alternative to the use of traditional materials. Representative samples of class F fly and bottom ash were collected from two utility power plants in Indiana and tested for their mechanical properties (compaction, permeability, strength, stiffness, and compressibility). Three mixtures of fly and bottom ash with different mixture ratios (i.e., 50, 75, and 100% fly ash content by weight) were prepared for testing. Test results indicated that ash mixtures compare favorably with conventional granular materials.

  9. Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu; Ye Li; Jinsheng Gao [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Department of Chemical Engineering for Energy Resources and Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification of Ministry of Education

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali-activated fly ash Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering ; Materials Science 12 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated fly ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineering ; Materials Science 9 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

  12. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cetin, Bora [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Aydilek, Ahmet H., E-mail: aydilek@umd.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Li, Lin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS 17068 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the evaluation of leaching potential of fly ash-lime mixed soils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This objective is met with experimental and numerical analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn leaching decreases with increase in fly ash content while Ba, B, Cu increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu while Zn increases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical analysis predicted lower field metal concentrations. - Abstract: A study was conducted to evaluate the leaching potential of unpaved road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater impacts of barium, boron, copper, and zinc leaching. This objective was met by a combination of batch water leach tests, column leach tests, and computer modeling. The laboratory tests were conducted on soil alone, fly ash alone, and URM-fly ash-lime kiln dust mixtures. The results indicated that an increase in fly ash and lime content has significant effects on leaching behavior of heavy metals from URM-fly ash mixture. An increase in fly ash content and a decrease in lime content promoted leaching of Ba, B and Cu whereas Zn leaching was primarily affected by the fly ash content. Numerically predicted field metal concentrations were significantly lower than the peak metal concentrations obtained in laboratory column leach tests, and field concentrations decreased with time and distance due to dispersion in soil vadose zone.

  13. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  14. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Norton; Hongqun Yang; Robert C. Brown; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John Erjavec; Joseph M. Okoh

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using fly ash from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was from Blacksville coal. Elemental Hg was injected upstream from samples of fly ash loaded onto filters housed in an oven at 120 or 180 C. Concentrations of oxidized and elemental Hg downstream from the filters were determined using the Ontario Hydro method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables affecting Hg oxidation. The presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were all important with respect to Hg oxidation, with NO{sub 2} and HCl being the most important. The presence of NO suppressed Hg oxidation in these tests. Although the two fly ashes were chemically and mineralogically diverse, there were generally no large differences in catalytic potential (for oxidizing Hg) between them. Similarly, no ash fraction appeared to be highly catalytic relative to other ash fractions. This includes fractions enriched in unburned carbon and fractions enriched in iron oxides. Although some differences of lesser magnitude were observed in the amount of oxidized Hg formed, levels of oxidized Hg generally tracked well with the surface areas of the different ashes and ash fractions. Therefore, although the Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, this could be due to the relatively high surface area of that ash. Similarly, for Blacksville fly ash, using nonmagnetic ash resulted in more Hg oxidation than using magnetic ash, but this again tracked well with the relative surface areas of the two ash fractions. Test results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important in Hg oxidation chemistry than the fly ash composition. Combustion tests were performed in which Blacksville and PRB fly ashes were injected into filtered (via a baghouse with Teflon bags) flue gas obtained while firing PRB coal in a 35 kW combustor. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the Hg speciation after fly ash injection. Wall effects in the combustor complicated interpretation of testing data, although a number of observations could still be made. The amount of Hg collected in the Ontario Hydro impingers was lower than anticipated, and is probably due to sorption of Hg by the fly ash. While firing PRB coal without any ash injection, the percent oxidized Hg in the gas stream was fairly high (average of 63%). The high levels of vapor phase oxidized Hg in these base line tests may be due to catalytic effects from the refractory materials in the combustor. When PRB fly ash was injected into a filtered PRB flue gas stream, the percentage of oxidized Hg in the gas stream decreased dramatically. Decreases in the percentage of oxidized Hg were also observed while injecting Blacksville fly ash, but to a lesser extent. Injecting whole Blacksville fly ash into the filtered PRB flue gas appeared to result in greater concentrations of oxidized Hg relative to the tests where whole PRB fly ash was injected. However, because the Blacksville fly ash has a relatively high surface area, this may be only a surface area effect.

  15. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--January 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7--2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash beneficiation have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550--750{degrees}C. The P{sub 02} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively.

  16. Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

  17. California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S. [Indian Institute for Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. for Civil Engineering

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

  18. Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* , L. S. Fisher1 , J of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field and its influence on carbon sequestration. Also, addition of fly ash to soil, while generally considered

  19. Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hyung Jun

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    in soil to verify the effectiveness and optimum ratio of calcium chloride and Class F fly ash in soil stabilization. Mix design was programmed at pure calcium chloride concentrations at 0% to 6% and Class F fly ash at 10 to 15%. Laboratory tests showed...

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of metal leaching from fly ash-amended highway bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    December 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Coal combustion by products Fly ash Heavy metals Leaching road materials (URM) mixed with lime activated high carbon fly ashes and to evaluate groundwater is produced in the United States as a by-product of burning coal in electric power plants (ACAA, 2009

  1. Use of rubber and bentonite added fly ash as a liner material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cokca, Erdal; Yilmaz, Zeka

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many countries regulations require all hazardous waste disposal facilities to be lined with suitable impermeable barriers to protect against contamination. In this study, a series of laboratory tests on rubber and bentonite added fly ash were conducted. The aim of the tests was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash, rubber and bentonite as a low hydraulic conductivity liner material. Type C fly ash was obtained from Soma thermal power plant in Turkey; rubber in pulverized form was waste from the retreading industry. To investigate the properties of rubber and bentonite added fly ash, hydraulic conductivity, leachate analysis, unconfined compression, split tensile strength, one-dimensional consolidation, swell and freeze/thaw cycle tests were performed. The overall evaluation of results have revealed that rubber and bentonite added fly ash showed good promise and a candidate for construction of a liner.

  2. Modeling the formation and size distribution of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of mathematical models has been developed to predict the size distribution of fly ash particles formed in pulverized coal combustion. The large particle mode of the size distribution, typically centered about 10 to 20 ..mu..m, is predicted by a simple breakup model that is based on the complete coalescence of molten mineral inclusions within fragments of the devolatilized coal char. The ultrafine particle mode, that is typically centered about 0.1 to 0.2 ..mu..m, is modeled in terms of ash volatilization, nucleation, and coagulation. Silica and alumina are reduced to volatile suboxides through reactions at the char surface. The volatile suboxides are transported from the char surface where they are oxidized back to the stable oxides in the bulk gas, and then nucleated in accordance with homogeneous nucleation theory. The ultrafine nuclei coagulate in accordance with Brownian coagulation theory. The predicted particle size spectra have been compared to measured size distributions from a pilot-scale combustor and a full-scale utility boiler. Considering the disproportionate loss of coarse particles in the pilot-scale unit, the agreement between the predicted and measured size distributions was considered reasonably good. Both the predicted ultrafine and large particle modes agreed reasonably well with the measured particle size distribution for the full scale boiler. The validated computer models were used to study the effect of changes in the coal ash content, coal particle size, and the combustion flame temperature.

  3. Evaluation of the effects of coal fly ash amendments on the toxicity of a contaminated marine sediment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, R.M.; Perron, M.M.; Friedman, C.L.; Suuberg, E.M.; Pennell, K.G.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Ryba, S.A. [US EPA, Narragansett, RI (USA). Office for Research and Development

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches for cleaning up contaminated sediments range from dredging to in situ treatment. In this study, we discuss the effects of amending reference and contaminated sediments with coal fly ash to reduce the bioavailability and toxicity of a field sediment contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Six fly ashes and a coconut charcoal were evaluated in 7-d whole sediment toxicity tests with a marine amphipod (Ampelisca abdita) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). Fly ashes with high carbon content and the coconut charcoal showed proficiency at reducing toxicity. Some of the fly ashes demonstrated toxicity in the reference treatments. It is suspected that some of this toxicity is related to the presence of ammonia associated with fly ashes as a result of postoxidation treatment to reduce nitrous oxide emissions. Relatively simple methods exist to remove ammonia from fly ash before use, and fly ashes with low ammonia content are available. Fly ashes were also shown to effectively reduce overlying water concentrations of several PAHs. No evidence was seen of the release of the metals cadmium, copper, nickel, or lead from the fly ashes. A preliminary 28-d polychaete bioaccumulation study with one of the high-carbon fly ashes and a reference sediment was also performed. Although preliminary, no evidence was seen of adverse effects to worm growth or lipid content or of accumulation of PAHs or mercury from exposure to the fly ash. These data show fly ashes with high carbon content could represent viable remedial materials for reducing the bioavailability of organic contaminants in sediments.

  4. Site-specific study on stabilization of acid-generating mine tailings using coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, J.Q.; Wang, H.L.; Kovac, V.; Fyfe, J. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A site-specific study on stabilizing acid-generating mine tailings from Sudbury Mine using a coal fly ash from Nanticoke Generating Station is presented in this paper. The objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility of codisposal of the fly ash and mine tailings to reduce environmental impacts of Sudbury tailings disposal sites. The study includes three phases, i.e., characterization of the mine tailings, and coal fly ash, oxidation tests on the mine tailings and kinetic column permeation tests. The results of the experiments indicate that when permeated with acid mine drainage, the hydraulic conductivity of Nanticoke coal fly ash decreased more than three orders of magnitude (from 1 x 10{sup -6} to 1 x 10{sup -9} cm/s), mainly due to chemical reactions between the ash solids and acid mine drainage. Furthermore, the hydraulic gradient required for acid mine drainage to break through the coal fly ash is increased up to ten times (from 17 to 150) as compared with that for water. The results also show that the leachate from coal fly ash neutralizes the acidic pore fluid of mine tailings. The concentrations of trace elements in effluents from all kinetic column permeation tests indicated that coplacement of coal fly ash with mine tailings has the benefit of immobilizing trace elements, especially heavy metals. All regulated element concentrations from effluent during testing are well below the leachate quality criteria set by the local regulatory authority.

  5. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, January--March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Yilmaz, E.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three year project that was proposed is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the benefication of fly ash by carbon burnout. The increasing use of coal fly ash as pozzolanic material in Portland cement concrete means that there is the highest economic potential in marketability of large volumes of fly ash. For the concrete industry to consider large scale use the fly ash must be of the highest quality. This means that the residual carbon content of the fly ash must have an acceptable loss on ignition (LOI) value, usually between 7-2% residual carbon. The economic gains to be had from low-carbon ash is a fact that is generally accepted by the electricity generating companies. However, since the cost of producing low-carbon in large quantities, based on present technology, far outweighs any financial gains, no electrical power company using coal as its fuel at present considers the effort worthwhile. The concrete industry would use fly ash in cement concrete mix if it can be assured of its LOI value. At present no utility company would give such assurance. Hence with several million tons of fly ash produced by a single power plant per year all that can be done is to dump the fly ash in landfills. The kinetics of fly ash benefication have been investigated in the zone II kinetic regime, using a Cahn TG 121 microbalance in the temperature 550-750{degrees}C. The P{sub O{sub 2}} and total surface area dependence of the reaction kinetics were determined using a vacuum accessory attached to the microbalance and a surface area analyzer (ASAP 2010), respectively. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions using whole fly ash samples as well as magnetic and nonmagnetic concentrates from sized fly ash. Only the Blacksville ash contained magnetic phases. The whole and fractionated fly ash samples were analyzed for morphology, chemical composition, mineralogical composition, total organic carbon, porosity, and surface area. Mineralogically, the Blacksville ash was composed predominantly of magnetite, hematite, quartz, and mullite, while the PRB ash contained mostly quartz with lesser amounts of lime, periclase, and calcium aluminum oxide. The iron oxides in the Blacksville ash were concentrated almost entirely in the largest size fraction. As anticipated, there was not a clean separation of magnetic (Fe-rich) and nonmagnetic (aluminosilicate-rich) phases for the Blacksville ash. The Blacksville ash had a significantly higher surface area and a much higher unburned carbon content than the PRB ash. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. Concentrations of total, oxidized, and elemental Hg downstream from the ash samples were determined by the Ontario Hydro Method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables. Based on the statistical analyses, the presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} and all two-way gas interactions were significant. In addition, it appears that even four-factor interactions between those gases are significant. The HCl, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were critical gases resulting in Hg oxidation, while the presence of NO appeared to suppress oxidation. The Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, but this could be largely due to the higher surface area of the Blacksville ash. Temperature was not a statistically important factor. The magnetic (Fe-rich) phases did not appear to be more catalytically active than the nonmagnetic phases, and unburned carbon did not appear to play a critical role in oxidation chemistry.

  7. Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z. [Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

  8. Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

  9. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, October 1996--December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodoo, J.N.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A. [and others

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called {open_quotes}Loss On Ignition{close_quotes} (LOI). The concrete producer`s day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

  10. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  11. Leaching of Metals from Fly ash-Amended Permeable Reactive Barriers Doina L. Morar 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    (Petzrick 2001). Unfortunately, this HCC fly ash cannot be beneficially reused in the construction industry organic and inorganic pollutants. Specific reactive materials such as wood chips, limestone, manure (USEPA

  12. aluminum-fly ash metal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of AluminumFly Ash...

  13. Investigation of the potential of fly ash as an adsorbent for removal of priority pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zardkoohi, Minoo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Aydin Akgerman Adsorption isotherms for adsorption of phenol, p-chlorophenol, 2, 4, dichlorophenol, cadmium and lead from water onto fly ash were determined. These isotherms were modeled by the Freundlich isotherm. The value of Freundlich isotherm..., parameter n indicated that the adsorption isotherms for contaminants studied were unfavorable. Phenol displayed a much higher aAinity for fly ash than chlorophenol and 2, 4 dichlorophenol Adsorption isotherms for the trace metals studied were slightly...

  14. Coal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings to harmful trace elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    inhabiting settling impoundments receiving slurried ash from a coal-fired power plant located on the U. SCoal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings Keywords: Coal fly ash basin Common Grackle Contaminants Quiscalus quiscala Selenium a b s t r a c t Birds

  15. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

  16. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  17. Selenium And Arsenic Speciation in Fly Ash From Full-Scale Coal-Burning Utility Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, F.E.; Senior, C.L.; Chu, P.; Ladwig, K.; Huffman, G.P.; /Kentucky U. /Reaction Engin. Int. /Elect. Power Res. Inst., Palo Alto

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy has been used to determine directly the oxidation states and speciation of selenium and arsenic in 10 fly ash samples collected from full-scale utility plants. Such information is needed to assess the health risk posed by these elements in fly ash and to understand their behavior during combustion and in fly ash disposal options, such as sequestration in tailings ponds. Selenium is found predominantly as Se(IV) in selenite (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) species, whereas arsenic is found predominantly as As(V) in arsenate (AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) species. Two distinct types of selenite and arsenate spectra were observed depending upon whether the fly ash was derived from eastern U.S. bituminous (Fe-rich) coals or from western subbituminous or lignite (Ca-rich) coals. Similar spectral details were observed for both arsenic and selenium in the two different types of fly ash, suggesting that the post-combustion behavior and capture of both of these elements are likely controlled by the same dominant element or phase in each type of fly ash.

  18. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  19. Hydration studies of calcium sulfoaluminate cements blended with fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Maté, M.; De la Torre, A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); León-Reina, L. [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)] [Servicios Centrales de Apoyo a la Investigación, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Aranda, M.A.G. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain) [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); CELLS-Alba synchrotron, Carretera BP 1413, Km. 3.3, E-08290 Cerdanyola, Barcelona (Spain); Santacruz, I., E-mail: isantacruz@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this work is to study the hydration and properties of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes blended with fly ash (FA) and the corresponding mortars at different hydration ages. Laboratory X-ray powder diffraction, rheological studies, thermal analysis, porosimetry and compressive strength measurements were performed. The analysis of the diffraction data by Rietveld method allowed quantifying crystalline phases and overall amorphous contents. The studied parameters were: i) FA content, 0, 15 and 30 wt.%; and ii) water addition, water-to-CSA mass ratio (w/CSA = 0.50 and 0.65), and water-to-binder mass ratio (w/b = 0.50). Finally, compressive strengths after 6 months of 0 and 15 wt.% FA [w/CSA = 0.50] mortars were similar: 73 ± 2 and 72 ± 3 MPa, respectively. This is justified by the filler effect of the FA as no strong evidences of reactivity of FA with CSA were observed. These results support the partial substitution of CSA cements with FA with the economic and environmental benefits.

  20. Investigation of fly ash carbon by thermal analysis and optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R. [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Boral Material Technologies Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Rathbone, R.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previous study investigated various fly ashes that had comparable loss on ignition values, but significant differences with respect to air entrainment performance. Thermal analysis data suggested that a poorly performing fly ash, with respect to air entrainment, contained a higher proportion of carbon that gasifies (oxidizes) at comparatively low temperatures. A relatively high abundance of isotropic carbon was identified in the poor-performing ash using optical microscopy. The present investigation examined a larger collection of fly ash samples to determine if thermal analysis could be used as a prognostic tool for fly ash performance. An attempt was made to correlate mortar air and foam index values for each sample with differential thermal analysis (DTA) data. Optical microscopy and BET surface area analysis were used as supportive techniques. No clear relationship could be established with the thermal or optical methods, although fly ash performance did correlate well with BET surface area. A low temperature component of the DTA exotherms was considered to be a function of inorganic catalytic species that reside on the carbon surface and lower the ignition temperature.

  1. EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Norton

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. The Ontario Hydro method was used to determine the total amount of Hg passing through the filter as well as the percentages of elemental and oxidized Hg collected. Results indicated that substantial amounts of Hg oxidation did not occur with either fly ash, regardless of the temperature used for testing. When oxidation was observed, the magnitude of the oxidation was comparable between the two fly ashes. These results suggest that the gas matrix may be more important than the ash components with respect to the distribution of Hg species observed in gaseous effluents at coal-fired power plants.

  2. Respirable aerosols from fluidized bed coal combustion. 3. Elemental composition of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, S.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace element constituents in fly ash from an experimental atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) are reported and compared with pulverized coal combustor (PCC) data and those from other fluidized bed combustors. Bulk and size-separated particles were collected and analyzed using spark source mass spectrometry. Fluidized bed combustion ash was similar to PCC ash in minor and trace element composition, but AFBC ash showed less size dependence of elemental composition. Bulk particle elemental composition varied with sampling position within the effluent stream. Penetration of elements through each cleanup stage and elemental enrichment were a function of the cleanup stage and the element under consideration.

  3. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

  4. Investigation of MSWI fly ash melting characteristic by DSC-DTA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Rundong [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)], E-mail: leerd@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, Lei; Yang, Tianhua; Raninger, Bernhard [Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering, Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy, Shenyang Institute of Aeronautical Engineering, Shenyang 110136 (China)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The melting process of MSWI (Municipal Solid Waste Incineration) fly ash has been studied by high-temperature DSC-DTA experiments. The experiments were performed at a temperature range of 20-1450 deg. C, and the considerable variables included atmosphere (O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}), heating rates (5 deg. C/min, 10 deg. C/min, 20 deg. C/min) and CaO addition. Three main transitions were observed during the melting process of fly ash: dehydration, polymorphic transition and fusion, occurring in the temperature range of 100-200 deg. C, 480-670 deg. C and 1101-1244 deg. C, respectively. The apparent heat capacity and heat requirement for melting of MSWI fly ash were obtained by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). A thermodynamic modeling to predict the heat requirements for melting process has been presented, and it agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, a zero-order kinetic model of fly ash melting transition was established. The apparent activation energy of MSWI fly ash melting transition was obtained.

  5. Stabilize ash using Clemson`s sintering process (Part 1 -- Phase 1 results): Mixed waste fly ash stabilization. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration of applicable Department of Energy (DOE) mixed wastes has produced a secondary waste stream of radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous fly ash that also requires treatment before land disposal. Unlike bottom ash, fly ash usually contains constituents making efficient stabilization difficult. For example, fly ash from the DOE Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) incinerator at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains volatile metals, metal salts, high concentrations of zinc, and unburned organic residues. All of these constituents can effect the stabilization process. The Department of Energy, and in particular the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) of EM-50, has stated the need for improved stabilization methods would accept a higher ash waste loading while meeting waste form disposal criteria. These alternative stabilization technologies should include delivery systems to minimize worker exposure and minimize secondary waste generation, while maximizing operational flexibility and radionuclide containment. Currently, the standard practice for stabilizing ash is mixing with Portland cement at room temperature. This standard practice produces a significant increase of waste material volume or has difficulty in adequately stabilizing the components in the fly ash to ensure regulatory requirements are consistently satisfied. To address these fly ash stabilization shortcomings, the MWFA, a DOE/EM-50 program, invested in the development of several fly ash stabilization alternatives, including the Clemson University sintering method.

  6. Respirable aerosols from fluidized bed coal combustion. 3. Elemental composition of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, S.H.; Carpenter, R.L.; Newton, G.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized bed coal combustion is a promising technology for using coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Trace elemental constituents in fly ash from an experimental atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) are reported and compared with pulverized-coal combustor (PCC) ash data and those from other fluidized bed combustors. Bulk and size-separated particles were collected and analyzed by using spark source mass spectrometry.Fluidized bed combustor ash was similar to PCC ash in minor and trace element composition. However, AFBC ash showed less size dependence of elemental composition than has been reported for PCC ash. Bulk particle elemental composition varied with sampling position within the effluent stream. Penetration of elements through each cleanup stage and elemental enrichment were a function of the cleanup stage and the element under consideration.

  7. Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

  8. Fly ash-enhanced aluminum composites for automotive parts. [Reports for April to June, 1998, and July to September, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, Dean; Rohatgi, Pradeep

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to produce and evaluate the use of aluminum ''ashalloys''--metal matrix composites that incorporate coal fly ash--in the commercial manufacture of cast automotive parts. Some highlights are: (1) Ashalloy ingot with ''C'' type fly ash was synthesized using stir casting techniques similar to the successful castings of ''F'' type fly ash. Agglomeration was noted. Stirring periods were increased up to 45 minutes compared to the normal 5 minutes to determine whether the shear force of stirring would disagglomerate the clusters noted with this type of fly ash. The resulting sample showed clustering. (2) The ashalloy ingots of ''C'' type fly ash were remelted and poured into permanent molds using a cloth filter to screen out clusters. There was no major reduction in clusters of fly ash particles in the composite since the filter with the mesh size larger than 1 x 1 mm was used. The composite melt would not flow through when filters with smaller openings were used. (3) The fly ash sample from Wisconsin Electric Power Company was sent for classification. (4) A 1 lb. sample of JTM-processed fly ash was sent to Wisconsin Electric Power Company for classification and 10 lb. of same fly ash was sent to The Jet Pulverizer Company for jet milling. (5) Experiments on fly ash pretreatment as well as synthesis of ash alloy are continuing. (6) Attempts are being made to apply high speed shear mixing with selected liquids to disperse the clusters noted in ashalloy with the ''C'' type fly ash base. Stir casting processes have been developed to incorporate type ''F'' fly ash of different sizes and measuring tensile data on cast bars. This data enables selection of the optimum size of fly ash to meet specific property requirements. Attempts are underway to develop stir casting techniques to incorporate ''C'' type fly ash in cast aluminum alloys. It is expected that the next milestone for making trial parts will be completed on schedule by June 1999.

  9. Iron distribution among phases in high- and low-sulfur coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Dyar, M.D.; Taylor, M.E. [West Chester Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Astronomy

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Moessbauer spectroscopy, reflected-light optical microscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, wet chemical, and X-ray diffraction studies were conducted on six fly ash samples. The fly ashes, representing the combustion by-products of coals with total sulfur contents of less than 2% to greater than 4%, ranged from 17.6 to 32.0% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by XRF analysis. Wet chemical analysis was used to determine the Fe{sup 3+}/{summation}Fe content of the ashes, which ranged from 72% to 83%. Optical analysis of the ashes indicated that the spinel, encompassing iron oxides of various compositions, ranges from 4.0 to 12.6% (vol.). Moessbauer analyses confirmed the presence of three Fe-bearing phases: magnetite, hematite (possibly of two different compositions), and glass. The variation in the Fe-oxidation state follows the variation in the sulfur, consequently pyrite, content of the feed coal.

  10. Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

  11. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C. [University of Florida, Apopka, FL (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  12. Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raba, Gary W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    structural evaluations of the subgrade and its overlying pavement layers for test sites in Texas. Six evaluations of the lime-fly ash stabilization technique, based on dual parametric results, are given in this thesis. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The author wishes... FOR TEST SITE 5 H. DFFLECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR TEST SITE 8 VITA PAGE 141 141 154 160 160 172 181 181 195 202 213 213 213 215 220 227 231 238 245 252 259 268 275 LIST OF TABLES TABLE PAGE 10. 12. 13. 14. Lime-Fly Ash...

  13. The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKerall, William Carlton

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the needed quality control of concrete . Another source of concern results from the recent development of lignite and sub-bituminous coal as fuel sources. The ash produced from these coals is of a different chemical composition than traditional bituminous... 50 percent to greater than 200 percent of a control test. An exhaustive literature review has revealed neglig1ble information concerning the PAI of sub- b1tuminous and lignite ashes. Research is greatly needed to determine the ash properties...

  14. Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Chuck Alan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the effects of source size and background soil radiation were included. The quantity of radon released fzom the pile depended on the following (26): 1. The specific activity of Ra-226 in the phosphogypsum 2. The eminating power of the radon (the amount... of radon released per unit generated). 3. The atmospheric pressure 4 ~ The di f fus ion coef f ic ient, which includes the effects of 23 moisture, for the radon in the phosphogypsum. For example, high moisture content or water standing on the pile...

  15. Conversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A. Aksay, and Wei-Heng Shih*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    and aluminum sources. Fly ash, which is a byproduct of coal burning, contains mostly aluminosilicates. Recently not only eliminates the disposal problem of fly ash but also turns an otherwise waste materialConversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A

  16. Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

  17. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  18. Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties

  19. High-Carbon Fly Ash in Manufacturing Conductive CLSM and Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ; Slurries; Steel fibers; Recycling. Introduction In response to Phase II of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, many electric utilities operating coal-fired power plants installed low NOx nitrogen oxides it in nonconcrete applications. The physical characteristics of the coal fly ash vary widely and depend on the type

  20. Optimization of cement and fly ash particle sizes to produce sustainable concretes Dale P. Bentz a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Optimization of cement and fly ash particle sizes to produce sustainable concretes Dale P. Bentz a and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 7313, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-7313, USA b Roman Cement LLC, Salt Lake City form 29 April 2011 Accepted 30 April 2011 Available online 7 May 2011 Keywords: Blended cement Design

  1. Evaluation of leaching and ecotoxicological properties of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A. Papadimitriou; I. Haritou; P. Samaras; A.I. Zouboulis [Technological Educational Institute of West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work were the evaluation of sewage sludge stabilization by mixing with fly ash, the examination of the physicochemical properties of the produced materials and their leachates and the assessment of their environmental impact by the evaluation of the ecotoxic characteristics. Different ratios of fly ash and sewage sludge (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6, and 1:9) were mixed for 48 and 72 h. After mixing, the liquid phase of the produced materials was analyzed for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, while the solid residue was dried and tested for the leaching characteristics by the application of TCLP and EN 12457-2 standard leaching methods. Furthermore, the produced leachates were analyzed for their content of specific metals, while their ecotoxicological characteristics were determined by the use of toxicity bioassays, using the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the crustacean Daphnia magna. The phytotoxicity of sewage sludge-fly ash mixtures was also determined by utilizing seeds of three higher plants (one monocotyl and two dicotyls). The mixtures exhibited low metal leaching in all cases, while the ecotoxic properties increased with the increase of fly ash/sewage sludge ratio. The phytotoxicity testing showed increased root length growth inhibition.

  2. How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  3. Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological storage) or the ex-situ mineral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors

  4. Evaluation of Leaching Protocols for Testing of High-Carbon Coal Fly AshSoil Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    from coal-fired power plants, which burn over 1 billion t of coal annually (Kim 2006). This generationEvaluation of Leaching Protocols for Testing of High-Carbon Coal Fly Ash­Soil Mixtures Jason Becker: Beneficial reuse of coal combustion byproducts, e.g., in highway construction, requires an evaluation

  5. Petrography and chemistry of high-carbon fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Robertson, J.D.; Wong, A.S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shawnee power station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150-MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur (< 1 wt %) eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units burn medium- and high-sulfur (> 1 wt %) coal in an atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25 wt %. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6% to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety, but there is a portion that is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

  6. Petrography and chemistry of fly ash from the Shawnee Power Station, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Thomas, G.A.; Wild, G.D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Clifford, D.S.; Eady, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shawnee Power Station in western Kentucky consists of ten 150 MW units, eight of which burn low-sulfur eastern Kentucky and central West Virginia coal. The other units bum medium and high-sulfur coal in an AFBC unit and in a research unit. The eight low-sulfur coal units were sampled in a 1992 survey of Kentucky utilities. Little between-unit variation is seen in the ash-basis major oxide and minor element chemistry. The carbon content of the fly ashes varies from 5 to 25%. Similarly, the isotropic and anisotropic coke in the fly ash varies from 6 to 42% (volume basis). Much of the anisotropic coke is a thin-walled macroporous variety but there is a portion which is a thick-walled variety similar to a petroleum coke.

  7. Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography: Examples from a western Kentucky power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Goodman, J. [Prestonburg High School, KY (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and ten baghouse hoppers at each of twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of low-sulfur, high volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical units. The coarser mechanical fly ash showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbons and total coke; the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in ratios of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units.

  8. Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

  9. Surface and bulk studies of leached and unleached fly ash using XPS, SEM, EDS and FTIR techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousuf, M.; Mollah, A.; Hess, T.R.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Gill Chair of Chemistry

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective chemical utilization of fly ash in environmental applications requires a detailed knowledge of the surface and bulk changes induced by leaching in acid solutions. The surface and bulk characteristics of fly ash from the combustion of Texas lignite have been examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of leaching with acid solutions commonly used in environmental studies have been documented using these techniques. The results of these studies reveal that the fly ash particles are relatively resistance to either chemical or physical changes due to attack by acidic leaching solutions.

  10. Petrography and chemistry of sized fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Trimble, A.S. [Franklin County High School, Frankfort, KY (United States); Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Palmer, C. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash samples were collected in November and December, 1994, from two units representing high- and low-sulfur feed coals at a Kentucky power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh. The dried ({approximately}40 C) fractions were then weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, mounted in epoxy and prepared as polished pellets, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The November ashes had a similar size distribution in the +325 mesh fractions. The low-sulfur hot side and cool side ashes had a similar size distribution in the November ashes. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the typical trend, the cool-side ash being finer (over 20% more ash in the {minus}500 mesh fraction) than the hot-side ash. Carbon tends to be relatively concentrated in the coarse fractions. The dominance of the {minus}325 mesh fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes is an important consideration in the utilization potential of the fly ash.

  11. Feasibility of using reject fly ash in cement-based stabilization/solidification processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poon, C.S.; Qiao, X.C.; Cheeseman, C.R.; Lin, Z.S. [Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (China). Dept. of Civil & Structural Engineering

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilization/solidification (s/s) has been routinely used for the final treatment of hazardous wastes prior to land disposal. These processes involve adding one or more solidifying reagents into the waste to transform it into a monolithic solid with improved structural integrity. Cement-based systems with partial replacement by pulverized fuel ash (PFA) have been widely used to minimize leaching of contaminants from hazardous wastes. The finer fraction of PFA ({lt}45 {mu} m, fine fly ash, MA), produced by passing the raw ash through a classifying process is commonly used in s/s processes. Low-grade fly ash is rejected (rFA) from the ash classifying process, and is largely unused due to high carbon content and large particle size but represents a significant proportion of PFA. This paper presents experimental results of a study that has assessed the feasibility of using rFA in the cement-based s/s of a synthetic heavy metal waste. Results were compared to mixes containing fFA. The strength results show that cement-based waste forms with rFA replacement are suitable for disposal at landfill and that the addition of heavy metal sludge can increase the degree of hydration of fly ash and decrease the porosity of samples. Adding Ca(OH){sub 2} and flue gas desulphurization sludge reduces the retarding effect of heavy metals on strength development. The results of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and Dynamic Leach Test show that rFA can be used in cement-based s/s wastes without compromising performance of the product.

  12. Demineralization of petroleum cokes and fly ash samples obtained from the upgrading of Athabasca oil sands bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid, A.; Ratcliffe, C.I.; Ripmeester, J.A. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Div. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash reduction of the cokes and fly ash samples derived from the Athabasca oil sands bitumen was attempted by dissolving the mineral matter in acids. The samples used for this investigation included Syncrude fluid coking coke, Suncor delayed coking coke and the two fly ash samples obtained from the combustion of these cokes. All samples were analyzed for C,H,N,O, and S before and after acid demineralization and the analyses results compared. Further, the ash from the samples before and after acid demineralization was analyzed for silica, alumina, iron titanium, nickel and vanadium to assess the acid leaching of these elements. CP/MAS, /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopic study of the demineralized coke and fly ash samples was also attempted.

  13. An examination of fly ash carbon and its interactions with air entraining agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, R.L. [Monex Resources, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States)] [Monex Resources, Inc., San Antonio, TX (United States); Sarkar, S.L. [Sarkar and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)] [Sarkar and Associates, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)] [Univ. of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four fly ash samples, which had previously been found to effect concrete air entrainment in a manner inconsistent with their respective loss on ignition, were investigated using several physico-chemical techniques. This study focused on characterization of the high-carbon fraction of each fly ash, obtained by a triboelectric separation process. While the four samples displayed varying reactivities toward AEA adsorption, the BET specific surface area of all four samples was determined to be essentially the same. Thermal analysis and petrographic examination revealed that the higher demand for air entraining agents exhibited by two of the samples could be directly related to the presence of a higher proportion of optically isotropic, amorphous carbon. Liquid and vapor phase adsorption analysis suggested that the surface chemistry characteristics of the isotropic carbon resulted in a higher adsorption capacity for polar compounds such as air entraining surfactants.

  14. Speciation of Major and Selected Trace Elements in IGCC Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Font,O.; Querol, X.; Huggins, F.; Chimenos, J.; Fernandez, A.; Burgos, S.; Pena, F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation of Ga, Ge, Ni, V, S and Fe in fly ash from IGCC power plant were investigated for possible further extraction process by combining conventional mineral and chemical analysis, leaching tests, wet sequential extraction, Moessbauer and XAFS spectroscopies. The results shown that Ge occurs mainly as water-soluble species, GeS and/or GeS2 and hexagonal GeO2. Ga is present as an oxide, Ni occurs mainly as nickeline (NiAs), with minor proportions of Ni arsenates and vanadium as V(III) with minor amounts of V(IV) in the aluminosilicate glass matrix. Pyrrhotite and wurtzite-sphalerite are sulfide species containing Fe and Zn, but an important fraction of iron is also present in the aluminosilicate glass. These clear differences between the speciation of the above elements in this material and those reported for fly ash from conventional PC combustion.

  15. Characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yongqi Lu; Massoud Rostam-Abadi; Ramsay Chang; Carl Richardson; Jennifer Paradis [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine fly ash samples were collected from the particulate collection devices of four full-scale pulverized coal utility boilers burning eastern bituminous coals and three cyclone utility boilers burning either Powder River Basin coals or PRB blends. As-received fly ash samples were mechanically sieved to obtain six size fractions. Unburned carbon content, mercury content, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface areas of as-received fly ashes and their size fractions were measured. In addition, UBC particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy, and thermogravimetry to obtain information on their surface morphology, structure, and oxidation reactivity. It was found that the UBC particles contained amorphous carbon, ribbon-shaped graphitic carbon, and highly ordered graphite structures. The mercury contents of the UBCs in raw ash samples were comparable to those of the UBC-enriched samples, indicating that mercury was mainly adsorbed on the UBC in fly ash. The UBC content decreased with a decreasing particle size range for all nine ashes. The mercury content of the UBCs in each size fraction, however, generally increased with a decreasing particle size for the nine ashes. The mercury contents and surface areas of the UBCs in the PRB-CYC ashes were about 8 and 3 times higher than UBCs in the EB-PC ashes, respectively. It appeared that both the particle size and surface area of UBC could contribute to mercury capture. The particle size of the UBC in PRB-CYC ash and thus the external mass transfer was found to be the major factor impacting the mercury adsorption. Both the particle size and surface reactivity of the UBC in EB-PC ash, which generally had a lower carbon oxidation reactivity than the PRB-PC ashes, appeared to be important for the mercury adsorption. 26 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Oxonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fifth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fifth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from April-July 2005. (An additional month is included in this quarterly report as we have been in a data analyses mode and wanted to provide new data relative to the previous report). During this period, the project team has been reviewing and analyzing data from the onsite ozonation tests, as well as conducting additional laboratory ash and concrete tests. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  17. Case study of the conversion of tangential- and wall-fired units to low-NO{sub x} combustion: Impact on fly ash quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Rathbone, R.F.; Robl, T.L.; Thomas, G.A. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Haeberlin, B.O. [LG and E Energy Corp., Louisville, KY (United States)] [LG and E Energy Corp., Louisville, KY (United States); Trimble, A.S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research] [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; [Franklin County High School, Frankfort, KY (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion of boilers to low-NO{sub x} combustion can influence fly ash quality in terms of the amount and forms of carbon, the overall fly ash fineness, and the relative amount of glass versus crystalline inorganic phases. All of these factors can influence the potential for a fly ash to be marketed for utilization. In this study, three coal-fired combustors, two tangentially fired and one wall-fired, all burning high-sulfur Illinois coal at the same power plant, were studied before and after conversion to low-NO{sub x} combustion. In all cases, the post-conversion fly ash was higher in carbon than the pre-conversion ash from the same unit. The fly ashes in at least two of the units would appear to have post-conversion ashes which still fall within the regional guidelines for the limit of carbon (or loss on ignition).

  18. Influence of conversion to low NO{sub x} combustion on fly ash petrology and mineralogy: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robl, T.L.; Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Medina, S.S. [East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Winchester, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The wall-fired 116 MW unit 2 at the John Sherman Cooper Station, Pulaski County, Kentucky, was converted to low-NO{sub x} combustion in the winter of 1993--1994. The fly ash from before and after conversion was studied in detail. The coal feed, which did not change significantly over the study, was from southeastern Kentucky and had an ash range of 10--12% and a sulfur range of 1.5--1.9%. The coal rank was high volatile bituminous A with a vitrinite reflectance (R{sub max}) of about 0.8%. The coal had about 17% by volume inertinite macerals (mineral-free basis). The fly ash carbon can be divided into three types: anisotropic coke, isotropic coke and inertinite. The post-conversion fly ash has nearly twice the amount of carbon as the pre-conversion ash and shows an increase in anisotropic coke. Mullite and quartz were observed petrographically to be more abundant in the post-conversion fly ash, although only the mullite increase was confirmed by XRD. The proportion of glass is slightly less in the post-conversion ash and is accompanied by one-third drop in the amount of cenospheres.

  19. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  20. Concentration of carbon types from fly ash by density gradient centrifugation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maroto-Valer, M.M.; Taulbee, D.N.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the increasing amount of unburned carbon in fly ash is known to preclude the use of ash in the cement industry, very little is known about the characteristics of the unburned carbon. Three types of carbon particles have been identified microscopically: inertinite, isotropic coke and anisotropic coke. This manuscript describes a method to isolate these three types of carbon. A preliminary enrichment, followed by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) with a high-density polytungstate media (2.85 g/cm{sup 3} max), resulted in an enrichment of inertinites from a starting concentration of 3.8% to 61%, isotropic coke from 13.4% to 65%, and anisotropic coke from 19.2% to 74%. Large scale runs (LS) have been conducted to accumulate sufficient sample for subsequent analyses. The recovery weights and petrography composition of the PS and LS fractions are very similar.

  1. Enhancement of mercury capture by the simultaneous addition of hydrogen bromide (HBr) and fly ashes in a slipstream facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan Cao; Quan-Hai Wang; Jun Li; Jen-Chieh Cheng; Chia-Chun Chan; Marten Cohron; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low halogen content in tested Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and low loss of ignition content (LOI) in PRB-derived fly ash were likely responsible for higher elemental mercury content (averaging about 75%) in the flue gas and also lower mercury capture efficiency by electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet-FGD. To develop a cost-effective approach to mercury capture in a full-scale coal-fired utility boiler burning PRB coal, experiments were conducted adding hydrogen bromide (HBr) or simultaneously adding HBr and selected fly ashes in a slipstream reactor (0.152 x 0.152 m) under real flue gas conditions. The residence time of the flue gas inside the reactor was about 1.4 s. The average temperature of the slipstream reactor was controlled at about 155{sup o}C. Tests were organized into two phases. In Phase 1, only HBr was added to the slipstream reactor, and in Phase 2, HBr and selected fly ash were added simultaneously. HBr injection was effective (>90%) for mercury oxidation at a low temperature (155{sup o}C) with an HBr addition concentration of about 4 ppm in the flue gas. Additionally, injected HBr enhanced mercury capture by PRB fly ash in the low-temperature range. The mercury capture efficiency, at testing conditions of the slipstream reactor, reached about 50% at an HBr injection concentration of 4 ppm in the flue gas. Compared to only the addition of HBr, simultaneously adding bituminous-derived fly ash in a minimum amount (30 lb/MMacf), together with HBr injection at 4 ppm, could increase mercury capture efficiency by 30%. Injection of lignite-derived fly ash at 30 lb/MMacf could achieve even higher mercury removal efficiency (an additional 35% mercury capture efficiency compared to HBR addition alone). 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Leaching characteristics of selected South African fly ashes: Effect of pH on the release of major and trace species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gitari, W.M.; Fatoba, O.O.; Petrik, L.F.; Vadapalli, V.R.K. [University of Western Cape, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash samples from two South African coal-fired power stations were subjected to different leaching tests under alkaline and acidic conditions in an attempt to assess the effect of pH on the leachability of species from the fly ashes and also assess the potential impact of the fly ashes disposal on groundwater and the receiving environment. To achieve this, German Standard leaching (DIN-S4) and Acid Neutralization Capacity (ANC) tests were employed. Ca, Mg, Na, K and SO{sub 4} were significantly leached into solution under the two leaching conditions with the total amounts in ANC leachates higher than that of DIN-S4. This indicates that a large fraction of the soluble salts in unweathered fly ash are easily leached. These species represents the fraction that can be flushed off initially from the surface of ash particles on contacting the ash with water. The amounts of toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Cd, Cr and Pb leached out of the fly ashes when in contact with de-mineralized water (DIN-S4 test) were low and below the Target Water Quality Range (TWQR) of South Africa. This is explained by their low concentrations in the fly ashes and their solubility dependence on the pH of the leaching solution. However the amounts of some minor elements such as B, Mn, Fe, As and Se leached out at lower pH ranging between 10 to 4 (ANC test) were slightly higher than the TWQR, an indication that the pH of the leaching solution plays a significant role on the leaching of species in fly ash. The high concentrations of the toxic elements released from the fly ashes at lower pH gives an indication that the disposal of the fly ash could have adverse effects on the receiving environment if the pH of the solution contacting the ashes is not properly monitored.

  3. Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

  4. Lead Isotopic Composition of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Residues from Municipal Solid Waste Combustors in France: Implications for Atmospheric Lead Source Tracing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Lead Isotopic Composition of Fly Ash and Flue Gas Residues from Municipal Solid Waste Combustors@crpg.cnrs-nancy.fr _______________________________________________________________________________________ Fly ash and flue gas residues from eight municipal solid waste combusters (MSWC) in France (1992 of "industrial Pb" is not an easy task because of its possible extreme heterogeneity. Municipal solid waste

  5. JOM November 2006, Volume 58, Issue 11, pp 71-76 71 Applications of Fly Ash in Synthesizing Low Cost Metal Matrix Composites for Automotive and other Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    Cost Metal Matrix Composites for Automotive and other Engineering Applications P. K. Rohatgi Materials and adequate properties for several automotive applications [1, 2]. Fly ash particles can be either solid will have to be remelted. Additions of fly ash can make automotive castings lighter, leading to further

  6. Nickel and Sulfur Speciation of Residual Oil Fly Ashes from Two Electric Utility Steam-Generating Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galbreath,K.; Schulz, R.; Toman, D.; Nyberg, C.; Huggins, F.; Huffman, G.; Zillioux, E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative duplicate fly ash samples were obtained from the stacks of 400- and 385-MW utility boilers (Unit A and Unit B, respectively) using a modified U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 17 sampling train assembly as they burned 0.9 and 0.3 wt % S residual (No. 6 fuel) oils, respectively, during routine power plant operations. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) samples were analyzed for Ni concentrations and speciation using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  7. Wet extraction of heavy metals and chloride from MSWI and straw combustion fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguiar del Toro, M. [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Eissendorfer Street 40, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany); Calmano, W. [Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Eissendorfer Street 40, D-21073 Hamburg (Germany)], E-mail: calmano@tuhh.de; Ecke, H. [Vattenfall Research and Development AB, SE-814 26 Alvkarleby (Sweden)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash residues from combustion often do not meet the criteria neither for reuse as construction materials nor landfilling as non-hazardous waste, mainly because of the high concentration of heavy metals and chlorides. This work aimed to technically evaluate an innovative wet treatment process for the extraction of chloride (Cl{sup -}), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from fly ashes from a municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant and from a straw combustion (SC) facility. Factors investigated were liquid/solid (L/S) ratio, full carbonation (CO{sub 2} treatment), influence of pH and leaching time, using a two-level full factorial design. The most significant factor for all responses was low pH, followed by L/S ratio. Multiple linear regression models describing the variation in extraction data had R{sup 2} values ranging from 58% to 98%. An optimization of the element extraction models was performed and a set of treatment conditions is suggested.

  8. Influence of the composition of cement kiln dust on its interaction with fly ash and slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaunsali, Piyush, E-mail: chaunsa2@illinois.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Peethamparan, Sulapha, E-mail: speetham@clarkson.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States)] [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cement kiln dust (CKD), a by-product of the cement industry, contains significant amounts of alkali, free lime, chloride and sulfate. Wide variation reported in the chemical composition of CKDs limits their potential application as a sustainable binder component in concrete. In the current study, the performance of two different CKDs as components in a novel binder is evaluated. Several binders are developed by blending CKDs with fly ash or slag. Binders with 70% CKD were prepared at a water-to-binder ratio of 0.4, and heat-cured at 75 °C to accelerate the strength development. The hydration progress was monitored using X-ray diffraction, and morphological examination was performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ettringite and calcium aluminosilicate hydrate (C-A-S-H) were identified as the main hydration products in the hardened binder system. Strength development of CKD-based binder was found to be significantly influenced by its free lime and sulfate contents. -- Highlights: •Interaction of cement kiln dust with fly ash and slag was explored. •CKD with higher free lime and sulfate content increased the strength of binder. •C-S-H like reaction gel with fibrillar morphology is observed in CKD-based binders.

  9. Characterization of fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources: Partitioning of carbon and trace elements with particle size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research]|[Franklin County High School, Frankfort, KY (United States); Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash samples were collected in November and December of 1994, from generating units at a Kentucky power station using high- and low-sulfur feed coals. The samples are part of a two-year study of the coal and coal combustion byproducts from the power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh (150, 75, 42, and 25 {micro}m, respectively). The size fractions were then dried, weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The low-sulfur heavy side and light side ashes each have a similar size distribution in the November samples. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the trend observed in later months, the light-side ash being finer (over 20% more ash in the {minus}500 mesh [{minus}25 {micro}m] fraction) than the heavy-side ash. Carbon tended to be concentrated in the coarse fractions in the December samples. The dominance of the {minus}325 mesh ({minus}42 {micro}m) fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes may be an important consideration in the utilization of the fly ash. Element partitioning follows several patterns. Volatile elements, such as Zn and As, are enriched in the finer sizes, particularly in fly ashes collected at cooler, light-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) temperatures. The latter trend is a function of precipitation at the cooler-ESP temperatures and of increasing concentration with the increased surface area of the finest fraction. Mercury concentrations are higher in high-carbon fly ashes, suggesting Hg adsorption on the fly ash carbon. Ni and Cr are associated, in part, with the spinel minerals in the fly ash.

  10. Discussion on 'characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption' by Lu et al.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Hower; Bruno Valentim; Irena J. Kostova; Kevin R. Henke [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury capture by coal-combustion fly ash is a function of the amount of Hg in the feed coal, the amount of carbon in the fly ash, the type of carbon in the fly ash (including variables introduced by the rank of the feed coal), and the flue gas temperature at the point of ash collection. In their discussion of fly ash and Hg adsorption, Lu et al. (Energy Fuels 2007, 21, 2112-2120) had some fundamental flaws in their techniques, which, in turn, impact the validity of analyzed parameters. First, they used mechanical sieving to segregate fly ash size fractions. Mechanical sieving does not produce representative size fractions, particularly for the finest sizes. If the study samples were not obtained correctly, the subsequent analyses of fly ash carbon and Hg cannot accurately represent the size fractions. In the analysis of carbon forms, it is not possible to accurately determine the forms with scanning electron microscopy. The complexity of the whole particles is overlooked when just examining the outer particle surface. Examination of elements such as Hg, present in very trace quantities in most fly ashes, requires careful attention to the analytical techniques. 36 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Geotechnical characteristics of low-NO{sub x} fly ash when used as structural fill material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnear, D.G.; Phillippi, H.M.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shawville Generating Station, owned and operated by the Pennsylvania Electric Company (Penelec) a subsidiary of GPU-Genco, is located in north-central Pennsylvania, near the City of Clearfield. In 1990, Penlec was instructed by the Pennsylvania DEP (formerly PADER) to close the Shawville Ash Disposal site and to prepare a new facility meeting the requirements of the Chapter 287/288 regulations. Due to site limitations, an alternate plan was developed and approved wherein the existing facility was {open_quotes}closed{close_quotes} by placement of an approved liner system at the current grade with the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} landfill developed immediately above. The key to this innovative technique of piggy-backing of state-of-the-art facility on top of a closed facility was the use of a multi-layered geosynthetic zone which could act as both a cap to the old site, and a liner/leachate collection system for the new facility. And a critical component of the liner/collection zone was construction of an adequate subbase for placement of the geosynthetic materials. For this facility, the logical material for use in this subbase zone was fly ash since the PADEP considered material placed prior to installation of the liner system as part of the {open_quotes} closed{close_quotes} portion of the landfill. The disposal site has been in operation since the early 1960`s when the plant was initially constructed like a dam, with well-compacted ash material placed in an arched shape and loose ash end-dumped behind that. In the mid-1980`s Penelec began placing tighter control over the placement methods and required compaction throughout. The operation of the site is discussed.

  12. Evaluation of fly ash-surfaced pens as a control for fugitive dust emissions from beef cattle feedyards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kantor, Theodore Lee

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of pens was surfaced with fly ash from a coal-fired power plant, while the other set, surfaced with caliche, served as a control. Five sampling trips were completed for a total of 492 TSP samples and 288 PM10 samples. Results indicate that statistically...

  13. Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 26312643 Charcoal and fly-ash particles from Lake Lucerne sediments (Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 2631­2643 Charcoal and fly-ash particles from Lake Lucerne emitted in the area of Lake Lucerne (Central Europe) throughout the last 7200 years. Charcoal navigation on Lake Lucerne. The successive burning of wood (after AD 1838), coal (after AD 1862), and diesel

  14. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  15. Cement technology for borehole plugging: interim report on the effects of fly ash and salt on the physical properties of cementitious solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, J.G.; Morgan, M.T.; McDaniel, E.W.; Greene, H.B.; West, W.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of initial studies of a systematic investigation to determine the effects of fly ash and salt on the physical properties of pozzolanic concretes and saltcretes are reported. Addition of fly ash to mortars decreased the set time and bleed characteristics and increased the compressive strength and permeability, but it had very little effect on the density or the thermal conductivity of the solid. The magnitude of these effects was only slightly related to the lime content of the fly ash. In the case of saltcretes, low-lime fly ash slightly decreased the set time and the bleed characteristics of the wet mix. However, a high-lime fly ash doubled the set time and decreased the bleed characteristics to essentially zero. The compressive strength of saltcretes was increased by the addition of fly ash and was independent of the lime content. Such additions had little effect on the thermal conductivity or density. The thermal conductivities of cement pastes containing fly ash showed a near-linear relationship with the density of the resulting solids. In the case of mortars, the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and showed some hysteresis in the initial heating cycle. After the first cycle, the thermal conductivity decreased from about 1.32 W/m.K at 350/sup 0/K to 1.27 W/m.K at 475/sup 0/K.

  16. Synthetic aggregate compositions derived from spent bed materials from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Michael J. (Aston, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cementitious compositions useful as lightweight aggregates are formed from a blend of spent bed material from fluidized bed combustion and fly ash. The proportions of the blend are chosen so that ensuing reactions eliminate undesirable constituents. The blend is then mixed with water and formed into a shaped article. The shaped article is preferably either a pellet or a "brick" shape that is later crushed. The shaped articles are cured at ambient temperature while saturated with water. It has been found that if used sufficiently, the resulting aggregate will exhibit minimal dimensional change over time. The aggregate can be certified by also forming standardized test shapes, e.g., cylinders while forming the shaped articles and measuring the properties of the test shapes using standardized techniques including X-ray diffraction.

  17. Management of lignite fly ash for improving soil fertility and crop productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, L.C.; Srivastava, N.K.; Jha, S.K.; Sinha, A.K.; Masto, R.E.; Selvi, V.A. [Central Fuel Research Institute, Dhanbad (India)

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and bioferfertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy metal contents and in the level of gamma-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

  18. Hg and Se capture and fly ash carbons from combustion of complex pulverized feed blends mainly of anthracitic coal rank in Spanish power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Surez-Ruiz; J.C. Hower; G.A. Thomas [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the petrology and chemistry of fly ashes produced in a Spanish power plant from the combustion of complex pulverized feed blends made up of anthracitic/meta-anthracitic coals, petroleum, and natural coke are investigated. It was found that the behavior of fly ash carbons derived from anthracitic coals follows relatively similar patterns to those established for the carbons from the combustion of bituminous coals. Fly ashes were sampled in eight hoppers from two electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows. The characterization of the raw ashes and their five sieved fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) showed that glassy material, quartz, oxides, and spinels in different proportions are the main inorganic components. As for the organic fraction, the dominant fly ash carbons are anisotropic carbons, mainly unburned carbons derived from anthracitic vitrinite. The concentration of Se and Hg increased in ashes of the second ESP row, this increase being related to the higher proportion of anisotropic unburned carbons, particularly those largely derived from anthracitic vitrinite in the cooler ashes of the ESP (second row) and also related to the decrease in the flue gas temperature. This suggests that the flue gas temperature plays a major role in the concentration of mercury for similar ratios of unburned carbons. It was also found that Hg is highly concentrated in the medium-coarser fractions of the fly ashes ({gt} 45 {mu}m), there being a positive relationship between the amount of these carbons, which are apparently little modified during the combustion process, in the medium-coarse fractions of the ashes and the Hg retention. According to the results obtained, further research on this type of fly ash could be highly productive. 28 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Electrochemical study of Aluminum-Fly Ash composites obtained by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, E. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Lekka, M., E-mail: maria.lekka@uniud.it [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Andreatta, F.; Fedrizzi, L. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Itskos, G. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece); Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Avenue 357-359, Halandri 15231, Athens (Greece); Moutsatsou, A. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece); Koukouzas, N. [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Avenue 357-359, Halandri 15231, Athens (Greece); Kouloumbi, N. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, two different ASTM C 618 Class C fly ashes (FA) were used for the production of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMCs) using powder metallurgy (PM) technology. Calcareous FAs were sampled from the electrostatic precipitators of two different lignite-fired power stations: from Megalopolis, Southern Greece (MFA) and from Kardia, Northen Greece (KFA), under maximum electricity load. FAs were milled in order to reduce the mean particle diameter and Aluminum-FA composites containing 10% and 20% of FA were then prepared and compacted. The green products were sintered for 2 h at 600 Degree-Sign C. Sintered Al-FA MMCs showed increased hardness and wear resistance suggesting their possible use in industrial applications for example in covers, casings, brake rotors or engine blocks. As most possible industrial applications of MMCs not only require wear resistance, but also corrosion resistance in different mild aggressive medias, this paper aims to study the electrochemical behavior of FA MMCs in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance. The morphology and chemical composition of the phases in the Aluminum-FA composite samples were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Moreover, topographic and Volta potential maps were acquired by Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKP-FM). Volta potential maps provide information about the electrochemical behavior of the different phases in absence of electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior was investigated by Open Circuit Potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, while the corrosion mechanisms were studied by SEM observations after different times of immersion in a mild corrosive medium. In all cases it could be stated that the addition of the FA particles into the Al matrix might cause an increase of the hardness and mechanical properties of the pure aluminum but deteriorates the corrosion resistance. The degradation phenomena occurring on the FA containing samples might be related to the following mechanisms: 1) Partial detachment or dissolution of the FA soluble phases, in particular based on Si, Fe and Ca; 2) dissolution of the Al matrix surrounding the FA particles due to crevice corrosion; 3) Al localized dissolution due to galvanic coupling between the Fe-rich intermetallics and the matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum metal matrix composites containing two types of fly ashes have been characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure and the electrochemical behavior have been studied using different techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of FA deteriorates the corrosion resistance of the aluminum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation mechanisms: galvanic coupling, crevice corrosion, detachment of FA particles.

  20. Task 3.15 -- Impacts of low-NO{sub x} combustion on fly ash and slagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) focuses on the issues of entrained-ash formation and slagging for low-NO{sub x} combustion systems in general. Time-resolved combustion tests under conventional and low-NO{sub x} conditions have been conducted to note particle-size formation and slagging deposition. Results will be used to support demonstration projects at the utility boiler scale. The results from this work are yielding an increased understanding of the mechanisms of ash formation during low-NO{sub x} combustion along with methods for enhancing heat transfer and fly ash collectibility. Specific objectives of this research project include (1) determining whether initial char and ash generated under low-NO{sub x} conditions have greater tendencies for slagging than conventionally generated ash and (2) determining the differences, if any, between particle size and composition for entrained ash generated under low-NO{sub x} and conventional combustion conditions. Progress on this sub-task is presented.

  1. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  2. Association of the sites of heavy metals with nanoscale carbon in a Kentucky electrostatic precipitator fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Hower; Uschi M. Graham; Alan Dozier; Michael T. Tseng; Rajesh A. Khatri [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HRTEM-STEM-EELS) was used to study fly ashes produced from the combustion of an eastern Kentucky coal at a southeastern-Kentucky wall-fired pulverized coal utility boiler retrofitted for low-NOx combustion. Fly ash was collected from individual hoppers in each row of the electrostatic precipitators (ESP) pollution-control system, with multiple hoppers sampled within each of the three rows. Temperatures within the ESP array range from about 200 {degree}C at the entry to the first row to <150{degree}C at the exit of the third row. HRTEM-STEM-EELS study demonstrated the presence of nanoscale (10 s nm) C agglomerates with typical soot-like appearance and others with graphitic fullerene-like nanocarbon structures. The minute carbon agglomerates are typically juxtaposed and intergrown with slightly larger aluminosilicate spheres and often form an ultrathin halo or deposit on the fly ash particles. The STEM-EELS analyses revealed that the nanocarbon agglomerates host even finer (<3 nm) metal and metal oxide particles. Elemental analysis indicated an association of Hg with the nanocarbon. Arsenic, Se, Pb, Co, and traces of Ti and Ba are often associated with Fe-rich particles within the nanocarbon deposits. 57 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Hydrometallurgical recovery of germanium from coal gasification fly ash: pilot plant scale evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyo, F.; Fernandez-Pereira, C.; Olivares, J.; Coca, P. [University of Seville, Seville (Spain)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, a hydrometallurgical method for the selective recovery of germanium from fly ash (FA) has been tested at pilot plant scale. The pilot plant flowsheet comprised a first stage of water leaching of FA, and a subsequent selective recovery of the germanium from the leachate by solvent extraction method. The solvent extraction method was based on Ge complexation with catechol in an aqueous solution followed by the extraction of the Ge-catechol complex (Ge(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}){sub 3}{sup 2-}) with an extracting organic reagent (trioctylamine) diluted in an organic solvent (kerosene), followed by the subsequent stripping of the organic extract. The process has been tested on a FA generated in an integrated gasification with combined cycle (IGCC) process. The paper describes the designed 5 kg/h pilot plant and the tests performed on it. Under the operational conditions tested, approximately 50% of germanium could be recovered from FA after a water extraction at room temperature. Regarding the solvent extraction method, the best operational conditions for obtaining a concentrated germanium-bearing solution practically free of impurities were as follows: extraction time equal to 20 min; aqueous phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5; stripping with 1 M NaOH, stripping time equal to 30 min, and stripping phase/organic phase volumetric ratio equal to 5. 95% of germanium were recovered from water leachates using those conditions.

  4. Geopolymeric materials prepared using Class F fly ash and elevated temperature curing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakharev, T. [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)]. E-mail: tanya.bakharev@eng.monash.edu.au

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of the study of the influence of elevated temperature curing on phase composition, microstructure and strength development in geopolymer materials prepared using Class F fly ash and sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. In particular, the effect of storage at room temperature before the application of heat on strength development and phase composition was studied. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and SEM were utilised in this study. Long precuring at room temperature before application of heat was beneficial for strength development in all studied materials, as strength comparable to 1 month of curing at elevated temperature can develop in this case only after 24 h of heat curing. The main product of reaction in the geopolymeric materials was amorphous alkali aluminosilicate gel. However, in the case of sodium hydroxide activator in addition to it, traces of chabazite, Linde Type A, Na-P1 (gismondine) zeolites and hydroxysodalite were also present. The type of zeolite present and composition of aluminosilicate gel were dependent on the curing history.

  5. Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY HDOBPvvIi va vGI ge(iD(vI oannItI au NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT 9(evP(n uDnuPnnBIrv au vGI eI0DPeIBIrvR uae vGI i...?H?? NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT oG(PeB(r au Ei1PRaeT oaBBPvvII? ?e? ??C? ?IiOIvvIe oDeeIrv 9e(8vP8IR (ri vGIaeT 8aruaeB va vGI 8ar8I9v vG(v uae R9I8P(nP?Ii DRIR ( 9aevn(ri 8IBIrv 8ar8eIvI B(vIeP(n ?PvG RveIrtvG (99ea(8GPrt ?????? 9RP B(T OI 9eaiD8Ii OT eIiD8...

  6. Preparation of Cu and Fly Ash Composite by Powder Metallurgy Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, P. Y.; Lim, P. S.; Ng, M. C. [Infineon Technologies (M) Sdn Bhd, Batu Berendam, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Zahi, S.; You, A. H. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Cu and Fly Ash (FA) mixtures with different weight percentages were prepared. Pellets of the mixture powder were produced with the dimension of 17.7 mm in diameter and 10-15 mm in height. These different composites were compacted at a constant pressure of 280 MPa. One of the selected weight percentages was then compacted to form into pellet and sintered at different temperatures which were at 900, 950 and 1000 deg. C respectively for 2 hours. Density of green pellet was measured before sintered in furnace. After sintering, all the pellets with different temperatures were re-weighed and sintered density were calculated. The densification of the green and sintered pellets was required to be measured as one of the parameter in selection of the best material properties. Porosity of the pellet shall not be ignored in order to analyze the close-packed particles stacking in the pellet. SEM micrograph had been captured to observe the presence of pores and agglomeration of particles in the sample produced.

  7. THE IMPACT OF DISSOLVED SALTS ON PASTES CONTAINING FLY ASH, CEMENT AND SLAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J.; Edwards, T.; Williams, V.

    2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of hydration of a mixture of cementitious materials (Class F fly ash, blast furnace slag and portland cement) in highly concentrated alkaline salt solutions is enhanced by the addition of aluminate to the salt solution. This increase in the degree of hydration, as monitored with isothermal calorimetry, leads to higher values of dynamic Young's modulus and compressive strength and lower values of total porosity. This enhancement in performance properties of these cementitious waste forms by increased hydration is beneficial to the retention of the radionuclides that are also present in the salt solution. The aluminate ions in the solution act first to retard the set time of the mix but then enhance the hydration reactions following the induction period. In fact, the aluminate ions increase the degree of hydration by {approx}35% over the degree of hydration for the same mix with a lower aluminate concentration. An increase in the blast furnace slag concentration and a decrease in the water to cementitious materials ratio produced mixes with higher values of Young's modulus and lower values of total porosity. Therefore, these operational factors can be fine tuned to enhance performance properties of cementitious waste form. Empirical models for Young modulus, heat of hydration and total porosity were developed to predict the values of these properties. These linear models used only statistically significant compositional and operational factors and provided insight into those factors that control these properties.

  8. artificial fly ash-clay: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interacting visually with each other. Each fly is described by a simple tracking system (Poggio and Reichardt, 1973; Land and Collett, 1974) which summarizes ... Poggio, M....

  9. Demineralization of petroleum cokes and fly ash samples obtained from the upgrading of Athabasca oil sands bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majid, A.; Ratcliffe, C.I.; Ripmeester, J.A.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's commercially proved technology to recover oil from the Athabasca oil sands, as practiced by Suncor and Syncrude, involves two major operations, namely: separation of the bitumen from the sand and upgrading of the bitumen to refinery oil. Significant amounts of petroleum coke are produced during the bitumen upgrading process. Suncor burns the bulk of its petroleum coke in boilers to fulfill the energy requirements of the entire operation, still meeting government regulations restricting the amount of sulfur dioxide that can be released to the environment. In contrast, Syncrude is able to burn only 20% of its coke production because of high sulphur dioxide emissions from elsewhere in its operations. The boiler ash (Fly ash) which contains appreciable amounts of metals, such as vanadium, nickel, titianium, iron, aluminum and other elements, is collected in the boiler hoppers and cyclones of the petroleum coke fired steam generation plants. There has been relatively little effort made towards the understanding of the chemical or physical nature of these materials. Knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of these materials will be helpful in assessing their beneficiation and potential use as fuel or metallurigcal coke and the feasibility of extracting some metals, especially Ni and V. In this communication the authors report studies of acid demineralization as a means of reducing ash content of these materials for /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopic investigations.

  10. STATE-OF-THE-ART: FLY ASH, SILICA FUME AND SLAG UTILIZATION IN USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    improvement, land reclamations, slurried flowable ash, water pollution control, etc. The medium technology Backfill. 1.0 Introduction At the present time, coal fired electric power plants in the USA produce

  11. FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from conventional as well as advanced coal combustion technologies are addressed. Constructive use improvement, land reclamation, slurried flowable ash, and water pollution control. The medium technology matrix composites, polymer matrix composites, and several other filler applications. INTRODUCTION Coal

  12. PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH USING MODIFIED CAM CLAY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    -ash is a fine powdery silty material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It shows specific by slurry disposal technique. A series of triaxial compression tests have been performed on overconsolidated

  13. Task 3.15 -- Impacts of low-NOx combustion on fly ash and slagging. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zygarlicke, C.J.; McCollor, D.P.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, the coal-fired power industry began a more accelerated move toward using low-NOx burner (LNB) technologies to reduce NOx emissions. Most LNBs incorporate less oxygen with the coal initially, creating a cooler and somewhat substoichiometric initial combustion zone, with additional oxygen added further on in the combustion process to complete char combustion. Another method used to achieve lower NOx emissions is to fire the coal substoichiometrically and add additional air through overfire air ports. Both of these methods create certain impacts on fireside performance that are different from conventional high-excess-air firing arrangements. Some of the impacts that have been noticed by the utility industry are higher levels of unburned carbon in the fly ash and bottom ash, increased boiler tube corrosion, higher particulate loadings on control devices, and changes in slagging in the main furnace. Work on the fundamental mechanisms of entrained ash and ash deposit formation during low-NOx combustion has been sparse. This project by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) focuses on the issues of entrained ash formation and slagging for low-NOx combustion systems in general. Time-resolved combustion tests under conventional and low-NOx conditions have been conducted to note particle-size formation and slagging deposition. The results from this work are yielding an increased understanding of the mechanisms of ash formation during low-NOx combustion along with methods for enhancing heat transfer and fly ash collectability. Specific objectives of this research project include (1) determining whether initial char and ash generated under low-NOx conditions have greater tendencies for slagging than conventionally generated ash and (2) determining the differences, if any, between particle size and composition for entrained ash generated under low-NOx and conventional combustion conditions.

  14. Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of Aluminum/Fly Ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of Aluminum/Fly Ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by Pressure Infiltration Technique P.K. Rohatgi1 , N of thermal expansions (CTEs) of commercially available pure aluminum and aluminum alloy composites containing

  15. Journal of Materials Science, 2009. 44(6): p. 1485-1493. Compressive and Ultrasonic Properties of Polyester/Fly Ash Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    of Polyester/Fly Ash Composites Pradeep K. Rohatgi1 , Takuya Matsunaga1 and Nikhil Gupta2 1 University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Materials Engineering Department, 3200 N. Cramer St., Milwaukee, WI 53211 2 Composite of the resulting composite, called syntactic foams, while concurrently improving its mechanical properties

  16. Composites: Part A 37 (2006) 430437 430 Compressive Characteristics of A356/Fly ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by Pressure Infiltration Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    Composites: Part A 37 (2006) 430­437 430 Compressive Characteristics of A356/Fly ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by Pressure Infiltration Technique P. K. Rohatgi, J. K. Kim, N. Gupta*1 , Simon Alaraj (Currently a Fulbright Scholar at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) 3 Composite Material Lab., Central

  17. Dewatering Fly Ash Slurries Using Geotextile Containers M. E. Kutay1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    during its settlement. However, the hydraulic compatibility of a geotextile with the contact soil is also for ensuring hydraulic compatibility is that the geotextile should not be clogged during the dewatering process ash slurries. A testing program that included filter press and hanging bag tests was implemented

  18. Selenium(IV) and (VI) sorption by soils surrounding fly ash management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, S.; Burns, P.E.; Murarka, I.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from unlined coal ash disposal facilities is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting transport of selenium in ash leachate, sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} was measured for 18 soils obtained down-gradient from three ash landfill sites and evaluated with respect to several soil properties. Furthermore, soil attenuation from lab-generated ash leachate and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations as well as pH on both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was quantified for a subset of soils. For both Se(IV) and Se(VI), pH combined with either percentage clay or dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-extractable Fe described {gt} 80% of the differences in sorption across all soils, yielding an easy approach for making initial predictions regarding site-specific selenium transport to sensitive water bodies. Se(IV) consistently exhibited an order of magnitude greater sorption than Se(VI). Selenium sorption was highest at lower pH values, with Se(IV) sorption decreasing at pH values above 6, whereas Se(VI) decreased over the entire pH range (2.5-10). Using these pH adsorption envelopes, the likely effect of ash leachate-induced changes in soil pore water pH with time on selenium attenuation by down gradient soils can be predicted. Selenium sorption increased with increasing Ca{sup 2+} concentrations while SO{sub 4}2- suppressed sorption well above enhancements by Ca{sup 2+}. Soil attenuation of selenium from ash leachates agreed well with sorption measured from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4}, indicating that 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} is a reasonable synthetic leachate for assessing selenium behavior at ash landfill sites.

  19. Evaluation of sulfidic mine tailings solidified/stabilized with cement kiln dust and fly ash to control acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nehdi, M.; Tariq, A. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present research, industrial byproducts, namely, cement kiln dust (CKD) and Class C fly ash (FAC) have been used as candidate materials along with the partial addition of sulfate-resistant cement (SRC) in the Stabilization/solidification of polymetallic sulfidic mine tailings (MT). The effectiveness of S/S was assessed by comparing laboratory experimental values obtained from unconfined compressive strength, hydraulic conductivity and leaching propensity tests of S/S samples with regulatory standards for safe surface disposal of such wastes. Despite general regulatory compliance of compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity, some solidified/stabilized-cured matrices were found unable to provide the required immobilization of pollutants. Solidified/stabilized and 90-day cured mine tailings specimens made with composite binders containing (10% CKD + 10% FAC), (5% SRC + 15% FAC) and (5% SRC + 5% CKD + 10% FAC) significantly impaired the solubility of all contaminants investigated and proved successful in fixing metals within the matrix, in addition to achieving adequate unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity values, thus satisfying USEPA regulations. Laboratory investigations revealed that, for polymetallic mining waste, leachate concentrations are the most critical factor in assessing the effectiveness of S/S technology.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

  1. Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Landreth

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 16, 2005 through December 31, 2008 on the project entitled �Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete�. The project covers testing at three host sites: Progress Energy H.F. Lee Station and the Midwest Generation Crawford and Will County Stations. At Progress Energy Lee 1, parametric tests were performed both with and without SO{sub 3} injection in order to determine the impact on the mercury sorbent performance. In addition, tests were performed on the hot-side of the air preheater, before the SO{sub 3} is injected, with H-PAC� sorbents designed for use at elevated temperatures. The BPAC� injection provided the expected mercury removal when the SO{sub 3} injection was off. A mercury removal rate due to sorbent of more than 80% was achieved at an injection rate of 8 lb/MMacf. The operation with SO{sub 3} injection greatly reduced the mercury sorbent performance. An important learning came from the injection of H-PAC� on the hot-side of the air preheater before the SO{sub 3} injection location. The H-PAC� injected in this manner appeared to be independent of the SO{sub 3} injection and provided better mercury removal than with injecting on the cold-side with SO{sub 3} injection. Consequently, one solution for plants like Lee, with SO{sub 3} injection, or plants with SO{sub 3} generated by the SCR catalyst, is to inject H-PAC� on the hot-side before the SO{sub 3} is in the flue gas. Even better performance is possible by injecting on the cold-side without the SO{sub 3}, however. During the parametric testing, it was discovered that the injection of B-PAC� (or H-PAC�) was having a positive impact upon ESP performance. It was decided to perform a 3-day continuous injection run with B-PAC� in order to determine whether Lee 1 could operate without SO{sub 3} injection. If the test proved positive, the continuous injection would continue as part of the long-term test. The injection of B-PAC� did allow for the operation of Lee 1 without SO{sub 3} injection and the long-term test was conducted from March 8 through April 7, 2006. The total mercury removal for the 30-day long-term test, excluding the first day when SO{sub 3} was injected and the last day when a plain PAC was used, averaged 85%. The achievement of 85% Hg removal over the 30 days longterm test is another milestone in the history of achievement of the Albemarle Environmental f/k/a Sorbent Technologies Corporation B-PAC� sorbent. A clear indication of the impact of B-PAC� on opacity came at the end of the long-term test. It was hoped that Lee 1 could be operated for several days after the end of the long-term test. It took less than a day before the opacity began to increase. The discovery that B-PAC� can improve ESP performance while capturing a large amount of mercury is another milestone for the B-PAC� mercury sorbent. The parametric testing at the Midwest Generation Crawford Station was divided into two phases; the first using C-PAC�, the concrete friendly sorbent, and the other using nonconcrete friendly materials. The first phase of the parametric tests was conducted before the long-term test. The second phase of the parametric testing was performed after the long-term test in order to avoid contaminating the fly ash containing the concrete friendly sorbents. The parametric test began with an injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and, after a period to allow the mercury concentration to stabilize, the rate was increased to 3 lb/MMacf. The Hg removal for this test was about 60% due to sorbent and 69% total at the injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and 80% due to sorbent and 84% total for the 3 lb/MMacf injection rate. The average total vapor phase mercury removal for the first 21 days of the long-term test was 82% at an injection rate o

  2. Development of dredged ash disposal area, Paradise fossil plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradise Steam-Electric Plant coal-fired facility in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky. This project is to construct a dredge pond near the Jacobs Creek ash pond capable of storing fly ash dredged from the ash pond. This will provide approximately 10 years of additional fly ash storage in the fly ash pond. Effluent from the dredge pond will be returned to the Jacobs Creek ash pond for discharge to Jacobs Creek. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Maternal Transfer of Contaminants to Eggs in Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscala) Nesting on Coal Fly Ash Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    be warranted. The disposal of slurried coal combustion waste (hereafter, ash) into open settling impoundmentsMaternal Transfer of Contaminants to Eggs in Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscala) Nesting on Coal 2002/Accepted: 13 February 2003 Abstract. Coal combustion is a major source of trace elements

  4. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quarterly technical Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based geopolymer Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash penurunan kadar Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash paving demonstration Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AND DEMONSTRATION... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ahto lobjakas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based gepolymer Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

  13. KINEMATIC SEISMIC RESPONSE OF SINGLE PILES AND PILE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    KINEMATIC SEISMIC RESPONSE OF SINGLE PILES AND PILE GROUPS By Ke Fan,1 George Gazetas,2 Amir Kaynia on the kinematic response of groups of vertical floating piles connected through rigid massless caps and sub- jected to vertically propagating harmonic 5-waves. Pile-soil and pile-pile interaction effects

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash material analisis Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was used in this work. An ASTM Class F fly ash... , and N3) were proportioned with clean coal fly ash containing 22% ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes total contents Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fly ash content for normal concrete... contained fly ash up to a maximum of 35% of clean-coal ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

  16. Method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yavorsky, Paul M. (Monongahela, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting coal from a coal refuse pile comprises soaking the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution and distributing an oxygen-containing gas throughout the coal refuse pile for a time period sufficient to effect oxidation of coal contained in the coal refuse pile. The method further comprises leaching the coal refuse pile with an aqueous alkali solution to solubilize and extract the oxidized coal as alkali salts of humic acids and collecting the resulting solution containing the alkali salts of humic acids. Calcium hydroxide may be added to the solution of alkali salts of humic acid to form precipitated humates useable as a low-ash, low-sulfur solid fuel.

  17. Reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial dysfunction in lung after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnani, Natalia D.; Marchini, Timoteo; Vanasco, Virginia [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, Deborah R. [CESyMA, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, Silvia [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Evelson, Pablo, E-mail: pevelson@ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive O{sub 2} species production triggered by particulate matter (PM) exposure is able to initiate oxidative damage mechanisms, which are postulated as responsible for increased morbidity along with the aggravation of respiratory diseases. The aim of this work was to quantitatively analyse the major sources of reactive O{sub 2} species involved in lung O{sub 2} metabolism after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes (ROFAs). Mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight), and lung samples were analysed 1 h after instillation. Tissue O{sub 2} consumption and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity were evaluated in tissue homogenates. Mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain complexes activity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and ATP production rates, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative damage markers were assessed in isolated mitochondria. ROFA exposure was found to be associated with 61% increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption, a 30% increase in Nox activity, a 33% increased state 3 mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption and a mitochondrial complex II activity increased by 25%. During mitochondrial active respiration, mitochondrial depolarization and a 53% decreased ATP production rate were observed. Neither changes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate, nor oxidative damage in isolated mitochondria were observed after the instillation. After an acute ROFA exposure, increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption may account for an augmented Nox activity, causing an increased O{sub 2}{sup ·?} production. The mitochondrial function modifications found may prevent oxidative damage within the organelle. These findings provide new insights to the understanding of the mechanisms involving reactive O{sub 2} species production in the lung triggered by ROFA exposure. - Highlights: • Exposure to ROFA alters the oxidative metabolism in mice lung. • The augmented Nox activity contributes to the high tissue O{sub 2} consumption. • Exposure to ROFA produces alterations in mitochondrial function. • ??{sub m} decrease in state 3 may be responsible for the decreased ATP production. • Mild uncoupling prevents mitochondrial oxidative damage.

  18. Utilization FLY ASH INFORMATION FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Products In European power plants, using spray-dry absorption techniques for desulphurization of the flue

  19. ash utilization symposium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST Report No.CBU-1996-07 July 1996 Presented and Published at the...

  20. Incident at the Rock Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birgfeld, Doug

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the off limit rock pile At a Portland school Where theDoug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/Doug. “Incident at the Rock Pile” http://escholarship.org/

  1. ash aqueous carbonation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon content, specific surface area Aydilek, Ahmet 3 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  2. alkaline coal ash: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from pulverized coal pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces is fly...

  3. Pile driving and bioacoustic impacts on fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKee, Deborah C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was the nexus to use steel piles as the preferred structuralbegan driving the steel piles, we realized that underwaterdeath to fish near the pile. Pressure waves are generated

  4. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Jacked piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Jacked piles The axial capacity of displacement piles in sand is arguably consensus of the mechanism by which a pile penetrates soil. As a consequence, the most widely used design piles. Since pile hammers and vibrators are rarely permitted in urban areas, displacement piles

  5. Theorie des langages Automates `a pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonzon, Elise

    Th´eorie des langages Automates `a pile Elise Bonzon http://web.mi.parisdescartes.fr/ bonzon/ elise.bonzon@parisdescartes.fr 1 / 62 Th´eorie des langages #12;Automates `a pile Automates `a pile Introduction Rappels sur les piles Automates `a pile : d´efinition Automates `a pile : configurations Les crit`eres d

  6. Ash pelletization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodall, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash pelletization is outlined under the following topics: projects with CSX involvement; US Generating (Cedar Bay), Jacksonville, FL; Hydra-Co (Salt City Project), Solvay, NY; Virginia Power, Yorktown Plant; US Generating; Indiantown, FL; Future Projects; Development of ash disposal site;s Reuse of ash product; and Utility Survey.

  7. Effects of H{sub 2}O and particles on the simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and fly ash using a fluidized-bed sorbent/catalyst reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rau, J.Y.; Chen, J.C.; Wey, M.Y.; Lin, M.D. [National Chung Hsing University, Taichung (Taiwan). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the potential of a fluidized-bed sorbent/catalyst reactor for the simultaneous removals of SO{sub 2} and fly ash from a simulated flue gas containing different H{sub 2}O and particles. Experimental results showed that the removal efficiency of particles and SO{sub 2} was 85%-96% and 5.75-2.97 mg SO{sub 2}/g, respectively, as the H{sub 2}O content was 1.5-5.3%. The activities of sorbent/catalysts for simultaneous removals of SO{sub 2} and particles were inhibited by H{sub 2}O and particles, and the inhibition effects increased with the content of H{sub 2}O. As the H{sub 2}O content increased, the particle size distribution (PSD) of fine particles shifted to the coarse particles. The results of BET analysis show that the obstruction phenomenon of the sorbent/catalyst caused by the particles was diminished with the increased content of H{sub 2}O. The results showed this aggregation phenomenon of fine particles shifted to the coarse particles may cause increased water vapor content in fluidized-bed sorbent/catalyst reactor.

  8. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing dry Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shrinkage of Non-Air Entrained HRWRA Concrete -0.05% 0.00% 0.05% 0... NS3, 33% Clean Coal Ash, 5% Class F Fly Ash Fig. 15 - ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of -...

  10. LES PILES DOMESTIQUES Fiche I La quantit de piles mises en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    1 LES PILES DOMESTIQUES Fiche I La quantité de piles mises en marché au Québec L'Association canadienne des piles domestiques (ACPD) estime qu'il s'est vendu environ 48 millions de piles1 au Québec tableau suivant montre une répartition sommaire de ces piles pour cette période : TYPE DE PILES MASSE

  11. ash upptag av: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  12. ash particle deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coal fly ash by reaction with nitrogen oxides can occur in the smokestack, but with the aging Dutta, Prabir K. 5 Particle deposition in ventilation ducts University of California...

  13. ash cenospheres composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Composite Material Lab., Central Gupta, Nikhil 3 Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of AluminumFly Ash...

  14. Tapping the tire pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamarre, L.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What happens to car tires after they`ve exhausted their life on the road? Whether they are handed over to a tire dealer or tossed into the trash, many tires get a second life, reincarnated into products like doormats, park benches, and playground equipment. But the biggest single market for scrap tires is fuel; fuel that supplements the feedstock of paper mills, cement kilns, and even electric utility boilers. As well as offering a higher heating value than coal, tires can lower utilities` fuel costs and reduce polutant like nitrogen oxides and ash. But it`s the rare utility boiler that is amenable to burning tires successfully. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Test Pile Reactivity Loss Due to Trichloroethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumlee, K.E.

    2001-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of trichloroethylene in the test pile caused a continual decrease in pile reactivity. A system which removed, purified, and returned 12,000 cfh helium to the pile has held contamination to a negligible level and has permitted normal pile operation.

  16. DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    DYNAMIC INTERACTION FACTORS FOR FLOATING PILE GROUPS By George Gazetas,1 Ke Fan,2 Amir Kaynia,3 at the head of each pile. These readily applicable graphs have been developed with a rigorous analytical- portional to depth) and three pile separation distances (3,5, and 10 pile-diamctcrs). A wide range of values

  17. Piles of Objects Shu-Wei Hsu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Piles of Objects Shu-Wei Hsu Texas A&M University John Keyser Texas A&M University Figure 1: L-shaped objects piling up. This is an image from Example 5--Drop in a Line (see Section 4). Abstract We present a method for directly modeling piles of objects in multi- body simulations. Piles of objects represent some

  18. Prparation l'agrgation Automates pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitz, Sylvain

    Préparation à l'agrégation Automates à pile Exercice 1 (Exemples de langages reconnus par automate à pile) Montrer que les langages suivants sont reconnus par automate à pile : 1. Le langage de Dyck. 2. {an bp | 0 pile) 1. Montrer que

  19. Coal ash by-product reutilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncy, J. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States); Miller, B. [DYNA Corp., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has as part of its vision and value statement that, ``We are responsible stewards of environmental and corporate resources.`` With this moral imperative in mind, a project team was charged with initiating the Coal Pile Liner Project--installing a membrane liner under the existing coal storage pile at the Morgantown Generating Station. The existing coal yard facilities were constructed prior to the current environmental regulations, and it became necessary to upgrade the storage facilities to be environmentally friendly. The project team had two objectives in this project: (1) prevent coal pile leachate from entering the groundwater system; (2) test the viability of using coal ash by-products as an aggregate substitute for concrete applications. Both objectives were met, and two additional benefits were achieved as well: (1) the use of coal ash by-products as a coal liner produced significant cost savings to the project directly; (2) the use of coal ash by-products reduced plant operation and maintenance expenses.

  20. Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

  1. Seismic testing of existing full-scale pile-to-deck connections : precast prestressed and steel piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Jared Keith

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing of a Full-Scale Pile-Deck Connection Utilizing2001) “ Seismic Performance of Pile-Wharf Connections”, PEERp : Deformation component from pile flexibility. c : Extreme

  2. Field tests of timber railroad bridge piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donovan, Kendra Ann

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    with crane??????????? 29 2.8 Plan view of load cells and string pot arrangement beneath bent cap??.. 29 3.1 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 1?????????????. 30 3.2 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 2?????????????. 31 3.3 Plot... of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 3?????????????. 32 3.4 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 4?????????????..33 3.5 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 5?????????????. 34 3.6 Plot of load (Crane B) vs. time for Pile 6...

  3. Tidal Evolution of Rubble Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Goldreich; Re'em Sari

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Many small bodies in the solar system are believed to be rubble piles, a collection of smaller elements separated by voids. We propose a model for the structure of a self-gravitating rubble pile. Static friction prevents its elements from sliding relative to each other. Stresses are concentrated around points of contact between individual elements. The effective dimensionless rigidity, $\\tilde\\mu_{rubble}$, is related to that of a monolithic body of similar composition and size, $\\tilde\\mu$ by $\\tilde \\mu_{rubble} \\sim \\tilde \\mu^{1/2} \\epsilon_Y^{-1/2}$, where $\\epsilon_Y \\sim 10^{-2}$ is the yield strain. This represents a reduction in effective rigidity below the maximum radius, $R_{max}\\sim [\\mu\\epsilon_Y/(G\\rho^2)]^{1/2}\\sim 10^3\\km$, at which a rubble pile can exist. Densities derived for binary near-Earth asteroids imply that they are rubble piles. As a consequence, their tidal evolution proceeds $10^3$ to $10^4$ times faster than it would if they were monoliths. This accounts for both the sizes of their semimajor axes and their small orbital eccentricities. We show that our model for the rigidity of rubble piles is compatible with laboratory experiment in sand.

  4. BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN Abstract. In this paper we define an extension of the Sand Pile Model SPM and more generally of the Ice Pile Model IPM by adding a further dimension to the system. By drawing a parallel between

  5. Thorie des Langages -TD 7 AUTOMATES PILE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonzon, Elise

    Théorie des Langages - TD 7 AUTOMATES � PILE Exercice 1 - Donnez deux automates à pile (acceptation par pile vide ; par état final) qui reconnaissent chacun des langages suivants : 1. L1 = {anbm|n,m 0 l'automate à pile suivant reconnaissant le langage L par état final : 0 1 3 2 a, Z0/AZ0 , A/ a, A

  6. Plaxis Simulation of Static Pile Tests and Determination of Reaction Piles Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serhii Lozovyi; Evhen Zahoruiko

    2015-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Finite element simulations of four pile static tests were performed using Plaxis 3D. In addition, calculations of pile settlements according to Ukrainian and USSR building codes were performed. These results compared to full-scale pile tests. In order to determine the influence of reaction piles on the test pile response in a static load test were performed simulations with group of reaction piles around tested pile and applied respective negative loads. Plaxis and in situ measured load-displacement curves showed good correlation. Recommendations for Plaxis modeling were given.

  7. Rappels : piles et tas Ordonnancement (scheduling)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Rappels : piles et tas Ordonnancement (scheduling) Chap. X : Ordonnancement Laurent Poinsot UMR : Ordonnancement #12;Rappels : piles et tas Ordonnancement (scheduling) Le compilateur sépare les différents objets apparaissant dans un programme dans des zones mémoires (code, données, librairies, pile). Précisons cela par un

  8. DYNAMIC ONE-PILE NIM Arthur Holshouser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    DYNAMIC ONE-PILE NIM Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St. Charlotte, NC, USA Harold Reiter Department The purpose of this paper is to solve a class of combinatorial games consisting of one-pile counter pickup during the play of the game. Two players alternate removing a positive number of counters from the pile

  9. Plaxis Simulation of Static Pile Tests and Determination of Reaction Piles Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuievska, Natalia; Lozovyi, Serhii

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performed finite element simulation of four pile static tests using Plaxis 3D. Also performed calculations of pile settlements according to Ukrainian and USSR building codes. These results compared to full-scale pile tests. In addition, were performed simulations with reaction piles in order to determine their influence on the main pile testing results. Plaxis and in situ measured load-displacement curves showing good correlation. Given recommendations on Plaxis modeling.

  10. The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Larry Milton

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Load In Pile During Tension Test 87 88 50 Comparison of Residual Loads in Vibrated and Driven Piles 89 51 Hunter-Davisson Hethod for Residual Load Correction 92 52 Comparison of the Fr iction Load in Tension and Compression 97 53 Pile and Soil... and the load- settlement behavior of single piles in cohesionless soils is addressed. The available data on instrumerted piles load-tested vertically in sands is collected and analyzed to determine the load transfer characteristics of the soil. A...

  11. Drain Flies (Moth Flies or Filter Flies)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansone, Chris; Minzenmayer, Rick

    2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Drain flies can be a common problem in homes. They live and reproduce in drains and septic tank field lines. The first step in controlling these pests is identifying the source of the infestation. Then there are cleaning products and insecticides...

  12. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. Stabilization/solidification of TSCA incinerator ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Trotter, D.R.; Francis, C.L.; Morgan, I.L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stabilization/solidification is a well-known waste treatment technique that utilizes different additives and processes. The Phoenix Ash Technology of the Technical Innovation Development Engineering Company is such a technique that uses Cass C fly ash and mechanical pressure to make brick waste forms out of solid wastes, such as the bottom ash from the Toxic Substances Control Act incinerator at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. One advantage of this technique is that no volume increase over the bulk volume of the bottom ash occurs. This technique should have the same high pH stabilization for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals as similar techniques. Also, consolidation of the bottom ash minimizes the potential problems of material dispersion and container corrosion. The bottom ash was spiked with {sup 99}{Tc} to test the effectiveness of the bricks as a physical barrier. The {sup 99}{Tc} leachability index measured for these bricks was 6.8, typical for the pertechnetate anion in cementitious waste forms, indicating that these bricks have accessible porosity as high as that of other cementitious waste forms, despite the mechanical compression, higher waste form density, and water resistant polymer coating.

  14. The measurement of pile driving forces and its application to wave equation analysis of piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Francis Xavier

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPECIFICATIONS FOR DELMAG -- DIESEL PILE HAMMER, MODEL D-12 PROPERTIES USED IN COMPUTATIONS OF CALIBRATION SIGNAL EQUIVALENT VALUES FINAL DETERMINATION OF WEIGHTED AVERAGE PERCENT DIFFERENCE OF DYROD GALVO FROM STDSYS FINAL DETERMINATION OF WEIGHTED AVERAGE... OF A PILE. 67 19 BEARING GRAPH FOR PILE 8-17 INTRODUCTION Present Status of the uestion. The wave equation method of analysis has become a rather well- known technique over the last decade for the simulation of piles during driving. It is a...

  15. Skin friction for steel piles in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOVEMENT 4) For dry pile tests at initial void ratio of 0. 63, the assumption of a Coulomb type failure applies and the envelope is shown in Figure 23. The skin friction computed is the total friction caused by applied load. and. the static load caused... Sand 43 22. Skin Friction-Chamber Pressure Ratio Versus Pile Movement for Dense Dry Sand 44 23 ~ 24. Mohr Envelope for Skin Friction Measured. and Assumed. Pile Deformation 49 25 ~ Computed and Actual Load-Movement Curves for Test Pile 1 26...

  16. Press-in piling: Ground vibration and noise during pile installation David White*, Tim Finlay**, Malcolm Bolton*** and Grant Bearss****

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    of press-in piling makes use of hydraulic rams to provide the force necessary to jack pre-formed piles1 Press-in piling: Ground vibration and noise during pile installation David White*, Tim Finlay-suited to the urban environment. The press- in method offers an alternative technique of pile installation, which

  17. The Chips game -Dynamic programming activity This is a game between two players. It starts with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirbel, Craig L.

    with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a player may take one chip from one pile, or two chips, one from each pile. If one pile is empty, you can only take one chip from the other pile chip from each pile, your opponent becomes the first player in the "9-9" game. If you take one chip

  18. Nonlinear Seismic Response Of Single Piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairo, R.; Conte, E.; Dente, G. [University of Calabria, Dipartimento di Difesa del Suolo, Rende (Italy)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method is proposed to analyse the seismic response of single piles under nonlinear soil condition. It is based on the Winkler foundation model formulated in the time domain, which makes use of p-y curves described by the Ramberg-Osgood relationship. The analyses are performed referring to a pile embedded in two-layer soil profiles with different sharp stiffness contrast. Italian seismic records are used as input motion. The calculated bending moments in the pile are compared to those obtained using other theoretical solutions.

  19. Wave equation prediction of pile bearing capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoskewitz, Richard Edward

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , J', and u V, where R = dynamic or static soil resistance in pounds; u maximum elastic soil deformation, or quake, in inches; J = a damping constant for the soil at the point of the pile, in seconds per foot; J' = a damping constant... for the soil along the side of the pile, in seconds per foot; and V = the instantaneous velocity of a pile segment during a given time interval, in feet per second. The total soil resistance mobilized during dynamic loading was given by Smith as: R = R (1...

  20. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles #12;Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles #12;Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets

  1. Dynamic One and Two Pile Nim Games Using Generalized Bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Dynamic One and Two Pile Nim Games Using Generalized Bases Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St with a class of combinatorial games consisting of one-pile and two-pile counter pickup games for which a number of factors including the number of counters removed on the last move, the sizes of the piles

  2. 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Predicting pile behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Predicting pile behaviour The axial capacity of displacement piles in sand widely used technique for the design of long offshore displacement piles is that proposed by the American resistance in sand The observed unreliability in pile design methods suggests that the governing behaviour

  3. A study of wave flow around thin piles and pile groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haney, John Patrick

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ma)or Sub]ect: Ocean Engineering A STUDY OF WAVE FLOW AROUND THIN PILES AND PILE GROUPS A Thesis by JOHN PATRICK HANEY, III Approved as to style and content by: a rman o o ttee ea o epartm t em er December 1977 ABSTRACT A Study of Wave..., known as runup, occurs. Concurrently, a cavity known as drawdown is formed behind the pile. Wave runup on beaches has been the subject of many studies. Wave flow patterns around single piles have been investigated several times, as discussed below...

  4. A study of small drilled shaft piles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riewe, Tillman Arthur

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 ~. . . 41 211 Pile 08(44+ Bsseg ol Boll Pf0$%'ties ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ 43 22 e Me IIAIF 1 Al Beisg Nt80telk e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ r ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 45 23 those Basthm Xllastrsttag %aors ef Plastic Rqpailfhrias...

  5. A study of small drilled shaft piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riewe, Tillman Arthur

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 ~. . . 41 211 Pile 08(44+ Bsseg ol Boll Pf0$%'ties ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ 43 22 e Me IIAIF 1 Al Beisg Nt80telk e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ r ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 45 23 those Basthm Xllastrsttag %aors ef Plastic Rqpailfhrias...

  6. Downdrag on bitumen-coated piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, Randall Keith

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOWNDRAG ON BITUMEN-COATED PILES A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BUSH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject...: Civil Engineering DOWNDRAG ON BITUMEN-COATED PILES A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BUSH Approved as to style and content by: Jean-Louis Briaud (Chair of Committee) Har M. Coyle (Member) Alan Letton (Member) James . P. Yao (Head of artment...

  7. The behavior of piles in cohesionless soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Larry Milton

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INCLUDING RESIDUAL STRESSES Page 98 98 98 98 104 104 119 IX General The Real Meaning of Residual Stresses Correlations Residual Driving Stresses Point Load-Point Movement Characteristics Side Friction-Pile Movement Characteristics Low... Examples of Hyperbolic Load Transfer Curves 122 126 127 128 130 131 134 77 Elastic Compression of Pile Under Residual State of Stress 137 78 Coyle-Castello Correlation For Obtaining Unit Side Friction 143 79 Coyle-Castello Correlation...

  8. The pile-splitting problem M117, October 12, 2011 (due October 14, 2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Sarah

    The pile-splitting problem M117, October 12, 2011 (due October 14, 2011) Your names: 1. The Pile Problem Given n objects in a pile, split the objects into two smaller piles. Continue to split each pile into two smaller piles until there are n piles of size one. At each splitting, compute the product

  9. Liquefaction-induced softening of load transfer between pile groups and laterally spreading crusts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenberg, Scott J; Boulanger, R W; Kutter, Bruce L; Chang, Dongdong

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. J. ?2005?. “Behavior of pile foundations in laterallyChang, D. ?2005?. “Behavior of pile foundations in laterallyLoad transfer between pile groups and laterally spreading

  10. Simple pressuremeter approach to lateral loads on piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donthireddy, Srinivas

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University. Table 8. List of References Pertaining to Piles 27 to 47 in the Database. . . . Table 9. Categories of Extrapolation. Table 10. Predictions for Piles Shorter Than 10m. . . . . . . . . . . Table 11. Predictions for Piles Between 10 to15 m Long.... Table 12. Predictions for Piles Between 15 to 20 m Long. Table 13. Predictions for Piles Between 20 to 25 m Long. . . . 52 54 . . . 56 75 . . . 75 . . . 75 . . 76 Table 14. Predictions for Piles Longer Than 25 m. . . . 76 I. 1ST OF FIGURES...

  11. The star pile in Abell 545

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Salinas; T. Richtler; A. J. Romanowsky; M. J. West; Y. Schuberth

    2007-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Context:Struble (1988) found what appeared to be a cD halo without cD galaxy in the center of the galaxy cluster Abell 545. This remarkable feature has been passed almost unnoticed for nearly twenty years. Aims:Our goal is to review Struble's claim by providing a first (preliminary) photometric and spectroscopic analysis of this ''star pile''. Methods:Based on archival VLT-images and long-slit spectra obtained with Gemini-GMOS, we describe the photometric structure and measure the redshift of the star pile and of the central galaxy. Results:The star pile is indeed associated with Abell 545. Its velocity is higher by about 1300 km/s than that of the central object. The spectra indicate an old, presumably metal-rich population. Its brightness profile is much shallower than that of typical cD-galaxies. Conclusions:The formation history and the dynamical status of the star pile remain elusive, until high S/N spectra and a dynamical analysis of the galaxy cluster itself become available. We suggest that the star pile might provide an interesting test of the Cold Dark Matter paradigm.

  12. Particle Pile-ups and Planetesimal Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew N. Youdin; Eugene I. Chiang

    2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid particles in protoplanetary disks that are sufficiently super-solar in metallicity overcome turbulence generated by vertical shear to gravitationally condense into planetesimals. Super-solar metallicities result if solid particles pile up as they migrate starward as a result of aerodynamic drag. Previous analyses of aerodynamic drift rates that account for mean flow differences between gas and particles yield particle pile-ups. We improve on these studies not only by accounting for the collective inertia of solids relative to that of gas, but also by including the transport of angular momentum by turbulent stresses within the particle layer. These turbulent stresses are derived in a physically self-consistent manner from the structure of marginally Kelvin-Helmholtz turbulent flows. They are not calculated using the usual plate drag formulae, whose use we explain is inappropriate. Accounting for the relative inertia of solids to gas retards, but does not prevent, particle pile-ups, and generates more spatially extended regions of metal enrichment. Turbulent transport hastens pile-ups. We conclude that particle pile-up is a robust outcome in sufficiently passive protoplanetary disks. Connections to observations of circumstellar disks, including the Kuiper Belt, and the architectures of planetary systems are made.

  13. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets arbitraires

  14. Brief updates Status of truth in pile-up events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brief updates Status of truth in pile-up events November 18, 2008 Anton Kapliy #12;Contents of McEventCollection Raw truth container of events ­ Physics Event : GenParticles ­ In-time pile-up event 1 : GenParticles ­ In-time pile-up event 2 : GenParticles ­ BC +/-1 pile-up event 1 : GenParticles ­ .... far out

  15. Clearing a Pile of Unknown Objects using Interactive Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Dov

    Clearing a Pile of Unknown Objects using Interactive Perception Dov Katz, Moslem Kazemi, J. Andrew of clearing a pile of unknown objects using an autonomous interactive perception approach. Our robot hypothesizes the boundaries of objects in a pile of unknown objects (object segmentation) and verifies its

  16. Eight Versions of n-Pile Nim Arthur Holshouser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Eight Versions of n-Pile Nim Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St. Charlotte, NC 28208, USA Harold hbreiter@email.uncc.edu Abstract. We first state eight versions of n-pile Bouton's nim. Then we briefly definitions, we determine balanced and unbalanced positions for all eight versions, including the regular n-pile

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics and Fractal Avalanches in a Pile of Rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Nonlinear Dynamics and Fractal Avalanches in a Pile of Rice Rinke J. Wijngaarden1 , Kinga A to determine whether a particular system is SOC or not. In fact, for sand piles both SOC and non-SOC behaviour-dimensional pile of rice with a 1 × 1 m2 floor area. Using the more stringent criteria, we discovered [10

  18. Dynamic Single-Pile Nim Using Multiple Bases Arthur Holshouser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Dynamic Single-Pile Nim Using Multiple Bases Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St. Charlotte, NC 28208 positive numbers of counters from a single pile and the winner is the player who removes the last counter t was the number of counters removed by his opponent on the preceding move and n is the preceding pile size, where

  19. ANALYSIS OF VARIABILITY IN PRECASTING AND INSTALLATION OF PILE FOUNDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    1 ANALYSIS OF VARIABILITY IN PRECASTING AND INSTALLATION OF PILE FOUNDATIONS Hasan Kaplan1-stressed precast foundation piles using data collected on a building project that comprised the installation of more than 340 piles. The objective is to assess the presence of product and process variability

  20. Three Pile Nim with Move Blocking Arthur Holshouser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Three Pile Nim with Move Blocking Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St. Charlotte, NC, USA Harold hbreiter@email.uncc.edu 1 #12;Three Pile Nim with Blocking Nim, also known as Bouton's Nim, is a two player for ordinary nim. Specifically, we explore a three pile game with two players, a moving player and a blocking

  1. Dynamic One-Pile Blocking Nim Achim Flammenkamp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Dynamic One-Pile Blocking Nim Achim Flammenkamp Mathematisierung, Universit¨at Bielefeld, Federal consisting of one-pile counter pickup games for which the number of counters that can be removed on each imply that (Mi-mi N0)iN is a nondecreasing sequence. There are two players and a pile of counters

  2. Thermochemical structures within a spherical mantle: Superplumes or piles?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Shijie

    Thermochemical structures within a spherical mantle: Superplumes or piles? Allen K. Mc interpreted as being either piles or superplumes of dense material. We perform numerical modeling a dense chemical component into a small number of isolated, rounded piles or superplumes of material. We

  3. DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    DRIVEN PIPE PILES IN DENSE SAND BYRON BYRNE GEOMECHANICS GROUP THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA #12;Driven Pipe Piles in Dense Sand Byron Byrne Geomechanics Group The University of Western Australia #12;Driven Pipe Piles in Dense Sand Byron Byrne Geomechanics Group The University of Western Australia

  4. Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, Harold; Nyer, Warren

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day.

  5. Argonne nuclear pioneers: Chicago Pile 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Agnew, Harold; Nyer, Warren

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 2, 1942, 49 scientists, led by Enrico Fermi, made history when Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) went critical and produced the world's first self-sustaining, controlled nuclear chain reaction. Seventy years later, two of the last surviving CP-1 pioneers, Harold Agnew and Warren Nyer, recall that historic day.

  6. Controlling Blow Flies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Blow flies lay their eggs on animal remains and can spread disease. To control blow flies, it is important to remove dead animals and dispose of them properly, and to use effective insecticides when necessary....

  7. Madabhushi & Haigh: The pull-out behaviour of piles. 1 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PILE FOUNDATIONS SUBJECT TO PULL-OUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    Madabhushi & Haigh: The pull-out behaviour of piles. 1 FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF PILE FOUNDATIONS.K.HAIGH, Cambridge University Engineering Department, UK ABSTRACT: The behaviour of piles in sand under tensile-out resistance with soil density, pile size and speed of pull was investigated in an attempt to predict pile

  8. Encapsulation of mixed radioactive and hazardous waste contaminated incinerator ash in modified sulfur cement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the process waste streams incinerated at various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities contain traces of both low-level radioactive (LLW) and hazardous constituents, thus yielding ash residues that are classified as mixed waste. Work is currently being performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to develop new and innovative materials for encapsulation of DOE mixed wastes including incinerator ash. One such material under investigation is modified sulfur cement, a thermoplastic developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Monolithic waste forms containing as much as 55 wt % incinerator fly ash from Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been formulated with modified sulfur cement, whereas maximum waste loading for this waste in hydraulic cement is 16 wt %. Compressive strength of these waste forms exceeded 27.6 MPa. Wet chemical and solid phase waste characterization analyses performed on this fly ash revealed high concentrations of soluble metal salts including Pb and Cd, identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic metals. Leach testing of the ash according to the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) resulted in concentrations of Pb and Cd above allowable limits. Encapsulation of INEL fly ash in modified sulfur cement with a small quantity of sodium sulfide added to enhance retention of soluble metal salts reduced TCLP leachate concentrations of Pb and Cd well below EPA concentration criteria for delisting as a toxic hazardous waste. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Numerical analysis of kinematic soil-pile interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castelli, Francesco; Maugeri, Michele [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria no. 6, 95125, Catania (Italy); Mylonakis, George [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Patras, Rio GR-26500, Patras (Greece)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, the response of singles pile to kinematic seismic loading is investigated using the computer program SAP2000. The objectives of the study are: (1) to develop a numerical model that can realistically simulate kinematic soil-structure interaction for piles accounting for discontinuity conditions at the pile-soil interface, energy dissipation and wave propagation; (2) to use the model for evaluating kinematic interaction effects on pile response as function of input ground motion; and (3) to present a case study in which theoretical predictions are compared with results obtained from other formulations. To evaluate the effects of kinematic loading, the responses of both the free-field soil (with no piles) and the pile were compared. Time history and static pushover analyses were conducted to estimate the displacement and kinematic pile bending under seismic loadings.

  10. Stratified chaos in a sand pile formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ate Poortinga; Jan G. Wesseling; Coen J. Ritsema

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand pile formation is often used to describe stratified chaos in dynamic systems due to self-emergent and scale invariant behaviour. Cellular automata (Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model) are often used to describe chaotic behaviour, as simulating physical interactions between individual particles is computationally demanding. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art parallel implementation of the discrete element method on the graphical processing unit to simulate sand pile formation. Interactions between individual grains were simulated using a contact model in an Euler integration scheme. Results show non-linear self-emergent behaviour which is in good agreement with experimental results, theoretical work and self organized criticality (SOC) approaches. Moreover, it was found that the fully deterministic model, where the position and forces on every individual particle can be determined every iteration has a brown noise signal in the x and y direction, where the signal is the z direction is closer to a white noise spectrum.

  11. Measured and predicted response for 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Joseph Stephen

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , axially loaded piles in clay, sand or mixed soil. 2. 2 ~ LDADZm~n Test piles were located at bridge sites in many different counties throughout the state of Mississippi. Each bridge site was identified by a site number, but since there was sometimes... Lts. Tri axial 1 clay sand x x 2 clay sand x x x 3 sand x 4 clay x 5 clay x 6 clay x 7 clay x 8 clay x 9 clay x x x x x x x x x x x x 0 clay sand x x 1 clay x 12 sand x x x x 3 clay sand x x 4 clay sand x x 5 clay...

  12. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry La Buz; Rui Afonso

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the third quarterly report and it refers to the time period from October to December 2004. As the project is in its ''pre-deployment'' stage, no results are available. This report summarizes the ongoing activities and provides an updated schedule. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  13. Method and apparatus of measuring unburned carbon in fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Robert C. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are shown to measure unburned carbon particles in the exhaust of a combustor. Photoacoustic absorption spectrometry is employed to measure the presence of the unburned carbon. Especially helpful in these measurements is a vertically elongated photoacoustic cell in which high flow velocities are maintained to prevent particles from settling. These measurements are useful in determining the efficiency of coal-fired combustors.

  14. Scale-Up and Demonstation of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the second quarterly report and it refers to the time period from July to September 2004. As the project is in its ''design'' stage, no results are available. This report summarizes the ongoing activities and provides an updated schedule. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  15. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry LaBuz; Rui Afonso

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fourth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from January to March 2004. The on-site deployment and testing of the ozonation system took place during this period. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.

  16. Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Chuck Alan

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation. Detailed Investigation. 51 58 IV CONCLUSIONS V RECOMMENDATIONS 114 REFERENCES 115 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B APPENDIX C Historical Summary of the Wet Process Phosphoric Acid Industry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hemihydrate and Hemihydrate-Dihydrate... generally exist in three different forms. 1. dihydrous (CaSO& 2H20) 2 . hemihydrous (CaSOd 1/2 H20) 3. anhydrous (CaSO ) It is these crystals, called phosphogypsum, that are filtered from the acid solution and piped to stockpiles in slurry form...

  17. High Carbon Fly Ash Treatment | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanfordDepartmentInnovation Portal 130221326 SiteHigh

  18. The Supercritical Pile Model for GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mastichiadis; D. Kazanas

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral and temporal radiative signatures expected within the "Supercritical Pile" model of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). This model is motivated by the need for a process that provides the dissipation necessary in GRB and presents a well defined scheme for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of the Relativistic Blast Waves (RBW) associated with GRB into radiation; at the same time it leads to spectra which exhibit a peak in the burst $\

  19. PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HIGH VALUE MATERIALSFROM THE ULTRA-FINE (PM2.5)FRACTION OF COAL COMBUSTION ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo

    2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry fly ash samples were collected from 6 of the7 largest power plants operated by Louisville Gas and Electric Company (LG&E). Samples were taken from individual ESP hoppers in a continuous flow through stages of particulate collection. A total of 41 samples were taken from 16 operating units. The samples were thoroughly characterized for pertinent physical and chemical composition. The fly ash samples contained 10 to 50% -10{micro}m material, with higher concentrations of finer particles located in the latter stages of particulate collection. Flotation evaluation was conducted on a continuous flow though a single unit at each power station to assess the viability of using froth flotation to reduce the LOI in the fly ash to very low levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Ash from all of the units tested responded favorably with the exception of the ash from Henderson Station, which is attributed to a significant proportion of un-combusted or partially-combusted petroleum coke in the ash at this station, Bulk samples of dry ash and pond ash were also collected from Mill Creek, Trimble County, E.W. Brown and Coleman power plants and evaluated for carbon removal by froth flotation. Release analyses showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels for most of the substrates tested. The exception was the Mill Creek ashes. The cause of this exception will be further investigated.

  20. Sorption of cadmium and lead by clays from municipal incinerator ash-water suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, W.R.; Krapac, I.G.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of Cl complexation in extracts of a flue gas-scrubber incinerator fly ash sample on the sorption of Cd and Ph by kaolinite and illite was investigated using batch-sorption methods. In the pH range of 5 to 9, Cl complexation may reduce sorption and thus increase the mobility of these metals. When an ash-water suspension was acidified to pH 6.85, the dissolution of Cl and Ca essentially eliminated Cd sorption because of complexation and cationic competition. Cadmium would be considered as either mobile or very mobile under these conditions. Lead was not soluble in the pH-6.85 suspension. At pH 12, the approximate pH of water in contact with flue gas-scrubber fly ash, Cd was essentially insoluble and Ph occurred as anionic Ph hydroxide. Anionic Ph was sorbed by the two clays, and the extent of sorption was not influenced by Cl or carbonate complexation. Sorption constants, derived from isotherms, suggested that Ph would be relatively immobile in saturated soil-water systems. The recent concern that highly alkaline, flue gas-scrubber fly ash may release environmentally significant concentrations of mobile Ph when placed in an ash-disposal site with a soil liner should be reevaluated in light of this study. 37 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Ecrire une classe Pile, mod elisant le fonctionnement d'une pile de car-act eres. Chaque pile encapsulera une liste cha^ n ee d' el ements, dont la classe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulbois, Thierry

    Exercice 2 Ecrire une classe Pile, mod#19;elisant le fonctionnement d'une pile de car- act#18;eres. Chaque pile encapsulera une liste cha^#16;n#19;ee d'#19;el#19;ements, dont la classe Element devra aussi ^etre d#19;e#12;nie. La classe Pile sera pourvue des trois m#19;ethodes suivantes : #15; boolean est

  2. L3 Informatique Automates et langages formels 4 mars 2009 TD 5 : Automates `a pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitz, Sylvain

    L3 Informatique Automates et langages formels 4 mars 2009 TD 5 : Automates `a pile Exercice 1 (Exemples d'automates `a pile). Donner un automate `a pile A = Q, , Z, T, q0, z0, F pour chacun des trois pile. Montrer que l'on peut construire un automate `a pile A ´equivalent avec une relation de

  3. [ ]February 2014 The original 1957 Gates pile driving formula is an empirically derived dynamic formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    [ ]February 2014 PROBLEM The original 1957 Gates pile driving formula is an empirically derived dynamic formula that is used to predict pile capacity in the field during pile installation.The original Gates formula tends to over-predict pile capacity for low driving resistances and under-predict pile

  4. Ashing properties of coal blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.L.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion properties of sulfur materials present in coals were investigated. The treatment of the samples of eleven different coals is described. Thermal treatment of low temperature ashing (LTA) concentrates of eight of the coals was performed, and raw and wash ashing curves were examined to determine what quantitative correlations, if any, exist between ashing parameters and rank of coal. The actual form of the function which describes the ashing curve is derived.

  5. aupres des piles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    taient placs les dtecteurs. ?talonnage des canaux exprimentaux de la pile peuventtre . obturs compltement l'aide de blocs de graphite (dimen...

  6. asteroids rubble piles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grains, the strength of small rubble pile asteroids is constant. This creates a scale dependence, with relative strength increasing as size decreases. This counters...

  7. UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

  8. anchor piles: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the protection channels at the field splice... Bush, Randall Keith 1991-01-01 25 Energy and Geotechnical Behaviour of Energy Piles. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  9. Protecting Cattle from Horn Flies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Horn flies are the most damaging insect to cattle in Texas. This publication explains biological, cultural and chemical methods of controlling horn flies. Various insecticides used to suppress horn flies are listed...

  10. Field tests of a small instrumented pile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vari. cty of field soils. The soils at the test site;-, inc! udc clays of high and low p! anti c- ity, clayey sands, and silty sar. :ds. The model pile is instrun ?need in such a way that separate r&easurements of skin friction and poirt bearing arc...' Iant damping value for friction. S&tggestions are made regarding the practical use of te"t res lt in piljng behavior studies. Acknow I edgement. , The aut hor wishes to take this opportunity to thank the following persons for their. contributions...

  11. Field tests of a small instrumented pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korb, Kenneth Wayne

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pilot. Hole Installation of tbe Smail Pile Dynamic Test Procedure Static Test Procedure 23 24 2S 28 29 30 30 V ANALYSIS OF TIP DAKPING DATA Fine-Grained Soils Coarse-Grained Soils 34 40 VI ANAI YSIS OF FRICTION DAIiPING DATA Fine... Friction Damping Data for. Fine-Grained Soils 41 Friction Damping Constants from Modified Smith Model 48 VT Friction Damping Data for Coarse-Grained Soils 51 VII /nake Data from Field Test Program VIII Load Distribution Data 57 62 viii LISi...

  12. SVSM/Combinatorics Assignment 5 One Pile Nim 1. Consider the game G1 which starts with one pile of 20 counters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    SVSM/Combinatorics Assignment 5 One Pile Nim 1. Consider the game G1 which starts with one pile. 2. Consider the game G2 which starts with one pile of 20 counters. The rules allow a player to take with one pile of 20 counters. The rules allow a player to take 1, 2, or 6 counters on each turn. Denote

  13. Solutionnaire pour les exercices sur les piles 1. Trois dpiler ont gnr des exceptions Pile Vides, donc sept dpiler ont fonctionn.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Solutionnaire pour les exercices sur les piles 1. Trois « dépiler » ont généré des exceptions Pile Vides, donc sept dépiler ont fonctionné. Si on a empilé 25 éléments à la pile et que j'ai dépilé 7 de ces éléments, alors il me reste 25-7 = 18 éléments dans la pile. => taille courante = 18 2. Voici la

  14. Bond-Slip Behavior and Development of Bridge Column Longitudinal Reinforcing Bars in Enlarged Pile Shafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murcia-Delso, Juan

    embedded 1829 mm (6 ft) in the pile shaft. The transversebridge drilled-shaft RC pile/columns,” Journal of Structuraland ductility of extended pile-shafts I: Analytical model,”

  15. Influence of soil permeability on liquefaction-induced lateral pile response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Jose Manuel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Goh, S. H. (2003). "Pile response to lateral spreads:Goh, S. H. (2003). "Single piles in lateral spreads: FieldSpreading and its Effects on Pile Foundations, Ph.D. Thesis,

  16. Behavior of Pile Foundations in Laterally Spreading Ground during Centrifuge Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenberg, Scott J; Boulanger, R W; Kutter, Bruce L; Chang, Dongdong

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of lateral-load resistance of pile caps. ” J. Geotech.P. , and Chang, D. ?2003?. “Pile foundations in lique?ed andLoad transfer between pile groups and laterally spreading

  17. Evidence for the incorporation of lead into barite from waste rock pile materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COURTIN-NOMADE, ALEXANDRA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into Barite from Waste Rock Pile Materials A L E X A N D R Awithin the waste rock pile resulting from the excavationdeveloped within waste rock pile originated from a former

  18. Static pushover analyses of pile groups in liquefied and laterally spreading ground in centrifuge tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenberg, Scott J; Boulanger, R W; Kutter, Bruce L; Chang, Dongdong

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. J. ?2005?. “Behavior of pile foundations in lique?ed andChang, D. ?2005?. “Behavior of pile foundations in laterallyWinkler foundation analyses of pile foundations in laterally

  19. Nonlinear behavior and modeling of piles in partially liquefied and layered soil conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Barbara Jean

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the reinforced concrete pile after testing (NLP-M) and (b)the reinforced concrete pile after testing (NLP-M) and (b)sequence of testing, the reinforced concrete pile underwent

  20. Pile design using wave equation analysis program application in offshore wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Siddharth

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pile driving has been of interest to geotechnical engineers for a very long time. Originally, empirical pile driving formulae were used to interpret pile displacements caused by a hammer blow. Smith (1960) proposed a ...

  1. On-line carbon-in-ash monitors: Survey and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorge, J.; Larrimore, L.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fly ash unburned carbon (UBC) level is an important consideration for combustion efficiency as well as ash marketing. The presence of unburned carbon in fly ash has been shown to be a function of furnace design, coal quality, the ability of the pulverizer to grind the coal, and heat release rate. Boilers are designed to take these factors into consideration. However, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 drove many utilities to switch coal supplies and install low NO{sub x} burners. Higher carbon-in-ash levels have been the result of these changes in coal quality and the staged combustion characteristics associated with low NO{sub x} burners. Over the past few years, several instruments for the on-line determination and monitoring of the unburned carbon content of ash samples have been developed. However, to date they have not been deployed widely in the U.S. despite potential uses for combustion optimization and as an aid in fly ash marketing. Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operation data available for the current CIAM (carbon-in-ash monitor) commercial offerings, Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on its coal-fired units. As part of a DOE Clean Coal Project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction on NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired boilers, the CAM, SEKAM and FOCUS systems were installed at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4. CAM and M&W instruments were also placed at Alabama Power Company`s Plant Gaston Unit 4. The testing of the instruments was conducted from November 1995 through August 1996.

  2. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  3. Coal ash utilization in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, S.R.; Brendel, G.F.; Gray, R.E. [GAI Consultants, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes methods of coal combustion product (CCP) management successfully employed in the US and considers their potential application in India. India produces about 66 million tons per year (mty) of coal ash from the combustion of 220 mty of domestically produced coal, the average ash content being about 30--40 percent as opposed to an average ash content of less than 10 percent in the US In other words, India produces coal ash at about triple the rate of the US. Currently, 95 percent of this ash is sluiced into slurry ponds, many located near urban centers and consuming vast areas of premium land. Indian coal-fired generating capacity is expected to triple in the next ten years, which will dramatically increase ash production. Advanced coal cleaning technology may help reduce this amount, but not significantly. Currently India utilizes two percent of the CCP`s produced with the remainder being disposed of primarily in large impoundments. The US utilizes about 25 percent of its coal ash with the remainder primarily being disposed of in nearly equal amounts between dry landfills and impoundments. There is an urgent need for India to improve its ash management practice and to develop efficient and environmentally sound disposal procedures as well as high volume ash uses in ash haulback to the coalfields. In addition, utilization should include: reclamation, structural fill, flowable backfill and road base.

  4. Still Flying Issue 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Still Flying can be found on http://www.browncoats.com ! Still Flying is always looking for more people to get involved in all aspects of its production and distribution. If you are interested please either join the Yahoo Group (http://uk.groups.yahoo.com.../group/stillflying) or you can contact the editor (dave@bowsy.co.uk) UK Browncoats come join the fun at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Firefly_Serenity_UK ! If anyone is interested in getting a group together to either fly to the US or hire a cinema...

  5. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  6. The impact of conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners on ash characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robi, T.L.; Hower, J.C.; Graham, U.M.; Groppo, J.G.; Rathbone, R.F.; Taulbee, D.N. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research; Medina, S.S. [East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Winchester, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A research initiative focusing on the changes in coal-combustion byproducts that result from the conversion of coal-fired boilers to low-NO{sub x} burners has been implemented at the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER). This paper presents selected results from the first such study, the conversion of East Kentucky Power`s 116 MW, wall-fired unit {number_sign}1 at the John Sherman Cooper Station in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Samples of the coal feedstock and fly ash recovered in several downstream collection vessels were collected prior to and following conversion and extensively analyzed. The results presented in this report include total carbon, petrography, mineralogy, particle size, and leaching characteristics. The major changes noted in the fly-ash properties include an increase in carbon content, a slight increase in particle size, and a decrease in glassy components in the ash following conversion. Those changes induced by the conversion to low-NO{sub x} burners are evaluated in terms of the potential impact on the marketability of the fly ash.

  7. Ash deposit workshop: Class outline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatt, R. [Commercial Testing & Engineering Co., Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ash deposits formed from the combustion of coal and other fuels have plagued the steam production industry from the start. The ash fusion test has been around for over eighty years. As steam plant size increased, so have the problems associated with ash deposits. This workshop is designed to cover: (1) The basic types of deposits. (2) Causes of deposits. (3) Analytical procedures for resolving, or at least providing information about deposits and fuels, and (4) Deposit removal and reduction techniques.

  8. Unsaturated flow modeling of a retorted oil shale pile.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, F.W.; Freshley, M.D.; Gee, G.W.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the capabilities of the UNSAT1D model for assessing this potential threat to the environment by understanding water movement through spent shale piles. Infiltration, redistribution, and drainage of water in a spent shale pile were simulated with the UNSAT1D model for two test cases: (1) an existing 35 m pile; and (2) a transient pile growing at a rate of 10 m/year for 5 years. The first test case simulated three different layering scenarios with each one being run for 1 year. The second test case simulated two different initial moisture contents in the pile with each simulation being run for 30 years. Grand Junction and Rifle, Colorado climatological data were used to provide precipitation and potential evapotranspiration for a wet (1979) and dry (1976) year, respectively. Hydraulic properties obtained from the literature on Paraho process spent shale soil, and clay were used as model input parameters to describe water retention and hydraulic conductivity characteristics. Plant water uptake was not simulated in either test case. The two test cases only consider the evaporation component of evapotranspiration, thereby maximizing the amount of water infiltrating into the pile. The results of the two test cases demonstrated that the UNSAT1D model can adequately simulate flow in a spent shale pile for a variety of initial and boundary conditions, hydraulic properties, and pile configurations. The test cases provided a preliminary sensitivity analysis in which it was shown that the material hydraulic properties, material layering, and initial moisture content are the principal parameters influencing drainage from the base of a pile. 34 figures, 4 tables.

  9. Ageing of a granular pile induced by thermal cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibaut Divoux; Ion Vassilief; Hervé Gayvallet; Jean-Christophe Géminard

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we show that variations of temperature, even of a few degrees in amplitude, induce the ageing of a granular pile. In particular, we report measurements of physical properties of a granular heap submitted to thermal cycles. Namely, we focus on the evolution of the thermal linear-expansion coefficient and of the thermal conductivity of the pile with the number of cycles. The present contribution nicely supplements a recent article we published elsewhere [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{101}, 148303 (2008)] and introduces a different and promising method to impose temperature cycles to a granular pile.

  10. Integrity testing methods for drilled and grouted piles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dupin, Richard Martin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 762 m) and a length of 110 ft (33. 5 m). It had constructed defects in the grout curtain. The insert casing for this pile was 20 in. (0. 508 m) in diameter with a wall thickness of 3/4 in. (19 mm). The other two piles were 8 in. (20. 3 mm...) in diameter and 40 ft (12. 2 m) in length, with a 5 in. (127 mm) diameter, 3/8 in. (9. 5 mm) wall thickness insert casing. One of the two 8 in. (20. 3 mm) diameter piles was constructed with prepared defects while the other one was constructed without...

  11. Parametric study and dynamic analysis of compliant piled towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moog, Karl Heinz

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for element I; WD Weight of the deck Equivalent submerged specific weight per unit of total equivalent transverse area of the element I: Equivalent submerged specific weight of the element I' Total equivalent transverse area, of element I. Buoyant weight... Prototype C 58 18 Parametric Curves of 2nd Natural Period vs. Pile Length Prototype C 59 19 Parametric Curves of the 1st Uatural Period vs. Pile Area. ? Vibration with Respect to the X Axis . 60 20 Parametric Curves of the 1st Uatural Period vs. Pile...

  12. MESURE DES RACTIVITS DANS UNE PILE (1) Par JACQUES BERNOT et VICTOR RAIEVSKI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    359. MESURE DES RÉACTIVITÉS DANS UNE PILE (1) Par JACQUES BERNOT et VICTOR RAIEVSKI, Service de la Pile de Saclay, Commissariat à l'Énergie atomique. Sommaire. 2014 Nous reprenons ici de façon plus'une pile. Cette méthode de comptage, appliquée à une pile essentiellement sous-critique, nécessite la

  13. n-pile Dynamic Nim with Various Endings by Arthur Holshouser and Harold Reiter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    n-pile Dynamic Nim with Various Endings by Arthur Holshouser and Harold Reiter Arthur Holshouser of counters from one of n piles of counters, and the choice of which pile he removes from can change on each move. On his initial move, the player moving first can remove from one pile of his choice at most

  14. EXPRIENCES SUR LA DCHARGE DISRUPTIVE FAITES AVEC LA PILE AU CHLORURE D'ARGENT ;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    253 EXPÉRIENCES SUR LA DÉCHARGE DISRUPTIVE FAITES AVEC LA PILE AU CHLORURE D'ARGENT ; PAR MM résultats d'ex- périences faites avec la pile constante à chlorure d'argent. La pile , dont nous nous sommes- veaux prêts à être chargés, ce qui fera un total de 1 i ooo. Cette pile est disposée par séries de 20

  15. Two Pile Move-Size Dynamic Nim Arthur Holshouser1 and Harold Reiter2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Two Pile Move-Size Dynamic Nim Arthur Holshouser1 and Harold Reiter2 13600 Bullard St., Charlotte consisting of two-pile counter pickup games for which the maximum number of counters that can be removed in his turn first chooses one of the piles, and his choice of piles can change from move to move. He

  16. Confinement of Concrete Piles with FRP Hatem M. Seliem (hmseliem@gmail.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Confinement of Concrete Piles with FRP Hatem M. Seliem (hmseliem@gmail.edu) Department of Civil, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC, USA ABSTRACT Precast piles are typically reinforced as ductility of the pile. Confinement is particularly critical within the top region of the pile to resist

  17. Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherhead, Patrick J.

    Ratsnakes and Brush Piles: Intended and Unintended Consequences of Improving Habitat for Wildlife, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Champaign 61820 ABSTRACT.--Brush pile creation is a common habitat of brush pile creation and the indirect effects of brush piles on multi-species interactions. Here we

  18. Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

  19. Effect of deep excavation on an adjacent pile foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliadelis, Dimitrios

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis studies the behavior of single axially loaded pile located close to a 30m deep braced excavation in Marine Clay corresponding to site conditions of the Kallang formation in Singapore. Parametric analyses were ...

  20. The axial behaviour of piled foundations in liquefiable soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Mark

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the mechanisms by which any engineering structure resists load is an essential requirement for its consistent and reliable design. The axial resistance which can be mobilised by piled foundations in liquefiable soils when subjected...

  1. Maximum angle of stability of a wet granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ­7 . The friction-based Mohr­Coulomb model3,8 distinguishes between granular friction and interparticle friction stability of dry particles on the surface of a pile2 is in excellent agreement with experiment. However

  2. Analysis of consolidation around driven piles in overconsolidated clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niarchos, Dimitrios G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this thesis is to assess the capabilities of an already established analytical framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of piles driven in highly overconsolidated clays (OCR24). ...

  3. The impact of weathering and aging on a LIMB ash stockpile material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeghly, J.H. [Dravo Lime Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bigham, J.M. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources; Dick, W.A.; Stehouwer, R.C. [Ohio State Univ., Wooster, OH (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources; Wolfe, W.B. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1,500 ton temporary storage pile of water conditioned LIMB (Lime Injected Multistage Burner) ash by-product from the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant Lorain, OH was constructed in July, 1991 at a coal company near New Philadelphia, Ohio. This stockpile was created for dry FGD by-product material to be held in reserve for a land application uses field demonstration. High volume, beneficial uses of dry FGD by-products, such as for mine reclamation and embankment stabilization, will require temporary stockpiling of the by-product. Purpose for constructing this pile was to study changes with time in the LIMB by-product material when exposed to weathering. This by-product material was studied over a 2 1/2 year period. The water to control fugitive dust was added in the ash conditioner at the power plant while being loaded into dump trucks. Amount of water normally added in the conditioning process is close to the optimum moisture content of 40--50 % (dry weight basis), to construct a compacted road embankment or road base. Four environmental operating permits required for construction of the storage pile were obtained, three from Ohio EPA (air, water and solid waste), and one from the Ohio Division of Reclamation (revised reclamation area permit). There was no significant environmental impacts from storm runoff or leachate water from the LIMB ash stockpile during the initial 18 month period through December, 1992. After 2 1/2 years of storage, the potential value of the LIMB material for use as a road embankment material or soil conditioner has declined significantly. Ettringite formation occurs. Aging allows the expansive reaction to take place before its potential use as compacted structural fill or embankment.

  4. A lattice gas model of avalanches in a granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antal Karolyi; Janos Kertesz

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A granular media lattice gas (GMLG) model is used to study avalanches in a two-dimensional granular pile. We demonstrate the efficiency of the algorithm by showing that several features of the non-critical behaviour of real sandpile surfaces, such as the bounded outflow statistics or the finite-size effect of the time evolution of the pile mass, can be reproduced by this simulation approach.

  5. Pile Structure Program, Projected Start Date : January 1, 2010 (Implementation).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Chris; Corbett, Catherine [Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership; Ebberts, Blaine [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2009-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion includes Reasonable and Prudent Alternative 38-Piling and Piling Dike Removal Program. This RPA directs the Action Agencies to work with the Estuary Partnership to develop and implement a piling and pile dike removal program. The program has since evolved to include modifying pile structures to enhance their habitat value and complexity by adding large woody debris. The geographic extent of the Pile Structure Program (PSP) includes all tidally-influenced portions of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam; however, it will focus on the mainstem. The overarching goal of the PSP is to enhance and restore ecosystem structure and function for the recovery of federally listed salmonids through the active management of pile structures. To attain this goal, the program team developed the following objectives: (1) Develop a plan to remove or modify pile structures that have lower value to navigation channel maintenance, and in which removal or modification will present low-risk to adjacent land use, is cost-effective, and would result in increased ecosystem function. (2) Determine program benefits for juvenile salmonids and the ecosystem through a series of intensively monitored pilot projects. (3) Incorporate best available science and pilot project results into an adaptive management framework that will guide future management by prioritizing projects with the highest benefits. The PSP's hypotheses, which form the basis of the pilot project experiments, are organized into five categories: Sediment and Habitat-forming Processes, Habitat Conditions and Food Web, Piscivorous Fish, Piscivorous Birds, and Toxic Contaminant Reduction. These hypotheses are based on the effects listed in the Estuary Module (NOAA Fisheries in press) and others that emerged during literature reviews, discussions with scientists, and field visits. Using pilot project findings, future implementation will be adaptively managed to maximize program benefits and address limiting factors.

  6. Direct N-body Simulations of Rubble Pile Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. M. Leinhardt; D. C. Richardson; T. Quinn

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing evidence that many km-sized bodies in the Solar System are piles of rubble bound together by gravity. We present results from a project to map the parameter space of collisions between km-sized spherical rubble piles. The results will assist in parameterization of collision outcomes for Solar System formation models and give insight into fragmentation scaling laws. We use a direct numerical method to evolve the positions and velocities of the rubble pile particles under the constraints of gravity and physical collisions. We test the dependence of the collision outcomes on impact parameter and speed, impactor spin, mass ratio, and coefficient of restitution. Speeds are kept low (piles. In the cases we tested, less than 2% of the system mass ends up orbiting the remnant. Initial spin can reduce or enhance collision outcomes, depending on the relative orientation of the spin and orbital angular momenta. We derive a relationship between impact speed and angle for critical dispersal of mass in the system. We find that our rubble piles are relatively easy to disperse, even at low impact speed, suggesting that greater dissipation is required if rubble piles are the true progenitors of protoplanets.

  7. Chips game with draws Dynamic programming activity This is a game between two players. It starts with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirbel, Craig L.

    with two piles of chips, ten chips per pile. On each turn, a player may take two chips from one pile, or one chip from each pile. The player who takes the last chip or chips wins the game. If you get down, with one chip in each pile at the beginning of the game. Does the first player always win? How? 4. Try

  8. Still Flying Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the missing episodes before he com- piled this wonderful elegy to our Big Damn Heroes as I think he would have enjoyed consid- ering certain themes and issues brought forward in Heart of Gold, Trash and The Message. In particular, I feel that his views... (tbc) How Much? ?15 (includes ticket, teas and coffees, screening, and free entrance in the raffle) INTERESTED? Email Mireilleisis2003@yahoo.co.uk for more details. Be part of the BIG DAMN BROWNCOATS!! 14 Compare and Contrast #1...

  9. Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

    1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

  10. Avalanches on a conical bead pile: scaling with tuning parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. Lehman; Elizabeth Baker; Howard A. Henry; Andrew J. Kindschuh; Larry C. Markley; Megan B. Browning; Mary E. Mills; R. Michael Winters IV; D. T. Jacobs

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform spherical beads were used to explore the behavior of a granular system near its critical angle of repose on a conical bead pile. We found two tuning parameters that could take the system to a critical point where a simple power-law described the avalanche size distribution as predicted by self-organized criticality, which proposed that complex dynamical systems self-organize to a critical point without need for tuning. Our distributions were well described by a simple power-law with the power {\\tau} = 1.5 when dropping beads slowly onto the apex of a bead pile from a small height. However, we could also move the system from the critical point using either of two tuning parameters: the height from which the beads fell onto the top of the pile or the region over which the beads struck the pile. As the drop height increased, the system did not reach the critical point yet the resulting distributions were independent of the bead mass, coefficient of friction, or coefficient of restitution. All our apex-dropping distributions for any type of bead (glass, stainless steel, zirconium) showed universality by scaling onto a common curve with {\\tau} = 1.5 and {\\sigma} = 1.0, where 1/{\\sigma} is the power of the tuning parameter. From independent calculations using the moments of the distribution, we find values for {\\tau} = 1.6 \\pm 0.1 and {\\sigma} = 0.91 \\pm 0.15. When beads were dropped across the surface of the pile instead of solely on the apex, then the system also moved from the critical point and again the avalanche size distributions fell on a common curve when scaled similarly using the same values of {\\tau} and {\\sigma}. We also observed that an hcp structure on the base of the pile caused an emergent structure in the pile that had six faces with some fcc or hcp structure.

  11. Leaching and toxicity behavior of coal-biomass waste cocombustion ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skodras, G.; Prokopidou, M.; Sakellaropoulos, G.P. [Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Land disposal of ash residues, obtained from the cocombustion of Greek lignite with biomass wastes, is known to create problems due to the harmful constituents present. In this regard, the leachability of trace elements from lignite, biomass, and blends cocombustion ashes was investigated by using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). In this work, the toxicity of the aqueous leachates and the concentrations of the metals obtained from the leaching procedure were measured using the Microtox test (Vibrio fischen) and inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), respectively. The toxic effects of most leachates on Vibrio fischeri were found to be significantly low in both 45% and 82% screening test protocols. However, the liquid sample originating from olive kernels fly ash (FA4) caused the highest toxic effect in both protocols, which can be attributed to its relatively high concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn.

  12. Characterisation Progress at the Windscale Pile Reactors. Challenges and Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ervin, P.F. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, Denver, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the United Kingdom, if not the world. The decommissioning is being performed by an Alliance of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services (CHNS) Ltd. and AMEC, NNC. The 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident is summarized. The resulting fire caused significant characterisation challenges. Challenges to intrusive characterization included hypothesized uranium hydride causing re-ignition of the core fire, unknown fuel configurations leading to a reactor criticality and graphite dust explosions. As a result, the Pile 1 facilities were sealed, isolated and managed in a monitoring and surveillance regime while plans for dismantling were developed. For years the intrusive inspection of the fire damaged region of Pile 1, estimated to contain 15 tonnes of fuel, was precluded based on safety grounds. In June of 2006 the United Kingdom Health and Safety Directorate approved a new Pile 1 safety case that successfully demonstrated that Pile 1 presents a minimal safety risk with no credible risk of a core fire, criticality or graphite dust explosion. Adoption of the new safety case enabled the intrusive inspections of the fire damaged region. Characterisation activities planned and performed since the safety case approval, were prioritised relative to the results potential to mitigate decommissioning project risks. D-Void examinations, irradiation foil hole intrusive inspections, bio-shield and thermal shield plate characterizations were performed. Results obtained allow determination of waste stream composition and confirmation of assumed design conditions. Changes to the strategic approach to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors include waste packaging and storage facilities and confirmation of design assumptions. Fuel channel endoscope inspections have confirmed the strategic approach to safely and efficiently decommission the Windscale Pile 1 Reactor. The first detailed images from deep within the Pile 1 fire affected zone(FAZ) since the 1957 fire are discussed. The decommissioning impacts of these images are provided. Characterisation has confirmed design assumptions and supported decommissioning option evaluation. The results confirmed that the decommissioning strategy of a top down approach, employing an array of light weight, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete remains the most efficient decommissioning method. (authors)

  13. Pile --idee ADT IFT2010 H2006 UdeM Miklos Csuros 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csürös, Miklós

    Pile -- id´ee ADT IFT2010 H2006 UdeM Mikl´os Csur¨os 7 Id´ee de pile : objets empil´es un sur l pop push pop push push #12;Pile ADT IFT2010 H2006 UdeM Mikl´os Csur¨os 8 Objets : listes de style A1 pile (au lieu de retourner une nouvelle pile) #12;Pile -- implantation avec un tableau ADT IFT2010 H

  14. Field investigation of potential contamination by bitumen-coated piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeung, A.T.; Viswanathan, R.; Briaud, J.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coating piles with bitumen down to their neutral points to debond them from embedding soil is a feasible method to minimize the adverse effects of negative skin friction. Bitumen is a petroleum product composed of numerous extremely complex organic compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that have been identified by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as toxic and carcinogenic materials. To investigate the engineering behavior of bitumen-coated piles under extreme weather conditions, full-scale field tests were performed in New Orleans, Louisiana, and Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Instrumented piles were installed at these sites from 1989 to 1990. This paper presents the results of geoenvironmental field investigations performed at these sites to determine the spatial distribution of target PAHs in the subsurface after the piles had been installed for 2--3{1/2} yr. The findings of the investigation indicate that the subsurface contamination, if there is any, caused by the installation of bitumen-coated piles is well within acceptable limits.

  15. Modeling the Dynamic Behavior of a Single Pile in Dry Sand using a new p-y Material Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, JungIn; Brandenberg, Scott J; Kim, MyoungMo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. 2013. Evaluation of dynamic pile behavior by centrifugeAbghari, A. 1999. Seismic soil-pile- structure interactionand Goh, S.H. 2003. Single Piles in Lateral Spreads: Field

  16. THE ADVERSE EFFECTS TO FISHES OF PILE-DRIVING - THE IMPLICATIONS FOR ESA AND EFH CONSULTATIONS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, John H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVERSE EFFECTS TO FISHES OF PILE-DRIVING - THE IMPLICATIONS753-9517 Chapter 2 Abstract Piles are integral components ofWhile treated-wood and concrete piles are commonly used for

  17. Slide 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Firehouse Burn Area * Duct Bank Remediation * K-720 Fly Ash Pile * K-901-A Holding Pond Fish KillCylinder Removal * Demolition of Powerhouse Cooling Towers and Buildings * Zone 1...

  18. Invited review: Effect of temperature on a granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibaut Divoux

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As a fragile construction, a granular pile is very sensitive to minute external perturbations. In particular, it is now well established that a granular assembly is sensitive to variations of temperature. Such variations can produce localized rearrangements as well as global static avalanches inside a pile. In this review, we sum up the various observations that have been made concerning the effect of temperature on a granular assembly. In particular, we dwell on the way controlled variations of temperature have been employed to generate the compaction of a granular pile. After laying emphasis on the key features of this compaction process, we compare it to the classic vibration-induced compaction. Finally, we also review other granular systems in a large sense, from microscopic (jammed multilamellar vesicles) to macroscopic scales (stone heave phenomenon linked to freezing and thawing of soils) for which periodic variations of temperature could play a key role in the dynamics at stake.

  19. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  20. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  1. Thermocouples For High Temperature In-Pile Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many advanced nuclear reactor designs require new fuel, cladding and structural materials. Data are needed to characeterize the performance of these new materials in high temperature, oxidizing and radiation conditions. To obtain this data, robust instrumentation is needed htat can survive proposed test conditions. Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project was intiated to develop specialized thermocouples for high temperature in-pile applications (see Rempe and Wilkins, 2005). This paper summarizes efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate these specialized thermocouples.

  2. Investigation of soil damping on full-scale test piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Reenen, Dirk Andries

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    per foot. This value of friction damping is obtained using the mathematical model with impact velocity exponent equal to 1. 0. The point damping parameter required for piles all in clay is 0. 15 seconds per foot with the velocity exponent equal..., but the pile tips were embedded in sand. Using the mathematical model with a velocity exponent of 1. 0 and a point damping value of 0. 15 seconds per foot, extremely high values of friction damping are needed to achieve agreement between predicted and actual...

  3. Review of CPT based design methods for estimating axial capacity of driven piles in siliceous sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monzón A., Juan Carlos (Monzón Alvarado)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cone Penetration Test has been used for more than 30 years for soil exploration purposes. Its similarities in mode of installation with driven piles provides the potential of linking key variables of pile design and ...

  4. Speciation of chromium in feed coals and ash byproducts from Canadian power plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fariborz Goodarzi; Frank E. Huggins [Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. ash dispersion utilizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the USA for all coal ashes was approximately 34% in the year products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much...

  6. LES GRANDEURS CARACTRISTIQUES DE LA PILE DE CHATILLON (1) Par L. KOWARSKI.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    751. LES GRANDEURS CARACTÉRISTIQUES DE LA PILE DE CHATILLON (1) Par L. KOWARSKI. Laboratoire du de la pile de Châtillon : cuve à eau lourde, barres actives contenant de l'oxyde d'uranium, bloc régime actuel de fonctionnement de la pile ainsi que la puissance qu'elle développe. Il termine en

  7. USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS TO IMAGE THE INTERNAL STRUCTURE OF MINE WASTE ROCK PILES Campos, D.1-Noranda, Canada (bruno.bussiere@uqat.uquebec.ca) INTRODUCTION Mine waste rock piles, or rockwaste dumps rock piles. One of the most critical of these is water flow and water distribution in the waste rock

  8. Adaptive Density Estimation in the Pile-up Model Involving Measurement Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adaptive Density Estimation in the Pile-up Model Involving Measurement Errors Fabienne Comte, Tabea of nonparametric density estimation in the pile-up model. Adaptive nonparametric estimators are proposed for the pile-up model in its simple form as well as in the case of additional measurement errors. Furthermore

  9. Numerical Modelling of Unsaturated Flow in Uniform and Heterogeneous Waste Rock Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    Numerical Modelling of Unsaturated Flow in Uniform and Heterogeneous Waste Rock Piles O Fala1 , M Aubertin1,3 , J Molson1 , B Bussière2,3 , G W Wilson4 , R Chapuis1 and V Martin1 ABSTRACT Waste rock piles these piles, many physical, geochemical and biological processes can contribute to the production of AMD

  10. Evolution of the contact network during tilting cycles of a granular pile under gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staron, Lydie

    Evolution of the contact network during tilting cycles of a granular pile under gravity S. Deboeuf of a granular pile undergoing quasi-static tilting cycles in the gravity field. The volumic deformation of granular piles during continuous load in the gravity field (Staron, Vilotte, & Radjai 2002). Far before

  11. Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science 7, 2005, 110 Two Pile Move-Size Dynamic Nim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science 7, 2005, 1­10 Two Pile Move-Size Dynamic Nim of this paper is to solve a special class of combinational games consisting of two-pile counter pickup games of the games. Two players alternate moving. Each player in his turn first chooses one of the piles, and his

  12. Written date: January 19, 2012 Preliminary study on the mechanical behaviour of heat exchanger pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Written date: January 19, 2012 Preliminary study on the mechanical behaviour of heat exchanger pile piles are necessary to be taken into account in geotechnical design. In this preliminary study, the behaviour of an axially loaded pile under thermal cycles was investigated using a physical model. After

  13. Contrle des changeurs de chaleur : application au circuit de refroidissement d'un systme pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Contrôle des échangeurs de chaleur : application au circuit de refroidissement d'un système pile à, confort thermique, refroidissement des machines électriques et des systèmes avec piles à combustibles). Dans cet article, nous présentons un exemple d'application pour un système pile à combustible avec

  14. Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    page 1 Assessment of the risk of pile driving to juvenile fish James J. Anderson Fisheries Research-12, 1990, Seattle, WA. The problem In this talk I will report on an effort to reassess the risk of pile industry concerns that provisions restricting pile driving during the spring migration are resulting

  15. EMPIRICAL PILE DESIGN BASED ON CONE PENETROMETER DATA: AN EXPLANATION FOR THE REDUCTION OF UNIT BASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    EMPIRICAL PILE DESIGN BASED ON CONE PENETROMETER DATA: AN EXPLANATION FOR THE REDUCTION OF UNIT BASE RESISTANCE BETWEEN CPTs AND PILES X. Borghi 1 , D.J. White 2 , M.D. Bolton 2 , S. Springman 1 1 test (CPT) is regarded as an effective tool for pile design, since it resembles the penetration process

  16. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF LONG TERM UNSATURATED FLOW AND ACID MINE DRAINAGE AT WASTE ROCK PILES Omar representative) waste rock piles and using observed climatic recharge data. The simulations were used to help are applied each year at the top of the piles, the water content profiles become periodic after a few years

  17. Paper No. 12A-12 ERRORS IN DESIGN LEADING TO PILE FAILURES DURING SEISMIC LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    Paper No. 12A-12 1 ERRORS IN DESIGN LEADING TO PILE FAILURES DURING SEISMIC LIQUEFACTION Subhamoy.K) University of Cambridge (U.K) ABSTRACT Collapse of piled foundations in liquefiable soils has been observed. The current method of pile design under earthquake loading is based on a bending mechanism where the inertia

  18. Rduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile combustible oxyde solide dans un Titan ETEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Réduction et oxydation in situ de cellules de pile à combustible à oxyde of Denmark (DTU), DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark La technologie commune des piles à combustible à'opération de la pile à haute température (550°C à 1000°C), conduisant à une

  19. New Structural Model for Multicomponent Pile Cross Sections under Axial Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    New Structural Model for Multicomponent Pile Cross Sections under Axial Load John S. Horvath, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE1 Abstract: Piles composed of more than one material in their cross section have been used for more than 100 years. Originally this was limited to driven steel shell or pipe piles filled

  20. Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    Stochastic numerical simulations of long term unsaturated flow in waste rock piles O. Fala Genivar water flow in waste rock piles using selected realizations of stochastically distributed hydraulic term hydrogeological behaviour of waste rock piles, to help select the construction sequence

  1. Rsum--La pile combustible est une technologie alternative pour la propulsion des vhicules lectriques.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Résumé-- La pile à combustible est une technologie alternative pour la propulsion des véhicules...) pour assurer l'alimentation et la gestion de l'hydrogène et de l'air. Un modèle du générateur à pile à standard utilisé dans les applications transport. I. INTRODUCTION La pile à combustible (PAC) est un

  2. Implementing Per Bak's Sand Pile Model as a Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Implementing Per Bak's Sand Pile Model as a Two-Dimensional Cellular Automaton Leigh Tesfatsion 21 January 2009 Econ 308 Presentation Outline · Brief review: What is a Cellular Automaton? · Sand piles and "self-organized criticality" · Algorithmic description of Per Bak's sand pile model as a two

  3. MTHODE D'OSCILLATION DANS LA PILE, APPLIQUE A LA COMPARAISON D'CHANTILLONS DE GRAPHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    784. MÉTHODE D'OSCILLATION DANS LA PILE, APPLIQUÉE A LA COMPARAISON D'ÉCHANTILLONS DE GRAPHITE Par aux Roses. Sommaire. 2014 On fait osciller lentement dans le réflecteur d'une pile un échantillon de'une pile de l'oscillation d'un absorbeur a été étudié théoriquement par A. M. Weinberg et H. C. Schweinler

  4. Interactive singulation of objects from a pile Lillian Chang, Joshua R. Smith, Dieter Fox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at SeattleUniversity of

    Interactive singulation of objects from a pile Lillian Chang, Joshua R. Smith, Dieter Fox Abstract. We present a framework for interactive singulation of individual items from a pile. The proposed, such as counting, arranging, or sorting items in a pile. A perception module combined with pushing actions

  5. Regulatory Guidance Letter 88-14 SUBJECT: Applicability of Section 404 to Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Regulatory Guidance Letter 88-14 SUBJECT: Applicability of Section 404 to Piles DATE: November 7, 1988 EXPIRES: December 31, 1990 The Corps of Engineers has a longstanding policy that piles do not constitute fill material and that placing piles does not constitute a discharge of fill material. This policy

  6. Research Associate, Cambridge University Engineering Department EFFECTS OF LATERAL SPREADING ON PILE FOUNDATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    ON PILE FOUNDATIONS Data report on tests SKH-13-17 S.K. Haigh1 CUED/D-SOILS/TR318 (2002) #12;#12;-i- Table piles. 2 Figure 2: Particle size distributions for fraction E and fraction B silica sands. 4 Figure 3 10 Figure 8: Pile instrumentation in test SKH-17 10 Figure 9: Accelerations measured in test SKH-13

  7. Structure and Dynamics of the Surface in a Pile of Rice A. Malthe-Srenssen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Kim

    Structure and Dynamics of the Surface in a Pile of Rice A. Malthe-Sørenssen1 , J. Feder1 , K, 2001) We analyze the surface geometry and dynamics in a slowly driven, quasi one-dimensional pile of rice. The pile dynamics is characterized by a sequence of contour lines (profiles). Only a narrow zone

  8. Field Applications of Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes for Marine Piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SP·215-9 Field Applications of Concrete-Filled FRP Tubes for Marine Piles by A. Fam. R. Greene. and S. Rizkalla Synopsis: This paper presents eight field applications of an innovative composite pile in marine environments. The pile consists of a concrete-filled circular fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) tube

  9. MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES Miguel Pando, Ph_rizkalla@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles are a possible foundation alternative for projects located in harsh marine environments. Problems associated with traditional pile materials used in harsh

  10. PILESIZE DYNAMIC ONE-PILE NIM AND BEATTY'S THEOREM Arthur Holshouser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    PILESIZE DYNAMIC ONE-PILE NIM AND BEATTY'S THEOREM Arthur Holshouser 3600 Bullard St. Charlotte, NC of this game and show its relationship with Beatty's Theorem. The game is a one-pile counter pickup game of the game. The move size is bounded by a move function f whose arguments are pile sizes. After analyzing

  11. Microsymposium 34, MS047, 2001 SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROIDS RUBBLE PILE. G. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsymposium 34, MS047, 2001 SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROIDS ­ RUBBLE PILE. G the evolution of an asteroid ­ rubble pile ­ as an isolated object. Evidently, we can distinguish two processes the pile of individ- ual fragments with maximum energy and an- gular momentum, the distribution of which

  12. Behavior of Concrete Piles Confined with CFRP Grid Lining Ding, Hatem. M. Seliem, Sami. H. Rizkalla,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behavior of Concrete Piles Confined with CFRP Grid Lining Ding, Hatem. M. Seliem, Sami. H. Rizkalla spirals to confine precast concrete piles. The research focuses on the effectiveness of the confinement of the specified C-Grid on the concrete core of piles. The experimental program consists of a total of seven short

  13. Windscale pile reactors - Decommissioning progress on a fifty year legacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Richard J. [CH2M HILL International Nuclear Services, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Windscale Pile 1 reactor, fifty years after the 1957 fire, is one of the most technically challenging decommissioning projects in the UK, if not the world. This paper presents a summary of the 1957 Windscale Pile 1 accident, its unique challenges and a new technical approach developed to safely and efficiently decommission the two Windscale Pile Reactors. The reactors will be decommissioned using a top down approach that employs an array of light weight, carbon fiber, high payload robotic arms to remove the damaged fuel, the graphite core, activated metals and concrete. This relatively conventional decommissioning approach has been made possible by a recently completed technical assessment of reactor core fire and criticality risk which concluded that these types of events are not credible if relatively simple controls are applied. This paper presents an overview of the design, manufacture and testing of equipment to remove the estimated 15 tons of fire damaged fuel and isotopes from the Pile 1 reactor. The paper also discusses recently conducted characterization activities which have allowed for a refined waste estimate and conditioning strategy. These data and an innovative approach have resulted in a significant reduction in the estimated project cost and schedule. (authors)

  14. Resolution of Identity Crisis of Events in Pile-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avinash A. Deshpande; Harsha Raichur

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mutually uncorrelated random discrete events, manifesting a common basic process, are examined often in terms of their occurrence rate as a function of one or more of their distinguishing attributes, such as measurements of photon spectrum as a function of energy. Such rate distributions obtained from the observed attribute values for an ensemble of events will correspond to the "true" distribution only if the event occurrence were {\\it mutually exclusive}. However, due to finite resolution in such measurements, the problem of event {\\it pile-up} is not only unavoidable, but also increases with event rate. Although extensive simulations to estimate the distortion due to pile-up in the observed rate distribution are available, no restoration procedure has yet been suggested. Here we present an elegant analytical solution to recover the underlying {\\it true} distribution. Our method, based on Poisson statistics and Fourier transforms, is shown to perform as desired even when applied to distributions that are significantly distorted by pile-up. Our recipes for correction, as well as for prediction, of pile-up are expected to find ready applications in a wide variety of fields, ranging from high-energy physics to medical clinical diagnostics, and involving, but not limited to, measurements of count-rates and/or spectra of incident radiation using Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) or other similar devices.

  15. Enhanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material Testing Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of U.S. nuclear research programs are requesting enhanced in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiations. For example, fuel research and development funded by the U.S. Department of Energy now emphasize approaches that rely on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data must be miniature, reliable and able to withstand high flux/high temperature conditions. Depending on user requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these user needs, in-pile instrumentation development efforts have been initiated as part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF), the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D), and the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) programs. This paper reports on recent INL achievements to support these programs. Specifically, an overview of the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to MTR users are identified. In addition, recent results and products available from sensor research and development are detailed. Specifically, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and thermal conductivity are reported. Results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are also summarized.

  16. Strutture Dati (parte I: pile, code, liste, tabelle hash)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradella, Matteo

    (POP) ­ l'operazione di POP restituisce l'elemento cancellato Una pila è gestita con una politica LIFO (queue) Le code sono simili alle pile, salvo che una coda è gestita con una politica FIFO (First'elemento cancellato Una coda è gestita con una politica FIFO l'elemento che viene cancellato è quello che era stato

  17. Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste Ashes Preparatory thesis Randi Skytte Pedersen is to investigate Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes with respect to particle sizes, structures and composition with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant M°abjergværket, Holstebro. MSW

  18. 14 September, 2009 PROBLEM SEMINAR --PROBLEMS 1 Norm Do 1. There are 25 stones sitting in a pile next to a blackboard. You are allowed to take a pile and divide it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Norman

    14 September, 2009 PROBLEM SEMINAR -- PROBLEMS 1 Norm Do 1. There are 25 stones sitting in a pile next to a blackboard. You are allowed to take a pile and divide it into two smaller piles of size are left with 25 piles, each with one stone. What is the maximum possible sum of the numbers written

  19. KEYWORDS: H-pile, group effect, press-in method, deep foundation ABSTRACT: A novel foundation system comprising steel H-piles is described. Using the press-in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    KEYWORDS: H-pile, group effect, press-in method, deep foundation ABSTRACT: A novel foundation system comprising steel H-piles is described. Using the press-in method, continuous walls of H-piles can force of the individual piles. This construction tech- nique represents an efficient foundation solution

  20. Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large populations of stable flies can substantially reduce the income of beef and dairy producers. This publication explains how to suppress stable flies effectively and economically....

  1. Hessian Fly in Texas Wheat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Sansone, Chris; Knutson, Allen E.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hessian fly came from Russia and may have been introduced into the United States during the Revolutionary War. It has since spread to many parts of the country. By 2005, more than 67 counties in Texas reported Hessian fly infestations...

  2. Hessian Fly in Texas Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Gaylon; Sansone, Chris; Knutson, Allen E.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hessian fly came from Russia and may have been introduced into the United States during the Revolutionary War. It has since spread to many parts of the country. By 2005, more than 67 counties in Texas reported Hessian fly infestations...

  3. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, I. Matias; Combe, Gaeel; Foray, Pierre; Flin, Frederic; Lesaffre, Bernard [Universite de Grenoble, 3SR Lab, UMR 5521 Grenoble-INP, UJF-Grenoble 1, CNRS, Grenoble, France CEN, CNRM-GAME UMR 3589, Meteo France - CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety of cyclic loading paths due to their complex environment. While many studies focus on global pile behaviour, the soil-pile interface is explored here by a micromechanical study of the soil layer in contact with the pile surface. This work is devoted to the analysis of frozen post-mortem silica sand samples recovered at the pile interface following installation and cyclic loading tests in a calibration chamber using x-ray tomography. An experimental procedure developed for three dimensional (3D) snow imaging was adapted for the recovery of the in-situ sand samples to preserve their structure during tomography scans. 3D images at a pixel size of 7 {mu}m were then obtained using a cryogenic cell. Results confirm the presence of a shear band at the pile surface as well as void ratios changes in the direction of the pile's radius.

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 061301 (2011) Simulation of a Casimir-like effect in a granular pile with avalanches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW E 83, 061301 (2011) Simulation of a Casimir-like effect in a granular pile-Tang-Wiesenfeld model for sand piles, we simulate a Casimir-like effect in a granular pile with avalanches. Results of walls placed on the slope of the pile is investigated, but the prevention effect is found

  5. THE MAGNETIC FIELD PILE-UP AND DENSITY DEPLETION IN THE MARTIAN MAGNETOSHEATH: A COMPARISON WITH THE PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    THE MAGNETIC FIELD PILE-UP AND DENSITY DEPLETION IN THE MARTIAN MAGNETOSHEATH: A COMPARISON Global Surveyor (MGS) and theWind spacecraft we show that the region of magnetic field pile of the terrestrial magnetopause when the magnetic field piles up against the obstacle and particles in the pile

  6. Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

  7. The Hydrogeologic Character of the Lower Tuff Confining Unit and the Oak Springs Butte Confining Unit in the Tuff Pile Area of Central Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, Jr., Sigmund L.; Prothro, Lance B.; Gonzales, Jose L.; Mercadante, Jennifer M.

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower tuff confining unit (LTCU) in the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) consists of a monotonous sequence of pervasively zeolitized volcanic tuff (i.e., mostly bedded with lesser nonwelded to poorly welded tuff; not fractured) (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). The LTCU is an important confining unit beneath Yucca Flat because it separates the alluvial and volcanic aquifers, where many underground nuclear tests were conducted, from the regional lower carbonate aquifer. Recent sub-CAU-scale modeling by Los Alamos National Laboratory in the Tuff Pile area of Yucca Flat (Boryta, et al., in review) includes postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones (i.e., fractured welded-tuff aquifers) within the LTCU. This scenario indicates that such postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones could provide fast-path lateral conduits to faults, and eventually to the lower carbonate aquifer. A fractured and faulted lower carbonate aquifer is postulated to provide a flow path(s) for underground test-derived contaminants to potential offsite receptors. The ramifications of such a scenario are obvious for groundwater flow and contaminant migration beneath Yucca Flat. This paper describes the reasoning for not including postulated low-porosity, high-permeability zones within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area or within the LTCU in the Yucca Flat CAU-scale model. Both observational and analytical data clearly indicate that the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area consists of pervasively zeolitic, nonwelded to poorly welded tuffs that are classified as tuff confining units (i.e., high-porosity, low-permeability). The position regarding the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area is summarized as follows: • The LTCU in the Tuff Pile area consists of a monotonous sequence of predominantly zeolitic nonwelded to poorly welded tuffs, and thus is accurately characterized hydrogeologically as a tuff confining unit (aquitard) in the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2006). • No welded-tuff (or lava-flow aquifers), referred to as low-porosity, high-permeability zones in Boryta et al. (in review), are present within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. • Fractures within the LTCU are poorly developed, a characteristic of zeolitic tuffs; and fracture distributions are independent of stratigraphic and lithologic units (Prothro, 2008). • Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will not be affected by laterally extensive zones of significantly higher permeability within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. Although not the primary focus of this report, the hydrogeologic character of the Oak Spring Butte confining unit (OSBCU), located directly below the LTCU, is also discussed. The OSBCU is lithologically more diverse, and does include nonwelded to partially welded ash-flow tuffs. However, these older ash-flow tuffs are poorly welded and altered (zeolitic to quartzofeldspathic), and consequently, would tend to have properties similar to a tuff confining unit rather than a welded-tuff aquifer.

  8. High Temperature Thermocouples For In-pile Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; S. C. Wilkins

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional methods for measuring temperature in-pile degrade at temperatures above 1080 degrees C. Hence, a project has been initiated to explore the use of specialized thermocouples that are composed of materials that are able to withstand higher temperature, in-pile test conditions. Results from efforts to develop, fabricate and evaluate the performance of these specialized thermocouples are reported in this paper. Candidate materials were evaluated for their ability to withstand irradiation, to resit material interactions and to remain ductile at high temperatures. In addition, candidate thermocouples were evaluated based on their resolution over the temperature ranges of interest. Results from these evaluations are reported, and additional on-going development activities are summarized.

  9. Chestnut Ridge Borrow Area Waste Pile work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. (Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), through its contractor Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., has constructed a storage facility, the Chestnut Ridge Borrow Area Waste Pile (CRBAWP), for mercury-contaminated soil excavated from the Oak Ridge Civic Center properties and the Oak Ridge Sewer Line Beltway. Excavation of the soil from the Civic Center began in September 1984 and was completed in early 1985. Similar soils from other areas of the city were added to the pile until 1987. Approximately 3000 yd{sup 3} are stored at the present time. An Interim Status RCRA permit was initially sought for this facility. Samples from the waste pile passed the Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test (EP Tox). The Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (now the Tennessee Department of Conservation-TDC) denied the permit based on their conclusion that the waste was not a RCRA-regulated waste. On September 25, 1990 the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) superseded the EP Tox test. TCLP tests are not proposed to satisfy a request by TDC and to make a final determination of the nature of the soils in order to close the CRBAWP as a solid waste disposal facility under Tennessee State rule 1200-1-7-.04. The objectives of this work are to summarize existing site information and detail actions necessary to sample and characterize soils from the waste pile as hazardous or nonhazardous per the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Within the scope of this plan, a site investigation will be discussed; a field sampling plan will be described in terms of sampling locations, procedures, and quality assurance; and ancillary activities such as waste management, data management, and health and safety will be outlines. 15 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Wave equation analysis of pile driving in gravel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawson, William Dieterich

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and gravel. The fundamental analysis procedure involves varying the soil damping parameter J to match measured static soil resistance and blowcount records. The analysis uses quake values determined by drawing a secant through a point corresponding to 25X... of the ultimate load on the load-deflection curves. For each selected pile, the J value that best correlates ultimate static resistance of the time of driving (calculated by the wave equation) and the measured ultimate static resistance from the load tests...

  11. Enhanced In-Pile Instrumentation at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; K. Condie

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and real-time flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted.

  12. Enhanced in-pile instrumentation at the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Daw, J. E.; Unruh, T.; Chase, B. M.; Palmer, J.; Condie, K. G.; Davis, K. L. [Idaho National Laboratory, MS 3840, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper reports results from this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and realtime flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted. (authors)

  13. Enhanced In-Pile Instrumentation at the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley; Steven Taylor

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the sensors deployed at materials and test reactors cannot withstand the high flux/high temperature test conditions often requested by users at U.S. test reactors, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. To address this issue, an instrumentation development effort was initiated as part of the ATR National Scientific User Facility in 2007 to support the development and deployment of enhanced in-pile sensors. This paper provides an update on this effort. Specifically, this paper identifies the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to ATR users. Accomplishments from new sensor technology deployment efforts are highlighted by describing new temperature and thermal conductivity sensors now available to ATR users. Efforts to deploy enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and real-time flux detectors are also reported, and recently-initiated research to evaluate the viability of advanced technologies to provide enhanced accuracy for measuring key parameters during irradiation testing are noted.

  14. NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daw; J. Rempe; J. Palmer; P. Ramuhalli; R. Montgomery; H.T. Chien; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; P. Keller

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters during irradiation of fuels and materials, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues that currently limit in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. The harsh nature of in-pile testing and the variety of desired measurements demand that an enhanced signal processing capability be developed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. To address these issues, the NEET ASI program funded a three year Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation and Signal Processing Enhancements project, which is a collaborative effort between the Idaho National Laboratory, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory, and the Pennsylvania State University. The objective of this report is to document the objectives and accomplishments from this three year project. As summarized within this document, significant work has been accomplished during this three year project.

  15. COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Derek S.

    COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

  16. Combustion with reduced carbon in the ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion of coal in which oxygen is injected into the coal as it emerges from burner produces ash having reduced amounts of carbon.

  17. SciTech Connect: NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-Final...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues that currently limit in-pile deployment of...

  18. ash leachate generation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72 Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 Materials Science Websites Summary: Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 FGD-2 Alliant Energy FGD-3 WPS Pulliam Ash 12;Center for By-Products...

  19. ash quality characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 Materials Science Websites Summary: Key To Ash Sources FGD-1 MPU 8 FGD-2 Alliant Energy FGD-3 WPS Pulliam Ash 12;Center for By-Products...

  20. ash blended cement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass blends Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: , low ash partially composted manure LAPC, high ash raw manure HARM, and high ash partially composted manure HAPC)...

  1. Contact dynamics in a gently vibrated granular pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Kabla; Georges Debregeas

    2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We use multi-speckle diffusive wave spectroscopy (MSDWS) to probe the micron-scale dynamics of a granular pile submitted to discrete gentle taps. The typical time-scale between plastic events is found to increase dramatically with the number of applied taps. Furthermore, this microscopic dynamics weakly depends on the solid fraction of the sample. This process is strongly analogous to the aging phenomenon observed in thermal glassy systems. We propose a heuristic model where this slowing down mechanism is associated with a slow evolution of the distribution of the contact forces between particles. This model accounts for the main features of the observed dynamics.

  2. Method and apparatus for analog pulse pile-up rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for pulse pile-up rejection are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a delay value application constituent configured to receive a threshold-crossing time value, and provide an adjustable value according to a delay value and the threshold-crossing time value; and a comparison constituent configured to receive a peak-occurrence time value and the adjustable value, compare the peak-occurrence time value with the adjustable value, indicate pulse acceptance if the peak-occurrence time value is less than or equal to the adjustable value, and indicate pulse rejection if the peak-occurrence time value is greater than the adjustable value.

  3. Method and apparatus for analog pulse pile-up rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for pulse pile-up rejection are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a delay value application constituent configured to receive a threshold-crossing time value, and provide an adjustable value according to a delay value and the threshold-crossing time value; and a comparison constituent configured to receive a peak-occurrence time value and the adjustable value, compare the peak-occurrence time value with the adjustable value, indicate pulse acceptance if the peak-occurrence time value is less than or equal to the adjustable value, and indicate pulse rejection if the peak-occurrence time value is greater than the adjustable value.

  4. Tension capacity of two drilled and grouted piles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kubena, Mark Edward

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement, Load vs. Depth and Friction vs. Movement (Load Transfer). 2 SITE DESCRIPTION 2. 1 Location The site selected for this drilled and grouted pile research project is on the Texas A&M University Riverside Campus. The TAMU Riverside campus...) 24 results. The chart is based on the point bearing, q, versus the friction ratio, FR. The CPT soundings and the boring are used to prepare the cross section shown on Figure 17 which summarizes the soil conditions. 25 10F 4 20Ft 30FC STIFF...

  5. Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing:DOECoach Compliance Form MyCoal Pile

  6. ashes oral biotillgaenglighet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash 1. Halima Hadiahmetovi?; D. D. Sarajevo; M. Sc; Raza Sunulahpai?; Bosnia Herzegovina 97 Leachate Geochemical Results for Ash Samples from the June 2007 Angora...

  7. Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Poster presentation at the 2007...

  8. Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Government Utility Program Info State North Carolina Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County...

  9. Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and Engine Wear Impact of Biodiesel on Ash Emissions and Lubricant Properties Affecting Fuel Economy and...

  10. ash intranasal instillation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    there is no mixing of insufficiently thermally treated material with bottom ash. Good fire control Columbia University 17 Characteristics and Uses for Ash Environmental...

  11. ash deposition propensities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environments (>3.5 km), banded iron, volcanic ashes Summary diagrams available Clastic depositional environments Harbor, David 57 Ash Dump Site Manager: EHS&RM Biology and...

  12. Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Ash Formation and Transport Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash,...

  13. Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

  14. Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic Introduction to Municipal Solid Waste Incineration 2 Chapter 2 Plants Considered and Samples Collected 5 Chapter 3 Mapping of Ash Chemistry in MSWI Plants 8 Chapter 4 Advanced Characterization Methods 12 4

  15. Evaluation of Candidate In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Fox; H. Ban; J. Daw; K. Condie; D. Knudson; J. Rempe

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophysical properties of materials must be known for proper design, test, and application of new fuels and structural properties in nuclear reactors. In the case of nuclear fuels during irradiation, the physical structure and chemical composition change as a function of time and position within the rod. Typically, thermal conductivity changes, as well as other thermophysical properties being evaluated during irradiation in a materials and test reactor, are measured out-of-pile in “hot-cells.” Repeatedly removing samples from a test reactor to make out-of-pile measurements is expensive, has the potential to disturb phenomena of interest, and only provide understanding of the sample's end state at the time each measurement is made. There are also limited thermophysical property data for advanced fuels. Such data are needed for the development of next generation reactors and advanced fuels for existing nuclear plants. Having the capacity to effectively and quickly characterize fuels and material properties during irradiation has the potential to improve the fidelity of nuclear fuel data and reduce irradiation testing costs.

  16. In-Pile Thermal Conductivity Measurement Method for Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joy L. Rempe; Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joshua E. Daw; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophysical properties of advanced nuclear fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel and material performance. A joint Utah State University (USU) / Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project, which is being conducted with assistance from the Institute for Energy Technology at the Norway Halden Reactor Project, is investigating in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement methods. This paper focuses on one of these methods – a multiple thermocouple method. This two-thermocouple method uses a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation to gain insights about in-pile detection of thermal conductivity. Preliminary results indicated that this method can measure thermal conductivity over a specific temperature range. This paper reports the thermal conductivity values obtained by this technique and compares these values with thermal property data obtained from standard thermal property measurement techniques available at INL’s High Test Temperature Laboratory. Experimental results and material properties data are also compared to finite element analysis results.

  17. and a Prayer eople flying in airplanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fish, Frank

    On a Fin and a Prayer Frank Fish eople flying in airplanes invariably think of birds in flight the flight of flying fish. The article examined the steeringand handling mecha- nisms of the fish in the Spirit of St. Louis, researchers could not fullygrasp how fish could fly above the surface of the ocean

  18. Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential effects on marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Assessing underwater noise levels during pile-driving at an offshore windfarm and its potential of underwater noise on marine spe- cies, particularly from pile-driving for wind turbines. Environmental population of bottlenose dol- phins. We measured pile-driving noise at distances of 0.1 (maximum broadband

  19. TUDE DU FACTEUR DE MULTIPLICATION DANS LA PILE DE SACLAY Par B. JACROT, F. NETTER et V. RAIEVSKI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    31 ÉTUDE DU FACTEUR DE MULTIPLICATION DANS LA PILE DE SACLAY Par B. JACROT, F. NETTER et V facteur de multiplication effectif dans une pile,par des expériences en régime sous-critique. Ces méthodes sont appliquées à la déter- mination de l'effet sur la réactivité de différents paramètres de la pile

  20. Extremal Dynamics and the Approach to the Critical State: Experiments on a Three Dimensional Pile of Rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Extremal Dynamics and the Approach to the Critical State: Experiments on a Three Dimensional Pile in three dimensions. With time, the pile approaches a critical state with a certain slope. Assuming extremal dynamics in the evolution of the pile, the way the critical state is approached is dictated

  1. Information bounds and MCMC parameter estimation for the pile-up model Tabea Rebafkaa,b$, Franois Roueffa, Antoine Souloumiacb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information bounds and MCMC parameter estimation for the pile-up model Tabea Rebafkaa,b$, François Abstract This paper is concerned with the pile-up model defined as a nonlinear transformation of a distribution of interest. An observation of the pile-up model is the minimum of a random number of independent

  2. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 051309 (2012) Relation between self-organized criticality and grain aspect ratio in granular piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ratio in granular piles D. V. Denisov, Y. Y. Villanueva, K. A. Lorincz, S. May, and R. J. Wijngaarden-organized criticality (SOC) occurs in granular piles composed of different grains, namely, rice, lentils, quinoa fluctuation (and thus bigger avalanches) happen in piles consisting of grains with larger aspect ratio. DOI

  3. Ageing of a granular pile induced by thermal cycling Thibaut Divoux, Ion Vassilief, Herv Gayvallet and Jean-Christophe Gminard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ageing of a granular pile induced by thermal cycling Thibaut Divoux, Ion Vassilief, Hervé Gayvallet of temperature, even of a few degrees in amplitude, induce the ageing of a granular pile. In particular, we of the pile with the number of cycles. The present contribution nicely supplements a recent article we

  4. Appels de fonctions dans les langages 3.1 Fonctions, pile, rcursion, blocs d'activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balat, Vincent - Laboratoire Preuves, Programmes et Systèmes, Université Paris 7

    Chapitre 3 Appels de fonctions dans les langages à blocs Sommaire 3.1 Fonctions, pile, récursion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3.1.2 La pile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3, pile, récursion, blocs d'activation 3.1.1 Le problème Les appels de fonctions et la récursion

  5. ccsd-00083932,version1-4Jul2006 The S shape of a granular pile in a rotating drum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ccsd-00083932,version1-4Jul2006 The S shape of a granular pile in a rotating drum Nicolas Taberlet1 (Dated: July 4, 2006) The shape of a granular pile in a rotating drum is investigated. Using Discrete reveals a dimensionless number which quantifies the influence of the end plates on the shape of the pile

  6. Granular Matter 2, 179187 c Springer-Verlag 2000 Effect of particle size distribution on pile tip resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    Granular Matter 2, 179­187 c Springer-Verlag 2000 Effect of particle size distribution on pile tip the specific boundary problem associated with the penetration of a model pile into two different gradings of fine particles on the pile end bearing resistance. The first grading of sand comprised particles

  7. sonde) (1). Lia, sonde contient un petit compteur de Geiger-Mller aliment par une pile de 75o V,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    78 A sonde) (1). Lia, sonde contient un petit compteur de Geiger-Müller alimenté par une pile de 75o V, en parallèle avec un condensateur de 25 00o pF; l'appareil est donc autonome. Les piles cet appareil, des piles ayant des éléments (1) Modèle du Commissariat à l'Énergie atomique. de 0 = 2I

  8. F. FRIEDRICHS. -Ueber eine galvanische Batterie (Sur une pile lectrique); Wied. Ann., t. XXXII, p. I9I; I887.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    498 F. FRIEDRICHS. - Ueber eine galvanische Batterie (Sur une pile électrique); Wied. Ann., t. XXXII, p. I9I; I887. Les éléments de cette pile sont renfermés dans des vases qui communiquent par leur partie inférieure avec une bouteille con- tenant le liquide excitateur; on met la pile en activité ou

  9. Influence of the driving rate in a two-dimensional rice pile model Kinga A. Lrincz and Rinke J. Wijngaarden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Influence of the driving rate in a two-dimensional rice pile model Kinga A. Lrincz and Rinke J the influence of the driving rate in the two-dimensional Oslo rice pile model. We find that the usual power are the Bak-Tang- Wiesenfeld BTW sandpile model 1,7 , the rice pile models the Oslo model 8 and the Amaral

  10. Avalanche dynamics, surface roughening, and self-organized criticality: Experiments on a three-dimensional pile of rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    -dimensional pile of rice C. M. Aegerter, R. Gu¨nther, and R. J. Wijngaarden Division of Physics and Astronomy-organized criticality. The avalanches that occur on the surface of a pile of rice are found to exhibit finite size toy systems studied were sand piles; however, it has been shown that due to the appearance of, e

  11. A digital method for separation and reconstruction of pile-up events in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakhostin, M.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Walker, P. M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of pulse pile-up is very often encountered in precise measurements of {gamma}-rays using germanium detectors. The standard method of treating the pile-up events is to identify and reject them using an appropriate electronic system. Digital acquisition techniques now allow the recording of waveforms of pile-up events that can be analyzed and the contributing single pulses recovered, rather than simply tolerating the losses associated with pile-up. In this paper, a method for the off-line digital processing of pile-up events from germanium detectors is demonstrated. The method is based on an appropriate fitting of the detector signals, shaped with a suitable digital pulse shaper. It is shown that the method is able to recover the pile-up events with good accuracy even when the constituent signals are in close proximity. The method is very useful for {gamma}-ray spectroscopy in nuclear physics experiments, where the low intensity signals can be lost due to the pile-up in a high-rate environment.

  12. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  13. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  14. Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning. Topical report No. 1, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and FGD sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  15. Environmental aspects of the Brandywine ash site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simek, E.; Potera, G.; Schuller, R.; Herritt, M.; Wagner, R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brandywine ash site, located in Prince Georges County, Maryland, is owned and operated by the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO). This site was designed specifically for the storage of the large quantities of coal ash produced at PEPCO's nearby Chalk Point Generating Station. Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM), with assistance from the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Tidewater Administration, conducted a study of this site for the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program (PPSP) to determine if ash constituents are adversely affecting the environment. Section 1 of this report is an introduction to coal ash and its physical/chemical characteristics. Section 2 describes the environment at the site and in adjacent areas. Within this setting, a description of the facility is presented as Section 3. Section 4 relies on the previous sections to point out any likely effects of the facility on the environment and to discount unlikely interactions. Key conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  16. Statistical and risk analysis for the measured and predicted axial response of 100 piles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdomo, Dario

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2. Load Settlement Curves "Good Guess" Example for Actual Curve(from Briaud et al, 1985) TOP LOAD (HIPS) 0 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 iJ PILE I. D. NO. 28 Actual Wild Guess + Penpile- Verbrugge (L. P. C. Cone) Coyle Briaud-Tucker L. P. C... ' 7. 2 Mgbinpina1. JLDglxaim ~ The results of the statistical analysis are shown in Tables 10 600 DRIVEN PILES SAND COYLE'S METHOD 500 M 0 400 (A o o UJ 300 X I? O UJ I- 200 O L0 K 100 No. OF PILES=S MEAN PRED/MEAS=1. 01...

  17. Analysis of the behavior of 5 axially loaded single piles in sand at Hunter's Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kon, Chee Min

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2. 1 Prediction methods 57 4. 2. 2 Comparison of predicted and measured results 58 5. CLOSED-ENDED PIPE PILE 64 5. 1 Background 5. 2 Residual loads 5. 3 Compression test 5. 3. 1 Load versus settlement curve 5. 3. 2 Load versus depth 64 66.... Horizontal earth pressure coefficient from load test of closed-ended pipe pile. (1 ft = 0. 3048 m) 89 51. Toe piezometer readings (Toe 2) versus time. (1 psi = 6. 89 kPa) 90 52. Assumed residual load profile of uplift test on closed-ended pipe pile. (1...

  18. Utilization of pulverized fuel ash in Malta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camilleri, Josette [Department of Building and Civil Engineering, Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Malta, Msida (Malta); Sammut, Michael [Department of Pathology, St. Luke's Hospital, G'Mangia (Malta); Montesin, Franco E. [Department of Building and Civil Engineering, Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Malta, Msida (Malta)]. E-mail: franco.montesin@um.edu.mt

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Malta all of the waste produced is mixed and deposited at various sites around the island. None of these sites were purpose built, and all of the waste is above groundwater level. The landfills are not engineered and do not contain any measures to collect leachate and gases emanating from the disposal sites. Another waste, which is disposed of in landfills, is pulverized fuel ash (PFA), which is a by-product of coal combustion by the power station. This has been disposed of in landfill, because its use has been precluded due to the radioactivity of the ashes. The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of the pulverized fuel ash and to attempt to utilize it as a cement replacement in normal concrete mixes in the construction industry. The levels of radiation emitted from the ashes were measured by gamma spectrometry. The results of this study revealed that although at early ages cement replacement by PFA resulted in a reduction in compressive strength (P = 0), when compared to the reference concrete at later ages the strengths measured on concrete cores were comparable to the reference concrete (P > 0.05). The utilization of PFA up to 20% cement replacement in concrete did not raise the radioactivity of the concrete. In conclusion, utilization of PFA in the construction industry would be a better way of disposing of the ashes rather than controlling the leachate and any radioactivity emitted by the landfilled ashes.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A PILED-FOUNDATION MODEL The models discussed in Chapter 3 illustrated the importance of modelling a building's foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    85 Chapter 4 DEVELOPMENT OF A PILED-FOUNDATION MODEL The models discussed in Chapter 3 illustrated-isolation. It was concluded that a generic base- isolated building model requires a comprehensive model of a piled foundation of the pile head due to longitudinal and transverse motion of the pile; · interaction between neighbouring

  20. Monotonic & Dilatory Piezocone Dissipation in NC and OC Geomaterials The hybrid solution for porewater decay monitored by piezoprobes, driven piles, and piezocone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    for porewater decay monitored by piezoprobes, driven piles, and piezocone dissipation tests is based on cavity

  1. Naphthalene and o-Xylene Adsorption onto High Carbon Fly Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    electricity, resulting in the generation of vast quantities of coal combustion by-products. One of these by for the treatment of groundwater con- taining both organic and inorganic pollutants (Guerin et al. 2002; Jenk et al. 2003; Long et al. 2008). Approximately 90% of the coal used in the United States is burned to produce

  2. LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    . Approximately 90% of the coal used in United States is burned to produce electricity. As a result, the power and o-xylene, and a tertiary model non-aqueous phase liquid were used as the pollutants in batch for alternative approaches, such as soil stabilization by addition of a binder to adsorb the pollutant(s) while

  3. Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (nRa iIRIe1Prt au ( vG(r? TaD uae vGI B(rT vI8GrP8(n 8arvePODvParR GI B(iI vGeaDtGaDv vGI n(Oae(vaeT Pr1IRvPt(vPar (ri uae (n?(TR 9ea1PiPrt ( nPRvIrPrt I(e (ri Bae(n RD99aev iDePrt vGI vaDtG vPBIR? NG(r? TaD (nRa va ?eauIRRae AP8G(ei L(GIe uae rav...?????? ??????? (ri 3?6???? 9RP 9eaiD8vPar 9eIRRDeIR ????? ?5 ?? oaB9eIRRP1I RveIrtvG 1R? 9eaiD8vPar 9eIRRDeI eIn(vParRGP9 uae 3?? 9Ie8Irv 9aevn(ri 8IBIrv 8aB9(8vR (v vGeII? RI1Ir? (ri v?IrvT?IPtGv i(TR au (tI ??????????????????????????????????????????????????? 5...

  4. Device and method for separating minerals, carbon and cement additives from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Link, Thomas A.; Schoffstall, Micael R.; Soong, Yee

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for separating organic and inorganic particles from a dry mixture by sizing the particles into isolated fractions, contacting the sized particles to a charged substrate and subjecting the charged particles to an electric field to separate the particles.

  5. Leaching of As, Cr, and Cu from High-Carbon Fly AshSoil Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    of conversion to low-NOX combustion (Hower et al. 1998) and activated carbon ad- dition to control Hg emissions

  6. Process for removing sulfur from sulfur-containing gases: high calcium fly-ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary T. (Austin, TX); Chang, John C. S. (Cary, NC)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure relates to improved processes for treating hot sulfur-containing flue gas to remove sulfur therefrom. Processes in accordance with the present invention include preparing an aqueous slurry composed of a calcium alkali source and a source of reactive silica and/or alumina, heating the slurry to above-ambient temperatures for a period of time in order to facilitate the formation of sulfur-absorbing calcium silicates or aluminates, and treating the gas with the heat-treated slurry components. Examples disclosed herein demonstrate the utility of these processes in achieving improved sulfur-absorbing capabilities. Additionally, disclosure is provided which illustrates preferred configurations for employing the present processes both as a dry sorbent injection and for use in conjunction with a spray dryer and/or bagfilter. Retrofit application to existing systems is also addressed.

  7. Nitration of Benzo[a]pyrene Adsorbed on Coal Fly Ash Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K.

    , collected from the top stack scrubber of a coal furnace, and exposed to NO2. It was qualitatively determined

  8. Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    investigations. Recycled materials, such as tire chips (Kim et al 1997) and foundry sand (Lee et al. 2004) have in the utilization of recycled materials for remediation of contaminated groundwater as a part of sorptive barrier

  9. Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei Tung

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to be cost effective. It was shown that about two and half dollars per cubic meter could be saved through savings on portland cement....

  10. Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raba, Gary W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 000 E /E(=l I O. I E( = 2, 000, 000 5 6 7 8 8 IO II (2 (3 I4 H, inches Figure 9. Surface Curvature Index - Thickness re(ation for various pavement systems [after Maj(dzadeh (23)]. 0. 7 0, 6 0. 5 0. 4 0. 3 0. 2 X u" II4 'X & lo' 'X H...=9 E~= 20, 000 psi Hfa H=4 H=5 6 7 H = IO a H = II X H-l4 O. l X 0. 0 O. l I. O IO EI /E2 Ratio 100 500 Figure 10. Surface Curvature Index - Modu1ar Ratio Relationship for various pavement systems [after Majidzadeh (23)]. 36 200...

  11. Characterisation of reactive magnesia and sodium carbonate-activated fly ash/slag paste blends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdalqader, Ahmed F.; Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    of the paste samples, all the dry materials (GGBS, FA, and MgO) were 151 mixed by hand in a bowl followed by 5 minutes’ dry mixing in a mixer to which the Na2CO3 152 solution was then added. The mixer was stopped after 3 minutes of slow mixing, to collect 153... using 20±2 mg powder under static air in an open alumina crucible heated at 10 °C/min over 182 the range of 40-1000°C on a Perkin Elmer STA6000 machine. Attenuated Total Reflectance 183 Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectra of the samples were...

  12. pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly Ash - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( ( (

  13. Ground penetrating radar characterization of wood piles and the water table in Back Bay, Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeFrançois, Suzanne O'Neil, 1980-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys are performed to determine the depth to the water table and the tops of wood piles beneath a residential structure at 122 Beacon Street in Back Bay, Boston. The area of Boston known ...

  14. SVSM/Combinatorics Assignment 11 More Composite Games 1. The table below gives the Grundy values for all pairs of pile sizes from up to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    for all pairs of pile sizes from up to 10 per pile for Whytoff's game. For example, the Grundy value of counters from one pile or the same number of counters from two piles. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 0 0 1 2 3 4 of the four one pile nim games N(3), N(5), N(7) and N(9). That is, N(3, 5, 7, 9) = N(3)N(5)N(7)N(9

  15. ash solvent extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alessandro 2013-01-01 27 ASH PNEUMATIC TRANSPORT UNDER ELECTROFILTERS OF UNIT 5 THERMAL POWER PLANT TUZLA CiteSeer Summary: Ash pneumatic transport is basic on fact that at...

  16. rsistances trouves semblent dpendre de la rsistance de la pile; on les limine par divers procds, et notamment en renver-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    501 résistances trouvées semblent dépendre de la résistance de la pile; on les élimine par divers procédés, et notamment en renver- sant le sens du courant de pile. G. LIPPAMANN R.-T. GLAZEBROOK. 2014 un même pôle de la pile par les deux condensateurs à comparer ; il y a équilibre dans le pont, au

  17. Sur la gestion echantillonnee de l'energie d'un syst`eme -pile `a combustible-super

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sur la gestion ´echantillonn´ee de l'´energie d'un syst`eme - pile `a combustible la gestion de l'´energie d'un syst`eme compos´e d'une pile `a combustible associ´ee `a un super solliciter dans un premier temps le super condensateur et dans un deuxi`eme temps la pile. Deux strat

  18. The "Supercritical Pile" Model of GRB: Thresholds, Polarization, Time Lags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demosthenes Kazanas; Markos Georganopoulos; Apostolos Mastichiadis

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The essence of the ``Supercritical Pile'' model is a process for converting the energy stored in the relativistic protons of a Relativistic Blast Wave (RBW) of Lorentz factor $\\Gamma$ into electron -- positron pairs of similar Lorentz factor, while at the same time emitting most of the GRB luminosity at an energy $E_p \\simeq 1$ MeV. This is achieved by scattering the synchrotron radiation emitted by the RBW in an upstream located ``mirror'' and then re-intercepting it by the RBW. The repeated scatterings of radiation between the RBW and the ``mirror'', along with the threshold of the pair production reaction $p \\gamma \\to p e^-e^+$, lead to a maximum in the GRB luminosity at an energy $E_p \\simeq 1$ MeV, {\\sl independent of the value of $\\Gamma$}. Furthermore, the same threshold implies that the prompt $\\gamma-$ray emission is only possible for $\\Gamma$ larger than a minimum value, thereby providing a ``natural'' account for the termination of this stage of the GRB as the RBW slows down. Within this model the $\\gamma-$ray ($E \\sim 100$ keV -- 1 MeV) emission process is due to Inverse Compton scattering and it is thus expected to be highly polarized if viewed at angles $\\theta \\simeq 1/\\Gamma$ to the RBW's direction of motion. Finally, the model also predicts lags in the light curves of the lower energy photons with respect to those of higher energy; these are of purely kinematic origin and of magnitude $\\Delta t \\simeq 10^{-2}$ s, in agreement with observation.

  19. Modeling the Dynamic Behavior of a Single Pile in Dry Sand using a new p-y Material Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, JungIn; Brandenberg, Scott J; Kim, MyoungMo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dynamic pile behavior by centrifuge tests consideringof KOCED geotechnical centrifuge and its shear wave velocitysurface plasticity theory. Centrifuge model data analyzed

  20. Costs of Harvesting, Storing in a Large Pile, and Transporting Corn Stover in a Wet Form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corn stover is potentially an attractive biomass resource, but must be stored if used to supply a biorefinery year-round. Based on experience with successfully storing water-saturated large piles of bagasse for the pulping industry, Atchison and Hettenhaus (2003) proposed that such a system can also be applied to corn stover. Regardless of the technical feasibility of this system, in this article we estimate the cost of harvesting corn stover in a single pass with corn grain, delivering the chopped biomass to a storage pile, storing the stover in a wet form in a large pile at 75% moisture in a 211,700-dry Mg facility within a radius of 24 km from the field, and transporting the stover 64 km to a biorefinery. Field-ground corn stover can be delivered to a biorefinery by rail for $55 to $61/dry Mg. Truck transport is more expensive, $71 to $77/dry Mg. To achieve a minimum cost in the system proposed by Atchison and Hettenhaus, it is necessary to field densify stover to 74 dry kg/m3, without losing combine field efficiency, have a large storage pile to spread fixed costs of storage over enough biomass, and use rail transportation. Compared to storage in an on-farm bunker silo at $60/dry Mg, there are limited circumstances in which large pile storage has a cost advantage.

  1. Real Time Pulse Pile-up Recovery in a High Throughput Digital Pulse Processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoullar, Paul A. B.; McLean, Chris C. [Southern Innovation, Melbourne (Australia); Evans, Rob J. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne (Australia)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection and measurement of radiation is used extensively for non-invasive material characterization in a range of industries. However, many practical applications are frustrated by pulse pile-up within the detector. Pulse pile-up, which occurs when multiple radiation events arrive within the temporal resolving time of the detector, degrades the fidelity of subsequent material analysis. Traditional pulse processing techniques use fast digital filters and logic circuits to detect piled-up events and discard the corrupted data, however, this leads to substantial detector dead time. Consequently, there is considerable interest in more complex signal-processing algorithms to extend the performance of pulse processors and improve material characterization techniques. We present a technology for real-time decoding of pulse pile-up events. It is a model-based signal-processing algorithm able to accurately characterize the number, time-of-arrival and energy of all events in the detector output. Even in the presence of severe multi-pulse pile-up, the composite events are decoded and the energy and time-of-arrival recovered. The technology has been evaluated using a range of detectors, sources and count rates. An exceptional improvement over traditional pulse processing techniques is demonstrated.

  2. 2007 world of coal ash conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theme of the conference was science, applications and sustainability. Papers are presented under the following topics: aggregates/geotechnology; agriculture; ash facility; management; CCT products; cement and concrete; chemistry and mineralogy; emerging technology; environmental; LOI/beneficiation/handling; mercury; mining and regulations and standards. The poster papers are included as well.

  3. Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzik, P. [Derrick Corp., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

  4. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Crepeau; J.L. Rempe; J.E. Daw; D.L. Knudson: K.G. Condie; S.C. Wilkins

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped molybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of the art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing them to become familiar with the techniques and equipment used for specialized high temperature instrumentation fabrication and evaluation and to author/coauthor several key conference papers and journal articles.

  5. Enhancements to High Temperature In-Pile Thermocouple Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. C. Crepeau; J. L. Rempe; J. E. Daw; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; S. C. Wilkins

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint University of Idaho (UI) and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) University Nuclear Research Initiative (UNERI) was to initiated to extend initial INL efforts to develop doped lybdenum/niobium alloy High Temperature Irradiation Resistant Thermocouples (HTIR-TCs). The overall objective of this UNERI was to develop recommendations for an optimized thermocouple design for high temperature, long duration, in-pile testing by expanding upon results from initial INL efforts. Tasks to quantify the impact of candidate enhancements, such as alternate alloys, alternate geometries, and alternate thermocouple fabrication techniques, on thermocouple performance were completed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL), a state of the art facility equipped with specialized equipment and trained staff in the area of high temperature instrumentation development and evaluation. Key results of these evaluations, which are documented in this report, are as follows. The doped molybdenum and Nb-1%Zr, which were proposed in the initial INL HTIR-TC design, were found to retain ductility better than the developmental molybdenum-low niobium alloys and the niobium-low molybdenum alloys evaluated. Hence, the performance and lower cost of the commercially available KW-Mo makes a thermocouple containing KW-Mo and Nb-1%Zr the best option at this time. HTIR-TCs containing larger diameter wires offer the potential to increase HTIR-TC stability and reliability at higher temperatures. HTIR-TC heat treatment temperatures and times should be limited to not more than 100 °C above the proposed operating temperatures and to durations of at least 4 to 5 hours. Preliminary investigations suggest that the performance of swaged and loose assembly HTIR-TC designs is similar. However, the swaged designs are less expensive and easier to construct. In addition to optimizing HTIR-TC performance, This UNERI project provided unique opportunities to several University of Idaho students, allowing them to become familiar with the techniques and equipment used for specialized high temperature instrumentation fabrication and evaluation and to author/coauthor several key conference papers and journal articles.

  6. Memory of the Unjamming Transition during Cyclic Tiltings of a Granular Pile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanie Deboeuf; Olivier Dauchot; Lydie Staron; Anne Mangeney; Jean-Pierre Vilotte

    2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete numerical simulations are performed to study the evolution of the micro-structure and the response of a granular packing during successive loading-unloading cycles, consisting of quasi-static rotations in the gravity field between opposite inclination angles. We show that internal variables, e.g., stress and fabric of the pile, exhibit hysteresis during these cycles due to the exploration of different metastable configurations. Interestingly, the hysteretic behaviour of the pile strongly depends on the maximal inclination of the cycles, giving evidence of the irreversible modifications of the pile state occurring close to the unjamming transition. More specifically, we show that for cycles with maximal inclination larger than the repose angle, the weak contact network carries the memory of the unjamming transition. These results demonstrate the relevance of a two-phases description -strong and weak contact networks- for a granular system, as soon as it has approached the unjamming transition.

  7. Acoustic Emission Signal Processing Technique to Characterize Reactor In-Pile Phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Magdy Samy Tawfik; James A Smith

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing and developing advanced sensor technologies and instrumentation will allow non-intrusive in-pile measurement of temperature, extension, and fission gases when coupled with advanced signal processing algorithms. The transmitted measured sensor signals from inside to the outside of containment structure are corrupted by noise and are attenuated, thereby reducing the signal strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Identification and extraction of actual signal (representative of an in-pile phenomenon) is a challenging and complicated process. In this paper, empirical mode decomposition technique is proposed to reconstruct actual sensor signal by partially combining intrinsic mode functions. Reconstructed signal corresponds to phenomena and/or failure modes occurring inside the reactor. In addition, it allows accurate non-intrusive monitoring and trending of in-pile phenomena.

  8. SIMULATING ASTEROID RUBBLE PILES WITH A SELF-GRAVITATING SOFT-SPHERE DISTINCT ELEMENT METHOD MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J. [Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-431UCB (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper applies a soft-sphere distinct element method Granular Dynamics code to simulate asteroid regolith and rubble piles. Applications to regolith studies in low gravity are also studied. Then an algorithm to calculate self-gravity is derived and incorporated for full-scale simulations of rubble-pile asteroids using Granular Dynamics techniques. To test its validity, the algorithm's results are compared with the exact direct calculation of the gravitational forces. Further avenues to improve the performance of the algorithm are also discussed.

  9. Noise dependence with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araque Espinosa, Juan Pedro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment and comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. Under these challenging conditions not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but also a component coming from other collisions. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects calorimeter noise under different circumstances are described.

  10. In-situ measurements of friction and bearing correlated with instrumented pile tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, George William

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    values, in-situ measurements of tip-only tests, embedded tests, and the corresponding CT values, TABLE 4 SERIES I FRICTION DATA ? PILE I- Ir?MEDIATE STATIC LOAD TEST DEPTH FEET 12. 0 21. 5 30. 0 31. 0 32. 0 40. 5 41. 5 50. 0 60. 5 61. 5... Procedure 20 20 20 21 22 ANALYSIS OF TEST RESULTS General Instrumented Pile Test Data . In-Situ Friction Test Data In-Situ Bearing Test Data . Correlation with Soil Properties 27 27 28 30 41 42 COiNCLUSIOiNS A!ND P...

  11. A pressuremeter method for single piles subjected to cyclic lateral loads in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Robert Lewis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of piles in sand subJected to ~~ cyclic horizontal loads, and (0) the proposed method cannot predict the degradation (or lack of it) of piles in sand subjected to ~~ cyclic horizontal loads because the pr essuremeter is a cyclic test. Zn memory of my... and dedication to his own research served as an inspiration for the author. Mr. Tucker's talent in micr ocomputer pr ogr amming and his vii willingness to share his knowledge were invaluable in the reduction of the pressuremeter data. Finally, the author...

  12. Paper No. 11.02 1 Axial-Compressive Capacities of a New Type of Tapered Steel Pipe Pile at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Paper No. 11.02 1 Axial-Compressive Capacities of a New Type of Tapered Steel Pipe Pile at the John driven piles have been the deep foundation of choice at the well-known John F. Kennedy International. For many decades naturally tapered timber piles were used primarily but various brands of closed-end steel

  13. Casimir-like effect on a granular pile Y. Y. Villanueva, D. V. Denisov, S. de Man, and R. J. Wijngaarden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wijngaarden, Rinke J.

    Casimir-like effect on a granular pile Y. Y. Villanueva, D. V. Denisov, S. de Man, and R. J-like effect in a three-dimensional pile of rice, which has a power- law avalanche size distribution. We observe the change in distance between two Plexiglas sheets placed on the pile parallel to each other

  14. TUDE EXPRIMENTALE DE LA CINTIQUE DE LA PILE DE CHATILLON ParA. ERTAUD, R. BEAUG, H. FAUQUEZ et L. VAUTREY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    17 A. ÉTUDE EXPÉRIMENTALE DE LA CINÉTIQUE DE LA PILE DE CHATILLON ParA. ERTAUD, R. BEAUGÉ, H courbes de montée en puissance de la pile et leur liaison avec sa réactivité permet de déterminer expérimentalement la variation de réactivité de la pile lorsque les paramètres suivants varient : - niveau d

  15. Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Paper No. 11.05 1 A Half Century of Tapered-Pile Usage at the John F. Kennedy International Airport piles have been the deep foundation of choice ever since construction of and at the well-known John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFKIA) in New York City began in the late 1940s. Timber piles were used

  16. Class Problems, Second week, Math 6105 1. Consider the game of Bouton's nim with pile sizes 15, 20, 25, 30, 35.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    Class Problems, Second week, Math 6105 1. Consider the game of Bouton's nim with pile sizes 15, 20, 25, 30, 35. (a) Find the binary representation of each pile size. (b) Find the binary configuration sum of the pile sizes is not zero. Find a move which results in a balanced binary configuration

  17. R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Vegetation Recovery in Slash-Pile Scars Following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, Charles B.

    R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Vegetation Recovery in Slash-Pile Scars Following Conifer Removal piles to reduce woody residues from forest restoration practices generates intense, prolonged heating, with adverse effects on soils and vegetation. In this study, we examined veg- etation responses to pile burning

  18. SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROID RUBBLE PILE G. A. Leikin and A. N. Sanovich, Sternberg State Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROID ­ RUBBLE PILE G. A. Leikin and A. N. Sanovich, Sternberg of a asteroid ­ rubble pile as a qualitative problem and analyse the results of this evolution in interaction with interplanetary medium. The analysis shows, that asteroid ­ rubble pile loses its fast fragments in no time

  19. Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray I. Matas Silva, Gal Combe, Pierre Foray, Frdric Flin, and Bernard Lesaffre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Postmortem analysis of sand grain crushing from pile interface using X-ray tomography I. Matías of Sand Grain Crushing From Pile Interface Using X-ray Tomography Matías Silva I., Gaël Combe, Pierre. Pile foundations of offshore platforms, wind and water turbines are typically subjected to a variety

  20. White, D. J. & Bolton, M. D. (2004). Geotechnique 54, No. 6, 375397 Displacement and strain paths during plane-strain model pile installation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    paths during plane-strain model pile installation in sand D. J. WHITE* and M. D. BOLTON* The underlying mechanisms governing the behaviour of displacement piles in sand are not well understood, lead- ing to quantify the penetration mechanism around the pile tip, and the response of the interface layer adjacent

  1. Market assessment of PFBC ash use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, A. E.; Brown, T. H., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is undergoing demonstration in the United States, as well as throughout the world. American Electric Power`s (AEP`s) bubbling PFBC 70 MWe Tidd demonstration program in Ohio and pilot-scale development at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MWth circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, have demonstrated the advantages of PFBC technology. Further technology development in the US is planned with the deployment of the technology at the MacIntosh Clean Coal project in Lakeland, Florida. Development of uses for solid wastes from PFBC coal-fired power systems is being actively pursued as part of the demonstration of PFBC technologies. Ashes collected from Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low sulfur subbituminous and (2) high sulfur bituminous coal; and ash from the AEP`s high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at Western Research Institute (WRI).

  2. Evaluation of Lateral Behavior of Pile-Supported Bridges under Scour Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Cheng

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of laterally loaded piles by considering the stress history of the remaining soils and the scour-hole dimensions. Furthermore, a comprehensive study was conducted to evaluate the lateral behavior of an entire bridge under a scour condition by considering soil...

  3. NEET In-Pile Ultrasonic Sensor Enablement-FY 2012 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JE Daw; JL Rempe; BR Tittmann; B Reinhardt; P Ramuhalli; R Montgomery; HT Chien

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several Department Of Energy-Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs, such as the Fuel Cycle Research and Development, Advanced Reactor Concepts, Light Water Reactor Sustainability, and Next Generation Nuclear Plant programs, are investigating new fuels and materials for advanced and existing reactors. A key objective of such programs is to understand the performance of these fuels and materials when irradiated. The Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation (ASI) in-pile instrumentation development activities are focused upon addressing cross-cutting needs for DOE-NE irradiation testing by providing higher fidelity, real-time data, with increased accuracy and resolution from smaller, compact sensors that are less intrusive. Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential to measure a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes, under harsh irradiation test conditions. There are two primary issues associated with in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors. The first is transducer survivability. The ability of ultrasonic transducer materials to maintain their useful properties during an irradiation must be demonstrated. The second issue is signal processing. Ultrasonic testing is typically performed in a lab or field environment, where the sensor and sample are accessible. Due to the harsh nature of in-pile testing, and the range of measurements that are desired, an enhanced signal processing capability is needed to make in-pile ultrasonic sensors viable. This project addresses these technology deployment issues.

  4. Brazilian uranium mine decommissioning-chemical and radiological study of waste rock piles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiikmann, L. O. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil, Pocos de Caldas (Brazil)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pocos de Caldas plateau is a high-natural-radioactivity area in the state of Minas Gerais, southeast Brazil. Uranium occurrence in the plateau was first observed in 1948. Mining started in 1977 with mine scouring, and the first ore pile was constructed in 1981. Waste rocks are derived from the mine material. The analysis of core samples is discussed.

  5. Determination of Ash in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ash in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NREL...

  6. ash transportation distance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash 1. Halima Hadiahmetovi?; D. D. Sarajevo; M. Sc; Raza Sunulahpai?; Bosnia Herzegovina 4 Dimensional contraction via Markov transportation distance Francois...

  7. Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sulloway, H. M.

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

  8. Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Species in the Ring Pack and Ash Emissions and Their Dependence on Crankcase Oil Properties Key Parameters Affecting DPF Performance Degradation and Impact on Lifetime Fuel Economy...

  9. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash related problems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ash related problems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 By-Products Utilization Summary: of clean coal ash will increase. Finding practical solutions to this "ash problem" is essential...

  11. Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

  12. Cell Ashing for Trace Element Analysis: A New Approach Based on Ultraviolet/Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    : synchrotron spectromicroscopy; micro- chemical analysis; MEPHISTO; ashing; incineration; trace element. Ashing ashing is based on high-temperature incineration or on the exposure to oxygen plasma (1­ 4). We adopted

  13. The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: High intestinal paracellular absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    The digestive adaptation of flying vertebrates: High intestinal paracellular absorption compensates analysis. Significantly greater amplification of digestive surface area by villi in small birds, also in actively flying vertebrates. digestion gut morphometrics nutrient absorption paracellular uptake Birds have

  14. Wakate-Initiative Seminar Memory formation in the fly brain!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    Wakate-Initiative Seminar Memory formation in the fly brain! Dr. Hiromu Tanimoto Head is synthesized in ~280 neurons in the fly brain and involved also in other brain functions, it is important

  15. IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

  16. Biological impact studies of the Faulkner ash site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klose, P.N.; Potera, G.T.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has operated the Faulkner coal ash storage facility in southern Charles County, Maryland since 1970. This site handles all the coal ash produced at the nearby Morgantown Generating Stations. Environmental Resources Management, Inc. (ERM) produced an earlier report (Simek, et al., 1983) for PPSP entitled, Environmental Aspects of the Faulkner Ash Site. That report presented a compilation of existing data and newly-generated field information on the ash site and its influence on the local environment. Several questions remained as a result of the analyses carried out for the above study. These were: (a) Are trees downgradient of the site accumulating metals associated with the ash. (b) Is Zekiah Swamp Run being affected by dissolved or precipitated metals. (c) Are invertebrates in Zekiah Swamp Run accumulating metals from the ash site. The studies described herein present data on each of the three questions. Results indicate that no adverse effects on water quality, invertebrates, or trees are occurring. Elevated levels of aluminum, cadmium, and manganese were found throughout the watershed, both above and below the ash site, but no relationship to the ash site could be established.

  17. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  18. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

  19. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  20. State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, B.P.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

  1. Pile-up correction for the Swift-XRT observations in WT mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mineo; P. Romano; V. Mangano; A. Moretti; G. Cusumano; V. La Parola; E. Troja; S. Campana; G. Chincarini; G. Tagliaferri; M. Capalbi; M. Perri; P. Giommi; D. Burrows; ;

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The detector at the focal plane of the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) supports four readout modes, automatically changed on board, to cover the dynamical range of fluxes and rapid variability expected from GRB afterglows. The Windowed Timing (WT) mode is used for sources with flux higher than a few mCrab and is obtained by compressing 10 rows into a single row, and then reading out only the central 200 columns of the CCD. Point sources with a rate above ~300 c/s produce severe pile-up in the central region of the Point Spread Function. This paper presents three methods to correct the effects of the pile-up in WT mode. On ground calibration results and data from the very bright GRB 060124 are used to define and test these methods.

  2. Higgs boson as a gluon trigger: the study of QCD in high pile-up environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Van Haevermaet; P. Cipriano; S. Dooling; A. Grebenyuk; P. Gunnellini; F. Hautmann; H. Jung; P. Katsas

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the forthcoming high-luminosity phase of the LHC many of the most interesting measurements for precision QCD studies are hampered by large pile-up conditions, especially at not very high transverse momenta. However, with the recently discovered Higgs boson, which couples in the heavy top limit directly to gluons, we have access to a novel production process to probe QCD by a colour-singlet current. In this study we compare observables in Higgs boson and Drell-Yan production and investigate whether measuring ratios or subtractions can yield results that are stable in high pile-up environments, and yet sensitive to (small-$p_{\\text{T}}$) QCD physics in gluon fusion processes. We present results of Monte Carlo event generator calculations for a few specific examples.

  3. Cosmic Ray induced Neutron and Gamma-Ray bursts in a Lead Pile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapline, G; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Snyderman, N J; Wurtz, R

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron background is created primarily by cosmic rays interactions. Of particular interest for SNM detection is an understanding of burst events that resemble fission chains. We have been studying the interaction of cosmic rays with a lead pile that is efficient at creating neutron bursts from cosmic ray interactions. The neutron burst size depends on the configuration of the lead. We have found that the largest bursts appear to have been created by primaries of energy over 100 GeV that have had a diffractive interaction with the atmosphere. The large events trigger muon coincidence paddles with very high efficiency, and the resulting interactions with the lead pile can create over 10, 000 neutrons in a burst.

  4. Noise dependency with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araque Espinosa, Juan Pedro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects noise under different circumstances are described.

  5. Cathodic protection system design for steel pilings of a wharf structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolakakos, S.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of steel pilings in sea and brackish water is mostly due to the establishment of localized corrosion cells and the effects of the tidal changes. The most frequently used corrosion protection systems are coatings and/or cathodic protection. These protective systems when properly designed, installed and operated are very effective in preventing corrosion problems. The design of a cathodic protection system, in order to be effective and reliable, must take into consideration all technical design criteria, the type of materials used, the geometric shape of the structure, environmental conditions, site restrictions, and any outside interferences. These design considerations, as well as the use of design data and an overall design methodology for a cathodic protection system for pipe and sheet piling used in a wharf structure, are discussed in this paper.

  6. Effect of age of adult horn flies, Haematobia irritans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), on choice of feeding and resting sites on cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blume, Richard Rockwell

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPPECT QF Agg QP AgOLT BQBB PLIES, 'BAEMMiIBIA XBSITA~ (L. ) (DIPTEBAc NUSCXDAE) ~ OB CHOICE OP PEEDIHG AHD BESTXHO SXTES QH CATTLE Suhnitted In==the=Ciaduef e College o&the Tease-ASH-UniversirP in pertiel fulfillment of the requirements... ~ . ~ 0 ~ Chapter 'UI v ' SQcXioRrephp+ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ a ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ 4. ~ . ~;4 ~ - -i l '31 ~ . ~ 'E t. t. t+. , ~ LIST OP TABLES Table Table l. Page Analysis of variance of data coapiled from horn fly resting study. . . . . . . . . . ~ . . . . 24...

  7. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

  8. A comparison of the accuracy of two wave equation pile driving predictors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, John Randolph

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    types, piles, and soils. The concept of a balanced stroke of a diesel hammer is explained, and plots are made of this stroke for various diesel hanmers operating at varying soil resistances. The programs are compared to each other with respect... Specific Objectives. II, CASE AND TTI PROGRAM DIFFERENCES Smith's Basic Solution . . Differences in Case's Basic Solution Procedure . Idealization of Single-Acting Air/Steam Haamer . Idealization of Open End Diesel Hanmer , . Idealization of Other Ha...

  9. Appendix E. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Noncompliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    recurrence. E.2 East Tennessee Technology Park In 2007, there were five Clean Water Act/NPDES noncompliances at the East Tennessee Technology Park. Details are provided in Chap. 3, Sect. 3.5.1.3.2, of this document sources come together. The sources include a remediated coal fly ash pile. On August 30, 2007, a p

  10. Evaluation of Dynamic Behavior of Pile Foundations for Interim Storage Facilities Through Geotechnical Centrifuge Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuo Tsurumaki [Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Fujitakanko Toranomon Bldg. 7F, 3-17-1 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan); Hiroyuki Watanabe [Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama City, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Akira Tateishi; Kenichi Horikoshi; Shunichi Suzuki [Taisei Corporation, 1-25-1, Nishi-Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 163-0606 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Japan, there is a possibility that interim storage facilities for recycled nuclear fuel resources may be constructed on quaternary layers, rather than on hard rock. In such a case, the storage facilities need to be supported by pile foundations or spread foundations to meet the required safety level. The authors have conducted a series of experimental studies on the dynamic behavior of storage facilities supported by pile foundations. A centrifuge modeling technique was used to satisfy the required similitude between the reduced size model and the prototype. The centrifuge allows a high confining stress level equivalent to prototype deep soils to be generated (which is considered necessary for examining complex pile-soil interactions) as the soil strength and the deformation are highly dependent on the confining stress. The soil conditions were set at as experimental variables, and the results are compared. Since 2000, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has been conducting these research tests under the auspices on the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan. (authors)

  11. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corces, Victor G.

    Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly B.V.Gurudatta and Victor G.Corces Abstract Chromatin insulators are DNA^protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components

  12. Where Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    with the development of new energetic systems, CECD's expansion calls for the creation of other areas of excellenceWhere Eagles FlyTM CHARLES COUNTY MARYLAND CENTER FOR ENERGETIC CONCEPTS DEVELOPMENT Dr. D. K Phone 301.405.5294 Fax 301.314.9477 dkanand@umd.edu Website: www.cecd.umd.edu ENERGETICS TECHNOLOGY

  13. Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    surface to purify air, employing existing technology in a new way. It is the brainchild of artistFEATURE Deep-hole drilling Fruit Flies & Zebrafish Björk FEATURE Academics & Industry: ResearchIScOvER mAGAZInE discover@sheffield.ac.uk Research and Innovation Services University of Sheffield New

  14. Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

    2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

  15. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigent, W.L.; Luey, J.K.; Scheele, R.D.; Li, H.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of PNNL's work was to characterize the ash prior to calcination and to investigate the effect of calcination on product quality, representative material was obtained from LANL. Ash obtained from LANL was selected based on its similarity to that currently stored at RFETS. The plutonium-bearing ashes obtained from LANL are likely from a RFETS incinerator, but the exact origin was not identified.

  16. Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of pollution being used for coal ash deposits. Pollutants present in the ash can contaminate water resources and soil its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

  17. Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I to the early 1950's. The Ash Pits were also used for disposal of coal ash from various buildingsFinal Close Out Report for the Ash Pit Operable Unit I Area of Concern 2F February 5, 2004..................................................................................................2 Figure 1 - Ash Level Verification Borings

  18. Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helium Ash Simulation Studies with Divertor Helium Pumping in JET Internal Transport Barrier Discharges

  19. Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry L. Baxter

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

  20. Illuminations Subtraction games worksheet Lesson 2, Games 1. Consider the game G1 which starts with one pile of 20 counters.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    with one pile of 20 counters. The rules allow a player to take 1, 3, or 5 counters on each turn. The player starts with one pile of 20 counters. The rules allow a player to take 1, 2, or 5 counters on each turn G3 which starts with one pile of 20 counters. The rules allow a player to take 1, 2, or 6 counters