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1

Fly ash carbon passivation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Utilization FLY ASH INFORMATION FROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, quarries, and pits (34%), 6% for temporary stockpile, and 7% landfilled. Fly Ash In Europe, the utilization

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

3

Lead contents of coal, coal ash and fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flameless atomic absorption spectrometry is applied for the determination of Pb in coal, coal ash and fly ash. Lead concentrations in coal and coal ash ranging from respectively 7 to 110 µg...?1 and 120 to 450 µg...

C. Block; R. Dams

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fly ash chemical classification based on lime  

SciTech Connect

Typically, total lime content (CaO) of fly ash is shown in fly ash reports, but its significance is not addressed in US specifications. For certain applications a low lime ash is preferred. When a class C fly ash must be cementitious, lime content above 20% is required. A ternary S-A-C phase diagram pilot is given showing the location of fly ash compositions by coal rank and source in North America. Fly ashes from subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin usually contain sufficient lime to be cementitious but blending with other coals may result in calcium being present in phases other than tricalcium aluminate. 9 refs., 1 fig.

Fox, J. [BASF Construction Chemicals, LLC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Petrographic characterization of economizer fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Policies for reducing NOx emissions have led power plants to restrict O{sub 2}, resulting in high-carbon fly ash production. Therefore, some potentially useful fly ash, such as the economizer fly ash, is discarded without a thorough knowledge of its composition. In order to characterize this type of fly ash, samples were collected from the economizer Portuguese power plant burning two low-sulfur bituminous coals. Characterization was also performed on economizer fly ash subsamples after wet sieving, density and magnetic separation. Analysis included atomic absorption spectroscopy, loss-on-ignition, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Soares, S.; Guedes, A.; Garcia, C.; Flores, D.; Oliveira, A. [University of Porto, Oporto (Portugal). Center of Geology

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon and Cement Additives from Fly Ash Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Device and Method for Separating Minerals, Carbon, and Cement Additives from Fly Ash." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Overview This invention includes a device, along with a method, to recover and use fly ash as a source of high purity carbon, ash, and minerals. The device and associated method can isolate components of the fly ash based on size and electrical charge. By improving beneficiation and usage methods, fly ash can be transformed from a waste material to a valuable by-product. Recent shifts to low nitrogen

8

Application of Coal Fly Ash in Air Quality Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Coal Fly Ash in Air Quality Management ... It has been found from the literature that fly ash possesses potential application in the management of air quality. ... Application of Zeolite Synthesized from Fly Ash in Air Quality Management ...

M. Ahmaruzzaman; V.K Gupta

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett (Park City, UT); Akash, Akash (Salt lake City, UT); Zhao, Qiang (Natick, MA)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

11

Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fly ash system technology improves opacity  

SciTech Connect

Unit 3 of the Dave Johnston Power Plant east of Glenrock, WY, USA had problems staying at or below the opacity limits set by the state. The unit makes use of a Lodge Cottrell precipitator. When the plant changed to burning Power River Basin coal, ash buildup became a significant issue as the fly ash control system was unable to properly evacuate hoppers on the unit. To overcome the problem, the PLC on the unit was replaced with a software optimization package called SmartAsh for the precipitator fly ash control system, at a cost of $500,000. After the upgrade, there have been no plugged hoppers and the opacity has been reduced from around 20% to 3-5%. 2 figs.

NONE

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

High carbon fly ash finds uses in highway construction  

SciTech Connect

The beneficial use of high carbon fly ash in a highway construction project is discussed. The fly ash also had a relatively high content of mercury and some other heavy metals. 1 fig., 4 photos.

Wen, H.; Patton, R. [University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, WI (United States). Recycled Materials Resources Center

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Eco-friendly fly ash utilization: potential for land application  

SciTech Connect

The increase in demand for power in domestic, agricultural, and industrial sectors has increased the pressure on coal combustion and aggravated the problem of fly ash generation/disposal. Consequently the research targeting effective utilization of fly ash has also gained momentum. Fly ash has proved to be an economical substitute for expensive adsorbents as well as a suitable raw material for brick manufacturing, zeolite synthesis, etc. Fly ash is a reservoir of essential minerals but is deficient in nitrogen and phosphorus. By amending fly ash with soil and/or various organic materials (sewage sludge, bioprocess materials) as well as microbial inoculants like mycorrhizae, enhanced plant growth can be realized. Based on the sound results of large scale studies, fly ash utilization has grown into prominent discipline supported by various internationally renowned organizations. This paper reviews attempts directed toward various utilization of fly ash, with an emphasis on land application of organic/microbial inoculants amended fly ash.

Malik, A.; Thapliyal, A. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi (India)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Maintaining and Improving Marketability of Coal Fly Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Maintaining and Improving Marketability of Coal Fly Ash John N. Ward Ben Franklin Headwaters;2 A Headline You May Have Seen What is the future of coal fly ash utilization in a mercury controls world? What is produced when coal is consumed by power plants Fly ash can be used beneficially in numerous applications

18

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash  

SciTech Connect

The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fly ash and concrete: a study determines whether biomass, or coal co-firing fly ash, can be used in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Current US national standards for using fly ash in concrete (ASTM C618) state that fly ash must come from coal combustion, thus precluding biomass-coal co-firing fly ash. The co-fired ash comes from a large and increasing fraction of US power plants due to rapid increases in co-firing opportunity fuels with coal. The fly ashes include coal fly ash, wood fly ash from pure wood combustion, biomass and coal co-fired fly ash SW1 and SW2. Also wood fly ash is blended with Class C or Class F to produce Wood C and Wood E. Concrete samples were prepared with fly ash replacing cement by 25%. All fly ash mixes except wood have a lower water demand than the pure cement mix. Fly ashes, either from coal or non coal combustion, increase the required air entraining agent (AEA) to meet the design specification of the mixes. If AEA is added arbitrarily without considering the amount or existence of fly ash results could lead to air content in concrete that is either too low or too high. Biomass fly ash does not impact concrete setting behaviour disproportionately. Switch grass-coal co-fired fly ash and blended wood fly ash generally lie within the range of pure coal fly ash strength. The 56 day flexure strength of all the fly ash mixes is comparable to that of the pure cement mix. The flexure strength from the coal-biomass co-fired fly ash does not differ much from pure coal fly ash. All fly ash concrete mixes exhibit lower chloride permeability than the pure cement mixes. In conclusion biomass coal co-fired fly ash perform similarly to coal fly ash in fresh and hardened concrete. As a result, there is no reason to exclude biomass-coal co-fired fly ash in concrete.

Wang, Shuangzhen; Baxter, Larry

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Manufacture of ceramic tiles from fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for forming glass-ceramic tiles. Fly ash containing organic material, metal contaminants, and glass forming materials is oxidized under conditions effective to combust the organic material and partially oxidize the metallic contaminants and the glass forming materials. The oxidized glass forming materials are vitrified to form a glass melt. This glass melt is then formed into tiles containing metallic contaminants. 6 figs.

Hnat, J.G.; Mathur, A.; Simpson, J.C.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The variability of fly ash and its effects on selected properties of fresh Portland cement/fly ash mortars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fly ash production. Researchers have subsequently had the opportunity to develop a full body of knowledge concerning bitum1nous ash and its applications. The first s1gn1ficant use of b1tuminous fly ash probably occurred 20 in the 1940's when...THE VARIABILITY OF FLY ASH AND ITS EFFECTS ON SELECTED PROPERTIES OF FRESH PORTLAND CEi'1ENT/FLY ASH MORTARS A Thesis by WILLIAM CARLTON MCKERALL Submitted to the Graduate Co11ege of Texas A&M Uni ver s i ty in partia1 fu1fi11ment...

McKerall, William Carlton

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Does the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Street, Suite 450, Austin, Texas, 78701, USA Summary: Fly ash, a waste material from coal-fired power of fly ash [9]. Fly ash is a waste material from coal fired power plants; when added to concrete, fly ashDoes the Addition of Fly Ash to Concrete Present a Radon Hazard? J. A. Siegel1 , M. Juenger1 and J

Siegel, Jeffrey

23

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust. Abstract: Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a...

24

Use of High-Calcium Fly Ash in Cement-Based Construction Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which 100 million tons with ASTM 618, coal fly ash is classified into two main categories, Class F fly ash (low-calcium) and Class coal, and Class C fly ash is generated from burning of lignite and subbituminous coals. Class F fly ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

25

The recycling of the coal fly ash in glass production  

SciTech Connect

The recycling of fly ash obtained from the combustion of coal in thermal power plant has been studied. Coal fly ash was vitrified by melting at 1773 K for 5 hours without any additives. The properties of glasses produced from coal fly ash were investigated by means of Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques. DTA study indicated that there was only one endothermic peak at 1003 K corresponding to the glass transition temperature. XRD analysis showed the amorphous state of the glass sample produced from coal fly ash. SEM investigations revealed that the coal fly ash based glass sample had smooth surface. The mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the glass sample were also determined. Recycling of coal fly ash by using vitrification technique resulted to a glass material that had good mechanical, physical and chemical properties. Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) results showed that the heavy metals of Pb, Cr, Zn and Mn were successfully immobilized into the glass. It can be said that glass sample obtained by the recycling of coal fly ash can be taken as a non-hazardous material. Overall, results indicated that the vitrification technique is an effective way for the stabilization and recycling of coal fly ash.

Erol, M.M.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Ersoy-Mericboyu, A. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol N:\R&D_Projects_Partial\FlyAsh&CCBs\Meetings\2005_04_WorldOfCoalAsh\AnnKim\HgSol ubility_Paper.doc Factors Controlling the Solubility of Mercury Adsorbed on Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 and Karl Schroeder 2 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 2 Research Group Leader, National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, activated carbon, pH ABSTRACT It is expected that increased controls on Hg emissions will shift the environmental burden from the flue gas to the solid coal utilization by-products (CUB), such as fly ash and flue-gas

28

Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

Dobbins, Michael S. (Ames, IA); Murtha, Marlyn J. (Ames, IA)

1983-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Environmental hazard assessment of coal fly ashes using leaching and ecotoxicity tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental hazard assessment of coal fly ashes using leaching and ecotoxicity tests V. Tsiridis t The environmental hazard of six coal fly ash samples collected from various coal incineration plants were examined- bustion, considerable amounts of coal fly ash are still produced. Although coal fly ash can be moderately

Short, Daniel

30

Reburning Characteristics of Residual Carbon in Fly Ash from CFB Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The content of residual carbon in fly ash of CFB boilers is a litter high especially when ... of fly ash through collection, recirculation in CFB furnace or external combustor is a possibly ... ash and correspond...

S. H. Zhang; H. H. Luo; H. P. Chen…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

SINGLE ELEMENT TEST PREDICTIONS FOR STRESS-STRAIN BEHAVIOR OF PANKI FLY-ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Fly-ash is a waste product produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. It is often used. Introduction Fly-ash is a fine powdery material, produced by burning of coal at thermal power plants. Fly

Prashant, Amit

32

Transcending Portland Cement with 100 percent fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect

The use of concrete, made with 100% fly ash and no Portland cement, in buildings at the Transportation Institute in Bozeman, MT, USA, is described. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Cross, D.; Akin, M.; Stephens, J.; Cuelh, E. [Montana State University, MT (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Enhancement of phosphogypsum with high lime fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering ENHANCEMENT OF PHOSPHOGYPSUM WITH HIGH'LIME FLY ASH A Thesis by CHUCK ALAN GREGORY Approved as to style and content by: Dr. ona d Saylak (Chairman f Committee) Dr. W. edbetter ( ember) (Member) r. Lloyd Deuel, 3...

Gregory, Chuck Alan

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Utilization of CFB fly ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

Disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler power plants. Recently, larger CFB boilers with generating capacities up to 300 MWe are currently being planned, resulting in increased volumes and disposal cost of ash by-product. Studies have shown that CFB ashes do not pose environmental concerns that should significantly limit their potential utilization. Many uses of CFB ash are being investigated by Foster Wheeler, which can provide more cost-effective ash management. Construction applications have been identified as one of the major uses for CFB ashes. Typically, CFB ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. However, CFB ashes can be used for other construction applications that require less stringent specifications including soil stabilization, road base, structural fill, and synthetic aggregate. In this study, potential construction applications were identified for fly ashes from several CFB boilers firing diverse fuels such as petroleum coke, refuse derived fuel (RDF) and coal. The compressive strength of hydrated fly ashes was measured in order to screen their potential for use in various construction applications. Based on the results of this work, the effects of both ash chemistry and carbon content on utilization potential were ascertained. Actual beneficial uses of ashes evaluated in this study are also discussed.

Conn, R.E.; Sellakumar, K.; Bland, A.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of coal fly ash water leachate  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash is a by-product of coal-fired electricity generation plants. The prevalent practice of disposal is as slurry of ash and water to storage or ash ponds located near power stations. This has lain to waste thousands of hectares of land all over the world. Since leaching is often the cause of off-site contamination and pathway of introduction into the human environment, a study on the genotoxic effects of fly ash leachate is essential. Leachate prepared from the fly ash sample was analyzed for metal content, and tested for mutagenicity and genotoxicity. Analyses of metals show predominance of the metals - sodium, silicon, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese, zinc, and sulphate. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay, was conducted on two-tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium strains TA97a and TA102. For genotoxicity, the alkaline version of comet assay on fly ash leachate was carried in vitro on human blood cells and in vivo on Nicotiana plants. The leachate was directly mutagenic and induced significantconcentration-dependent increases in DNA damage in whole blood cells, lymphocytes, and in Nicotiana plants. The comet parameters show increases in tail DNA percentage (%), tail length (mu m), and olive tail moment (arbitrary units). Our results indicate that leachate from fly ash dumpsites has the genotoxic potential and may lead to adverse effects on vegetation and on the health of exposed human populations.

Chakraborty, R.; Mukherjee, A. [University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Botany

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Leaching of elements from bottom ash, economizer fly ash, and fly ash from two coal-fired power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To assess how elements leach from several types of coal combustion products (CCPs) and to better understand possible risks from CCP use or disposal, coal ashes were sampled from two bituminous-coal-fired power plants. One plant located in Ohio burns high-sulfur (about 3.9%) Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal from the Monongahela Group of the Central Appalachian Basin; the other in New Mexico burns low-sulfur (about 0.76%) Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation coal from the San Juan Basin, Colorado Plateau. The sampled \\{CCPs\\} from the Ohio plant were bottom ash (BA), economizer fly ash (EFA), and fly ash (FA); the sampled \\{CCPs\\} from the New Mexico plant were BA, mixed FA/EFA, FA, and cyclone-separated coarse and fine fractions of a FA/EFA and FA blend. Subsamples of each ash were leached using the long-term leaching (60-day duration) component of the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) or the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP, 18-hour duration). These ashes were all alkaline. Leachate concentrations and leachabilities of the elements from the \\{CCPs\\} were similar between corresponding CCP types (BA, EFA, and FA) from each plant. The leachabilities of most elements were lowest in BA (least leachable) and increased from EFA to FA (most leachable). Ca and Sr were leached more from EFA than from either BA or FA. Leachability of most elements also increased as FA particle size decreased, possibly due in part to increasing specific surface areas. Several oxyanion-forming elements (As, Mo, Se, U, and V) leached more under SGLP than under TCLP; the opposite was true for most other elements analyzed.

Kevin B. Jones; Leslie F. Ruppert; Sharon M. Swanson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Reactivity of fly ashes in a spray dryer FGD process  

SciTech Connect

During the period 1981-1982, a study was performed to determine the ability of various fly ashes to retain sulfur dioxide in a pilot plant spray dryer/fabric filter flue gas desulfurization system. This knowledge would provide design engineers with the necessary data to determine whether the fly ash from a particular utility could be used as an effective supplement or substitute for slaked lime in a spray dryer system. The study commenced with the collection of 22 fly ashes from lignite, subbituminous, and bituminous eastern and western coals. The ashes were contacted with the flue gas entering the pilot plant by two different techniques. In the first, the ashes were slurried in water and injected into the spray dryer through a spinning disk atomizer. In the second, the ashes were injected as a dry additive into the flue gas upstream of the spray dryer. Analyses were conducted to determine the ability of each ash to retain sulfur dioxide in the system followed by statistical correlations of the sulfur retention with the physical/chemical properties of each ash. 17 references, 32 figures, 19 tables.

Davis, W.T.; Reed, G.D.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash 2003 Conference on Unburned Carbon on Utility Fly Ash October 28, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Participants List [PDF-31KB] Papers and Presentations Control Measures Predictive Performance Tools (Including Instrumentation) Processing and Utilization of High-LOI Fly Ash Beneficiation of High-LOI Fly Ash Characterization of High-LOI Fly Ash Poster Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

40

Effect of the Additives on the Desulphurization Rate of Flash Hydrated and Agglomerated CFB Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CFB fly ash from separators was mixed with ... and water or additives was pumped into a CFB combustion chamber by a sludge pump. Because ... the temperature of flue gas was high in CFB, the fly ash was hydrated f...

D. X. Li; H. L. Li; M. Xu; J. F. Lu; Q. Liu…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of Biomass Gasification Fly Ash in Lightweight Plasterboard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition, the overall environmental benefit of waste gasification plus ash utilization of a difficult fly ash makes the overall process attractive. ... Only the Autonomous Government of Catalonia has established regional regulations for waste management, including limited recycling for some wastes considered as byproducts. ... viability of gasifying untreated olive stone, also called "orujillo", a byproduct of the olive oil industry that comprises both olive stone and pulp. ...

C. Leiva; A. Gómez-Barea; L. F. Vilches; P. Ollero; J. Vale; C. Fernández-Pereira

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

42

Release of Ammonium and Mercury from NOx Controlled Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

One of the goals of the Department of Energy is to increase the reuse of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) to 50% by 2010. This will require both developing new markets and maintaining traditional ones such as the use of fly ash in concrete. However, the addition of pollution control devices can introduce side-effects that affect the marketability of the CUB. Such can be the case when NOx control is achieved using selective catalytic or non-catalytic reduction (SCR or SNCR). Depending on site-specific details, the ammonia slip can cause elevated levels of NH3 in the fly ash. Disposal of ammoniated fly ash can present environmental concerns related to the amount of ammonia that might be released, the amount of water that might become contaminated, and the extent to which metals might be mobilized by the presence of the ammonia. Ammonia retained in fly ash appears to be present as either an ammonium salt or as a chemisorbed species. Mercury in the leachates correlated to neither the amount of leachable ammonium nor to the total amount of Hg in the ash. The strongest correlation was between the decreases in the amount of Hg leached with increased LOI.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

High-performance, high-volume fly ash concrete  

SciTech Connect

This booklet offers the construction professional an in-depth description of the use of high-volume fly ash in concrete. Emphasis is placed on the need for increased utilization of coal-fired power plant byproducts in lieu of Portland cement materials to eliminate increased CO{sub 2} emissions during the production of cement. Also addressed is the dramatic increase in concrete performance with the use of 50+ percent fly ash volume. The booklet contains numerous color and black and white photos, charts of test results, mixtures and comparisons, and several HVFA case studies.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Continuous air Agglomeration Method for high Carbon fly ash Beneficiation  

SciTech Connect

The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carbon-free mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Finseth, Dennis H.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

Hydration and strength development of binder based on high-calcium oil shale fly ash  

SciTech Connect

The properties of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, which are produced in Israeli power stations, were investigated. High-calcium oil shale fly ash was found to contain a great amount of CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} in the form of lime and anhydrite. Mixtures of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash, termed fly ash binder, were shown to cure and have improved strength. The influence of the composition and curing conditions on the compressive strength of fly ash binders was examined. The microstructure and the composition of fly ash binder after curing and long-term exposure in moist air, water and open air conditions were studied. It was determined that ettringite is the main variable in the strength and durability of cured systems. The positive effect of calcium silicate hydrates, CSH, which are formed by interaction of high-calcium oil shale fly ash and low-calcium coal fly ash components, on the carbonation and dehydration resistance of fly ash binder in open air is pronounced. It was concluded that high-calcium oil shale fly ash with high CaO{sub free} and SO{sub 3} content can be used as a binder for building products.

Freidin, C. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)] [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede-Boqer (Israel)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hydrothermal reactions of fly ash. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis of the work done has been to determine the reactivities of two ashes believed to be representative of those generated. A bituminous ash and a lignitic ash have been investigated. The reactions of these ashes undergo when subjected to mild hydrothermal conditions were explored. The nature of the reactions which the ashes undergo when alkaline activators, calcium hydroxide and calcium sulfate are present was also investigated. It was determined that calcium silicate hydrate, calcium aluminate hydrate, and the calcium sulfoaluminate hydrate ettringite form under these conditions. It appears 3CaO{center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}3CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}32H{sub 2}O (ettringite) formation needs to be considered in ashes which contain significant amounts of sulfate. Therefore the stability region for ettringite was established. It was also determined that calcium silicate hydrate, exhibiting a high internal surface area, will readily form with hydrothermal treatment between 50{degrees} and 100{degrees}C. This phase is likely to have a significant capacity to take up heavy metals and oxyanions and this ability is being explored.

Brown, P.W.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum-fly ash metal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extent, bottom ash, contain elevated amounts of heavy metals, and fly ash... . The dioxinsfurans on ash then don't seem to create an environmental problem. Heavy metals are...

49

Thermal properties of high-volume fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volume of concrete placed is receiving renewed interest. Concrete mixtures in which the fly ash replaces Academic Group on Concrete Technology, Universidad Auto´noma de Nuevo Leo´n, Monterrey, Nuevo Leo´n, Mexico are critical in assessing the potential energy efficiency of HVFA concrete structures, such as residential

Bentz, Dale P.

50

Characterization of ash cenospheres in fly ash from Australian power stations  

SciTech Connect

Ash cenospheres in fly ashes from five Australian power stations have been characterized. The experimental data show that ash cenosphere yield varies across the power stations. Ash partitioning occurred in the process of ash cenosphere formation during combustion. Contradictory to conclusions from the literature, iron does not seem to be essential to ash cenosphere formation in the cases examined in the present work. Further investigation was also undertaken on a series of size-fractioned ash cenosphere samples from Tarong power station. It is found that about 70 wt% of ash cenospheres in the bulk sample have sizes between 45 and 150 {mu}m. There are two different ash cenosphere structures, that is, single-ring structure and network structure. The percentage of ash cenospheres of a network structure increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. Small ash cenospheres (in the size fractions {lt}150 {mu}m) have a high SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and the majority of the ash cenospheres are spherical and of a single-ring structure. Large ash cenosphere particles (in the size fractions of 150-250 {mu}m and {gt}250 {mu}m) have a low SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, and a high proportion of the ash cenospheres are nonspherical and of a network structure. A novel quantitative technique has been developed to measure the diameter and wall thickness of ash cenospheres on a particle-to-particle basis. A monolayer of size-fractioned ash cenospheres was dispersed on a pellet, which was then polished carefully before being examined using a scanning electron microscope and image analysis. The ash cenosphere wall thickness broadly increases with increasing ash cenosphere size. The ratios between wall thickness and diameter of ash cenospheres are limited between an upper bound of about 10.5% and a lower bound of about 2.5%, irrespective of the ash cenosphere size. 52 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

Ling-ngee Ngu; Hongwei Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Centre for Fuels and Energy and Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Leaching of mixtures of biochar and fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, and their effects on global temperature have led to interest in the possibility of carbon storage in terrestrial environments. Both the residual char from biomass pyrolysis (biochar) and fly ash from coal combustion have the potential to significantly expand terrestrial sequestration options. Both biochar and fly ash also have potentially beneficial effects on soil properties. Fly ash has been shown to increase porosity, water-holding capacity, pH, conductivity, and dissolved SO42-, CO32-, Cl- and basic cations. Adding biochar to soil generally raises pH, increases total nitrogen and total phosphorous, encourages greater root development, improves cation exchange capacity and decreases available aluminum. A combination of these benefits likely is responsible for observed increases in yields for crops such as corn and sugarcane. In addition, it has been found that soils with added biochar emit lower amounts of other greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide) than do unamended soils. Biochar and fly ash amendments may be useful in promoting terrestrial carbon sequestration on currently underutilized and degraded lands. For example, about 1% of the US surface lands consist of previously mined lands or highway rights-of-way. Poorly managed lands could count for another 15% of US area. Biochar and fly ash amendments could increase productivity of these lands and increase carbon storage in the soil. Previous results showed minimal leaching of organic carbon and metals from a variety of fly ashes. In the present study, we examined the properties of mixtures of biochar, fly ash, and soil and evaluated the leaching of organic carbon and metals from these mixtures. The carbon sorption experiments showed release of carbon from biochar, rather than sorption, except at the highest concentrations in the Biochar HW sample. Similar results were obtained by others for oxidative leaching of bituminous coal, in which more C was released as dissolved C than was oxidized to CO2 by the oxygen in water. We confirmed that both fly ash and two types of biochar (oak char [OKEB], and hardwood [HW] char) exhibited minimal leaching of heavy metals including Cr, Ni, Zn, Ga, and Ag, and no detectable leaching of Pb or Cd (data not shown) under the conditions tested. The Biochar HW had a slightly higher C/N ratio (334) and pH (7.7) than did the Biochar OKEB (284 and 6.5). There was no toxicity exhibited by the fly ash (not shown) or biochar leachates as measured by the Microtox© assay under the conditions tested. In previous results no toxicity was reported in testing the fly ash samples except for one high-pH sample. The most notable leachate component from both types of biochar, but not the fly ash, was organic carbon with the HW biochar leaching less organic carbon than the OKEB biochar (5.71 ppm vs. 59.3 ppm). Alone (in batch sorption experiments), or in mixtures of 90% soil and 10% biochar (column studies), we noted significant loss of carbon from the biochar into soluble components. However, when we added fly ash to the column experiments (80% soil, 10% fly ash, and 10% biochar) we observed significant decreases in the amounts of C leached (20% for HW, and 47% for OKEB). The results indicate that applying a combination of fly ash and biochar may result in maximizing the amount of carbon sequestration in soil while also increasing beneficial soil properties and fertility. The lower amount of carbon leached from the HW biochar compared to the OKEB biochar is likely due to the more recalcitrant form of the carbon in the HW char, due to its preparation at a higher temperature (600 şC) than the OKEB biochar (450 şC). High heat treatment temperatures during biochar preparation increase both the total carbon content of the biochar and the proportion of the carbon that is present in fused aromatic rings resistant to chemical and physical degradation.

Palumbo, Anthony V.; Porat, Iris; Phillips, Jana R.; Amonette, James E.; Drake, Meghan M.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

52

Soil stabilization and pavement recycling with self-cementing coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides design information for self-cementing coal fly ash as the sole stabilizing agent for a wide range of engineering applications. As in any process, the application of sound engineering practices, appropriate testing, and evaluation of fly ash quality and characteristics will lend themselves to successful projects using the guidelines in this manual. Topics discussed include: self-cementing coal fly ash characteristics; laboratory mix design; stabilization of clay soils; stabilisation of granular materials; construction considerations; high sulfate ash; environmental considerations for fly ash stabilization; design considerations; state specification/guidelines/standards; and a sample of a typical stabilization specification.

NONE

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

54

Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}) and 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 deg. C for 48 h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0 MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

Chindaprasirt, Prinya [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Rattanasak, Ubolluk, E-mail: ubolluk@buu.ac.t [Department of Chemistry and Center for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Burapha University, Chonburi 20131 (Thailand)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effects of pulverized coal fly-ash addition as a wet-end filler in papermaking  

SciTech Connect

This experimental study is based on the innovative idea of using pulverized coal fly ash as a wet-end filler in papermaking. This is the first evaluation of the possible use of fly ash in the paper industry. Coal-based thermal power plants throughout the world are generating fly ash as a solid waste product. The constituents of fly ash can be used effectively in papermaking. Fly ash has a wide variation in particle size, which ranges from a few micrometers to one hundred micrometers. Fly ash acts as an inert material in acidic, neutral, and alkaline papermaking processes. Its physical properties such as bulk density (800-980 kg/m{sup 3}), porosity (45%-57%), and surface area (0.138-2.3076 m{sup 2}/g) make it suitable for use as a paper filler. Fly ash obtained from thermal power plants using pulverized coal was fractionated by a vibratory-sieve stack. The fine fraction with a particle size below 38 micrometers was used to study its effect on the important mechanical-strength and optical properties of paper. The effects of fly-ash addition on these properties were compared with those of kaolin clay. Paper opacity was found to be much higher with fly ash as a filler, whereas brightness decreased as the filler percentage increased Mechanical strength properties of the paper samples with fly ash as filler were superior to those with kaolin clay.

Sinha, A.S.K. [SLIET, Longowal (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Role of Fly Ash in the Removal of Organic Pollutants from Wastewater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In India the problem is further compounded by the use of wet fly ash collection systems by a large number of power plants, which results in degradation of the pozzolanic characteristics of ash, an essential ingredient for several ash-based products. ... To accommodate the many new subbituminous fly ashes, the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) established two classes of fly ash, Class F from bituminous coal and Class C from subbituminous and lignite coal. ... Thermal power plant waste material (bottom ash) was utilized as a potential adsorbent for the textile dye malachite green. ...

M. Ahmaruzzaman

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

Classification of carbon in Canadian fly ashes and their implications in the capture of mercury  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ashes produced from Canadian power plants using pulverized coal and fluidized bed combustors were examined for their carbon content to determine their ability to capture mercury. The feed coal used in these power plants were lignite, subbituminous, high and medium volatile bituminous, their blends, and also blends of coal with petroleum coke (Petcoke). The carbon and mercury content of the coals and fly ashes were determined using the ASTM standard method and by the cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry method. The carbon content of the fly ash was concentrated by strong acid digestion using \\{HCl\\} and HF. The quantitative and qualitative analyses of the carbon concentrate were made by using a reflected light microscope. The results show that the carbon content of fly ash appears to be partially related to depositional environment during coalification and to the rank of the coal. The Hg captured by the fly ash depends on the rank and blend of the feed coals and the type of carbon in the fly ash. The isotropic vitrinitic char is mostly responsible for the capture of most Hg in fly ash. The inadvertent increase in carbon content due to the blending of coal with petroleum coke did not increase the amount Hg captured by the fly ash. The fly ash collected by the hot side electrostatic precipitator has a low Hg content and no relation between the Hg and carbon content of the ash was observed. These results indicate that the quantity of carbon in the fly ash alone does not determine the amount Hg captured. The types of carbon present (isotropic and anisotropic vitrinitic, isotropic inertinitic and anisotropic Petcoke), the halogen content, the types of fly ash control devices, and the temperatures of the fly ash control devices all play major roles in the capture of Hg.

Fariborz Goodarzi; James C. Hower

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Differences in gasification behaviors and related properties between entrained gasifier fly ash and coal char  

SciTech Connect

In the study, two fly ash samples from Texaco gasifiers were compared to coal char and the physical and chemical properties and reactivity of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), SEM-energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption method, and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis. The main results were obtained. The carbon content of gasified fly ashes exhibited 31-37%, which was less than the carbon content of 58-59% in the feed coal. The fly ashes exhibited higher Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, richer meso- and micropores, more disordered carbon crystalline structure, and better CO{sub 2} gasification reactivity than coal char. Ashes in fly ashes occurred to agglomerate into larger spherical grains, while those in coal char do not agglomerate. The minerals in fly ashes, especial alkali and alkaline-earth metals, had a catalytic effect on gasification reactivity of fly ash carbon. In the low-temperature range, the gasification process of fly ashes is mainly in chemical control, while in the high-temperature range, it is mainly in gas diffusion control, which was similar to coal char. In addition, the carbon in fly ashes was partially gasified and activated by water vapor and exhibited higher BET surface area and better gasification activity. Consequently, the fact that these carbons in fly ashes from entrained flow gasifiers are reclaimed and reused will be considered to be feasible. 15 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

Jing Gu; Shiyong Wu; Youqing Wu; Ye Li; Jinsheng Gao [East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China). Department of Chemical Engineering for Energy Resources and Key Laboratory of Coal Gasification of Ministry of Education

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated fly ash Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 9 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali-activated fly ash Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 12 By-Products Utilization Summary: CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique... of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Characterization and modeling of toxic fly ash constituents in the environment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal fly ash is a by-product of coal combustion that has drawn renewed public scrutiny due to the negative environmental impacts from accidental release of… (more)

Zhu, Zhenwei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Speciation of Selenium, Arsenic, and Zinc in Class C Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

A major environmental concern associated with coal fly ash is the mobilization of trace elements that may contaminate water. To better evaluate proper use of fly ash, determine appropriate disposal methods, and monitor postdisposal conditions, it is important to understand the speciation of trace elements in fly ash and their possible environmental impact. The speciation of selenium, arsenic, and zinc was determined in five representative Class C fly ash samples from combustion of sub-bituminous Powder River Basin coal using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide an improved understanding of the mechanisms of trace element association with the fly ash. Selenium in all fly ash samples occurs predominantly as Se(IV), with the exception of one sample, in which there was a minor amount of Se(0). Se(0) is likely associated with the high content of unburned coal in the sample. Arsenic exists in the fly ash as a single phase most consistent with calcium pyroarsenate. In contrast, zinc occurs as two distinct species in the silicate glass matrix of the fly ash. This work demonstrates that residual carbon in fly ash may reduce potential Se mobility in the environment by retaining it as less soluble elemental Se instead of Se(IV). Further, this work suggests that As and Zn in Class C fly ash will display substantially different release and mobilization behaviors in aquatic environments. While As release will primarily depend upon the dissolution and hydrolysis of calcium pyroarsenate, Zn release will be controlled by the dissolution of alkaline aluminosilicate glass in the ash.

Luo, Yun; Giammar, Daniel E.; Huhmann, Brittany L.; Catalano, Jeffrey G. (WU)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

63

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* , L. S. Fisher1 , J of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field and its influence on carbon sequestration. Also, addition of fly ash to soil, while generally considered

Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

64

California bearing ratio behavior of soil-stabilized class F fly ash systems  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash is a finely divided mineral residue resulting from the combustion of coal in power plants that occupies large extents of land and also causes environmental problems. Hence, concerted attempts are being made to effectively use fly ash in an environmentally friendly way instead of dumping. Several studies have been carried out for its bulk utilization, such as its addition to improve the California bearing ratio (CBR) of soil in roads and embankments. But a thorough mixing of fly ash with soil may not be possible in the field. Hence a study has been carried out on the CBR behavior of black cotton soil and Raichur fly ash (which is class F) in layers and compared with the same in mixes. The results show that the CBR values of soil-fly ash mixes are better than layers, as expected. To improve the strength of layers, cement is used as an additive to fly ash. The results show that black cotton soil can be improved with stabilized fly ash, solving its strength problem as well as the disposal problem of fly ash.

Leelavathamma, B.; Mini, K.M.; Pandian, N.S. [Indian Institute for Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. for Civil Engineering

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial fly ash-clay Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fly ash-clay Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Summary: studied. Context SiO2 CaO Al2O3 OPC BFS Class C fly ash Clays Metakaolin...

66

Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion...

Li, Wei Tung

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effect of Fly Ash on Solidification and Heavy Metals Chemical Speciation of Sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore new municipal sewage sludge treatment method and reduce its harm for environment, fly ash discarded from power plant was used as conditioner in sludge treatment in the paper. The properties of sewage sludge were changed after adding ... Keywords: fly ash, sludge, compressive strength, heavy metal, speciation

Yongjian Piao; Mingsong Wu; Xun Xu; Qingliang Zhao; Fugui Zhang; Nanqi Ren

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Controlling ettringite formation in FBC fly ash geopolymer concrete  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fluidized bed coal combstion (FBC) is extensively used in small self-generation power plants. The fly ash obtained from this FBC process contains high quantity of calcium and sulfate compounds which hinders its use in the construction industry. In addition, its reactivity is low and additional source material or additive is, therefore, needed to increase the reaction. This research studied the use of Al(OH)3 and high concentrations of NaOH to control ettringite formation in the FBC fly ash geopolymer. Two replacement levels of 2.5 wt.% and 5.0 wt.% of Al(OH)3 and three NaOH concentrations of 10, 12 and 15 M were used in the study. Results indicated that the NaOH concentration affected the ettringite formation and strength of the FBC geopolymer. No ettringite was formed at high NaOH concentration of 15 M which helped the dissolution of calcium sulfate and formed the additional calcium hydroxide. The subsequent pozzolanic reaction led to strength gain of the geopolymer. For 15 M NaOH, the addition of 2.5 wt.% Al(OH)3 promoted the reaction and formed a dense matrix of alumino silicate compound. Relatively high 7-day compressive strength of 30 MPa was obtained.

Prinya Chindaprasirt; Siwanant Thaiwitcharoen; Supranee Kaewpirom; Ubolluk Rattanasak

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Argonne CNM HighlightL Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Hard X-ray characterization of fly ash geopolymers Calcium Map Calcium map of an activated fly ash geopolymer displays regions of high calcium concentration (circled). Their distribution suggests localization as a discrete calcium-rich phase within the lower-calcium aluminosilicate geopolymer gel. Use of the Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) has provided the first access to the nature of heterogeneity in real fly ash-derived geopolymers at the nanoscale. Direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium nanometer-sized particles within a hydroxide-activated geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium fly ash has been obtained using HXN fluorescence characterization. Additionally, the team of CNM users from the University of Melbourne, the Universidad del Valle of Colombia, and the

70

Influence of curing temperature on cement hydration and mechanical strength development of fly ash mortars  

SciTech Connect

The influence of fly ash and curing temperature on cement hydration and compressive strength development of mortars was investigated. Test parameters included type of fly ash (two different Class F fly ashes were tested), the level of cement replacement (10, 20 and 30% by mass), and curing temperature (20 C and 40 C). The mortar physical and microstructural properties were determined by means of thermal analyses, compressive strength measurements and SEM observations. Test results confirm that fly ash tends to increase significantly the rate of cement hydration at early age. Data also demonstrate that an elevation of the curing temperature reduces the long-term compressive strength of the reference mortar mixture. In contrast, an increase of the curing temperature seems to have no detrimental effect on the long-term compressive strength of the fly ash mixtures.

Maltais, Y.; Marchand, J. [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton] [Univ. Laval, Quebec (Canada). Centre de Recherche Interuniversitaire sur le Beton

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Modelling fly ash generation for UK power station coals  

SciTech Connect

An in-depth characterization has been made of three UK bituminous coals and the combustion products from these coals when burned at a power station and on a range of experimental combustion facilities. The coals were chosen to represent the range of ash compositions and slagging propensities found at UK power stations. CCSEM analysis of the pulverized coals has been performed to provide quantitative data on the size and chemical composition of individual mineral occurrences, and to determine the nature of the mineral-mineral and mineral-organic associations in the pulverized fuel. In a similar way the size and chemical composition of individual fly ash particle has been determined. The mineral-mineral association information has been used to predict the effects of mineral coalescence, the dominant mineral transformation process for UK power station coals. The CCSEM information correctly identifies the types of mineral-mineral association and hence the predicted effects of coalescence. The limitations of the information are inherent in the analysis of a cross-section, but useful information for the modelling of ash generation may still be obtained.

Wigley, F.; Williamson, J. [Imperial Coll., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung The use of fly ash as an admixture results in enhancement of the electromagnetic interference (EMI of fly ash as an admixture for enhancing the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. EMI shielding

Chung, Deborah D.L.

73

Smoking Status and Occupational Exposure Affects Oxidative DNA Injury in Boilermakers Exposed to Metal Fume and Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sensitization by residual oil fly ash particles...composition of residual oil fly ash determines...coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry...particulate-mediated cytokine production in lung epithelial...et al. Residual oil fly ash induces cytotoxicity...probably through cumulative oxidative DNA damage...

Sutapa Mukherjee; Lyle J. Palmer; Jee Young Kim; David B. Aeschliman; Robert S. Houk; Mark A. Woodin; and David C. Christiani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EFFECTS OF FLY ASH ON MERCURY OXIDATION DURING POST COMBUSTION CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

Tests were performed in simulated flue gas streams using two fly ash samples from the electrostatic precipitators of two full-scale utility boilers. One fly ash was derived from a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, while the other was derived from Blacksville coal (Pittsburgh No. 8 seam). The tests were performed at temperatures of 120 and 180 C under different gas compositions using whole fly ash samples as well as magnetic and nonmagnetic concentrates from sized fly ash. Only the Blacksville ash contained magnetic phases. The whole and fractionated fly ash samples were analyzed for morphology, chemical composition, mineralogical composition, total organic carbon, porosity, and surface area. Mineralogically, the Blacksville ash was composed predominantly of magnetite, hematite, quartz, and mullite, while the PRB ash contained mostly quartz with lesser amounts of lime, periclase, and calcium aluminum oxide. The iron oxides in the Blacksville ash were concentrated almost entirely in the largest size fraction. As anticipated, there was not a clean separation of magnetic (Fe-rich) and nonmagnetic (aluminosilicate-rich) phases for the Blacksville ash. The Blacksville ash had a significantly higher surface area and a much higher unburned carbon content than the PRB ash. Elemental mercury (Hg) streams were injected into the simulated flue gas and passed over filters (housed in a convection oven) loaded with fly ash. Concentrations of total, oxidized, and elemental Hg downstream from the ash samples were determined by the Ontario Hydro Method. The gas stream composition and whether or not ash was present in the gas stream were the two most important variables. Based on the statistical analyses, the presence of HCl, NO, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} and all two-way gas interactions were significant. In addition, it appears that even four-factor interactions between those gases are significant. The HCl, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2} were critical gases resulting in Hg oxidation, while the presence of NO appeared to suppress oxidation. The Blacksville fly ash tended to show slightly more catalytic activity than the PRB fly ash, but this could be largely due to the higher surface area of the Blacksville ash. Temperature was not a statistically important factor. The magnetic (Fe-rich) phases did not appear to be more catalytically active than the nonmagnetic phases, and unburned carbon did not appear to play a critical role in oxidation chemistry.

Unknown

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Characterization of fly ashes from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers cofiring coal and petroleum coke  

SciTech Connect

The chemistry, mineralogy, morphology, and particle size distribution were investigated in fly ashes from the burning of Datong (ShanXi, China) bituminous coal and the cofiring of Mideast high-sulfur petroleum coke (PC) with 30:70 (cal %) and 50:50 (cal %) blends of Datong bituminous coal in two commercial CFBC boilers. With the exception of CaO, the amounts of major oxides in the fly ashes from cofiring PC and coal were close to those of the common coal fly ashes. The PC-coal fly ashes were enriched in Ni, V, and Mo, implying these trace elements were mainly derived from PC. Ni and V, along with several other elements, such as Cr, Cu, Se, Pb, U, Th, and possibly As and Cd, increased in content with a decrease in temperature of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The results of chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology studies suggested that the desulfurization rate of the CFBC boilers at current conditions was low, and the PC tends to coarsen the fly ash particles and increase the loss on ignition (LOI) values, making these fly ashes unsuitable for use as a cement additive or a mineral admixture in concrete. Further studies on the combustion status of the CFBC boilers are needed if we want to be able to increase the desulfurization rate and produce high-quality fly ashes for broader and full utilization. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Feihu Li; Jianping Zhai; Xiaoru Fu; Guanghong Sheng [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Construction of an embankment with a fly and bottom ash mixture: field performance study  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash and bottom ash are coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) that are generated in large quantities throughout the world. It is often economical to dispose ash as mixtures rather than separately; that notwithstanding, only a few studies have been performed to investigate the behavior of fly and bottom ash mixtures, particularly those with high contents of fly ash. Also, there is very limited data available in the literature on the field performance of structures constructed using ash mixtures. This paper describes the construction and the instrumentation of a demonstration embankment built with an ash mixture (60:40 by weight of fly ash:bottom ash) on State Road 641, Terre Haute, Ind. Monitoring of the demonstration embankment was conducted for a period of 1 year from the start of construction of the embankment. The settlement of the embankment stabilized approximately 5 months after the end of its construction. According to horizontal inclinometer readings, the differential settlement at the top of the embankment is about 5 mm. Results from field quality control tests performed during construction of the demonstration embankment and monitoring data from vertical and horizontal inclinometers and settlement plates indicate that the ash mixture investigated can be considered an acceptable embankment construction material.

Yoon, S.; Balunaini, U.; Yildirim, I.Z.; Prezzi, M.; Siddiki, N.Z. [Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Conversion of Fly Ash into Mesoporous Aluminosilicate Hsiao-Lan Chang, Chang-Min Chun, Ilhan A. Aksay, and Wei-Heng Shih*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and aluminum sources. Fly ash, which is a byproduct of coal burning, contains mostly aluminosilicates. Recently, several authors have studied the conversion of fly ash into zeolites.5-7 Shige- moto et al.8 increased the yield of zeolites by first fusing the fly ash with NaOH. The reaction of fly ash with NaOH produced

Aksay, Ilhan A.

79

Synthesis of CFB-Coal Fly Ash Clay Bricks and Their Characterisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to test CFB-derived fly ash for its potential to ... . Results showed that large-scale production of CFB FA-containing bricks is feasible, as their...

Nikolaos Koukouzas; Chrisovalantis Ketikidis…

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluation of environmental pollution and possible management options of heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the presence of toxic metals, dumping of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) is causing ever-growing environmental problem including the pollution of air, water and soil. The present study investigates the possibl...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimizing Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon produced from heavy oil fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to explore the beneficial utilization of heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) generated in the power plants, the present study is intended to optimize the chromium(VI) [Cr(VI)] adsorption on activated carbon prod...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain; Bing Chen

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Use of Heavy Oil Fly Ash as a Color Ingredient in Cement Mortar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavy oil fly ash (HOFA) is a byproduct generated by the burning of heavy fuel oil. Chemical analysis showed that HOFA is mainly composed of unburned carbon with a significant amount of heavy metals. Due to to...

Abdullah Mofarrah; Tahir Husain

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Soil stabilization using optimum quantity of calcium chloride with Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-going research at Texas A&M University indicated that soil stabilization using calcium chloride filter cake along with Class F fly ash generates high strength. Previous studies were conducted with samples containing calcium chloride filter cake...

Choi, Hyung Jun

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash  

SciTech Connect

The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Leaching characteristics of arsenic and selenium from coal fly ash: role of calcium  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the leaching behavior of arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) in coal fly ash is important in evaluating the potential environmental impact of coal fly ash. Batch experiments were employed to systematically investigate the leaching behavior of As and Se in two major types of coal fly ashes, bituminous coal ash and sub-bituminous coal ash, and to determine the underlying processes that control As and Se leaching. The effects of pH, solid/liquid (S/L) ratio, calcium addition, and leaching time on the release of As and Se were studied. Overall, bituminous coal ash leached significantly more As and Se than sub-bituminous coal ash, and Se was more readily leachable, in both absolute concentration and relative fraction, than As for both types of fly ashes. Adsorption/desorption played a major role on As and Se leaching from bituminous coal ashes. However, calcium precipitation played the most important role in reducing As and Se leaching from sub-bituminous coal ashes in the entire experimental pH range. The leaching of As and Se from bituminous coal ashes generally increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. However, for sub-bituminous coal ashes, the leaching of As was not detected under most experimental conditions, while the leaching of Se increased with increases in the S/L ratio and leaching time. As{sup V} and Se{sup IV} were found to be the major species in all ash leachates in this study. 46 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Tian Wang; Jianmin Wang; Yulin Tang; Honglan Shi; Ken Ladwig [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States). Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, and Environmental Research Center (ERC)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Investigation of the potential of fly ash as an adsorbent for removal of priority pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL OF FLY ASH AS AN ADSORBENT FOR REMOVAL OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS A Thesis by MINOO ZARDKOOHI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1993 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL OF FLY ASH AS AN ADSORBENT FOR REMOVAL OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS A Thesis by MINOO ZARDKOOHI Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial...

Zardkoohi, Minoo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of lime-fly ash stabilized bases and subgrades using static and dynamic deflection systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASFS AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis GARY W. RABA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF LIME-FLY ASH STABILIZED BASES AND SUBGRADES USING STATIC AND DYNAMIC DEFLECTION SYSTEMS A Thesis by Gary Nl. Raba Approved as to style and content by: !Chairman...

Raba, Gary W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

SciTech Connect

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coal fly ash disposal in the ocean: an alternative worth considering  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and biological experiments measured the solubility of 16 elements in coal fly ash and the short-term toxicity of coal fly ash to clams and phytoplankton. Of the elements studied, 10 to 60% of the As, Br, Cr, Sb, Se, Ni, Pb, and Sr dissolved within a 24-hour period. Elements which were less than 10% soluble in 24-hours included Cu, Zn, Na, La, Sc, Fe, Co and Eu. Littleneck clams (Protothaca staminea) were exposed to coal fly ash in flowing seawater for a 25-day period. At the end of the exposure Cu concentration in gills was 15 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ dry wt compared to 6 ..mu..g g/sup -1/ in control clams. Elements that were not elevated in the exposed clams were Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Se and As. The effects of the soluble fraction of coal fly ash on primary production was measured by /sup 14/C uptake rate on coastal phytoplankton. The addition of soluble coal fly ash material had no effect on the /sup 14/C uptake rate of phytoplankton. These measurements were made in the productive Washington shelf water during August. The literature indicates coal fly ash has a relatively low toxicity to plants and animals. Disposal methods could be designed so EPA water quality criteria levels would not be exceeded except in the immediate vicinity of the dumpsite.

Crecelius, E.A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Zeolite formation from coal fly ash and its adsorption potential  

SciTech Connect

The possibility in converting coal fly ash (CFA) to zeolite was evaluated. CFA samples from the local power plant in Prachinburi province, Thailand, were collected during a 3-month time span to account for the inconsistency of the CFA quality, and it was evident that the deviation of the quality of the raw material did not have significant effects on the synthesis. The zeolite product was found to be type X. The most suitable weight ratio of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to CFA was approximately 2.25, because this gave reasonably high zeolite yield with good cation exchange capacity (CEC). The silica (Si)-to-aluminum (Al) molar ratio of 4.06 yielded the highest crystallinity level for zeolite X at 79% with a CEC of 240 meq/100 g and a surface area of 325 m{sup 2}/g. Optimal crystallization temperature and time were 90{sup o}C and 4 hr, respectively, which gave the highest CEC of approximately 305 meq/100 g. Yields obtained from all experiments were in the range of 50-72%. 29 refs., 5 tabs., 7 figs.

Duangkamol Ruen-ngam; Doungmanee Rungsuk; Ronbanchob Apiratikul; Prasert Pavasant [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand). Department of Chemical Engineering

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LEACHING BEHAVIOR OF PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON CONTENT FLY ASH the stabilization of petroleum- contaminated soils (PCSs) using another recycled material, high carbon content fly; however, the level of petroleum contamination has a significant effect on the leaching properties

Aydilek, Ahmet

93

Risk Ranking of Bioaccessible Metals from Fly Ash Dissolved in Simulated Lung and Gut Fluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power plant fly ash from two fuels, coal and a mixture of coal and shredded tires, were evaluated for trace metal solubility in simulated human lung and gut fluids (SLF and SGF, respectively) to estimate bioaccessibility. ... The proportion of bioaccessible to total metal ranged from zero (V) to 80% (Zn) for coal-derived ash in SLF and from 2 (Th) to 100% (Cu) for tire-derived fly ash in SGF. ... On dissolution in SLF, the most limiting metals were Pb, Cu, and Zn. ...

John Twining; Peter McGlinn; Elaine Loi; Kath Smith; Reto Gieré

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Coal Combustion Fly Ash Characterization: Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis, Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis, and Scanning Electron Microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface and bulk properties of five samples of fly ash have been examined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy...

Rothenberg, S J; Denee, P; Holloway, P

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Biomass and Coal Fly Ash in Concrete: Strength, Durability, Microstructure, Quantitative Kinetics of Pozzolanic Reaction and Alkali Silica Reaction Investigations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Biomass represents an important sustainable energy resource, with biomass-coal cofiring representing among the most effective and cost efficient CO2 reduction strategies. Fly ash generated… (more)

Wang, Shuangzhen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Coal Fly Ash as a Source of Iron in Atmospheric Dust  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic coal fly ash aerosols may represent a significant source of bioavailable iron in the open ocean. Few measurements have been made to compare the solubility of atmospheric iron from anthropogenic aerosols and other sources. We report an investigation of the iron dissolution of three fly ash samples in acidic aqueous solutions and compare the solubilities with that of Arizona test dust, a reference material of mineral dust. The effects of pH, cloud processing, and solar irradiation on Fe solubility were explored. Similar to previously reported results on mineral dust, iron in aluminosilicate phases provide predominant dissolved iron compared with iron in oxides. Iron solubility of fly ash is higher than Arizona test dust, especially at the higher pH conditions investigated. Simulated atmospheric processing elevates iron solubility due to significant changes in the morphology aluminosilicate glass, a dominantly material in fly ash particle. Iron continuously releases into the aqueous solution as fly ash particles break up into smaller fragments. The assessment of dissolved atmospheric iron deposition fluxes, and their effect on the biogeochemistry at ocean surface should be constrained by taking into account the source, environment pH, Fe speciation, and solar radiation.

Chen, Haihan; Laskin, Alexander; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Gorski, Christopher A.; Scherer, Michelle; Grassian, Vicki H.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermal behavior of spiral fin-and-tube heat exchanger having fly ash deposit  

SciTech Connect

This research investigates the effect of fly-ash deposit on thermal performance of a cross-flow heat exchanger having a set of spiral finned-tubes as a heat transfer surface. A stream of warm air having high content of fly-ash is exchanging heat with a cool water stream in the tubes. In this study, the temperature of the heat exchanger surface is lower than the dew point temperature of air, thus there is condensation of moisture in the air stream on the heat exchanger surface. The affecting parameters such as the fin spacing, the air mass flow rate, the fly-ash mass flow rate and the inlet temperature of warm air are varied while the volume flow rate and the inlet temperature of the cold water stream are kept constant at 10 l/min and 5 C, respectively. From the experiment, it is found that as the testing period is shorter than 8 h the thermal resistance due to the fouling increases with time. Moreover, the deposit of fly-ash on the heat transfer surface is directly proportional to the dust-air ratio and the amount of condensate on heat exchange surface. However, the deposit of fly-ash is inversely proportional to the fin spacing. The empirical model for evaluating the thermal resistance is also developed in this work and the simulated results agree well with those of the measured data. (author)

Nuntaphan, Atipoang [Thermal Technology Research Laboratory, Mae Moh Training Center, Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Mae Moh, Lampang 52220 (Thailand); Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effect of environment atmosphere on the sintering of Thai lignite fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

Sintering of ash particles, related to deposit formation in a pulverized coal-fired boiler, was investigated for two lignite fly ashes obtained from Mae Moh and Bangpudum coal seams. The tests involved measuring the compressive strength of cold sintered pellets at varying sintering temperature, both under oxidizing (air) and non-oxidizing atmospheres (CO{sub 2}). Under ambient air condition, Mae Moh fly ash which contained higher amount of glassy phase gave significantly higher sinter strength than Bangpudum fly ash. The role of glassy phase was confirmed by the lowering of sinter strength when HF-extracted fly ash was tested. Sintering under CO{sub 2} environment resulted in larger strength development than sintering in air. Under this non-oxidizing condition, the pellet color turned black, indicating that most of the iron was in the reduced state and could form additional low melting-point glassy phase, hence facilitated sintering rate. In addition, blending of the two ashes yielded intermediate maximum strength, under both air and CO{sub 2} environments. This observation substantiates the important role of glassy phase in the sintering process and indicates the possibility of lowering deposit strength by judicious mixing of different raw coal feeds.

Tangsathitkulchai, C.; Tangsathitkulchai, M. [Suranaree Univ. of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima (Thailand)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Influence of combustion conditions and coal properties on physical properties of fly ash generated from pulverized coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

To develop combustion technology for upgrading the quality of fly ash, the influences of the coal properties, such as the size of pulverized coal particles and the two-stage combustion ratio during the combustion, on the fly ash properties were investigated using our test furnace. The particle size, density, specific surface area (obtained by the Blaine method), and shape of fly ash particles of seven types of coal were measured. It was confirmed that the size of pulverized coal particles affects the size of the ash particles. Regarding the coal properties, the fuel ratio affected the ash particle size distribution. The density and shape of the ash particles strongly depended on their ash size. Our results indicated that the shape of the ash particles and the concentration of unburned carbon affected the specific surface area. The influence of the two-stage combustion ratio was limited. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Hiromi Shirai; Hirofumi Tsuji; Michitaka Ikeda; Toshinobu Kotsuji [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Kanagawa (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Removal of radium from acidic solutions containing same by adsorption on coal fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for the removal of radium from acidic aqueous solutions. In one aspect, the invention is a process for removing radium from an inorganic-acid solution. The process comprises contacting the solution with coal fly ash to effect adsorption of the radium on the ash. The radium-containing ash then is separated from the solution. The process is simple, comparatively inexpensive, and efficient. High radium-distribution coefficients are obtained even at room temperature. Coal fly ash is an inexpensive, acid-resistant, high-surface-area material which is available in large quantities throughout the United States. The invention is applicable, for example, to the recovery of .sup.226 Ra from nitric acid solutions which have been used to leach radium from uranium-mill tailings.

Scheitlin, Frank M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The influence of high quantity of fly ash on reducing the expansion due to ASR in the presence of alkalis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A testing program was devised to study the role of high volume fly ash (HVFA) in reducing the expansion caused by alkali-silica reaction (ASR). A series of modified ASTM C 1260 tests were performed, where the replacement of cement by Class F fly ash...

Mohidekar, Saleel D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Maternal Transfer of Contaminants to Eggs in Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscala) Nesting on Coal Fly Ash Basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common grackles (Quiscalus quis- cala) nesting in association with coal fly ash settling basins be warranted. The disposal of slurried coal combustion waste (hereafter, ash) into open settling impoundments grackles (Quiscalus quiscala) nesting at coal ash settling basins for trace elements to determine

Hopkins, William A.

105

INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Remediation of Petroleum-Contaminated Groundwater Using High Carbon Content Fly Ash M. Melih for retardation of petroleum contaminants in barrier applications. Sorbed amounts measured in batch scale tests on remediation efficiency. INTRODUCTION Remediation of groundwater contaminated with petroleum-based products has

Aydilek, Ahmet

107

Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological storage) or the ex-situ mineral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin quantitation in stack-collected coal fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...TRACE CHEM FIRE SOUR ( 1978...SINCE ADVENT OF FIRE, SAYS DOW...because of the release of fly ash...sources of both airborne and waterborne...in four size fractions (Fl throughF4...sources of both airborne and waterborne...The TCDD fractions were evaporated...Chemistries of Fire-A Source...

BJ Kimble; ML Gross

1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

109

How carbon-based sorbents will impact fly ash utilization and disposal  

SciTech Connect

The injection of activated carbon flue gas to control mercury emissions will result in a fly ash and activated carbon mixture. The potential impact of this on coal combustion product disposal and utilization is discussed. The full paper (and references) are available at www.acaa-usa.org. 1 tab., 2 photos.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Hassett, D.J.; Buckley, T.D.; Heebink, L.V.; Pavlish, J.H. [Energy and Environmental Research Center (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Microwave-assisted sample preparation of coal and coal fly ash for subsequent metal determination  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to review microwave-assisted digestion of coal and coal fly ash. A brief description of microwave heating principles is presented. Microwave-assisted digestion appears currently to be the most popular preparation technique, possibly due to the comparatively rapid sample preparation and the reduction of contamination, compared to the conventional hot-plate digestion methods.

Srogi, K. [Inst. of Chemical Processing of Coal, Zabrze (Poland)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

TRACE ELEMENTS LEACHING FROM ORGANIC SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON FLY ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53706 USA, chbenson@wisc.edu 3 Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering INTRODUCTION Fly ash is a silt-size particulate collected by air pollution control systems at coal and transport of large volumes of soft soil and replacement with crushed rock from quarries. Eliminating removal

Aydilek, Ahmet

112

Characterization, decontamination and health effects of fly ash from waste incinerators  

SciTech Connect

The aims of the present work are (a) to investigate the physical and chemical properties of incinerator ash which are of importance for its utilization and environmental impact; (b) to evaluate the occupational exposure of incinerator workers to trace metals; and (c) to develop a novel technology for the conversion of contaminated fly-ash from incinerators into a material which can be disposed of cheaply or used in the construction industry. The discussion is illustrated by results obtained through experiments. Morphologically, fly-ash consists of irregularly shaped material, of widely varying sizes. Some minerals are identified using powder X-ray diffraction, i.e., calcite, pyrite, halite and maghemite. The chemical composition of ash samples examined consist of Ca, Al, Si, K, Ti, Mg, Fe, K, Na and Mn as the major and minor elements. Trace elements such as Pb, Co, Cr, Ni, Cu, Se, Mo and Cd are also found. The samples tested are rich in Cl, Cr, Zn, Sn, and Pb, as compared to the earth`s crust values. About 50% of the fly-ash particles are smaller than 5.5 {micro}m. These particles can play an important role in transferring toxic metals into the human blood stream by inhalation, deposition and absorption.

Lee, P.H.; Delay, I.; Nasserzadeh, V.; Swithenbank, J.; McLeod, C.; Argent, B.B. [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom); Goodfellow, J. [Dyson-Hotwork Limited, Dewsbury (United Kingdom)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly ash during coal and residual char combustion in a pressurized fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fly ash, the combustion of coal and residual char was performed in a pressurized spouted fluidized bed. After Soxhlet extraction and Kuderna-Danish (K-D) concentration, the contents of 16 PAHs recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in coal, residual char, and fly ash were analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence and diode array detection. The experimental results show that the combustion efficiency is lower and the carbon content in fly ash is higher during coal pressurized combustion, compared to the residual char pressurized combustion at the pressure of 0.3 MPa. Under the same pressure, the PAH amounts in fly ash produced from residual char combustion are lower than that in fly ash produced from coal combustion. The total PAHs in fly ash produced from coal and residual char combustion are dominated by three- and four-ring PAHs. The amounts of PAHs in fly ash produced from residual char combustion increase and then decrease with the increase of pressure in a fluidized bed. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang [Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing (China)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geochemistry and mineralogy of fly-ash from the Mae Moh lignite deposit, Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of 21 elements in fly ash from three boilers (75 MW, 150 MW, and 300 MW) at the EGAT power plant, Mae Moh, Thailand, were determined by INAA. The concentration of 10 major elements was determined by XRF. As, Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, and Sb generally increase in concentration going from bottom ash (BA) through the sequence of electrostatic precipitator ashes (ESPA) and reach maxima of As (352 ppm), Co (45 ppm), Cr (105 ppm), Mo (32 ppm), Ni (106 ppm), and Sb (15 ppm) in the ESPA. Ce, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, Sc, Ta, Tb, and Yb did not exhibit concentration trends or are variable except in the case of one boiler, which showed an increase going from BA to ESPA. Only Br decreased in composition going from BA to ESPA. Rb, Sm, U, and Th showed marked variation in trends. The major elements identified by EDS were Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Fe, and Ba, with minor amounts of Mg, Na, Ti, Mn, and Sr. Al, Si, K, and Ca occur together and are present in most of the fly-ash particles. Ba was found as a major component with Ca, Al, and Si. Fe and Ca are usually associated with sulfur. Some small spheres (< 5 {mu}m) are comprised almost entirely of Fe (probably as oxide). Symplectite textures are noted in high-Fe phases. All elements except Br are significantly enriched in the fly ash relative to the coal, which contains 35% ash. Particle chemistry is consistent with the major mineral phases identified by XRD, which include: quartz, magnetite, mullite, gehlenite, anorthite, hematite, anhydrite, and clinopyroxene.

Hart, B.R.; Powell, M.A.; Fyfe, W.S. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Ratanasthien, B. [Univ. of Chaing Mai (Thailand). Dept. of Geology

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Direct acid dissolution of aluminum and other metals from fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash could provide a significant domestic source of alumina and thus supply a large part of the US needs for aluminum and possibly also several other metals. The aluminum and other metals can be solubilized from fly ash by acid dissolution methods. The aluminum may be present in any or all of three solid phases: (1) crystalline; (2) glassy amorphous; and (3) irregular, spongy amorphous. The chemistry of these phases controls the solubilization behavior. The aluminum in high-calcium western ashes is primarily found in the amorphous phases, and much of it can be solubilized by using short-time, ambient-temperature leaching. Little of the aluminum in the low-calcium eastern ashes is solubilized under ambient-temperature conditions, and only a portion can be solubilized even at reflux temperature conditions. Some of the aluminum in these eastern ashes is present as mullite, while some is found in the amorphous material. The fraction contained in mullite is relativey acid insoluble, and only partial solubilization can be achieved even under vigorous acid leach conditions.

Kelmers, A.D.; Egan, B.Z.; Seeley, F.G.; Campbell, G.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Combined effects of fly ash and waste ferrochromium on properties of concrete Osman Gencel a,d,,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Unsalvaged fly ash, a by-product of coal power plants, causes environmental damage by causing air and water with coke as the reducing agent at the temperature of about 1700 °C. Both the liquids of the high

North Texas, University of

119

Composition and structure of the shells of fly ash cenospheres from the combustion of coal of the Kuznetsk Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical and phase composition and the structure of the shells of the narrow fractions of nonmagnetic and magnetic unperforated cenospheres in fly ash from the combustion of coal of the Kuznetsk Basin were...

E. V. Fomenko; N. N. Anshits; L. A. Solov’ev; O. A. Mikhailova…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

An investigation into the hydrothermal processing of coal fly ash to produce zeolite for controlled release fertiliser applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the year that concluded prior to the commencement of this PhD (2001) 11.7 million tonnes of fly ash was produced in Australia, of which… (more)

Elliot, Alexander Dean

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Biomass and Coal Fly Ash in Concrete: Strength, Durability, Microstructure, Quantitative Kinetics of Pozzolanic Reaction and Alkali Silica Reaction Investigations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass represents an important sustainable energy resource, with biomass-coal cofiring representing among the most effective and cost efficient CO2 reduction strategies. Fly ash generated during… (more)

Wang, Shuangzhen 1971-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements In Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements in Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS: Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, pH ABSTRACT In the US, over 100 million tons of coal utilization by-products (CUB) are generated annually. To determine if exposure of these materials to aqueous fluids poses an environmental threat, researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have conducted extensive leaching tests. Five 1 kg samples of 35 PC fly ashes have been leached with acid, neutral and alkaline solutions at an approximate rate of 130 mL/d for 1 to 3 months. The leachates are

123

Acoustic agglomeration of power-plant fly ash. A comprehensive semi-annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained during the reporting period are presented. The agglomeration of submicron fly ash particles has been studied as a function of sound pressure level, sound frequency, loading, and exposure time. A second generation model of the agglomeration process is being developed. A high-frequency, high-intensity variable speed siren delivering at least 600 W at frequencies up to 4000 Hz has been developed and tested. Details on the design and operation are presented. The agglomeration chamber has been completely cleaned and the aerosol generating system has been rebuilt. A mathematical model of the acoustics of agglomeration is being developed. Preliminary results of computerized electron microscopic scanning of fly ash particles during agglomeration are presented. (DMC)

Reethof, G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Engineering properties of miniature cement - fly ash compacts prepared by high pressure compaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY HDOBPvvIi va vGI ge(iD(vI oannItI au NId(R E)L xrP1IeRPvT 9(evP(n uDnuPnnBIrv au vGI eI0DPeIBIrvR uae vGI i...IteII au LEHNFA -M Ho2FYoF EDtDRv 3456 L(7ae HDO7I8v? oP1Pn FrtPrIIePrt ENGINEERING PROPERTIES OF MINIATURE CEMENT - FLY ASH COMPACTS PREPARED BY HIGH PRESSURE COMPACTION E NGIRPR OT SFMMAFU AEU C-ALEYY E99ea1Ii (R va RvTnI (ri 8arvIrv OT? LP...

Bormann, Jeffrey Ray

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Anion Sequestering by the Formation of Anionic Clays:? Lime Treatment of Fly Ash Slurries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given a source of calcium from the dissolution of hydrated lime; magnesium and carbonate from dolomite dissolution; and alumina from lime-induced leach ing of fly ash particlesboth minerals are probable products of the dolomite/lime-added runs. ... Clearly, precipitation of secondary aluminosilica mineral phases is the highlight of the reaction of lime with fly ash. ... Two important ones are pyroaurite, Mg6Fe2CO3(OH)16·4H2O, formed in kimberlites and as an alteration product of mafic rocks (15) and green rust, Fe6Fe2(SO4,CO3)(OH)16·4H2O), formed in soil weathering, in iron corrosion, and in the alteration of sulfidic mine tailings (16, 17). ...

E. J. Reardon; S. Della Valle

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

126

Adsorptive removal of thiophene and benzothiophene over zeolites from Mae Moh coal fly ash  

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Zeolites have been hydrothermally synthesized using Thai coal fly ash from Mae Moh Power Plant as silica and alumina sources. The synthesis conditions, i.e., SiO2/Al2O3 ratio, amount of water, amount of base, and aging temperature, were varied to prepare different topologies of zeolitic products. The zeolites attained were sodalite (SOD), gismondine (GIS), and cancrinite (CAN). The zeolites have been applied to adsorption of thiophene and benzothiophene in n-hexane solution. It was found that GIS with higher specific surface area and average pore volume had superior performance to other synthesized materials. Adsorption capacity of our developed zeolites was compared to those of commercial zeolites, i.e. NaY, HUSY, beta, and ZSM-5 obtained via the conventional synthesis methods. The results suggested a potential of zeolites derived from Mae Moh coal fly ash for removal of refractory sulfur compounds, such as benzothiophene.

Chawalit Ngamcharussrivichai; Chatchawan Chatratananon; Sakdinun Nuntang; Pattarapan Prasassarakich

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Novel Method for CO2 Sequestration via Indirect Carbonation of Coal Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The data show that the major Ca-containing phases in the fresh fly ash include lime (CaO), ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), and anhydrite (CaSO4). ... Lime and ettringite are reactive Ca-containing phases. ... In all the extraction residues, lime and ettringite are not detected, confirming that calcium as lime and ettringite largely dissolved in ammonium salt solutions under the conditions investigated. ...

Lanlan He; Dunxi Yu; Weizhi Lv; Jianqun Wu; Minghou Xu

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

A survey of the technical and regulatory issues concerning unburned carbon on utility fly ash  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenon of unburned carbon on/in utility fly ash has become a major imminent problem for the electric utility industry. The deadlines set by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 limiting nitrogen oxides emissions and the Environmental Protection Agency`s regulations implementing the statute are beginning to take effect. This survey discusses the technical and regulatory issues pertaining to the phenomenon and possible courses of action/solutions.

Sarkus, T.A.; Renninger, Scott [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Ruppel, T.C. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

An investigation of radon exhalation rate and estimation of radiation doses in coal and fly ash samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal is a technologically important material used for power generation. Its cinder (fly ash) is used in the manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. Coal and its by-products often contain significant amounts of radionuclides, including uranium which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas radon. Burning of coal and the subsequent atmospheric emission cause the redistribution of toxic radioactive trace elements in the environment. In the present study, radon exhalation rates in coal and fly ash samples from the thermal power plants at Kolaghat (W.B.) and Kasimpur (U.P.) have been measured using sealed Can technique having LR-115 type II detectors. The activity concentrations of 238U, 232Th, and 40K in the samples of Kolaghat power station are also measured. It is observed that the radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples from Kolaghat is higher than from coal samples and activity concentration of radionuclides in fly ash is enhanced after the combustion of coal. Fly ash samples from Kasimpur show no appreciable change in radon exhalation. Radiation doses from the fly ash samples have been estimated from radon exhalation rate and radionuclide concentrations.

A.K. Mahur; Rajesh Kumar; Meena Mishra; D. Sengupta; Rajendra Prasad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The lime-soda sinter process for resource recovery from fly ash: A new look  

SciTech Connect

The lime-soda sinter process is one of the earliest and most thoroughly researched and evaluated of the several methods available for resource recovery from fly ash. The principle product, metallurgical grade alumina, is obtained with yields as high as 90% depending upon how much alumina needs to be left in the residue to form acceptable byproduct cement clinker. The process has the advantages of requiring a relatively low sintering temperature (1100-1200{degree}C), using conventional equipment of carbon steel construction, utilizing a variety of calcium and mineralizer raw materials, and producing only a single byproduct consisting of dicalcium silicate that has been shown to be an attractive raw material for the manufacture of portland cement. An economic feasibility study for a combined facility to produce alumina and cement from the fly ash generated by a 1000 MWe coal-fired power station shows a 10.5% return on average investment. This is increased to 14.2% when a disposal charge of $10/ton of fly ash consumed is credited to the process. Research has shown that the soda ash can be replaced by coal cleaning refuse or that the soda ash and one-fourth of the limestone can be replaced by FGD sludge with a savings in raw material cost in both cases. The return on average investment becomes 14.5% when the refuse is used and 15.2% when the sludge is used. The return could be increased further if an inexpensive fluxing agent were substituted for the alumina deliberately left in the residue. 12 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Burnet, G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coal fly ash–carbide lime bricks: An environment friendly building product  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal fly ash and carbide lime are industrial by-products of coal combustion in thermal power plants and of manufacture of acetylene gas, respectively, available in profusion in southern Brazil. Research has been carried out to search for possible use of such materials to produce environmental friendly bricks that have high compressive strength. This study aims to evaluate strength controlling parameters of coal fly ash–carbide lime mixtures, as well as to show that porosity/carbide lime (?/Lv) ratio (corresponding to porosity divided by the volumetric carbide lime content) can be used to predict compressive strength (qu). The controlling parameters evaluated here are carbide lime content, porosity, curing temperature, curing time and porosity/carbide lime ratio. A number of unconfined compression tests were carried out. The results show that a power function adapts better the relation qu versus ?/Lv, in which Lv is adjusted by an exponent (in this case 0.11) for all coal fly ash–carbide lime mixtures studied. Equations that control the compressive strength for each curing period and curing temperature examined can be formulated using this unique ratio. Preferred strategies for varying ranges of qu are also proposed based on the energy required for heating, considering distinct curing periods and temperatures.

Nilo Cesar Consoli; Cecília Gravina da Rocha; Rodrigo Beck Saldanha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Fly ash utilization in McLean County, North Dakota. Topical report, Task 7.25  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the McLean County Commissioners requested assistance from personnel at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with the construction of a section of road and a boat ramp in their county. Assistance was sought from the EERC because the county`s construction plans called for partial replacement of the lime and portland cement normally used for soil stabilization with fly ash. Since the EERC had recently conducted several research projects dealing with the use of coal combustion by-products for road construction, the commissioners requested that EERC personnel help to determine appropriate formulas for the stabilized soil mixtures to be used for both the road and boat ramp applications. An additional incentive was provided when the management of the Coal Creek Power Plant offered to donate the necessary fly ash at no cost. This project was performed as a joint venture between McLean County and the EERC. The EERC was primarily responsible for conducting a laboratory testing program to develop soil stabilization mixtures for the two construction activities. These mixtures were to contain a relatively high percentage of fly ash and to exhibit sufficient strength and durability so that the road and boat ramp would both have a service life of 20 years or more. McLean County would be primarily responsible for the road and boat ramp construction activities. The funding for the EERC portion of the project was provided by the US Department of Energy through a joint venture support program.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Effect of Zeolitization of CFBC Fly Ash on Immobilization of Cu2+, Pb2+, and Cr3+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CFBC fly ash was obtained from a CFBC boiler of Jinling Power Plant (Nanjing, China), which cofired a fuel blend of bituminous coal and petroleum coke (50:50 cal %). ... By far the greater proportion of these materials, generally around 80% of the total solid discards from the electricity supply industry, comprise fly ash from the particulate collection equipment and bottom ash from the hoppers under the economizers and air preheaters of large pulverized coal boilers. ... properties, and there have been a no. of recent developments in power plant design and operation, which have resulted in significant changes in the characteristics of fly ashes, e.g., the progressive introduction of NOx emission control technologies and in-furnace NOx redn. ...

Feihu Li; Qin Li; Jianping Zhai; Guanghong Sheng

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

134

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Investigation of the relationship between particulate-bound mercury and properties of fly ash in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler  

SciTech Connect

The properties of fly ash in coal-fired boilers influence the emission of mercury from power plants into the environment. In this study, seven different bituminous coals were burned in a full-scale 100 MWe pulverized coal combustion boiler and the derived fly ash samples were collected from a mechanical hopper (MH) and an electrostatic precipitator hopper (ESP). The mercury content, specific surface area (SSA), unburned carbon, and elemental composition of the fly ash samples were analyzed to evaluate the correlation between the concentration of particulate-bound mercury and the properties of coal and fly ash. For a given coal, it was found that the mercury content in the fly ash collected from the ESP was greater than in the fly ash samples collected from the MHP. This phenomenon may be due to a lower temperature of flue gas at the ESP (about 135{sup o}C) compared to the temperature at the air preheater (about 350{sup o}C). Also, a significantly lower SSA observed in MH ash might also contribute to the observation. A comparison of the fly ash samples generated from seven different coals using statistical methods indicates that the mercury adsorbed on ESP fly ashes has a highly positive correlation with the unburned carbon content, manganese content, and SSA of the fly ash. Sulfur content in coal showed a significant negative correlation with the Hg adsorption. Manganese in fly ash is believed to participate in oxidizing volatile elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) to ionic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}). The oxidized mercury in flue gas can form a complex with the fly ash and then get removed before the flue gas leaves the stack of the boiler.

Sen Li; Chin-Min Cheng; Bobby Chen; Yan Cao; Jacob Vervynckt; Amanda Adebambo; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Soil solution chemistry of a fly ash-, poultry litter-, and sewage sludge-amended soil  

SciTech Connect

Mixing coal fly ash (FA) with organic wastes to provide balanced soil amendments offers a potential viable use of this industrial by-product. When such materials are land-applied to supply nutrients for agronomic crops, trace element contaminant solubility must be evaluated. In this study, major and trace element soil solution concentrations arising from application of fly ash, organic wastes, and mixtures of the two were compared in a laboratory incubation. Two fly ashes, broiler poultry litter (PL), municipal sewage sludge (SS), and mixtures of FA with either PL or SS were mixed with a Cecil sandy loam (fine, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Kanhapludult) at rates of 32.3, 8.1, and 16.1 g kg{sup {minus}1} soil for FA, PL, and SS, respectively. Treatments were incubated at 22 C at 17% moisture content and soil solution was periodically extracted by centrifugation over 33 d. Initial soil solution concentrations of As, Mo, Se, and Cu were significantly greater in FA/OL treatments than the respective FA-only treatments. For Cu, increased solution concentrations were attributable to increased loading rates in FA/PL mixtures. Solution Cu concentrations were strongly correlated with dissolved C (R{sup 2} > 0.96) in all PL treatments. Significant interactive effects for solution Mo and Se concentrations were observed for the FA/PL and may have resulted from the increased pH and competing anion concentrations of these treatments. Solution As concentrations showed a significant interactive effect for one FA/PL mixture. For the individual treatments, As was more soluble in the Pl treatment than either FA treatment. Except for soluble Se from on FA/SS mixture, trace element solubility in the FA/SS mixtures was not significantly different than the respective FA-only treatment.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Coal fly ash: the most powerful tool for sustainability of the concrete industry  

SciTech Connect

In the last 15 years the global cement industry has almost doubled its annual rate of direct emissions of carbon dioxide. These can be cut back by reducing global concrete consumption, reducing the volume of cement paste in mixtures and reducing the proportion of portland clinker in cement. It has recently been proved that use of high volumes of coal fly ash can produce low cost, durable, sustainable cement and concrete mixtures that would reduce the carbon footprint of both the cement and the power generation industries. 2 photos.

Mehta, P.K. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Chemical Imaging Analysis of Environmental Particles Using the Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Technique: Microanalysis Insights into Atmospheric Chemistry of Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

Airborne fly ash from coal combustion may represent a source of bioavailable iron (Fe) in the open ocean. However, few studies have been made focusing on Fe speciation and distribution in coal fly ash. In this study, chemical imaging of fly ash has been performed using a dual-beam FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope) system for a better understanding of how simulated atmospheric processing modify the morphology, chemical compositions and element distributions of individual particles. A novel approach has been applied for cross-sectioning of fly ash specimen with a FIB in order to explore element distribution within the interior of individual particles. Our results indicate that simulated atmospheric processing causes disintegration of aluminosilicate glass, a dominant material in fly ash particles. Aluminosilicate-phase Fe in the inner core of fly ash particles is more easily mobilized compared with oxide-phase Fe present as surface aggregates on fly ash spheres. Fe release behavior depends strongly on Fe speciation in aerosol particles. The approach for preparation of cross-sectioned specimen described here opens new opportunities for particle microanalysis, particular with respect to inorganic refractive materials like fly ash and mineral dust.

Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Laskin, Alexander

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Biosynthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticles using a probiotic from coal fly ash effluent  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Metal resistant probiotic species was isolated from coal fly ash effluent site. • Uniform sized anatase form of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were synthesized using Propionibacterium jensenii. • Diffraction patterns confirmed the anatase – TiO{sub 2} NPs with average size <80 nm. • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle incorporated wound dressing exhibits better wound healing. - Abstract: The synthesis of titanium dioxide nanoparticle (TiO{sub 2} NP) has gained importance in the recent years owing to its wide range of potential biological applications. The present study demonstrates the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs by a metal resistant bacterium isolated from the coal fly ash effluent. This bacterial strain was identified on the basis of morphology and 16s rDNA gene sequence [KC545833]. The physico-chemical characterization of the synthesized nanoparticles is completely elucidated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM, SEM). The crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was confirmed by X-RD pattern. Further, cell viability and haemolytic assays confirmed the biocompatible and non toxic nature of the NPs. The TiO{sub 2} NPs was found to enhance the collagen stabilization and thereby enabling the preparation of collagen based biological wound dressing. The paper essentially provides scope for an easy bioprocess for the synthesis of TiO{sub 2} NPs from the metal oxide enriched effluent sample for future biological applications.

Babitha, S; Korrapati, Purna Sai, E-mail: purnasaik.clri@gmail.com

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Reuse of Fly Ash from a Fluidized Bed Combustor for Sulfur Uptake:? The Role of Ettringite in Hydration-Induced Reactivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reuse of Fly Ash from a Fluidized Bed Combustor for Sulfur Uptake:? The Role of Ettringite in Hydration-Induced Reactivation ... It was found that ettringite was extensively produced during water hydration and that effective enhancement of the sulfur uptake ability of the fly ash was achieved. ... The very favorable performance of reactivated ash as a sulfur sorbent was mostly related to the large amount of free lime formed during thermal decomposition of ettringite. ...

Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino; Graziella Bernardo; Antonio Telesca; Gian Lorenzo Valenti

2005-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Relationship of fly ash composition, refractive index, and density to in-stack opacity. Final report, June 1981-May 1982  

SciTech Connect

The report gives results of an investigation of the refractive index, density, and composition of fly ash from coal-fired boilers, aimed at determining: (1) the interrelationship of refractive index and composition, and (2) the significance of ash properties on in-stack plume opacity. A survey was made of 14 ash samples representing a wide range of coals. Light absorption was measured using the Integrating Plate Method, which compares light absorption through a clean filter to that through a filter with a single layer of aerosol. Only absorption is measured, while scattered light is integrated equally for both cases. This technique requires fine particles (volume absorbers) for easy interpretation of results. The technique was calibrated using an aerosol, methylene blue, with known absorption characteristics. The real part of the refractive index was measured by an oil immersion technique. The real refractive index and density were found to be highly correlated with composition with a multilinear regression equation. The absorbing refractive index was well correlated with ash carbon content. The modeling of in-stack opacity showed a weak dependence on ash optical properties for the range of ashes studied. The effect of the real part of the refractive index on opacity tends to be counterbalanced by particle density effects. Furthermore, most fly ash absorbs relatively little light.

Cowen, S.J.; Ensor, D.S.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Discussion on 'characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption' by Lu et al.  

SciTech Connect

Mercury capture by coal-combustion fly ash is a function of the amount of Hg in the feed coal, the amount of carbon in the fly ash, the type of carbon in the fly ash (including variables introduced by the rank of the feed coal), and the flue gas temperature at the point of ash collection. In their discussion of fly ash and Hg adsorption, Lu et al. (Energy Fuels 2007, 21, 2112-2120) had some fundamental flaws in their techniques, which, in turn, impact the validity of analyzed parameters. First, they used mechanical sieving to segregate fly ash size fractions. Mechanical sieving does not produce representative size fractions, particularly for the finest sizes. If the study samples were not obtained correctly, the subsequent analyses of fly ash carbon and Hg cannot accurately represent the size fractions. In the analysis of carbon forms, it is not possible to accurately determine the forms with scanning electron microscopy. The complexity of the whole particles is overlooked when just examining the outer particle surface. Examination of elements such as Hg, present in very trace quantities in most fly ashes, requires careful attention to the analytical techniques. 36 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

James C. Hower; Bruno Valentim; Irena J. Kostova; Kevin R. Henke [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluation of fly ash-surfaced pens as a control for fugitive dust emissions from beef cattle feedyards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of pens was surfaced with fly ash from a coal-fired power plant, while the other set, surfaced with caliche, served as a control. Five sampling trips were completed for a total of 492 TSP samples and 288 PM10 samples. Results indicate that statistically...

Kantor, Theodore Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature ... The low utilization of calcium-based sorbent is caused by the formation of calcium sulfite or sulfate, which have larger molar volumes than CaO or Ca(OH)2. ... ignition?loss ...

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

146

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require large reductions in emissions of NO{sub x} from coal-fired electric utility boilers. This will necessitate the use of ammonia injection, such as in selective catalytic reduction (SCR), in many power plants, resulting in the deposition of ammonia on the fly ash. The presence of ammonia could create a major barrier to fly ash utilization in concrete because of odor concerns. Although there have been limited studies of ammonia emission from concrete, little is known about the quantity of ammonia emitted during mixing and curing, and the kinetics of ammonia release. This is manifested as widely varying opinions within the concrete and ash marketing industry regarding the maximum acceptable levels of ammonia in fly ash. Therefore, practical guidelines for using ammoniated fly ash are needed in advance of the installation of many more SCR systems. The goal of this project was to develop practical guidelines for the handling and utilization of ammoniated fly ash in concrete, in order to prevent a decrease in the use of fly ash for this application. The objective was to determine the amount of ammonia that is released, over the short- and long-term, from concrete that contains ammoniated fly ash. The technical approach in this project was to measure the release of ammonia from mortar and concrete during mixing, placement, and curing. Work initially focused on laboratory mortar experiments to develop fundamental data on ammonia diffusion characteristics. Larger-scale laboratory experiments were then conducted to study the emission of ammonia from concrete containing ammoniated fly ash. The final phase comprised monitoring ammonia emissions from large concrete slabs. The data indicated that, on average, 15% of the initial ammonia was lost from concrete during 40 minutes of mixing, depending on the mix proportions and batch size. Long-term experiments indicated that ammonia diffusion from concrete was relatively slow, with greater than 50% of the initial ammonia content remaining in an 11cm thick concrete slab after 1 month. When placing concrete in an enclosed space, with negligible ventilation, it is recommended that the ammonia concentration in the concrete mix water should not exceed 110 mg NH{sub 3}/L, if the NIOSH exposure limit of 25 ppm in the air is not to be exceeded. If even a modicum of ventilation is present, then the ammonia concentration in the concrete water should be less than 170 mg/L. The maximum level of ammonia in the fly ash can then be calculated using these limits if the concrete mix proportions are known. In general, during the mixing and placement of ammonia-laden concrete, no safety concerns were encountered. The only location where the ammonia concentration attained high levels (i.e. > 25 ppm in the air) was within the concrete mixing drum.

Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fractionation and transport of nutrients among coal ash residues and in soil covered with fly ash-amended organic compost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants generate different types of ash residues and discharge small particles and vapors to the atmosphere. The ash residues which account for the major part ... the byproducts are collected and ...

M. P. Menon; K. S. Sajwan; G. S. Ghuman; J. James…

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments  

SciTech Connect

The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chronic exposure to coal fly ash causes minimal changes in corticosterone and testosterone concentrations in male southern toads Bufo terrestris  

SciTech Connect

More than 50% of the electricity in the United States is produced by coal-burning power plants. The byproduct of coal-burning plants is coal fly ash, which contains increased concentrations of trace metals and is disposed of in collection basins. Southern toads (Bufo terrestris) frequently use these basins for reproduction. Male toads were collected in spring 2001 and 2002 from an ash basin and a reference site and divided into four groups: toads collected at the control site and maintained on (1) control substrate and food or (2) ash and contaminated food and toads collected at the ash site and maintained in (3) control or (4) ash conditions. Blood was collected periodically during 5 months to determine testosterone and corticosterone concentrations. Reference to ash toads exhibited a significant, transient increase in corticosterone at 4 weeks, but neither corticosterone nor testosterone continued to increase beyond this time. In contrast, toads caught and maintained on ash did not exhibit increased corticosterone. Testosterone in these toads appeared to be unrelated to ash exposure. This unexpected lack of a corticosterone response and no effect on testosterone suggests that toads chronically exposed to trace metals can acclimate to a polluted environment, but they may still experience subtle long-term consequences.

Ward, C.K.; Mendonca, M.T. [Auburn University, Montgomery, AL (United States). Dept. of Biology

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE  

SciTech Connect

Work completed in this reporting period focused primarily on continuing measurements of the rate of ammonia loss from concrete, and the measurement of ammonia gas in the air above concrete and flowable fill immediately after placement. Concrete slabs were prepared to monitor the loss of ammonia during mixing, the concentration in the airspace above the slabs soon after placement, and the total quantity of ammonia evolved over a longer time period. Variables tested include temperature, ventilation rate, water:cementitious (W:C) ratio, and fly ash source. Short-term data indicate that for concrete placed in areas with poor air ventilation the fly ash NH{sub 3} concentration should not exceed about 90 to 145 mg/kg ash, depending on the water:cement ratio and the fly ash replacement rate, if a concentration of 10 ppm NH{sub 3} in the air is assumed to be the maximum acceptable level. Longer-term experiments showed that the ammonia loss rate is dependent on ammonia source (that is ammoniated ash vs. non-ammoniated ash with ammonia added to the water), and is also dependent on W:C ratio and temperature. Experiments were also conducted to study the loss of ammonia from fresh concrete during mixing. It was found that a high water:cementitious mix lost a greater percentage of ammonia than a low W:C mix, with a medium W:C mix losing an amount intermediate between these two. However, a larger batch size resulted in a smaller percentage of ammonia lost. The data suggest that a significant quantity of ammonia could be lost from Ready Mix concrete during transit, depending on the transit time, batch size, and mix proportions.

Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

151

Bromine and Chlorine in Aerosols and Fly Ash when Co-Firing Solid Recovered Fuel, Spruce Bark and Paper Mill Sludge in a 80MWth BFB Boiler  

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Aerosol and fly ash sampling was carried out at a 80MWth bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler plant co-firing solid recovered fuel (SRF), spruce bark and paper mill ... conditions. The SRF-Bark ratio in the fuel m...

P. Vainikka; J. Silvennoinen; P. Yrjas…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE  

SciTech Connect

Work completed in this reporting period focused on the measurement of the rate of ammonia loss from mortar and concrete, and the measurement of ammonia gas in the air above the materials immediately after placement. The majority of mortar experiments have been completed, and testing has begun on concrete. The mortar experiments indicate that the rate of ammonia loss is greater in mortars prepared using a higher water content and water:cement (W:C) ratio, although the higher rate is primarily observed within the first 2 days, after which the loss rates are nearly the same. The source of low-calcium (Class F) fly ash exerted a negligible influence on the loss rate. However, mortar prepared using a higher-calcium fly ash evolved ammonia at a slightly slower rate than the Class F ash mortars. The data also indicate that an increase in ventilation increases the ammonia loss rate from mortar, and suggest that a well-ventilated space could substantially increase the loss of ammonia from mortar and, by inference, a concrete slab. Analysis of ammonia concentrations in the air above freshly-placed mortars in an enclosed space indicate that the fly ash ammonia concentration should not exceed 100 mg N/kg ash in confined space applications. For most other applications with some ventilation the maximum acceptable concentration would be approximately 200 mg/kg. Early results from experiments on concrete suggest that, under similar conditions, ammonia diffusion from concrete occurs at a higher rate than in mortar. In addition, increasing the slump of concrete through the use of chemical admixtures has only a minor effect on the ammonia loss rate.

Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

Influence of a Modification of the Petcoke/Coal Ratio on the Leachability of Fly Ash and Slag Produced from a Large PCC Power Plant  

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Influence of a Modification of the Petcoke/Coal Ratio on the Leachability of Fly Ash and Slag Produced from a Large PCC Power Plant ... This study is focused on identifying the changes in the environmental quality of co-fired fly ash and slag induced by a modification of the petcoke/coal ratio. ... Petcoke was found to increase the leachable content of V and Mo and to enhance the mobility of S and As. ...

Maria Izquierdo; Oriol Font; Natalia Moreno; Xavier Querol; Frank E. Huggins; Esther Alvarez; Sergi Diez; Pedro Otero; Juan Carlos Ballesteros; Antonio Gimenez

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Soluble arsenic and selenium species in fly ash/organic waste-amended soils using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Mixing coal fly ash with an organic waste increases macronutrient content and may make land application of fly ash a viable disposal alternative. However, trace element chemistry of these mixed waste products warrants investigation. Speciation of As and Se in soil solutions of fly ash-, poultry litter- and sewage sludge-amended soils was determined over a 10-day period by ion chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Detection limits were 0.031, 0.028, 0.051, 0.161, 0.497, and 0.660 {micro}g L{sup {minus}1} for dimethylarsinate (DMA), As(III), monomethylarsonate (MMA), As(V), Se(IV), and Se(VI), respectively. Arsenic was highly water-soluble from poultry litter and appeared to be predominantly As(V). Arsenic(V) was the predominant species in soil amended with two fly ashes. Application of fly ash/poultry litter mixtures increased As solubility and led to the prevalence of DMA as the major As species. DMA concentrations of these soil solutions decreased rapidly over the sampling period relative to As(V), suggesting that DMA readily underwent mineralization in the soil solution. Se(VI) was the predominant soluble Se species in all treatments indicating rapid oxidation of Se(IV) initially solubilized from the fly ashes.

Jackson, B.P.; Miller, W.P. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Size distributions of fly ash using Coulter Multisizer: Use of multiple orifices and fitting to truncated log-normal distributions  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash particles, which are predominantly spherical and glassy, are produced by melting of the mineral inclusions in the coal during combustion. Particle diameters can range from sub-micrometer (micron or {mu}m) to greater than 100 {mu}m. The size distribution of fly ash is needed to determine its role in the radiation transfer process in pulverized coal combustors. The Coulter Multisizer is an useful instrument for sizing powders with a broad size distribution. A single Multisizer orifice can size particles only within a specific size range limited at the lower end to a few percent of orifice diameter by sensitivity and at the upper end by increasing non-linearity of the signal-volume relation. A scheme for combining data obtained using orifices of different diameters is described. The manufacturers state that the smallest particle which can be sized accurately is nominally 2% of the diameter of the orifice. However, it was found that the data for particles less than 4% of the orifice diameter were not reliable. In order to use the smaller orifices, the larger particles have to be removed from the sample. A wet-sieving apparatus, designed for accurate separation of the particles by size, is described. A log-normal distribution function, truncated outside the measurement limits, fits the size distribution data well. Size parameters for fly ashes of six representative US coals are presented.

Ghosal, S.; Ebert, J.L.; Self, S.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Synthesis of zeolite from Italian coal fly ash: Differences in crystallization temperature using seawater instead of distilled water  

SciTech Connect

In this study Italian coal fly ash was converted into several types of zeolite in laboratory experiments with temperatures of crystallization ranging from 35 up to 90 deg. C. Distilled and seawater were used during the hydrothermal synthesis process in separate experiments, after a pre-treatment fusion with NaOH. The results indicate that zeolites could be formed from different kind of Italian coal fly ash at low temperature of crystallization using both distilled and seawater. SEM data and the powder patterns of X-ray diffraction analysis show that faujasite, zeolite ZK-5 and sodalite were synthesized when using both distilled and seawater; zeolite A crystallized only using distilled water. In particular the experiments indicate that the synthesis of zeolite X and zeolite ZK-5 takes place at lower temperatures when using seawater (35 and 45 deg. C, respectively). The formation of sodalite is always competitive with zeolite X which shows a metastable behaviour at higher temperatures (70-90 deg. C). The chemical composition of the fly ash source could be responsible of the differences on the starting time of synthesized zeolite with distilled water, in any case our data show that the formation of specific zeolites takes place always at lower temperatures when using seawater.

Belviso, Claudia, E-mail: belviso@imaa.cnr.i [Laboratory of Environmental and Medical Geology, IMAA-CNR, Tito Scalo (Italy); Cavalcante, Francesco; Fiore, Saverio [Laboratory of Environmental and Medical Geology, IMAA-CNR, Tito Scalo (Italy)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Impact of solid fuel combustion technology on valence speciation of chromium in fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fly ash (FA) generated in real furnaces was used to evaluate the impact of the kind of the solid fuel burnt and combustion technology on chromium speciation, particularly the presence of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms as well as readily and hardly leachable chromium(VI) species in FAs. The \\{FAs\\} originated from a pulverized coal combustion boiler (PCC boiler), a fluidized bed combustion boiler (FBC boiler), a stoker-fired boiler (SF boiler), a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI), a cement rotary kiln (CRK) and a modern domestic boiler (DB). The speciation analysis of chromium was carried out by means of extraction followed by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry with adsorption of Cr(III)-DTPA complexes (CCSV-DTPA) for determination of Cr(VI) and AAS was used for determination of Cr content. It has been revealed that the antagonistic action of alkali metal compounds and iron oxides plays a crucial role in shaping valence speciation of chromium. According to the proposed transformation path of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), hard coal combustion in an SF boiler, an FBC boiler or a domestic boiler will generate \\{FAs\\} with a low Cr(VI) level. Replacing fuel with biomass should create favorable conditions for generating FA enriched with Cr(VI). Relatively high concentrations of Cr(VI) can also be expected in FA generated in the process of high-temperature combustion of coal in PCC boilers.

Ryszard ?wietlik; Marzena Trojanowska; Monika ?o?y?ska; Artur Molik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Immittance spectra for Portland cement/fly ash-based binders during early hydration  

SciTech Connect

A range of immittance formalisms is exploited to understand the nature of conduction and polarization within Portland cement-based binders over the frequency range 1 Hz to 1 MHz. Data are presented for binders with and without aggregate additions; of particular interest was the electrical response of a binary combination of ordinary Portland cement and fly ash. Regarding the latter, when presented on a Nyquist diagram, a characteristic plateau region emerged between the electrode spur and the bulk arc. When presented in the form of dielectric constant and conductivity as a function of frequency, a region of dispersion was evident for all systems. Furthermore, it was shown that by undertaking a dielectric frequency-domain analysis of the data, the experimental results could be synthesized across the frequency range 1 kHz to 1 MHz. Rather than ascribing separate processes to each impedance zone, the observed response could be attributed to a single bulk polarization process. When transformed into the complex impedance plane, there was also good agreement between synthesized and measured response. It is postulated that polarization is as a result of double-layer effects on the grain with a relaxation frequency in the low kilohertz region.

McCarter, W.J.; Starrs, G.; Chrisp, T.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil and Offshore Engineering] [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil and Offshore Engineering

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis of Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in Fly Ash from a Waste Incineration Plant  

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......Article | 0 Benzofurans 0 Coal Ash 0 Particulate Matter...purification Carbon chemistry Coal Ash Gas Chromatography-Mass...Education,Departmentof Chemistry,42099 Konya,Turkey...obtained from various combustion processes.The combustionprocess......

Mustafa Pehlivan; Erol Pehlivan; Hüseyin Kara

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Towards controlling PCDD/F production in a multi-fuel fired BFB boiler using two sulfur addition strategies. Part III: Cu speciation in the fly ash  

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Abstract PCDD/F abatement strategies – sulfur pellet addition and peat co-combustion – were tested for a BFB boiler facility utilizing SRF-bark-sludge as fuel. In this paper chemical and physical analyses of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ashes were used to explain the differences in the performance of these strategies. These analyses revealed a difference between the coarse and fine fly ashes collected in the ESP. Chemical analysis of the fine fly ashes revealed high concentration of easily volatilized elements while the SEM micrographs showed that fine ash are composed of clusters of spherical particles, thereby leading to a conclusion that fine ashes were originally in a gas phase in the high temperature zones of the boiler. Variation in the distribution of active and passive forms of Cu in fly ashes was revealed using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES mode). It was also found that peat co-combustion led to increased formation of Cu oxides that may act as active catalysts in de novo synthesis. Furthermore, XANES revealed the formation of CuSO4 for all the test cases. By applying the empirical ratio between mole fractions of the active and passive species of Cu, the role of Cu speciation to PCDD/F production was emphasized. It is concluded that sulfur pellet addition is more effective than peat addition as a PCDD/F abatement strategy for the BFB facility understudy.

Cyril Jose E. Bajamundi; Pasi Vainikka; Irina Hyytiäinen; Kirsi Korpijärvi; Manu Lahtinen; Wantana Klysubun; Jukka Konttinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of fly ash from co-combustion of coal and petroleum coke for use in concrete  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of fly ash (FA) produced from various blends of coal and petroleum coke (pet coke) fired at Belledune Generating Station, New Brunswick, Canada, was conducted to establish its performance relative to FA derived from coal-only combustion and its compliance with CSA A3000. The FA samples were beneficiated by an electrostatic separation process to produce samples for testing with a range of loss-on-ignition (LOI) values. The results of these studies indicate that the combustion of pet coke results in very little inorganic residue (for example, typically less than 0.5% ash) and the main impact on FA resulting from the co-combustion of coal and up to 25% pet coke is an increase in the unburned carbon content and LOI values. The testing of FA after beneficiation indicates that FA produced from fuels with up to 25% pet coke performs as good as FA produced from the same coal without pet coke.

Scott, A.N.; Thomas, M.D.A.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Investigation of the use of fly-ash based autoclaved cellular concrete blocks in coal mines for air duct work. Final report, January 25, 1993--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Coal mines are required to provide ventilation to occupied portions of underground mines. Concrete block is used in this process to construct air duct walls. However, normal concrete block is heavy and not easy to work with and eventually fails dramatically after being loaded due to mine ceiling convergence and/or floor heave. Autoclaved cellular concrete block made from (70{plus_minus}%) coal fly ash is lightweight and less rigid when loaded. It is lighter and easier to use than regular concrete block for underground mine applications. It has also been used in surface construction around the world for over 40 years. Ohio Edison along with eight other electric utility companies, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and North American Cellular Concrete constructed a mobile demonstration plant to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block from utility fly ash. To apply this research in Ohio, Ohio Edison also worked with the Ohio Coal Development Office and CONSOL Inc. to produce autoclaved cellular concrete block not only from coal ash but also from LIMB ash, SNRB ash, and PFBC ash from various clean coal technology projects sponsored by the Ohio Coal Development Office. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the potential for beneficial use of fly ash and clean coal technology by-products in the production of lightweight block.

Horvath, M.L. [Ohio Edison Co., Akron, OH (United States)

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Influence of a Modification of the Petcoke/Coal Ratio on the Leachability of Fly Ash and Slag Produced from a Large PCC Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

Co-firing of coal with inexpensive secondary fuels such as petroleum coke is expected to increase in the near future in the EU given that it may provide certain economic and environmental benefits with respect to coal combustion. However, changes in the feed fuel composition of power plants may modify the bulk content and the speciation of a number of elements in fly ash and slag. Consequently, leachability of these byproducts also can be modified. This study is focused on identifying the changes in the environmental quality of co-fired fly ash and slag induced by a modification of the petcoke/coal ratio. Petcoke was found to increase the leachable content of V and Mo and to enhance the mobility of S and As. However, with the exception of these elements, the addition of this secondary fuel did not drastically modify the bulk composition or the overall leachability of the resulting fly ash and slag.

Izquierdo,M.; Font, O.; Moreno, N.; Querol, X.; Huggins, F.; Alvarez, E.; Diez, S.; Otero, P.; Ballesteros, J.; Gimenez, A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Rapid Analysis of PAHs in Fly Ash Using Thermal Desorption and Fast GC-TOF-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Department of Chemistry, Western...of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology...Carbon chemistry Coal Ash Gas Chromatography-Mass...incomplete combustion of organic...Department of Chemistry, Western...of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology......

Daozhong Zou; Kunlei Liu; Wei-Ping Pan; John T. Riley; Yiqan Xu

165

Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of Aluminum/Fly Ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Composite Materials, July 2006, Vol. 40 no. 13, 1163-1174 1163 Thermal Expansion of Aluminum/Fly Ash Cenosphere Composites Synthesized by Pressure Infiltration Technique P.K. Rohatgi1 , N of thermal expansions (CTEs) of commercially available pure aluminum and aluminum alloy composites containing

Gupta, Nikhil

166

The effect of fly ash content and types of aggregates on the properties of pre-fabricated concrete interlocking blocks (PCIBs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Construction waste is mainly composed of concrete waste. Eguchi et al. [5] reported that construction industry power plants, causes environmental pollution while the cost of storage of fly ash is very high, processing and polishing stages with obvious impact on the environment. A huge quantity of construction waste

North Texas, University of

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash technical progress Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and economic benefits. (1) Fly ash... of coal in conventional and or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom... ash, boiler slag, and flue...

168

JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

Robert Patton

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

The effect of low-NO{sub x} combustion on residual carbon in fly ash and its adsorption capacity for air entrainment admixtures in concrete  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash from pulverized coal combustion contains residual carbon that can adsorb the air-entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to control the air entrainment in concrete. This is a problem that has increased by the implementation of low-NO{sub x} combustion technologies. In this work, pulverized fuel has been combusted in an entrained flow reactor to test the impact of changes in operating conditions and fuel type on the AEA adsorption of ash and NO{sub x} formation. Increased oxidizing conditions, obtained by improved fuel-air mixing or higher excess air, decreased the AEA requirements of the produced ash by up to a factor of 25. This was due to a lower carbon content in the ash and a lower specific AEA adsorptivity of the carbon. The latter was suggested to be caused by changes in the adsorption properties of the unburned char and a decreased formation of soot, which was found to have a large AEA adsorption capacity based on measurements on a carbon black. The NO{sub x} formation increased by up to three times with more oxidizing conditions and thus, there was a trade-off between the AEA requirements of the ash and NO{sub x} formation. The type of fuel had high impact on the AEA adsorption behavior of the ash. Ashes produced from a Columbian and a Polish coal showed similar AEA requirements, but the specific AEA adsorptivity of the carbon in the Columbian coal ash was up to six times higher. The AEA requirements of a South African coal ash was unaffected by the applied operating conditions and showed up to 12 times higher AEA adsorption compared to the two other coal ashes. This may be caused by larger particles formed by agglomeration of the primary coal particles in the feeding phase or during the combustion process, which gave rise to increased formation of soot. (author)

Pedersen, K.H.; Jensen, A.D.; Dam-Johansen, K. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Size distributions of fly ash using Coulter Multisizer: Use of multiple orifices and fitting to truncated log-normal distributions. [Coulter Multisizer  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash particles, which are predominantly spherical and glassy, are produced by melting of the mineral inclusions in the coal during combustion. Particle diameters can range from sub-micrometer (micron or {mu}m) to greater than 100 {mu}m. The size distribution of fly ash is needed to determine its role in the radiation transfer process in pulverized coal combustors. The Coulter Multisizer is an useful instrument for sizing powders with a broad size distribution. A single Multisizer orifice can size particles only within a specific size range limited at the lower end to a few percent of orifice diameter by sensitivity and at the upper end by increasing non-linearity of the signal-volume relation. A scheme for combining data obtained using orifices of different diameters is described. The manufacturers state that the smallest particle which can be sized accurately is nominally 2% of the diameter of the orifice. However, it was found that the data for particles less than 4% of the orifice diameter were not reliable. In order to use the smaller orifices, the larger particles have to be removed from the sample. A wet-sieving apparatus, designed for accurate separation of the particles by size, is described. A log-normal distribution function, truncated outside the measurement limits, fits the size distribution data well. Size parameters for fly ashes of six representative US coals are presented.

Ghosal, S.; Ebert, J.L.; Self, S.A.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Influence of a modification of the petcoke/coal ratio on the leachability of fly ash and slag produced from a large PCC power plant  

SciTech Connect

Co-firing of coal with inexpensive secondary fuels such as petroleum coke is expected to increase in the near future in the EU given that it may provide certain economic and environmental benefits with respect to coal combustion. However, changes in the feed fuel composition of power plants may modify the bulk content and the speciation of a number of elements in fly ash and slag. Consequently, leachability of these byproducts also can be modified. This study is focused on identifying the changes in the environmental quality of co-fired fly ash and slag induced by a modification of the petcoke/coal ratio. Petcoke was found to increase the leachable content of V and Mo and to enhance the mobility of S and As. However, with the exception of these elements, the addition of this secondary fuel did not drastically modify the bulk composition or the overall leachability of the resulting fly ash and slag. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Maria Izquierdo; Oriol Font; Natalia Moreno (and others) [CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Institute of Earth Sciences 'Jaume Almera'

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

On-site field tests for study of low-rank western coal fly ash. Technical summary report, field test No. 3. Big Brown Station electrostatic precipitator  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of field and laboratory studies of combined NH/sub 3/ and SO/sub 3/ conditioning at the Big Brown Station of Texas Utilities Generating Company. This unusual combination of conditioning agents is used routinely at the Big Brown Station in order to improve the performance of the cold-side electrostatic precipitators. The primary objectives of this field study were to evaluate the performance of one of the Big Brown precipitators, and to obtain data on the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the fly ash, as well as the composition of the flue gas and the overall and fractional collection efficiencies of the precipitator. The laboratory studies of the Big Brown fly ash were intended to further characterize the ash both physically and chemically, and to study the attenuation of the electrical resistivity of the ash associated with the surface film produced by the dual conditioning process and by the use of SO/sub 3/ conditioning alone. 6 references, 22 figures, 9 tables.

Dahlin, R. S.; Bickelhaupt, R. E.; Marchant, Jr., G. H.; Gooch, J. P.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system  

SciTech Connect

There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V. [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand). Faculty of Science

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash bottom ash Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: of bottom ash, 3 million tons of boiler slag, and 28 million tons of clean-coal ash materials) were produced... CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By...

175

Measurement of natural radioactivity and radon exhalation rate in fly ash samples from a thermal power plant and estimation of radiation doses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fly ash produced by coal-burning in thermal power station has become a subject of world wide interest in recent years because of its diverse uses in construction activities and considerable economic and environmental importance. Fly ash is used in the production of bricks, sheets, cement and also in land filling etc. Indian coals used in thermal power plants are found to have high ash contents, resulting in the production of large amount of fly ash. Coal contains radionuclides including uranium (the source of inert gas radon), Th and K. Thus coal combustion results in enhanced concentration of natural radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. Since these radionuclides concentration in fly ash plays an important role in health physics it is important to measure radionuclides concentration in fly ash. In the present work enhanced radioactivity and radon exhalation rate from fly ash samples collected from a thermal power plant of NTPC (National Thermal Power Corporation), Dadri (U.P.) India, have been measured. A high resolution gamma ray spectroscopic system has been used for the measurement of natural radioactivity (226Ra, 232Th and 40K). Gamma spectrometric measurements were carried out at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi using a coaxial n-type \\{HPGe\\} detector (EG&G, ORTEC, Oak Ridge, USA). Activity concentration of 226Ra varies from 81.8 ± 2.2 to 177.3 ± 10.0 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 118.6 ± 7.4 Bq kg?1 and of 232Th from 111.6 ± 3.2 to 178.5 ± 3.9 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 147.0 ± 3.4 Bq kg?1. 40K activity was found to be below detection limit in some samples while other samples have shown potassium activity to vary from 365.9 ± 4.8 to 495.9 ± 6.2 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 352.0 ± 4.5 Bq kg?1. Surface radon exhalation rates (EA) and Mass exhalation rates (EM) in these samples were measured by “Sealed can technique” using LR-115 type II track detectors. EA is found to vary from 80.1 ± 9.3 to 242.7 ± 16.3 mBq m?2 h?1 with an average value 155.5 ± 12.8 mBq m?2 h?1, while EM varies from 3.1 ± 0.4 to 9.3 ± 0.6 mBq kg?1 h?1 with an average value of 6.0 ± 0.5 mBq kg?1 h?1. Radium equivalent activity (Raeq), related to the external gamma dose and internal dose due to radon and its daughters range from 283.2 to 422.4 Bq kg?1 with an average value of 353.9 Bq kg?1. The calculated values of external hazard index (Hex) vary from 0.77 to 1.87 with an average value of 1.03. Most of the samples show the value of Raeq close to the allowed upper limit of 370 Bq kg?1 and Hex close to unity respectively except in two samples. Annual effective dose varies from 0.15 to 0.23 mSv y?1 with an average value 0.19 mSv y?1.

Mamta Gupta; Ajay Kumar Mahur; Rati Varshney; R.G. Sonkawade; K.D. Verma; Rajendra Prasad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Time course of systemic oxidative stress and inflammatory response induced by an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash  

SciTech Connect

It is suggested that systemic oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases associated with the exposure to particulate matter (PM). The aim of this work was to evaluate the time changes of systemic markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ash (ROFA). Female Swiss mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight) or saline solution, and plasma levels of oxidative damage markers [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs) and protein carbonyls], antioxidant status [reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, ascorbic acid levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity], cytokines levels, and intravascular leukocyte activation were evaluated after 1, 3 or 5 h of exposure. Oxidative damage to lipids and decreased GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in ROFA-exposed mice as early as 1 h. Afterwards, increased protein oxidation, decreased ascorbic acid content and SOD activity were found in this group at 3 h. The onset of an adaptive response was observed at 5 h after the ROFA exposure, as indicated by decreased TBARS plasma content and increased SOD activity. The observed increase in oxidative damage to plasma macromolecules, together with systemic antioxidants depletion, may be a consequence of a systemic inflammatory response triggered by the ROFA exposure, since increased TNF-? and IL-6 plasma levels and polymorphonuclear leukocytes activation was found at every evaluated time point. These findings contribute to the understanding of the increase in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, in association with environmental PM inhalation. - Highlights: • An acute exposure to ROFA triggers the occurrence of systemic oxidative stress. • Changes in plasmatic oxidative stress markers appear as early as 1 h after exposure. • ROFA induces proinflammatory cytokines release and intravascular leukocyte activation. • PMN activation is a relevant source of reactive oxygen species in this model. • These findings may account for previously described cardiopulmonary alterations.

Marchini, T.; Magnani, N.D. [Cátedra de Química General e Inorgánica, Instituto de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Paz, M.L. [Cátedra de Inmunología, Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral (IDEHU UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vanasco, V. [Cátedra de Química General e Inorgánica, Instituto de Bioquímica y Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, D. [CESyMA, Facultad de Ciencia Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de General San Martín, Martín de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); González Maglio, D.H. [Cátedra de Inmunología, Instituto de Estudios de la Inmunidad Humoral (IDEHU UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junín 954, C1113AAB Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Methods for Characterization of Composition of Fly Ashes from Coal-Fired Power Stations:? A Critical Overview  

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HTA and LTA are laboratory-produced coal ashes that are originated at (i) regulated temperatures, commonly at 500?815 °C in air (after the spontaneous coal combustion), and (ii) oxygen plasma ashing (normally at 150?200 °C), respectively. ... The wet disposal of ash, from the coal-fired thermal power plants, involves its mixing with water and its impoundment in the ash ponds or lagoons. ... The fabric, mineralogy, and chem. of high-calcium ash deposits from the Agios Dimitrios pulverized-lignite power plant in northern Greece were investigated as a key to the ability to improve the performance of the power plant. ...

Stanislav V. Vassilev; Christina G. Vassileva

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

178

LF U Y  

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? ? 4 0-l 2 / LF U Y UCRL- 6 74 Unclassified Distribution UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory Contract No. W-7405-eng-48 \ EVIDENCE FOR THE PRODUCTION CF N E U T W M3SONS BY PHOTONS .'v , J . Steinberger, W . K. H . Panofsky and J. Steller April, 1950 4 Berkeley, California m8-h PUBL DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

179

Chemistry and petrology of fly ash derived from the co-combustion of western United States coal and tire-derived fuel  

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Inorganic ash chemistry and petrology was investigated in coal-combustion by-products from the burning of tire-derived fuel (TDF) with a 1:1 blend of Colorado and Utah high volatile C bituminous coal and Powder River Basin subbituminous coal. Both coal components had high vitrinite contents. With the exception of Sr and Ba, the trace-element contents of the coals were not high. The fly ash was enriched in Zn, known to be a constituent of both the rubber and the wire in tires. Cu, also a constituent of the brass coatings of bead wire, was enriched in the same fractions with high Zn concentrations. Zn and Cu, along with several other elements, increased in concentration in the back, cooler row of the electrostatic precipitator. The enrichment of other elements, such as Se, As, and Pb, was more problematical. It is possible that the latter elements have more of a coal source than a tire source.

James C. Hower; J.David Robertson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash cenospheres composites Sample Search...  

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Composites Addition of fly ash cenospheres to polymer matrix influences all... , polyethylene, etc.). The effects of addition of fly ash cenospheres on polymer composites...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash disposal area Sample Search Results  

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Engineering ; Materials Science 83 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: combustion 1. Fly ash is...

182

Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 16, 2005 through December 31, 2008 on the project entitled �Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete�. The project covers testing at three host sites: Progress Energy H.F. Lee Station and the Midwest Generation Crawford and Will County Stations. At Progress Energy Lee 1, parametric tests were performed both with and without SO{sub 3} injection in order to determine the impact on the mercury sorbent performance. In addition, tests were performed on the hot-side of the air preheater, before the SO{sub 3} is injected, with H-PAC� sorbents designed for use at elevated temperatures. The BPAC� injection provided the expected mercury removal when the SO{sub 3} injection was off. A mercury removal rate due to sorbent of more than 80% was achieved at an injection rate of 8 lb/MMacf. The operation with SO{sub 3} injection greatly reduced the mercury sorbent performance. An important learning came from the injection of H-PAC� on the hot-side of the air preheater before the SO{sub 3} injection location. The H-PAC� injected in this manner appeared to be independent of the SO{sub 3} injection and provided better mercury removal than with injecting on the cold-side with SO{sub 3} injection. Consequently, one solution for plants like Lee, with SO{sub 3} injection, or plants with SO{sub 3} generated by the SCR catalyst, is to inject H-PAC� on the hot-side before the SO{sub 3} is in the flue gas. Even better performance is possible by injecting on the cold-side without the SO{sub 3}, however. During the parametric testing, it was discovered that the injection of B-PAC� (or H-PAC�) was having a positive impact upon ESP performance. It was decided to perform a 3-day continuous injection run with B-PAC� in order to determine whether Lee 1 could operate without SO{sub 3} injection. If the test proved positive, the continuous injection would continue as part of the long-term test. The injection of B-PAC� did allow for the operation of Lee 1 without SO{sub 3} injection and the long-term test was conducted from March 8 through April 7, 2006. The total mercury removal for the 30-day long-term test, excluding the first day when SO{sub 3} was injected and the last day when a plain PAC was used, averaged 85%. The achievement of 85% Hg removal over the 30 days longterm test is another milestone in the history of achievement of the Albemarle Environmental f/k/a Sorbent Technologies Corporation B-PAC� sorbent. A clear indication of the impact of B-PAC� on opacity came at the end of the long-term test. It was hoped that Lee 1 could be operated for several days after the end of the long-term test. It took less than a day before the opacity began to increase. The discovery that B-PAC� can improve ESP performance while capturing a large amount of mercury is another milestone for the B-PAC� mercury sorbent. The parametric testing at the Midwest Generation Crawford Station was divided into two phases; the first using C-PAC�, the concrete friendly sorbent, and the other using nonconcrete friendly materials. The first phase of the parametric tests was conducted before the long-term test. The second phase of the parametric testing was performed after the long-term test in order to avoid contaminating the fly ash containing the concrete friendly sorbents. The parametric test began with an injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and, after a period to allow the mercury concentration to stabilize, the rate was increased to 3 lb/MMacf. The Hg removal for this test was about 60% due to sorbent and 69% total at the injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and 80% due to sorbent and 84% total for the 3 lb/MMacf injection rate. The average total vapor phase mercury removal for the first 21 days of the long-term test was 82% at an injection rate o

Ronald Landreth

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Results of fly ash quality for disposal options from high thermal shares up to pure biomass combustion in a pilot-scale and large scale pulverized fuel power plants  

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Abstract This work evaluated fly ash quality from combustion of high thermal shares of biomass fuels. Woody biomass was (co)combusted in an industrial scale pulverized fuel power plant, and a herbaceous biomass was co-combusted in a pilot-scale test facility. Ashes from the electrostatic precipitator were collected and evaluated for chemical compounds, leaching behavior, and mechanical properties. Results from the large-scale industrial pulverized fuel showed the ashes still had good reactivity and mechanical properties according to EN450-1, which is a good unexpected occurrence regarding strength development. Results from the pilot-scale test facility showed that a herbaceous biomass co-fired up to 50% thermal share does not seem to have any negative impact on existing fly ash utilization routes. It is concluded that co-firing clean woody biomass at a very high thermal share and co-firing a high thermal share of a herbaceous biomass with lignite would not change current utilization practices. In practice ashes from high thermal shares are not used due to safeguards in standards form a lack of experience from enough performance testing. Thus, the findings can lead to support for standards that incorporate other assessment methods for biomass fly ash utilization requirements.

A. Fuller; M. Carbo; P. Savat; J. Kalivodova; J. Maier; G. Scheffknecht

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash blended cement Sample Search Results  

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CLSM mixture utilized... . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... investigation. Two additional ash ......

185

Utilization of Coal Ash As Recycling Material Options in View Point of Geoenvironment  

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Disposed coal ash is result from the residual of coal refinery processes and become environmentalimportant issues. Coal ash consists of bottom ash and fly ash. The number of coal ash production is abundant, and c...

Ahmad Rifa’I; Noriyuki Yasufuku; Kiyoshi Omine…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Direct utilization - recovery of minerals from coal fly ash. Fossil Energy Program. Technical progress report, 1 July 1984-30 September 1984 including summary of work for FY84  

SciTech Connect

The research discussed in this report deals with resource recovery from coal conversion solid wastes. Progress is reported on two methods (the HiChlor and Lime-Sinter processes) for extracting metal values from power plant fly ash. Preliminary work is also reported on a method of making cement from the residue of the lime-sinter process. In the HiChlor Process, metal oxides in the fly ash are converted to volatile chlorides by reaction with chlorine in the presence of a reductant. Several versions of this approach are being investigated. The Lime-Sinter Process utilizes a solid state reaction to selectively convert the alumina in fly ash to a soluble form. Fly ash is mixed with limestone and a suitable mineralizer (to reduce the temperature required for sintering and to enhance alumina recovery) and then sintered in a high temperature kiln. Alumina is recovered by leaching the resulting clinker. A complex relationship between the calcium, alumina, silica, and sulfur constituents in the feed mixture controls the formation and extraction of aluminate compounds. Alumina recovery levels are enhanced by promoting the formation of less-soluble calcium compounds and/or more-soluble aluminum compounds. A study is underway to determine the degree to which flue gas scrubber sludge can be used both as a limestone substitute and as a sulfur bearing mineralizer. Results show that 20 to 25% of the limestone can be provided by the scrubber sludges. 25 refs.,25 figs., 10 tabs.

Burnet, G.; Murtha, M.J.; Benson, J.D.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Exposure Values-1991, Cincinnati, Ohio. Atwood, C. L, 1992. StatisticalAnaZysis of Radiological Data from WERF Fly Ash, EGG-SR-I0233.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6. REFERENCES 6. REFERENCES American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 1991. Guide to Occupational Exposure Values-1991, Cincinnati, Ohio. Atwood, C. L, 1992. StatisticalAnaZysis of Radiological Data from WERF Fly Ash, EGG-SR-I0233. Berry, W. J. and J. L Petty, 1990. Summary of Available Baseline Environmental Information for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EGG-WM-9063, EG&G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. Bowman et aI., 1984. INEL Environmental Characterization Report, EGG-NPR-6688, EG&G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, U.S. Spent Fuel Policy, DOE/EIS-0015, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, D.C.

188

Development of a Laboratory-Scale Leaching Plant for Metal Extraction from Fly Ash by ThiobacillusStrains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in an elevated load of elements in...suspension and used as a control. Elements such...for reducing the capital and maintenance costs of a pilot plant...vessel, and (as controls) from the fly...result, ChemEQL (a computer program used to...

Christoph Brombacher; Reinhard Bachofen; Helmut Brandl

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Leaching of boron from coal ash  

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Leaching of boron from coal ash ... First High-Resolution 11B Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra of Coal Fly Ash by Satellite-Transition Magic Angle Spinning (STMAS) NMR ... First High-Resolution 11B Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectra of Coal Fly Ash by Satellite-Transition Magic Angle Spinning (STMAS) NMR ...

James A. Cox; Gary L. Lundquist; Andrzej Przyjazny; C. David Schmulbach

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Microstructural and compositional change of NaOH-activated high calcium fly ash by incorporating Na-aluminate and co-existence of geopolymeric gel and C-S-H(I)  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the reaction products of alkali-activated Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate samples by means of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HSXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compressive strength tests to investigate how the readily available aluminum affects the reaction. Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate raw materials were prepared by incorporating Na-aluminate into the original fly ashes, then alkali-activated by 10 M NaOH solution. Incorporating Na-aluminate reduced the compressive strength of samples, with the reduction magnitude relatively constant regardless of length of curing period. The HSXRD provides evidence of the co-existence of C-S-H with geopolymeric gels and strongly suggests that the C-S-H formed in the current system is C-S-H(I). The back-scattered electron images suggest that the C-S-H(I) phase exists as small grains in a finely intermixed form with geopolymeric gels. Despite providing extra source of aluminum, adding Na-aluminate to the mixes did not decrease the Si/Al ratio of the geopolymeric gel.

Oh, Jae Eun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan Metropolitan City, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Juhyuk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Oh, Sang-Gyun [Department of Architectural Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangro, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Clark, Simon M. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 20015 (United States); Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Influence of Particle Morphology on the Hydraulic Behavior of Coal Ash and Sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Residues of thermo electrical power plants are generically known as ashes, and can be classifies as slag, bottom ash and fly ash. Slag has a high content of unburned ... %) and coarse grains or clods. Bottom ash ...

Karla Salvagni Heineck; Rosemar Gomes Lemos…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effects of curing temperature and NaOH addition on hydration and strength development of clinker-free CKD-fly ash binders  

SciTech Connect

Effects of curing temperature and NaOH addition on hydration and strength development of cement kiln dust (CKD)-fly ash (FA) binders were investigated. Pastes made with 50% CKD and 50% FA, having 0, 2, and 5% NaOH addition, and cured at temperatures of 24, 38, and 50 deg. C were evaluated. The hydration products of the binders were examined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) tests. The results indicate that the major crystalline hydration product of the CKD-FA binders is ettringite, and the ettringite is stable in the CKD-FA system at age over 100 days. Curing at elevated temperature is more effective for CKD-FA binder strength improvement than NaOH addition, the later often depressing ettringite formation in a CKD-FA system. At a proper curing temperature (38 deg. C), addition of a small amount of NaOH (2%) may increase CKD-FA binder strength; while at a high curing temperature (50 deg. C), addition of NaOH (2%) may reduce the binder strength.

Wang Kejin; Shah, Surendra P.; Mishulovich, Alexander

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Quality assurance project plan for the Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization Project at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Chestnut Ridge Fly Ash Pond Stabilization (CRFAPS) Project will stabilize a 19-m-high (62-ft-high) earthen embankment across Upper McCoy Branch situated along the southern slope of Chestnut Ridge. This task will be accomplished by raising the crest of the embankment, reinforcing the face of the embankment, removing trees from the face and top of the embankment, and repairing the emergency spillway. The primary responsibilities of the team members are: Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) will be responsible for project integration, technical support, Title 3 field support, environmental oversight, and quality assurance (QA) oversight of the project; Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) will be responsible for design and home office Title 3 support; MK-Ferguson of Oak Ridge Company (MK-F) will be responsible for health and safety, construction, and procurement of construction materials. Each of the team members has a QA program approved by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations. This project-specific QA project plan (QAPP), which is applicable to all project activities, identifies and integrates the specific QA requirements from the participant`s QA programs that are necessary for this project.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal at a medium temperature  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the reactivity of partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal. Sulfation tests were performed at 550{sup o}C using a fixed bed reactor under conditions simulating economizer zone injection flue gas desulfurization. Activation experiments were conducted with water or steam using a range of temperatures between 100 and 550{sup o}C. The results showed that the reactivity of the sorbents was closely related to the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} formed in the activation process, which varied with the water or steam temperature. The sulfur dioxide capture capacity of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the sorbent is higher than that of CaO at a medium temperature. Water or steam temperatures in the range of 100-200{sup o}C are favorable to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from CaO. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package: Volume 2, User's guide to the EFLOW groundwater flow code  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a two-dimensional finite element code, EFLOW, developed to simulate water flow in fully or variably saturated porous media. This code is one component in the FASTCHEM/trademark/ (Fly Ash and Flue Gas Desulfurization Sludge Transport and Geochemistry) package. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. For variably saturated flow problems, nonlinearities caused by unsaturated soil properties, atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage faces), and water uptake by plant roots are treated using Picard or Newton-Raphson methods. For fully saturated unconfined flow problems, the governing equations are formulated in an areal plane, and nonlinear water-table boundary conditions are treated using the Picard method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. 24 refs., 39 figs., 27 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Extraction of Lignite Coal Fly Ash for Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Modified and Unmodified Supercritical Fluid Extraction, Enhanced-Fluidity Solvents, and Accelerated Solvent Extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......7440-44-0 Carbon | Carbon analysis chemistry Coal analysis Coal Ash Gas Chromatography-Mass...Hydrocarbons, Aromatic analysis chemistry Industrial Waste analysis Particulate...particles on the interaction of coal combustion stack ash with organic matter......

Donald V. Kenny; Susan V. Olesik

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash slag silica Sample Search Results  

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Engineering ; Materials Science 91 By-Products Utilization Summary: pozzolans include coal fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and other combustion ashes. When...

198

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashe higher education Sample Search Results  

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higher abrasion... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quarterly technical Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash paving demonstration Sample Search...  

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AND DEMONSTRATION... Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash penurunan kadar Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash ahto lobjakas Sample Search Results  

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Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash based gepolymer Sample Search Results  

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Utilization Summary: . CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR CEMENT-BASED MATERIALS 2 The major... large amounts of conventional or...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash projekt vaendoera Sample Search Results  

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Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... -Strength Materials (CLSM); 232, Fly Ash and Natural...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash forming acid-resistant Sample Search...  

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European Summer Fly Ash Workshop," Warsaw, Poland, June 2005. Department... combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash material analisis Sample Search Results  

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was used in this work. An ASTM Class F fly ash... , and N3) were proportioned with clean coal fly ash containing 22% ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashes total contents Sample Search Results  

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fly ash content for normal concrete... contained fly ash up to a maximum of 35% of clean-coal ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

210

Reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase and mitochondrial dysfunction in lung after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes  

SciTech Connect

Reactive O{sub 2} species production triggered by particulate matter (PM) exposure is able to initiate oxidative damage mechanisms, which are postulated as responsible for increased morbidity along with the aggravation of respiratory diseases. The aim of this work was to quantitatively analyse the major sources of reactive O{sub 2} species involved in lung O{sub 2} metabolism after an acute exposure to Residual Oil Fly Ashes (ROFAs). Mice were intranasally instilled with a ROFA suspension (1.0 mg/kg body weight), and lung samples were analysed 1 h after instillation. Tissue O{sub 2} consumption and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity were evaluated in tissue homogenates. Mitochondrial respiration, respiratory chain complexes activity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and ATP production rates, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative damage markers were assessed in isolated mitochondria. ROFA exposure was found to be associated with 61% increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption, a 30% increase in Nox activity, a 33% increased state 3 mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption and a mitochondrial complex II activity increased by 25%. During mitochondrial active respiration, mitochondrial depolarization and a 53% decreased ATP production rate were observed. Neither changes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production rate, nor oxidative damage in isolated mitochondria were observed after the instillation. After an acute ROFA exposure, increased tissue O{sub 2} consumption may account for an augmented Nox activity, causing an increased O{sub 2}{sup ·?} production. The mitochondrial function modifications found may prevent oxidative damage within the organelle. These findings provide new insights to the understanding of the mechanisms involving reactive O{sub 2} species production in the lung triggered by ROFA exposure. - Highlights: • Exposure to ROFA alters the oxidative metabolism in mice lung. • The augmented Nox activity contributes to the high tissue O{sub 2} consumption. • Exposure to ROFA produces alterations in mitochondrial function. • ??{sub m} decrease in state 3 may be responsible for the decreased ATP production. • Mild uncoupling prevents mitochondrial oxidative damage.

Magnani, Natalia D.; Marchini, Timoteo; Vanasco, Virginia [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tasat, Deborah R. [CESyMA, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, Silvia [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Evelson, Pablo, E-mail: pevelson@ffyb.uba.ar [Instituto de Bioquímica Medicina Molecular (IBIMOL-UBA-CONICET), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Developing Engineered Fuel (Briquettes) Using Fly Ash from the Aquila Coal-Fired Power Plant in Canon City and Locally Available Biomass Waste  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to explore the feasibility of producing engineered fuels from a combination of renewable and non renewable energy sources. The components are flyash (containing coal fines) and locally available biomass waste. The constraints were such that no other binder additives were to be added. Listed below are the main accomplishments of the project: (1) Determination of the carbon content of the flyash sample from the Aquila plant. It was found to be around 43%. (2) Experiments were carried out using a model which simulates the press process of a wood pellet machine, i.e. a bench press machine with a close chamber, to find out the ideal ratio of wood and fly ash to be mixed to get the desired briquette. The ideal ratio was found to have 60% wood and 40% flyash. (3) The moisture content required to produce the briquettes was found to be anything below 5.8%. (4) The most suitable pressure required to extract the lignin form the wood and cause the binding of the mixture was determined to be 3000psi. At this pressure, the briquettes withstood an average of 150psi on its lateral side. (5) An energy content analysis was performed and the BTU content was determined to be approximately 8912 BTU/lb. (6) The environmental analysis was carried out and no abnormalities were noted. (7) Industrial visits were made to pellet manufacturing plants to investigate the most suitable manufacturing process for the briquettes. (8) A simulation model of extrusion process was developed to explore the possibility of using a cattle feed plant operating on extrusion process to produce briquettes. (9) Attempt to produce 2 tons of briquettes was not successful. The research team conducted a trial production run at a Feed Mill in La Junta, CO to produce two (2) tons of briquettes using the extrusion process in place. The goal was to, immediately after producing the briquettes; send them through Aquila's current system to test the ability of the briquettes to flow through the system without requiring any equipment or process changes. (10) Although the above attempt failed, the plant is still interested in producing briquettes. (11) An economic analysis of investing in a production facility manufacturing such briquettes was conducted to determine the economic viability of the project. Such a project is estimated to have an internal rate of return of 14% and net present value of about $400,000. (12) An engineering independent study class (4 students) is now working on selecting a site near the power plant and determining the layout of the future plant that will produce briquettes.

H. Carrasco; H. Sarper

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Urinary Metabolite of Phenanthrene as a Biomarker of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolic Activation in Workers Exposed to Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the boilers and accumulated in the ash pit. We studied the association between urinary...tubing of the boilers and repairing the ash pit. Most subjects did not consistently wear...New York (NY): Springer; 1997. 28 Burns DM. Cigarettes and cigarette smoking...

Jee Young Kim; Stephen S. Hecht; Sutapa Mukherjee; Steven G. Carmella; Ema G. Rodrigues; and David C. Christiani

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Experimental Study on Ash-Returned Reactor of CFB Atmospheric Air Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an attempt to improve the gasification efficiency and decrease the carbon content in fly ash of atmospheric air CFB gasifiers, an innovatory equipment by name ash-returned ... ash, and hence the coal conversio...

Zhang Shihong; Tian Luning; Zhou Xianrong…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Shaobin Wang [Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA (Australia). Department of Chemical Engineering

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

E E S S O N S L E A R N E D : C H A L L E N G E S A N D S U C C E S S E S Perdido LF-Gas to Electricity Escambia County, Florida Background  Perdido LF Gas-to-Energy Project (1997-2008)  Direct Use by Paper Mill (IP)  LFG piped from Perdido Landfill to IP Direct Use of LFG  Landfill Gas fueled IP boiler  Project developed and managed by 3 rd party vendor  Vendor managed the gas wellfield  County received minimum compensation from vendor for Gas Rights  Vendor received compensation from IP for fuel used Project Issues  Demand for LFG at IP for fuel fell off  LFG compliance at Perdido LF not a priority for vendor  Surface and boundary emissions increased  Vendor reluctant to implement additional control measures  Contract grey areas Rebirth of LFG Beneficial Reuse

216

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity Perdido LF-Gase to Electricity This presentation was given at the July 17, 2012, Community Renewable Energy Deployment webinar on successful landfill...

217

Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)-amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting and ASC application rates were at 25 and 20%, respectively.

Wong, J.W.C.; Selvam, A. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash dosage du Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: ash and iron-foundry baghouse dust in the manufacturing of economical self-compacting concrete... . CONCLUSIONS: The limestone-quarry fines and Class C fly ash showed...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quality characterization Sample Search...  

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Summary: ash and iron-foundry baghouse dust in the manufacturing of economical self-compacting concrete... . CONCLUSIONS: The limestone-quarry fines and Class C fly ash showed...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - ashing dry Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shrinkage of Non-Air Entrained HRWRA Concrete -0.05% 0.00% 0.05% 0... NS3, 33% Clean Coal Ash, 5% Class F Fly Ash Fig. 15 - ... Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash alter innate Sample Search Results  

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and Ecology 4 By-Products Utilization Summary: not meet ASTM C 618 requirements for coal fly ash for use as mineral admixture in concrete, and one source... of variable carbon fly...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash financial aspects Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference on Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag, and Natural Pozzolans in Concrete, Bangkok, Thailand Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash separators Sample Search Results  

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Conference on Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag, and Natural Pozzolans in Concrete, Bangkok, Thailand Source: Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of - Department of Civil Engineering and...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash corrosion resistant Sample Search Results  

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Engineering ; Materials Science 48 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: in improved resistance to...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash cement matrixes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Materials Science 13 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: to a construc- tion material...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash impact sorbent Sample Search Results  

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for By-Products Utilization Collection: Engineering ; Materials Science 23 Leaching of Dioxins from Municipal Waste Combustor Residues Summary: , and baghouses) including fly ash,...

227

Ash Research from Palm Coast, Florida to Banff, Canada: Entry of Biomass in Modern Power Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Six laboratories participated, and each performed five analyses, on three bituminous coal samples, focusing on their content of calcite, kaolinite, pyrite, and quartz. ... CCSEM of these ashes revealed that the fly ashes and deposits contained high quantities of salts, especially KCl, and varying quantities of K- and Ca-silicates, whereas the bottom ashes consisted of a mixture of quartz, K-, Ca-, and Al-silicates. ... Wang and Baxter(134) presented a work that systematically investigated the performance of biomass fly ash concrete, including mixtures of biomass fly ash and calcium hydroxide, with respect to strength, kinetics, and durability. ...

Flemming J. Frandsen

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

Blow Flies  

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Blow Flies Blow Flies Nature Bulletin No. 76 July 27, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation BLOW FLIES The big flies you sometimes find buzzing loudly and crazily around in your basement, garage, barn, or even your living room, are not overgrown house flies. They are blow flies. Of the several species in this region the most common are the Blue Bottle Fly, Green Bottle Fly, Black Blow Fly and Screw-Worm Fly. Adult flies do not grow after they emerge from the pupa case. They lay small white or ivory-colored oblong eggs which hatch, in a day or two at ordinary temperatures, into maggots. These feed and grow and shed their skins several times before they form a brown pupa case shaped like a medicine capsule. Inside this case a transformation takes place which results grown fly. In the case of the blow flies the whole process, from egg to adult fly, takes from 14 to 18 days.

229

Effectiveness of wood ash containing charcoal as a fertilizer for a forest plantation in a temperate region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amendment of forest soils with mixed wood ash (MWA) generated in biomass power plants can prevent the depletion of ... that results from the intensive harvesting of forest plantations. Unlike fly wood ash, MWA co...

Martín Santalla; Beatriz Omil; Roque Rodríguez-Soalleiro; Agustín Merino

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of oil shale ash into zeolite for cadmium and lead removal from wastewater Reyad; available online 29 October 2003 Abstract A by-product fly ash from oil shale processing was converted shale; Ash; Zeolite; Cadmium and lead removal 1. Introduction Oil shale exists in Jordan with large

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

231

COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced ?cars?) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993?1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High-Calcium Coal Combustion By-Products, 5) Development of an Environmentally Appropriate Leaching Procedure for Coal Combustion By-Products, 6) Set Time of Fly Ash Concrete, 7) Coal Ash Properties Database (CAPD), 8) Development of a Method for Determination of Radon Hazard in CCBs, 9) Development of Standards and Specifications, 10) Assessment of Fly Ash Variability, and 11) Development of a CCB Utilization Workshop. The primary goal of CARRC is to work with industry to solve CCB-related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economical utilization and disposal of these highly complex materials. CARRC 1993?1998 accomplishments included: C Updating the CAPD to a user-friendly database management system, and distributing it to CARRC members. C ASTM standard preparation for a guide to using CCBs as waste stabilization agents. C Preliminary identification of specific mineral transformations resulting from fly ash hydration. C Limited determination of the effects of fly ash on the set time of concrete. C Statistical evaluation of a select set of fly ashes from several regional coal-fired power plants. C Development and presentation of a workshop on CCB utilization focused on government agency representatives and interested parties with limited CCB utilization experience. C Participation in a variety of local, national, and international technical meetings, symposia, and conferences by presenting and publishing CCB-related papers.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Flying Squirrels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels Flying Squirrels Nature Bulletin No. 176-A January 23, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation FLYING SQUIRRELS Few people ever see a Flying Squirrel, although they are widely distributed throughout the wooded areas of the northern hemisphere and numerous in many localities. Unlike other squirrels, they sleep all day in their dens, coming out at dusk to feed and play during the night -- less in winter than in summer. They spend more time in the trees and less on the ground than any other squirrel. Most distinctive, of course, is their ability to glide thru the air. Flying squirrels do not fly. On each side of the body is a loose elastic membrane or fold of skin, covered with fur and extending from the wrist of the foreleg to the ankle of the hind leg, with a delicate rod of cartilage, attached only to the wrist, at the edge. Another membrane fills the triangular space between the foreleg and the neck and sides of the head. When the animal leaps outward from a tree, it spreads its legs so that, in the flaring membranes stretched between them, it appears almost square and flat -- shape and sails diagonally downward in a long swooping glide. Its long bushy tail, broad' and flat, is used as a rudder and as a brake to make the short graceful swoop upward when it lands on another tree.

233

Distribution of arsenic and mercury in lime spray dryer ash  

SciTech Connect

The partitioning of As and Hg in various components of lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples from a coal-fired boiler was characterized to better understand the form and fate of these elements in flue gas desulfurization byproducts. LSD ash samples, collected from the McCracken Power Plant on the Ohio State University campus, were separated by a 140-mesh (106 {mu}m) sieve into two fractions: a fly-ash-/unburned-carbon-enriched fraction (> 106 {mu}m) and a calcium-enriched fraction (< 106 {mu}m). Unburned carbon and fly ash in the material > 106 {mu}m were subsequently separated by density using a lithium heteropolytungstate solution. The concentrations of As and Hg were significant in all fractions. The level of As was consistently greater in the calcium-enriched fraction, while Hg was evenly distributed in all components of LSD ash. Specific surface area was an important factor controlling the distribution of Hg in the different components of LSD ash, but not for As. Comparing the LSD ash data to samples collected from the economizer suggests that As was effectively captured by fly ash at 600{sup o}C, while Hg was not. Leaching tests demonstrated that As and Hg were more stable in the calcium-enriched fraction than in the fly-ash- or carbon-enriched fractions, potentially because of the greater pH of the leachate and subsequently greater stability of small amounts of calcium solids containing trace elements in these fractions. 37 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Panuwat Taerakul; Ping Sun; Danold W. Golightly; Harold W. Walker; Linda K. Weavers [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: P Lf9inC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

P Lf9inC P Lf9inC ---'------------ SUBJECT: &j;&,&,ti ~eco~rlyev\bQo(+~r7 DATE ---------- CITY: %,+ ~--~~~---__--~~--_~---~~~- STATE- I+- - ------ -------- ow~:::~~~~wh i Me-me -----------A-- current: mkem./y ---------____---___-______ Owner contacted q yes &no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION -------__~~---__- p Research & Development p Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Prime 0 Subcontract& F Purchase Order m Facility Type a Hanuf acturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 81 material, etc)

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash fiber fundamental Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Composite Interfaces 18 (2011) 169184 brill.nlci Summary: Fiber-Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete with Fly Ash Osman Gencel a,b , Witold Brostow b, , Tea... . Important for...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash-silica fume pastes Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

; Engineering 100 By-Products Utilization Summary: of Recycled Aggregates in Self-Compacting4 Concrete", Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag and Natural Pozzolans... (0.00028 in.). For...

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash belite cement Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 77 Use of fly ash as an admixture for electromagnetic interference shielding Jingyao Cao, D.D.L. Chung* Summary: to a construc- tion material...

238

Radioactivity of coals and ashes from Çatalazi coal-fired power plant in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......from 15 countries(4). The combustion of coal in a CFPP leads to an increase...of utilization of Turkish coal combustion fly ash in concrete production...7440-29-1 Thorium | Coal analysis Coal Ash analysis chemistry Environmental Exposure analysis......

Hüseyin Aytekin; Ridvan Baldik

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian bush fly Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Ecology ; Geosciences 93 By-Products Utilization Summary: -319. 31. Haque, M.N., Langan, B.W., and Ward, M.A., "Properties of High Fly Ash Concrete", Australian Road......

240

NATIONAL LF.hD COMPANY OF C4IIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LF.hD COMPANY LF.hD COMPANY OF C4IIO Cincinnati 39, Ohio March 21, I1960 " ;:ri[l,!Im TRIP FRPCRT TO NATlO>!AL TUBE DIVISION, CIIRISTY PARK \~ORKS, K' CKEESPORT, ?ENNSYLVANXA, ON PFBRiJARY 15 TO t.WICII 2.: 196U ' II \' I .Ja A. Quigley; M.D. : ' ,. .' ,, we pirrpose of thi.s trip was to observe ' the' health and sn li ety aspects of i::i.er:cing normnl uraniuni bi.llets by thc..three roll Assel Mill process, nod 1:~ supervise and i.nsure tlecon.~amlnstion of the Christ; Park Works factLi.ti.es. Information from radiation measurements, air dust samples was collected foi use at NLO in the i Fi I.t~ntallcd at Ferna1.d in ' the future. We air dust snmp,le results show that no operation as we1 aseas sampled exceeded the maximum allowable ~l:l.sintegretions per minute per cubic meter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Disposal of boiler ash  

SciTech Connect

As more boilers are converted from oil to solid fuels such as coal, the quantity of ash requiring disposal will increase dramatically. The factors associated with the development of land disposal systems for ash landfills are presented, including ash characterization, site selection procedures, design parameters, and costs.

Atwell, J.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium. Annual report and selected publications, 1 July 1992--30 June 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced cars), formerly the Western Fly Ash Research, Development, and Data Center (WFARDDC), has continued fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research focused on promoting environmentally safe, economical use of coal combustion fly ash. The research tasks selected for the year included: (1) Coal Ash Properties Database Maintenance and Expansion, (2) Investigation of the High-Volume Use of Fly Ash for Flowable Backfill Applications, (3) Investigation of Hydrated Mineralogical Phases in Coal Combustion By-Products, (4) Comparison of Department of Transportation Specifications for Coal Ash Utilization, (5) Comparative Leaching Study of Coal Combustion By-Products and Competing Construction Materials, (6) Application of CCSEM for Coal Ash Characterization, (7) Determination of Types and Causes of Efflorescence in Regional Concrete Products, and (8) Sulfate Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete: A Literature Review and Evaluation of Research Priorities. The assembly of a database of information on coal fly ash has been a focus area for CARRC since its beginning in 1985. This year, CARRC members received an updated run time version of the Coal Ash Properties Database (CAPD) on computer disk for their use. The new, user-friendly database management format was developed over the year to facilitate the use of CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members as well as CARRC researchers. It is anticipated that this direct access to CAPD by members will be beneficial to each company`s utilization efforts, to CARRC, and to the coal ash industry in general. Many additions and improvements were made to CAPD during the year, and a three-year plan for computer database and modeling related to coal ash utilization was developed to guide both the database effort and the research effort.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Dockter, B.A.; Eylands, K.E.; Hassett, D.J.; O`Leary, E.M.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Utilization of SRS pond ash in controlled low strength material. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

Design mixes for Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) were developed which incorporate pond ashes (fly ashes) from the A-Area Ash Pile, the old F-Area Ash Basin and the D-Area Ash Basin. CLSM is a pumpable, flowable, excavatable backfill used in a variety of construction applications at SRS. Results indicate that CLSM which meets all of the SRS design specifications for backfill, can be made with the A-, D-, and F-Area pond ashes. Formulations for the design mixes are provided in this report. Use of the pond ashes may result in a cost savings for CLSM used at SRS and will utilize a by-product waste material, thereby decreasing the amount of material requiring disposal.

Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Changes in trace element contents in ashes of oil shale fueled PF and CFB boilers during operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two oil shale combustion technologies, pulverized firing (PF) and circulated fluidized bed (CFB) were compared with respect to partitioning of selected elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Sr, Th, Tl, U, V, and Zn) in the ashes along the flue gas ducts. The ash samples were characterized by high-resolution ICP-MS. The average contents of toxic heavy metals in fly ash samples from the CFB boiler are lower compared to the PF boiler. Main differences in trace element contents between combustion technologies were as follows: Cd content in the fly ash samples of PF boiler was up to 0.9 mg/kg while in CFB boiler it remained below 0.1 mg/kg in all analyzed ash samples; Hg was observed in the ashes of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of CFB boiler while in the PF boiler it was close to or below detection limit. In the PF boiler content of Sn was detected only in the ashes of ESPs, while in CFB boiler it was evenly distributed between bottom and fly ash samples. Highest content among heavy metals in ash samples was observed for Pb in the last field of ESP of the PF boiler (142 mg/kg).

Janek Reinik; Natalya Irha; Eiliv Steinnes; Gary Urb; Jekaterina Jefimova; Eero Piirisalu; Jüri Loosaar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessing determinants of industrial waste reuse: The case of coal ash in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Devising effective strategies to facilitate waste reuse depends on the solid understanding of reuse behaviors. However, previous studies of reuse behavior have been limited in scope, focusing mostly on household recycling behaviors or very limited types of industrial wastes. To gain a better understanding of the business reuse behaviors, this study examined the impact of various factors in technical, economic, regulatory, and behavioral categories in the case of coal ash generated in the United States. The results of fixed effect models for fly ash and bottom ash particularly showed the significance role of the behavioral factor. In both models, a proxy variable, which represents knowledge sharing among the power plants or the utility's decision-making, turned out to be statistically significant and had the largest coefficient estimates among a group of variables. This finding may imply that the characteristics of waste reuse behavior are determined more by business decision-making behaviors than by market or institutional factors. However, the role of the behavioral variable was stronger in the bottom ash models than in the fly ash models. While the reuse of bottom ash was determined primarily by the behavioral variable, fly ash reuse was determined by more diverse factors including economic and regulatory variables. This could be explained by material characteristics in relation to competing resources and the nature of reuse applications.

Joo Young Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Transformations and affinities for sulfur of Chinese Shenmu coal ash in a pulverized coal-fired boiler  

SciTech Connect

The self-desulfurization efficiency of Shenmu coal with a high initial Ca/S molar ratio of 2.02 was measured in a 1,025 t/h pulverized coal-fired boiler. It increases from 29% to 32% when the power capacity decreases from 100% to 70%. About 60% of the mineral matter and calcium element fed into the furnace is retained in the fly ash, while less than 10% is retained in the bottom ash. About 70% of the sulfur element fed into the furnace is emitted as SO{sub 2} in the flue gas, while less than 10% is retained in the fly ash and less than 1% is retained in the bottom ash. The mineralogical compositions of feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash were obtained by X-ray diffraction analysis. It is found that the initial amorphous phase content is 91.17% and the initial CaCO{sub 3} phase content is 2.07% in Shenmu coal. The vitreous phase and sulfation product CaSO{sub 4} contents are, respectively, 70.47% and 3.36% in the fly ash obtained at full capacity, while the retained CaCO{sub 3} and CaO contents are, respectively, 4.73% and 2.15%. However, the vitreous phase content is only 25.68% and no CaSO{sub 4} is detected in the bottom ash obtained at full capacity. When the power capacity decreases from 100% to 70%, the vitreous phase content in fly ash decreases from 70.47% to 67.41% and that in bottom ash increases from 25.68% to 28.10%.

Cheng, J.; Zhou, J.H.; Liu, J.Z.; Cao, X.Y.; Cen, K.F. [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Controlling Blow Flies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blow flies lay their eggs on animal remains and can spread disease. To control blow flies, it is important to remove dead animals and dispose of them properly, and to use effective insecticides when necessary....

Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

249

Controlling Blow Flies (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blow flies lay their eggs on animal remains and can spread disease. To control blow flies, it is important to remove dead animals and dispose of them properly, and to use effective insecticides when necessary....

Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study  

SciTech Connect

Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ash vaporization in circulating fluidized bed coal combustion  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the vaporization of the ash-forming constituents in circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) in a full-scale 80 MW{sub th} unit was studied. Ash vaporization in CFBC was studied by measuring the fly ash aerosols in a full-scale boiler upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at the flue gas temperature of 125{degree}C. The fly ash number size distributions showed two distinct modes in the submicrometer size range, at particle diameters 0.02 and 0.3 {mu}m. The concentration of the ultrafine 0.02-{mu}m mode showed a large variation with time and it decreased as the measurements advanced. The concentration of the 0.02-{mu}m mode was two orders of magnitude lower than in the submicrometer mode observed earlier in the bubbling FBC and up to three orders of magnitude lower than in the pulverized coal combustion. Scanning electron micrographs showed few ultrafine particles. The intermediate mode at 0.3 {mu}m consisted of particles irregular in shape, and hence in this mode the particles had not been formed via a gas to particle route. We propose that the 0.3-{mu}m mode had been formed from the partial melting of the very fine mineral particles in the coal. The mass size distribution in the size range 0.01-70 {mu}m was unimodal with maximum at 20 {mu}m. Less than 1% of the fly ash particles was found in the submicrometer size range. 35 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Lind, T.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Maenhaut, W. [Univ. of Gent (Belgium); Shah, A.; Huggins, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The use of PFBC ashes to ameliorate acid conditions: An equilibrium and greenhouse study  

SciTech Connect

Pilot-scale development at the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MW{sub th} circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, has demonstrated the advantages of pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) technology. Commercial scale deployment of the technology at the Lakeland Utilities MacIntosh Unit No. 4 has been proposed. Development of uses for the ashes from PFBC systems is being actively pursued as part of commercial demonstration of PFBC technologies. Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), conducted a laboratory scale investigation of the technical feasibility of PFBC ash as an amendment for acidic soils and spoils encountered in agricultural and reclamation applications. Ashes were collected from the Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low-sulfur subbituminous and (2) high-sulfur bituminous coals. The results of the technical feasibility testing indicated the following: (1) PFBC fly ash (Karhula-low S fly ash) and ag-lime (CaCO{sub 3}) were used as amendments attempting to ameliorate acid spoil conditions. These materials were found to be effective acid mine spoil amendments. (2) The greenhouse study demonstrated that PFBC ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in similar seed germination numbers as compared to the ag-lime amended spoils. (3) The greenhouse study also demonstrated that PFBC fly ash and/or bed ash amended spoils resulted in comparable plant productivity to the ag-lime amended spoils. In fact, all amendments resulted in statistically the same levels of plant production for each plant species.

Brown, T.H.; Bland, A.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Carbonation of Fly Ash in Oxy-fuel CFB Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion of fossil fuel is one of the most promising methods to produce a stream of concentrated CO2 ready for sequestration. Oxy-fuel FBC (fluidized bed combustion) can use limestone as a sorbent for

Chunbo Wang; Lufei Jia; Yewen Tan…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

West Virginia coal fly ash sorption of BTEX.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sorption is a term used in the environmental field to describe how chemical contaminants in soil and groundwater adhere to solid particles such as: clay,… (more)

Wentz, Jerome C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method and apparatus of measuring unburned carbon in fly ash  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are shown to measure unburned carbon particles in the exhaust of a combustor. Photoacoustic absorption spectrometry is employed to measure the presence of the unburned carbon. Especially helpful in these measurements is a vertically elongated photoacoustic cell in which high flow velocities are maintained to prevent particles from settling. These measurements are useful in determining the efficiency of coal-fired combustors.

Brown, Robert C. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Quarterly Report No. 8, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research program include: the identification of the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during pulverized coal combustion; identification of fundamental processes by which the transformation of minerals and organically associated species occurs; the incorporation of the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an engineering model for ash formation.

Bool, L.E. III; Helble, J.J.; Sarofim, A.F. [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HIGH VALUE MATERIALSFROM THE ULTRA-FINE (PM2.5)FRACTION OF COAL COMBUSTION ASH  

SciTech Connect

Dry fly ash samples were collected from 6 of the7 largest power plants operated by Louisville Gas and Electric Company (LG&E). Samples were taken from individual ESP hoppers in a continuous flow through stages of particulate collection. A total of 41 samples were taken from 16 operating units. The samples were thoroughly characterized for pertinent physical and chemical composition. The fly ash samples contained 10 to 50% -10{micro}m material, with higher concentrations of finer particles located in the latter stages of particulate collection. Flotation evaluation was conducted on a continuous flow though a single unit at each power station to assess the viability of using froth flotation to reduce the LOI in the fly ash to very low levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Ash from all of the units tested responded favorably with the exception of the ash from Henderson Station, which is attributed to a significant proportion of un-combusted or partially-combusted petroleum coke in the ash at this station, Bulk samples of dry ash and pond ash were also collected from Mill Creek, Trimble County, E.W. Brown and Coleman power plants and evaluated for carbon removal by froth flotation. Release analyses showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels for most of the substrates tested. The exception was the Mill Creek ashes. The cause of this exception will be further investigated.

T.L. Robl; J.G. Groppo

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Adaptiv regulering av fly.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Denne oppgaven gikk ut pĺ ĺ lage en matematisk modell av et fly som hadde varierende stabilitet i forhold til angrepsvinkelen. Deretter ble det utviklet… (more)

Algarheim, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Fusibility of Blended Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) of coal ash are found at temperatures below the predicted liquidus temperature and, for ashes from blended coals, are generally nonlinear with respect to the blend proportion. ... ashing. ...

G. W. Bryant; G. J. Browning; H. Emanuel; S. K. Gupta; R. P. Gupta; J. A. Lucas; T. F. Wall

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic, Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LF  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LF Baisuo Zhao 1 Noha M. Mesbah 1 Eileen Dalin 2 Lynne Goodwin 3 Matt Nolan 2 Sam Pitluck 2 Olga Chertkov 3 Thomas S. Brettin 4 James Han 2 Frank W. Larimer 2 Miriam L. Land 4 Loren Hauser 4 Nikolaos Kyrpides 2...

Baisuo Zhao; Noha M. Mesbah; Eileen Dalin; Lynne Goodwin; Matt Nolan; Sam Pitluck; Olga Chertkov; Thomas S. Brettin; James Han; Frank W. Larimer; Miriam L. Land; Loren Hauser; Nikolaos Kyrpides; Juergen Wiegel

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

VLF/LF reflectivity of the polar ionosphere. Report for 2 September-22 December 1979  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of high latitude ionospheric reflectivity as observed by the USAF high resolution VLF/LF ionosounder operating in northern Greenland. Ionospheric reflectivity parameters, including reflection heights and coefficients, are presented as a function of time of day. Riometer and magnetometer measurements of the polar propagation environment are presented as supplementary data.

Pagliarulo, R.P.; Turtle, J.P.; Rasmussen, J.E.; Klemetti, W.I.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

On-line carbon-in-ash monitors: Survey and demonstration  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash unburned carbon (UBC) level is an important consideration for combustion efficiency as well as ash marketing. The presence of unburned carbon in fly ash has been shown to be a function of furnace design, coal quality, the ability of the pulverizer to grind the coal, and heat release rate. Boilers are designed to take these factors into consideration. However, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 drove many utilities to switch coal supplies and install low NO{sub x} burners. Higher carbon-in-ash levels have been the result of these changes in coal quality and the staged combustion characteristics associated with low NO{sub x} burners. Over the past few years, several instruments for the on-line determination and monitoring of the unburned carbon content of ash samples have been developed. However, to date they have not been deployed widely in the U.S. despite potential uses for combustion optimization and as an aid in fly ash marketing. Based on the lack of publicly available performance and operation data available for the current CIAM (carbon-in-ash monitor) commercial offerings, Southern Company initiated a demonstration of several commercial technologies on its coal-fired units. As part of a DOE Clean Coal Project demonstrating advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction on NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired boilers, the CAM, SEKAM and FOCUS systems were installed at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4. CAM and M&W instruments were also placed at Alabama Power Company`s Plant Gaston Unit 4. The testing of the instruments was conducted from November 1995 through August 1996.

Sorge, J.; Larrimore, L.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ASH EMISSIVITY CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION  

SciTech Connect

The increased use of western subbituminous coals has generated concerns regarding highly reflective ash disrupting heat transfer in the radiant zone of pulverized-fuel boilers. Ash emissivity and reflectivity is primarily a function of ash particle size, with reflective deposits expected to consist of very small refractory ash materials such as CaO, MgO, or sulfate materials such as Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. For biomass fuels and biomass-coal blends, similar reflectivity issues may arise as a result of the presence of abundant organically associated calcium and potassium, which can transform during combustion to fine calcium, and potassium oxides and sulfates, which may act as reflective ash. The relationship of reflectivity to ash chemistry is a second-order effect, with the ash particle size distribution and melting point being determined by the size and chemistry of the minerals present in the starting fuel. Measurement of the emission properties of ash and deposits have been performed by several research groups (1-6) using both laboratory methods and measurements in pilot- and full-scale combustion systems. A review of the properties and thermal properties of ash stresses the important effect of ash deposits on heat transfer in the radiant boiler zone (1).

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Charlene R. Crocker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Modeling volcanic ash dispersal  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

265

Homemade Fly Killer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homemade Fly Killer Homemade Fly Killer Name: Pam Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What is a great homemade recipe for killing flies in the yard and house without endangering birds, dogs and cats? (we have many (flies, dogs, cats and birds, that is!!!!) Replies: Your best bet is one of the variants of traps. For example, the hanging strips of fly paper seem to stick a good number of flies. I have yet to see a bird dumb enough to run into and get stuck on one. Some of the funnel like traps (I've seen some for beetles, and yellow jackets) would likely work too if you stuck something attractive to flies inside. What you would do with captured flies, I'm not sure, but you definitely wouldn't want to leave it too long, if you put some real piece of food exposed inside as bait they would lay eggs on it, which would hatch as maggots, etc. There are ways to have the bait protected from any eggs (in a compartment screened off, for example). Then you could dunk the trap in water and leave it until they all died, or under an inverted bucket in a puddle of water with a lit candle, which would consume all the air and eventually choke them. You could just let them starve or dehydrate by leaving them in the trap, although that would take a while. The kids you teach maybe could think of other ways to kill them off without using toxic chemicals. Most of them would either be something mechanical (release into the blades of a high speed fan would be a little messy, but effective), or denial of the basics of life (air, water, food).

266

Integrated Pest Management of Flies in Texas Dairies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication identifies and gives management strategies for various species of flies infesting Texas dairies, including houseflies, stable flies, horn flies, garbage flies and blow flies....

Stevenson, Douglas; Cocke, Jesse

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparing properties of coal ash and alternative-fuel ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of investigating ash produced in burning alternative kinds of fuel are discussed. Its impact on the environment is evaluated, and possibilities of recovering it are studied.

E. P. Dick; G. A. Ryabov; A. N. Tugov; A. N. Soboleva

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Entrained-flow dry-bottom gasification of high-ash coals in coal-water slurries  

SciTech Connect

It was shown that the effective use of dry ash removal during entrained-flow gasification of coal-water slurries consists in simplification of the ash storage system and utilization of coal ash, a decrease in the coal demand, a reduction in the atmospheric emissions of noxious substances and particulate matter, and abandonment of the discharge of water used for ash slurry. According to the results of gasification of coal-water slurries (5-10 {mu}m) in a pilot oxygen-blow unit at a carbon conversion of >91%, synthesis gas containing 28.5% CO, 32.5% H{sub 2}, 8.2% CO{sub 2}, 1.5% CH{sub 4}, the rest being nitrogen, was obtained. The fly ash in its chemical composition, particle size, and density meets the requirements of the European standard EN 450 as a cement additive for concrete manufacture.

E.G. Gorlov; V.G. Andrienko; K.B. Nefedov; S.V. Lutsenko; B.K. Nefedov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Flying Squirrel Captive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrel Captive Flying Squirrel Captive Name: Tammy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: hello there, was looking around the internet for ideas on what to feed my daughters' pet flying squirrel when I happened across your page. When I saw the name Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation I decided to send an email because my name is also Eisenbeis. My question is what types of fruits and veggies should I feed him and is there anything he should not have? Replies: Hello, I have been taking care of flying squirrels for twenty years as part of our nature center display. We feed our flying squirrels Purina Mouse Chow with an occasional supplement of acorns, when they are available, and/or sunflower seeds. Sunflower seeds can be unhealthy if fed in too large a quantity. The high oil content can lead to hair loss. Also, changes in diet can lead to a loose droppings and a "messy" cage. Avoid feeding large quantities of any fresh foods and only add them a couple times a week, if you do.

270

Development of Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test Development of Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions...

271

Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals  

SciTech Connect

On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Prickly Ash and Prickly Pear Nature Bulletin No. 649-A October 1, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PRICKLY ASH AND PRICKLY PEAR In the plant kingdom, as among people, there are so-me that we avoid. They have few virtues, if any, and our experiences with them are painful or have unpleasant after effects. Poison ivy is a notorious example. Prickly Ash, a shrub, is another. Although not poisonous it is thickly armed with wicked thorns and has no ornamental, economic or wildlife value. In 1821 when the first section lines were established in Cook County, the surveyor recorded -- for the benefit of land buyers -- the principal kinds of trees and other vegetation observed along each mile. He frequently encountered prickly ash in thickets near the Little Calumet River and also the north and south branches of the Chicago River.

273

Still Flying Issue 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pictures 18: Crossword 20: Filk 21: Firefly URLs 24: Thanks, Feedback Still Flying ? Issue 1 - November 2003 Page 2 of 24 was defeated towards the end of the war. Others on board include Mal?s ex-second-in- command Zoe (Gina Torres ? Jasmine... information see: http://www.browncoats.com/ Still Flying ? Issue 1 - November 2003 Page 3 of 24 Dear Captain Tightpants? It was looking scary there for a moment. The show has been cancelled, everyone was off doing new things and then even...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.

275

Flying Squirrels and Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flying Squirrels and Houses Flying Squirrels and Houses Name: Kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: How do you get rid of flying squirrels in the attic of a Cape style home that has limited access to the attic? There is blown in insulation so we cannot see to the end of the house where we hear them, nor can a person crawl in to see anything. We have used d-con bars, mouse traps and have-a-heart traps in the crawl spaces we can reach, but have caught nothing. Replies: Place a statue of an owl near the entrance the squirrels are using. Owls are their motal enemies and this technique works for birds as well. Steve Sample You will not be able to solve this problem until you find the way they go in and out. Usually the easiest way is to look for light coming in from outside while in the dark attic, but if you can't see it that way do a thorough search of the outside. A flying squirrel does not need a very big hole, maybe 2" or less diameter. They go out at night so once you find the hole close it up at night while they are out. Good luck.

276

Fat Fruit Flies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broadcast Transcript: Breaking news from South Korea's hi-tech frontline. With the help of drosophila, or the fruit fly, scientists here have discovered strands of genetic material that control growth in the body. They're called micro-RNA and people...

Hacker, Randi

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

277

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation of Coal Ash Particle Deposition Experiments† ... Ichikawa et al.(7) measured deposition behavior for ash particles from ashing tests for a series of five coals, using a nominally 1 m tall × 60 mm diameter ash-heating tube that was fitted with a cooled, temperature-controlled particle impact probe oriented at a 30° angle to the atmospheric pressure air flow. ...

Weiguo Ai; John M. Kuhlman

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

278

Insurance coverage for coal ash liabilities  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses how liability insurance can be a valuable tool for limiting coal ash liabilities.

Elkind, D.L. [Dickstein Shapiro LLP (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Removing mercury from coal emissions: options for ash-friendly technologies  

SciTech Connect

The article gives a brief description of techniques to remove mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants and discusses environmental considerations associated with the effect of emission controls on coal fly ash. Techniques covered include use of injected mercury sorbents (activated carbon, metal oxide catalysts, MerCAP{trademark} and MercScreen{trademark}) and fuel cleaning. Technologies currently being researched are mentioned. 8 refs.

Sager, J. [United States Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Effect of Coal Ash Composition on Ash Fusion Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted in which mixtures of selected coal ashes and SiO2, Al2O3, CaO, Fe2O3, and MgO were subjected to the standard test for ash fusibility. ... One property that specifically gives detail information on the suitability of a coal source [Alpern, B., Nahuys, J., Martinez, L. Mineral matter in ashy and non-washable coals-its influence on chem. ...

Wen J. Song; Li H. Tang; Xue D. Zhu; Yong Q. Wu; Zi B. Zhu; Shuntarou Koyama

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Suppression of fine ash formation in pulverized coal flames. Final technical report, September 30, 1992--January 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Coal ash, and particularly fine fly ash, remain one of the principal practical and environmental problems in coal-based power generation. In particular, submicron aerosols are identified with direct inhalation risk. Submicron ash is thought to arise from mineral vaporization during char combustion, followed by nucleation, condensation and coagulation to yield an aerosol. While aerosols are predominantly made out of volatile alkali minerals, they also can include refractory oxides that are chemically reduced to more volatile forms within the char particle and vaporized. Most of the ash of size greater than 1 {mu}m is generated by agglomeration of mineral as the char particle bums out. These two principal mechanisms are thought to account for most of the ash generated in coal combustion. Previous research has shown that various forms of coal treatment can influence the yields of fine ash from combustion. The research reported here investigates various forms of treatment, including physical coal cleaning, aerodynamic sizing, degree of grinding, and combinations of these on both aerosol yields and on yields of fine residual ash (1-4 {mu}m). The work also includes results from the combustion of artificial chars that include individual mineral elements. This research shows that these various forms of coal treatment can significantly change ash characteristics. While none of the treatments affected the bulk of the residual ash size distribution significantly, the yield of the ash aerosol mode (d<0.5 {mu}m) and fine residual ash mode (1-4 {mu}m) are changed by the treatments.

Kramlich, J.C.; Chenevert, B.; Park, Jungsung; Hoffman, D.A.; Butcher, E.K.

1996-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development of a Comprehensive, Validated Pharmacophore Hypothesis for Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor (LF) Inhibitors Using Genetic Algorithms, Pareto Scoring, and Structural Biology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of a Comprehensive, Validated Pharmacophore Hypothesis for Anthrax Toxin Lethal Factor (LF) Inhibitors Using Genetic Algorithms, Pareto Scoring, and Structural Biology ... The chemical functionalities of these five ligands occupy various key regions of the LF active site and taken together cover all three critical subsites (S1?, S1–S2, S2?) of the LF binding area. ... In addn., a test of screening utility covering a diverse set of 29 proteins and corresponding ligand sets showed improved performance. ...

Ting-Lan Chiu; Elizabeth A. Amin

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

Moon Dust and Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... struck by the similarity between the preliminary descriptions of moon dust and that of the ash residue collected from pulverized ... residue collected from pulverized coal-fired boilers (that is, pulverized fuel ...

A. B. HART; E. RAASK

1969-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

Sustainable Use of Biofuel by Recycling Ash to Forests:? Treatment of Biofuel Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainable Use of Biofuel by Recycling Ash to Forests:? Treatment of Biofuel Ash ... Ash samples from combustion of biofuels in a circulating fluidized bed and grate-firing combustion plants are studied. ...

Maryam Mahmoudkhani; Tobias Richards; Hans Theliander

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Cast-Concrete Products Made with FBC Ash and Wet-Collected Coal-Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0899-1561 2005 17:6 659 CE Database subject headings: Recycling; Ashes; Concrete et al. 1991 . Fluidized bed combustion FBC ash is the ash produced by an FBC boiler in which the coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

286

Still Flying Issue 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 8 : Grand Prize Quiz! Page 9 : Snakes and Ladders Page 10 : Fan Club Questionnaire Page 11 : Thanks Issue Four April 2005 2 UK Serenity release date moved forward again! Now 7th October! Special pre... Browncoat Man He's a Browncoat Man 7 Still Flying in is offering Grand Prizes for the first two people to send in the correct answers to this quiz! First prize is a sweatshirt from last year?s Atlanta Shindig! Second prize is a Serenity Valley sow...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Insects and flies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Insects and flies Insects and flies Name: Carol L Giles Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What would the world be like without insects? How long can a fly hibernate being that its life span is very short? Name the insect that has the longest life span. Replies: If all insects were to suddenly die, then the insect-eating small animals (e.g. chickens, bats, birds, frogs) would die, as would most flowering plants (apple trees, corn, potatoes), from a lack of insects to carry the pollen from male to female plant. Higher animals that ate the flowering plants or insect-eating animals would then die. Given these facts, and starting from the fact that insects themselves constitute the majority of the life on the planet, it's a safe bet that the sudden death of all insects would mean the death of most or perhaps nearly all the life on Earth. If on the other hand the insects died off slowly, or had never been, probably some other small life form of very similar habits would evolve to fill the niche.

288

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Long duration ash probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

290

Ash chemistry and mineralogy of an Indonesian coal during combustion: Part II — Pilot scale observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on combustion experiments carried out in a pilot scale furnace as a follow-up to research previously carried out using a drop-tube furnace to investigate the combustion behaviour of an Indonesian coal, in particular the effects of additives on ash chemistry, mineralogy and ash deposit formation. Combustion experiments were carried out in a pilot scale furnace to test the effectiveness of bauxite addition in reducing ash build-up. Samples collected from deposits on the slagging panels and fouling probe tubes, electrostatic precipitator fly ash, the furnace ash and tunnel ash were fully characterized using various analytical techniques. Experimental results substantiated earlier drop-tube observations suggesting that the use of raw coal with an addition of 3 wt.% bauxite would appear to offer the best performance with respect to slagging and fouling propensity in comparison to use of the raw coal alone. Observations on the reduction in glass content resulting from the addition of bauxite during PSF test runs support the earlier findings of the drop-tube tests. The reduction in glass content found in the slagging panel and fouling probe samples is comparable to that found in ash formation experiments conducted at 1400 °C despite the observed differences in mineralogy. Although deposits are still likely to form as indicated by the PSF runs they appear to be more friable and hence amenable to removal by conventional methods such as frequent soot blowing. These findings demonstrate how the results of laboratory experiments can be combined with those of pilot scale trials to provide data for full-scale trials on the effects of additives in the remediation of ash problems associated with the firing low-rank coals.

H.B. Vuthaluru; D. French

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Protecting Cattle from Horn Flies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

months). Horn flies can also reduce milk production in dairy cows by up to 20 percent. To control horn flies effectively and economically, it is helpful to know how to distinguish them from other flies, what control methods to use for different stages... will not provide an economic return, and the unnecessary use of insecticides can speed the development of resistant fly populations. ? Read the label of the treatment to make sure it is suitable for use on beef or lactating dairy cows. ? Be careful when applying...

Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Final report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions are considered. (2) To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occur. Emphasis is placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under sub-stoichiometric combustion conditions. (3) To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation.

Bool, L.E. III; Helble, J.J. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Shah, N. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)] [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Technical report, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. Currently only about 30% of the 5 million tons of these coal combustion residues generated in Illinois each year are utilized, mainly as aggregate. These residues are composed largely Of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. The process being developed in this program will use the residues directly in the manufacture of cement products. Therefore, a much larger amount of residues can be utilized. To achieve the above objective, in the first phase (current year) samples of coal combustion residues will be blended and mixed, as needed, with a lime or cement kiln dust (CKD) to adjust the CaO composition. Six mixtures will be melted in a laboratory-scale furnace at CTL. The resulting products will then be tested for cementitious properties. Two preliminary blends have been tested. One blend used fly ash with limestone, while the other used fly ash with CKD. Each blend was melted and then quenched, and the resulting product samples were ground to a specific surface area similar to portland cement. Cementitious properties of these product samples were evaluated by compression testing of 1-inch cube specimens. The specimens were formed out of cement paste where a certain percentage of the cement paste is displaced by one of the sample products. The specimens were cured for 24 hours at 55{degrees}C and 100% relative humidity. The specimens made with the product samples obtained 84 and 89% of the strength of a pure portland cement control cube. For comparison, similar (pozzolanic) materials in standard concrete practice are required to have a compressive strength of at least 75% of that of the control.

Wagner, J.C. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bhatty, J.I.; Mishulovich, A. [Construction Technology Labs., Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Geopolymer concretes: a green construction technology rising from the ash  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at Louisiana Tech University have embarked on a multi-year research initiative to develop applications for inorganic polymer concrete, or geopolymer concrete, in the area of civil construction, and to bring solve of these applications to market. One objective was to produce a spray-on coating for use in the harsh environment of wastewater conveyance and treatment facilities. Another project is to establish relationships between fly ash composition and particle size distribution and the mechanical attributes and workability of the resulting geopolymer concrete. A third project is to develop a 'smart' geopolymer concrete whose response to a given electric current can be correlated to the stress level to which the structure is subjected. 1 fig., 6 photos.

Allouche, E. [Louisiana Tech University, LA (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Pollen Influx and Volcanic Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Artemisia) blooms in the fall and a dis-proportionate percentage...were recorded. The five pollen groups plotted in Fig. 5 were selected...expected to occur during the fall and perhaps winter months...probability of an initial ash-fall in late summer. Certain acid-resist-ant...

Peter J. Mehringer Jr.; Eric Blinman; Kenneth L. Petersen

1977-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Coal Ash and Clean Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IT is the normal view that the incombustible part of coal is not only a useless but even objectionable diluent. At times in the past, ... , familiar with the theory of contact catalysis of gas reactions, have speculated that the ash constituents might well play an active role in the processes of carbonisation and combustion. ...

H. J. HODSMAN

1926-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Superheater Tube Corrosion in Wood Gasifier Ash Deposits  

SciTech Connect

The upper operating temperature of tubes in heat exchangers/steam generators is strongly influenced by the degradation that can occur because of the reaction of the exchanger/generator tubing with the deposits that accumulate on the surface of the tubes. In fact, severe corrosion has been observed in some biomass fired systems, particularly with elevated potassium and chlorine concentrations in the deposits. Wood gasifiers have recently been and are currently being constructed at several sites in North America. In these systems, the syngas is burned to produce steam and the performance of the heat exchanger tubes under ash deposits is of great concern. As temperatures of the heat exchangers are increased in an effort to increase their operating efficiency, the performance of the tubes is of greater interest. The corrosion behavior of alloy steel tubes as a function of temperature has been investigated by exposing samples of selected alloys to ash collected from the steam generator fired by syngas produced in wood gasifiers. This study compares corrosion rates from laboratory exposures of synthesis gas and ash at 500 C and 600 C. This study investigated the material performance of four ferritic steels and one austenitic steel exposed to conditions expected on the fireside of a wood gasifier. The purpose of this study was to identify an effective method for determining material performance for samples exposed to both the process gas and the fly ash that is typically observed within the steam generator for times up to 1000 hours. Mass changes were measured for all of the samples, but this information can be misleading concerning material performance due to the difficulty in sufficiently cleaning the samples after exposure in the ash. Therefore, small cross sections of the samples were collected and imaged using optical microscopy. Oxide thicknesses were measured along with metal losses. The metal loss information provides a clear indication of material performance. The metal loss rates for the ferritic steels at 500 C were almost half of those observed at 600 C and the rates decreased with increasing exposure time. It was also reported that the metal loss rates generally decrease with increasing chromium concentration.

Bestor, Michael A [ORNL] [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Roll Control in Fruit Flies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to aerodynamic instabilities, stabilizing flapping flight requires ever-present fast corrective actions. Here we investigate how flies control body roll angle, their most susceptible degree of freedom. We glue a magnet to each fly, apply a short magnetic pulse that rolls it in mid-air, and film the corrective maneuver. Flies correct perturbations of up to $100^{\\circ}$ within $30\\pm7\\mathrm{ms}$ by applying a stroke-amplitude asymmetry that is well described by a linear PI controller. The response latency is $\\sim5\\mathrm{ms}$, making the roll correction reflex one of the fastest in the animal kingdom.

Beatus, Tsevi; Cohen, Itai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COURSE INFORMATION: Title: Fly Fishing Weekend Department/Number: NONC F040 F01 Credits: 0 to the art and science of fly casting, fishing and tying. Students will learn how use a fly rod to place a fly with pinpoint accuracy, tie fishing knots and construct their own leaders, and, most importantly

Sikes, Derek S.

302

Behavior study of trace elements in pulverized lignite, bottom ash, and fly ash of Amyntaio power station, Greece  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greece is second among EU countries for lignite coal production. The indicated reserves are 6.7 billion tonnes with a ... of Greece are generated through the utilization of lignite, while the remaining percentage...

Pavlos Megalovasilis; Georgios Papastergios…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The fluidized bed combustion ash management puzzle  

SciTech Connect

As the electric and industrial power generation industry upgrades and expands, the amount of coal and other solid fuels also expands. With increased environmental controls, the introduction of a competitive market for power, and the increased interest in opportunity fuels will increase the usage of Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) boilers in the power industry. The combustion of these solid fuels will generate combustion ashes. Power generators, including FBC boilers owners, have traditionally looked to landfills for the disposal of their ash. With the tighter environmental controls being placed on landfills at the federal and state level, power generators are beginning to see constantly escalating tipping fees which now make the landfill option less attractive. In some instances, landfills are beginning to refuse to accept ash regardless of the tipping fee. In view of this, the power generators are now struggling to find a place to store or dispose of the ash that is produced by their power boiler. Other disposal alternatives such as backhaul to the mine and beneficial reuse are now being considered. Either alternative presents its own set of technical and environmental variables to be considered in developing an effective ash management plan. To be effective, these plans need to incorporate an aggressive, yet realistic, role to support beneficial reuse of the ash. Many applications exist for reuse of the various types of ash. The applications for conventional ashes such as those from pulverized coal boilers and stoker fired boilers are mature and more commonplace. The uses for FBC ash are not as well researched and demonstrated and therefore the marketing opportunities for FBC ash continue to require development. FBC boiler owners and operators must be willing to accept the challenges posed in developing these reuse applications for FBC ash for the market to accept the applications for FBC ash and allow the full value of the FBC ash to be realized.

Fitzgerald, H.B. [ReUse Technology, Inc., Kennesaw, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ash transformations in the real-scale pulverized coal combustion of South African and Colombian coals  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the formation of ash particles in the combustion of South African Klein Kropie coal and a Colombian coal was studied by measuring the ash particle characteristics upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) at a 510 MW{sub e} pulverized coal fired power plant. The authors measured the ash particle mass size distributions in the size range 0.01--50 {micro}m using low-pressure impactors and precutter cyclones. Also, samples were collected for computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (CCSEM) with a cyclone with an aerodynamic cut-diameter of about 1 {micro}m. The cyclone-collected samples were analyzed with standard CCSEM procedure by depositing the particles on a filter, and by embedding the particles in epoxy hence acquiring the cross-section analysis of the sample. All major mineral classes in both coals were found to undergo extensive coalescence during combustion. Iron, calcium and magnesium rich particles resulting from the decomposition of pyrite, calcite and dolomite were found to coalesce with quartz and aluminosilicate particles. The size distributions of the fly ash determined with CCSEM and low-pressure impactor-cyclone sampler were found to be similar.

Lind, T.; Kauppinen, E.I.; Valmari, T. [VTT (Finland); Klippel, N. [ABB Corporate Research, Baden (Switzerland); Mauritzson, C. [ABB Flaekt Industri AB, Vaexjoe (Sweden)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water supply managers include: monitoring turbidity levels in raw water intakes, and if necessary increasing chlorination to compensate for higher turbidity; managing water demand; and communicating monitoring results with the public to allay fears of contamination. Ash can cause major damage to wastewater disposal systems. Ash deposited onto impervious surfaces such as roads and car parks is very easily washed into storm drains, where it can form intractable masses and lead to long-term flooding problems. It can also enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), both through sewer lines and by direct fallout. Damage to modern \\{WWTPs\\} can run into millions of dollars. Ash falls reduce visibility creating hazards for ground transportation. Dry ash is also readily remobilised by vehicle traffic and wind, and dry and wet ash deposits will reduce traction on paved surfaces, including airport runways. Ash cleanup from road and airports is commonly necessary, but the large volumes make it logistically challenging. Vehicles are vulnerable to ash; it will clog filters and brake systems and abrade moving parts within engines. Lastly, modern telecommunications networks appear to be relatively resilient to volcanic ash fall. Signal attenuation and interference during ash falls has not been reported in eruptions over the past 20 years, with the exception of interference from ash plume-generated lightning. However, some telecommunications equipment is vulnerable to airborne ash, in particular heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems which may become blocked from ash ingestion leading to overheating. This summary of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure provides insight into the relative vulnerability of infrastructure under a range of different ashfall scenarios. Identifying and quantifying these impacts is an essential step in building resilience within these critical systems. We have attempted to consider interdependencies between sectors in a holistic way using systems thinking. As modern society becomes increasingly complex and interdependent this

Thomas M. Wilson; Carol Stewart; Victoria Sword-Daniels; Graham S. Leonard; David M. Johnston; Jim W. Cole; Johnny Wardman; Grant Wilson; Scott T. Barnard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fabrication and Flying Test of Silicon Sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the further increase of the magnetic storage density of hard disk, flying height of sliders has to decrease down ... near future. To ensure that the working flying height is coincident with the design goal, ...

Jing Lin; Yonggang Meng; Nanhai Song

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Surface studies of coal, oil, and coal-oil-mixture ash using auger electron spectroscopy and solvent leaching techniques  

SciTech Connect

Fly ash produced by the combustion of coal, oil, and a coal-oil mixture have been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and solvent leaching techniques. The Auger data indicate that the surface concentration of the metal ions Na, Fe, Mg, Ni, V, and Al as well as S and C increases on going from coal to coal-oil mixture and oil ash. The relative surface enrichments of oil and coal-oil-mixture ash are consistent with a simple model of the ash-formation process, and the results confirm that several toxic metals are significantly enriched on the surface of the ash particles. The Auger data are compared to HCl and tris buffer leachate composition analyses, and in neither case does the leachate give an accurate representation of the surface composition. HCl apparently dissolves large oxide deposits and thus overestimates the surface concentrations of Fe, Al, and V. Conversely, several metallic ions are essentially insoluble in neutral aqueous solutions, so their surface concentration is underestimated by the tris leachate.

Stinespring, C.D.; Harris, W.R.; Cook, J.M.; Casleton, K.H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel Exhaust and Aftertreatment Systems Detailed Characterization of Lubricant-Derived Ash-Related Species in Diesel...

310

The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol The Development of a Small Engine Based Accelerated Ash Loading Protocol Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan....

311

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties deer12kamp.pdf More Documents...

312

Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Reducing Lubricant Ash Impact on Exhaust Aftertreatment with a Oil Conditioning Filter Under the test...

313

Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission Aftertreatment Systems via an Oil Conditioning Filter Minimizing Lubricant-Ash Requirement and Impact on Emission...

314

Connectome of the fly visual circuitry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reviews the recent study of connectomics in a brain of the fruit fly Drosophila and highlights...Diagram of horizontal section of the fly's brain and visual system. Fly's optic lobe...the inputs to a particular neuron or a brain region more quickly by skeletonizing neurons......

Shin-ya Takemura

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Settlement of footing on compacted ash bed  

SciTech Connect

Compacted coal ash fills exhibit capillary stress due to contact moisture and preconsolidation stress due to the compaction process. As such, the conventional methods of estimating settlement of footing on cohesionless soils based on penetration tests become inapplicable in the case of footings on coal ash fills, although coal ash is also a cohesionless material. Therefore, a method of estimating load-settlement behavior of footings resting on coal ash fills accounting for the effect of capillary and preconsolidation stresses is presented here. The proposed method has been validated by conducting plate load tests on laboratory prepared compacted ash beds and comparing the observed and predicted load-settlement behavior. Overestimation of settlement greater than 100% occurs when capillary and preconsolidation stresses are not accounted for, as is the case in conventional methods.

Ramasamy, G.; Pusadkar, S.S. [IIT Roorkee, Roorkee (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash Deposition Behavior of Upgraded Brown Coal and Bituminous Coal ... Ash with a low melting point causes slagging and fouling problems in pulverized coal combustion boilers. ... The ash composition in coal and operational conditions in boilers such as heat load greatly affect the ash deposition behavior. ...

Katsuya Akiyama; Haeyang Pak; Toshiya Tada; Yasuaki Ueki; Ryo Yoshiie; Ichiro Naruse

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fusibility and sintering characteristics of ash  

SciTech Connect

The temperature characteristics of ash fusibility are studied for a wide range of bituminous and brown coals, lignites, and shales with ratios R{sub B/A} of their alkaline and acid components between 0.03 and 4. Acritical value of R{sub B/A} is found at which the fusion temperatures are minimal. The sintering properties of the ashes are determined by measuring the force required to fracture a cylindrical sample. It is found that the strength of the samples increases sharply at certain temperatures. The alkali metal content of the ashes has a strong effect on their sintering characteristics.

Ots, A. A., E-mail: aots@sti.ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology (Estonia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

Winstead, M.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Cement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The geopolymer concrete is a more durable and green material with less CO2 emission and less energy consuming as compared with the widely used Portland… (more)

Fan, Fenghong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mercury Capture on Fly Ash and Sorbents: The Effects of Coal Properties and Combustion Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The control of mercury from coal combustion is very dependent upon the flue gas chemistry. The flue gas chemistry is a function of the time–temperature ... duct, etc. However, the flue gas chemistry, and thus mer...

Nick D. Hutson

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Naphthalene and o-Xylene Adsorption onto High Carbon Fly Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remediation technique for petroleum hydrocarbons because of its ease of use and high efficiency used to investigate the adsorption of two nonpolar petroleum contam- inants, naphthalene and o- tial of HCFA to stabilize petroleum-contaminated soils for use in highway environments. The results

Aydilek, Ahmet

324

Assessment of environmental impact of oil shale fly ash from PF and CFB combustion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Käesoleva doktoritöö eesmärgiks oli uurida pőlevkivielektrijaamast pärine¬vate tahkete osakeste ehk tuha mőju keskkonnale vőrreldes omavahel tolm¬pőletus- ja keevkihtpőletustehnoloogiat. Töö käigus teostati uuringud, mis kirjeldavad lendtuha… (more)

Urb, Gary

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Coal Fly Ash Chemistry and Carbon Dioxide Infusion Process to Enhance its Utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increased use of coal in production of electricity is predicted to ... continue well into the 21st century. Thus, coal burning power plants play a key role ... the United States. Like any other process, coal ...

Katta J. Reddy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Aerospace Engineering, Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, University of California, San Diego Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China b Department of Mechanical power plants, is a hollow micro-balloon ceramic. It is primarily composed of SiO2 and Al2O3. In recent

Nemat-Nasser, Sia

327

Multicomponent Adsorption Study of Metal Ions onto Bagasse Fly Ash Using Taguchi's Design of Experimental Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology?Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, India ... Adsorption technologies for metals wastes include activated carbon and ion exchange treatment. ... The concentration of Cd(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II) in the aqueous samples was determined using a flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (GBC Avanta, Australia) with the detection limit of 0.009, 0.040, and 0.008 mg/L at wavelengths of 228.8, 232, and 213.9 nm, for Cd(II), Ni(II), and Zn(II), respectively, using an air?acetylene flame. ...

Vimal C. Srivastava; Indra D. Mall; Indra M. Mishra

2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rapid Analysis of PAHs in Fly Ash Using Thermal Desorption and Fast GC-TOF-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system...Technology (NIST) data base, which...at 8 C/min, heat to 250 C at 5...8 h after the combustion condi- tions...Based on the data presented in...Fossil Fuel Combustion: A Source Book...Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), Update......

Daozhong Zou; Kunlei Liu; Wei-Ping Pan; John T. Riley; Yiqan Xu

329

Calcined Dolomite: Alternative to Lime for Minimizing Undesirable Element Leachability from Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In contrast, for the TCD-treated sample, the principal peaks for several newly formed minerals, including hydrocalumite (3CaO·Al2O3·Ca(OH)2·12H2O) (or hydrotalcite), portlandite (Ca(OH)2), and ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), were found. ... H hydrocalumite (or hydrotalcite); M mullite; E ettringite; P portlandite; Q quartz; K kalinite; C calcite; He hematite; Ge gehlenite hydrate; G gypsum. ... There was also a small peak for ettringite present. ...

Qinghai Guo; Eric J. Reardon

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Removal of sulphates from South African mine water using coal fly ash .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study evaluated SO4 2- removal from circumneutral mine water (CMW) collected from Middleburg coal mine using coal FA collected from Hendrina power station. The… (more)

Madzivire, Godfrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CONTROLLED LOW-STRENGTH MATERIAL (CLSM) PRODUCED WITH HIGH-LIME FLY ASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Detroit Edison Company, Detroit, Michigan, and Kuhlman Corp., Toledo, Ohio in the 1970s. The investigation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

332

Analysis of Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in Fly Ash from a Waste Incineration Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......been found in the samples obtained from various combustion processes.The combustionprocess isnowrecognizedas an im...For that reason, PCDFemissions re- sulting from combustion processes have received much sci- entific, political......

Mustafa Pehlivan; Erol Pehlivan; Hüseyin Kara

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Aqueous alteration of municipal solid waste ash  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste (MSW) ash is composed largely of amorphous oxides and approximately 20% minerals including halite, magnetite, hematite, quartz, gypsum, calcite, and rutile. It is also enriched in toxic trace metals by up to three orders of magnitude over average soil. The thermodynamic stabilities and rates of dissolution of the minerals and glasses in MSW ash will determine whether the ash is an environmental problem. The authors have used batch reactors at 20, 40, and 60 C over time periods up to 60 days to simulate longer reaction times for ash under cooler landfill conditions. Soluble salts are most quickly dissolved, giving solutions dominated by Ca[sup 2+], Na[sup +], K[sup +], SO[sub 2][sup 2[minus

Kirby, C.S.; Rimstidt, J.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Carbonation of FBC ash by sonochemical treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work explores the sonochemical-enhanced carbonation of FBC ash for direct disposal in landfills. Tests have been conducted using four ashes originating from three commercial CFBC boilers. Experiments with additives such as NaCl and seawater have also been carried out. Tests were performed at low (20°, 40 °C) and high (60°, 80 °C) temperatures. Sonicated samples were analyzed using TGA, TGA–FTIR and XRD techniques to determine the influence of other calcium compounds (OCC). The particle size reduction brought about by sonication was quantified using wet sieving. The ash reactivity displays a strong temperature dependency with almost complete carbonation achieved in minutes at higher temperatures. Additives were found to increase the level of hydration of the ashes, in line with previous work; however, carbonation levels were unaffected. TGA, TGA–FTIR and XRD analysis of the samples indicated participation of OCC, which were also formed during hydration.

A. Rao; E.J. Anthony; L. Jia; A. Macchi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Rocky Flats Ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. The test will provide information to determine charge sizes, soak times and mesh screen sizes (if available at time of test) for stabilization of Rocky Flats Ash items to be processed in the HC-21C Muffle Furnace Process. Once the charge size and soak times have been established, a program for the temperature controller of the HC-21C Muffle Furnace process will be generated for processing Rocky Flats Ash.

Funston, G.A.

1995-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Quarterly report No. 3, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The technical objectives of this project are: (a) to identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions will be considered. (b) To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occurs. Emphasis will be placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under substoichiometric combustion conditions. (c) To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation based upon the understanding developed in (a) and (b). When completed, this model will predict the particle size and chemical composition distributions of ash formed during the combustion of pulverized coal under a broad range of conditions.

Helble, J.J.; Bool, L.E. [PSI PowerServe, Andover, MA (United States); Sarofim, A.F.; Zeng, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Gallien, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

populations is sanitation. In confined animal facilities, a top priority should be to eliminate stable fly breeding sites as often as possible. To do this, remove and spread decomposing vegetation or bedding material that has become mixed with urine and feces... but in concert with other meth- ods, such as sanitation. Chemical control: If a stable fly problem persists, an insecticide can be used. Many compounds are available for suppressing adult and larval stable fly populations. Animals can be treated as needed...

Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece  

SciTech Connect

West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 232}Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R. [Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Koila, Kozani, 50100 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Flygtrafikens framtid i Villmanstrand : Case: Fly Lappeenranta.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Syftet med lärdomsprovet var att utreda flygtrafikens nuläge i Villmanstrand. Lärdoms-provet gjordes som ett uppdrag till bolaget Fly Lappeenranta som bär ansvaret för den reguljära… (more)

Hakkarainen, Laura

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Characteristics and distribution of potential ash tree hosts for emerald ash borer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) is a recently discovered (July 2002) exotic insect pest, which has caused the death of millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in Detroit, MI, USA and has also spread into other areas of Michigan, isolated locations in Indiana, Ohio, Maryland and Virginia, and nearby Windsor, Ont., in Canada. Ash trees occur in many different forest ecosystems in North America, are one of the more widely planted trees in urban areas, and are a valuable commercial timber species. If emerald ash borer populations are not contained and eventually eradicated, the ash resource in North America could be devastated. The destruction caused by EAB and its rate of spread are likely to be strongly influenced by the spatial distribution and status of the ash tree host, but general information regarding the abundance, health and distribution of ash trees is diffused throughout the literature. Here, we summarize what is currently known regarding the characteristics and potential spatial distribution of various species of Fraxinus in natural and planted ecosystems in North America and evaluate this information with specific regard to assessing the relative risk of ash populations to EAB.

David W. MacFarlane; Shawna Patterson Meyer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Utilization of ash from fluidized bed boilers  

SciTech Connect

Combustion ash from a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) boiler contains not only carbon, but also silica alumina, quicklime as a sorbent, and a calcium sulfate by-product. These substances react chemically during fluidized bed combustion, and with the addition of water, they start an ettringite reaction and solidify. We determined the conditions necessary for producing hard solids through the study of the composition, curing methods, and characteristics of the solidified ash. We then used two types of road base material, crushed stone and solidified ash from an FBC boiler, to construct a test road at a site with a great deal of heavy traffic. Construction began in 1985, and since then, periodic tests have been performed to evaluate the performance of the road base materials. The testing of the manufacturing techniques centered on the amount and manner that water was added to the mixture and the curing methods of the mixture. Additional testing focused on the handling of the ash powder, the mixtures, and the solidified ash. Since 1991, under the sponsorship of MITI, the Center for Coal Utilization, in conjunction with Naruto Salt Mfg., Ltd., Nippon Hodo Co., Ltd., and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., has used the referenced results to undertake a joint research and development project aimed at the eventual practical application of the technology. In 1993, a pilot facility to solidify ash with the fluidized bed boiler of 75 t/h capacity was completed. At present, all the discharged ash from the pilot facility is being solidified, and experiments on solidification and road base application techniques are underway. Actual road base tests are also in progress, and we are continuing research to meet the national certification requirements for road base materials.

Takada, Tomoaki [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Akashi (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Structural properties of amorphous carbon thin films deposited by LF (100 kHz), RF (13.56 MHz), and pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by LF (100 kHz), RF (13.56 MHz), and pulsed RF (13.56 MHz) plasma CVD with DC self-bias voltage of? ... properties of the deposited films in an asymmetric plasma reactor...

Dong-Sun Kim

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

On the solar cycle dependence of winds and planetary waves as seen from mid-latitude D1 LF mesopause region wind measurements*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mesospheric winds at Saskatoon, Canada, which were measured in 1978 and 1979 during high solar activityOn the solar cycle dependence of winds and planetary waves as seen from mid-latitude D1 LF-term trends and inÂŻuences of solar variability. The response of the prevailing wind to the 11-year solar cycle

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

Ash aerosol formation from oxy-coal combustion and its relation to ash deposit chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ash aerosol and ash deposit formation during oxy-coal combustion were explored through experiments in a self-sustained 100 kW rated down-fired oxy-fuel combustor. Inlet oxidant conditions consisted of 50% inlet oxygen with CO2 (hereafter denoted as OXY50 conditions). A Berner low pressure impactor (BLPI), a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) were used to obtain size segregated ash aerosol samples and to determine the particle size distributions (PSD). A novel surface temperature controlled ash deposition probe system that allowed inside and outside deposits to be separated was used to collect the ash deposits. The ash aerosol \\{PSDs\\} given by the BLPI and those produced by SMPS/APS were consistent with each other. Data suggested that oxy-coal combustion under these conditions did not change the formation mechanisms controlling the bulk ash aerosol composition, but it did increase the formation of ultra-fine particles initially formed through metal vaporization, due to increased vaporization of silicon at the higher combustion temperature. The smaller particles contained within the deposits had higher Si and lower Na and S concentrations under OXY50 conditions than for air combustion. Moreover, the ash aerosol composition for particle sizes less than 2.4 ?m was related to the composition of the inside deposits. A higher Na in the ash aerosol resulted in higher Na in inside deposits with comparable absolute Na concentrations in both those aerosol particles and those inside deposits particles. The contribution of S and Si to the inside deposits showed that S in the vaporization modes together with Si in the ultrafine vaporization mode, contributed significantly to the composition of the inside deposits. These results provided direct evidence that prediction of the chemistry of the initial deposit layer (but not of the bulk deposits) required knowledge of the size segregated chemistry of the ash aerosol.

Zhonghua Zhan; Andrew Fry; Yanwei Zhang; Jost O.L. Wendt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments  

SciTech Connect

Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Olive fruit fly populations measured in Central and Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maturation in the olive fruit fly, Dacus oleae (Diptera:In: Proc Second Int Symp on Fruit Flies. Crete, Greece.and control of olive fruit fly. In: Proc Second Int Symp

Rice, Richard E.; Phillips, Phil A.; Stewart-Leslie, Judy; Sibbett, G. Steven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Coal ash behavior in reducing environments  

SciTech Connect

This project is a four-year program designed to investigate the transformations and properties of coal ash in reducing environment systems. This project is currently midway through its third year. The work to date has emphasized four areas of research: (1) the development of quantitative techniques to analyze reduced species, (2) the production of gasification-type samples under closely controlled conditions, (3) the systematic gasification of specific coals to produce information about their partitioning during gasification, and (4) the study of the physical properties of ashes and slags under reducing atmospheres. The project is organized into three tasks which provide a strong foundation for the project. Task 1, Analytical Methods Development, has concentrated on the special needs of analyzing samples produced under a reducing atmosphere as opposed to the more often studied combustion systems. Task 2, Inorganic Partitioning and Ash Deposition, has focused on the production of gasification-type samples under closely controlled conditions for the study of inorganic partitioning that may lead to deposition. Task 3, Ash and Slag Physical Properties, has made large gains in the areas of sintering and strength development of coal ashes under reducing atmospheres for the evaluation of deposition problems. Results are presented for all three tasks.

Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Brekke, D.W.; Folkedahl, B.C.; Tibbetts, J.E.; Nowok, J.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Production of cements from Illinois coal ash. Final technical report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to convert Illinois coal combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler slag, into novel cementitious materials for use in the construction industry. These residues are composed largely of SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, and CaO, which are also the major components of cement. Since the residues are used as an integral component of the cement and not just as additives to concrete, larger amounts of the residues can be utilized. The process uses submerged combustion to melt blends of coal combustion residues with lime, clay, and/or sand. The submerged combustion melter utilizes natural gas-oxidant firing directly into a molten bath to provide efficient melting of mineral-like materials. Use of this melter for cement production has many advantages over rotary kilns including very little, if any, grinding of the feed material, very low emissions, and compact size. During the first year of the program, samples of coal combustion residues were blended and mixed, as needed; with lime, clay, and/or sand to adjust the composition. Six mixtures, three with fly ash and three with bottom ash, were melted in a laboratory-scale furnace. The resultant products were used in mortar cubes and bars which were subjected to ASTM standard tests of cementitious properties. In the hydraulic activity test, mortar cubes were found to have a strength comparable to standard mortar cements. In the compressive strength test, mortar cubes were found to have strengths that exceeded ASTM blended cement performance specifications. In the ASR expansion test, mortar bars were subjected to alkali-silica reaction-induced expansion, which is a problem for siliceous aggregate-based concretes that are exposed to moisture. The mortar bars made with the products inhibited 85 to 97% of this expansion. These results show that residue-based products have an excellent potential as ASR-preventing additions in concretes.

Wagner, J.C.; Bhatty, J.L.; Mishulovich, A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ash limitation of physical coal beneficiation for medium–high ash coal—A geochemistry perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nowadays the industrial coal beneficiation in China could only reduce the ash yield to about 10%, which could not meet the requirement or standard of environment protection. In this work, the possibility of reducing the ash yield was studied from the aspect of geochemistry. The channel samples were collected from two coal seams in Guizhou and Shanxi province, China and then conducted analysis by combining data from coals worldwide. The result reveals that the same coal seam or the coals deposited in the same peat swamp show a significantly positive correlation between ash yield and Al2O3 + SiO2 content, and the intercept of regression equation on the ash axis is always less than 5% (generally 2–5%). Overall, the coal from China is featured with a higher intercept compared with that in the other countries. The intercept of 2–5% on the ash axis indicates an original inorganic component in coal-forming peat. The research result also presents a theoretical limitation of coal ash by coal cleaning, because 2–5% of inorganic components in medium–high quality ash coal could hardly be separated by traditional physical coal beneficiation.

Wenfeng Wang; Weiduo Hao; Simon Xu; Fuchang Qian; Shuxun Sang; Yong Qin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Co-combustion of pulverized coal and solid recovered fuel in an entrained flow reactor – General combustion and ash behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was carried out in an entrained flow reactor, and the influence of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on co-combustion was investigated. The co-combustion experiments were carried out with SRF shares of 7.9 wt.%, 14.8 wt.% and 25 wt.%, respectively. The effect of additives was evaluated by maintaining the share of secondary fuel (mixture of SRF and additive) at 14.8 wt.%. The experimental results showed that the fuel burnout, NO and SO2 emission in co-combustion of coal and SRF were decreased with increasing share of SRF. The majority of the additives inhibited the burnout, except for NaCl which seemed to have a promoting effect. The impact of additives on NO emission was mostly insignificant, except for ammonium sulphate which greatly reduced the NO emission. For SO2 emission, it was found that all of the additives increased the S-retention in ash. Analysis of the bulk composition of fly ash from different experiments indicated that the majority of S and Cl in the fuels were released to gas phase during combustion, whereas the K and Na in the fuels were mainly retained in ash. When co-firing coal and SRF, approximately 99 wt.% of the K and Na in fly ash was present in water insoluble form such as aluminosilicates or silicates. The addition of NaCl, PVC, and ammonium sulphate generally promoted the vaporization of Na and K, resulting in an increased formation of water soluble alkalis such as alkali chlorides or sulphates. The vaporization degree of Na and K was found to be correlated during the experiments, suggesting an interaction between the vaporization of Na and K during pulverized fuel combustion. By collecting deposits on an air-cooled probe during the experiments, it was found that the ash deposition propensity in co-combustion was decreased with increasing share of SRF. The addition of NaCl and PVC significantly increased the ash deposition propensity, whereas the addition of ammonium sulphate or kaolinite showed a slight reducing effect. The chlorine content in the deposits generally implied a low corrosion potential during co-combustion of coal and SRF, except for the experiments with NaCl or PVC addition.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Grain characteristics and engineering properties of coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Ash produced by the coal fired thermal plants is often used as ... the grain characteristics and the engineering properties of coal ash. The results of x-ray diffraction, ... characteristic that may be used for ...

A. Trivedi; V. K. Sud

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Leaching of Major and Trace Elements from Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most power stations currently operate wet ash disposal systems. However, this method of ash disposal is being subjected to increasing scrutiny as there is a potential for contamination of surface and groundwat...

D. R. Jones

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Leaching of Selected Elements from Coal Ash Dumping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal ash obtained by coal combustion in the "Nikola Tesla A ... ionic strength of river water, we extracted coal ash with distilled water and 0.002 M–...3. The results show that changes in river water ionic ...

A. Popovic; D. Radmanovic; D. Djordjevic; P. Polic

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

POLYVINYLCHLORIDE WASTE WITH OIL SHALE ASH TO CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alkaline oil shale ash. Solid heat carrier (Galoter process)-type oil shale retorting units, where the

V. Oja; A. Elenurm; I. Rohtla; E. Tearo; E. Tali

355

Measurement of the Sintering Kinetics of Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of the Sintering Kinetics of Coal Ash ... A new technique has been developed to determine the sintering rate of coal ash based on the measurement of the pressure-drop across a pellet of ash. ... The technique developed in this study shows a good repeatability of the rate of sintering and confirms that viscous flow is the dominant mechanism for sintering of coal ash. ...

A. Y. Al-Otoom; L. K. Elliott; T. F. Wall; B. Moghtaderi

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems ... A holding pond for coal ash collapsed, releasing billions of gallons of coal-ash sludge onto nearby farmland and into the waters of the Emory and Tennessee rivers. ... For decades, researchers, environmental advocates, local communities, and even the U.S. EPA have been concerned about the ongoing risks posed by the unregulated management of coal ash. ...

Rhitu Chatterjee

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Impact of Coal Ash Lagoons Upon the Surrounding Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ash and slag are the waste products from thermal power stations (TPS). In one Polish TPS, 10,000 Mg of slag, and 48,700 Mg of ash are produced every year. All the slag is utilizedi whereas the ash is tipped of...

E. S. Kempa; A. J?drczak

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Screening technology reduces ash in spiral circuits  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, the James River Coal Co. selected the Stack Sizer to remove the minus 100 mesh high ash clay fraction from the clean coal spiral product circuits at the McCoy-Elkhorn Bevins Branch prep plant and at the Blue Diamond Leatherwood prep plant in Kentucky. The Stack Sizer is a multi-deck, high-frequency vibrating screen capable of separations as fine as 75 microns when fitted with Derrick Corp.'s patented high open area urethane screen panels. Full-scale lab tests and more than 10 months of continuous production have confirmed that the Stack Sizer fitted with Derrick 100 micron urethane screen panels consistently produces a clean coal fraction that ranges from 8 to 10% ash. Currently, each five-deck Stack Sizer operating at the Bevins Branch and Leatherwood prep plants is producing approximately 33 tons per hour of clean coal containing about 9% ash. This represents a clean coal yield of about 75% and an ash reduction of about 11% from the feed slurry. 3 figs. 2 tabs.

Brodzik, P. [Derrick Corp., Buffalo, NY (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

TECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stableTECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders Pablo- dure is implemented to simulate the flying height response of a typical thermal flying height control

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

360

Flying height adjustment technologies for high-density magnetic recording  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying height adjustment technology becomes important to achieve the stable ultra low flying height for recording density 1 Tb/in˛ in hard disk drive. The possible approaches towards flying height adjustment, advantages and disadvantages of different adjusting methods are discussed. Finally, the flying stability of thermal actuated slider is studied taking into account the short-range interaction forces. It is noticed that the flying height of thermal actuated slider is less sensitive to the short-range interactions than the normal slider and can sustain larger shocks. The thermal actuated flying height adjusting technology is more suitable for ultra-low flying height applications.

Mingsheng Zhang; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Flying Cloud Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Cloud Wind Farm Flying Cloud Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Flying Cloud Wind Farm Facility Flying Cloud Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer Clipper Windpower Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location West of Spirit Lake IA Coordinates 43.416975°, -95.422282° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.416975,"lon":-95.422282,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Flying Electric Generators | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flying Electric Generators Home > Groups > Clean and Renewable Energy Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(107) Contributor 15 September, 2014 - 12:17 How High Can They Go? Are you ready...

363

Flying Around Thunderstorms by K. Truemper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Missouri at 200 ft AGL, and was planning to go on to Texas. Indeed, he added some oil to the engine yellow (= heavy rain, turbulence), while the rest is green (= rain). Never, ever fly in such weather

Truemper, Klaus

364

Biological controls investigated to aid management of olive fruit fly in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson A, Hooper G (eds. ). Fruit Flies: Their Biology,R, et al. 2006. Olive fruit fly management guidelines forand fitness of an olive fruit fly parasitoid, Psyttalia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High temperature affects olive fruit fly populations in California’s Central Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature affects olive fruit fly populations inand Kent M. Daane Olive fruit fly commonly infests olives inthat trap counts for olive fruit fly adults in pesticide­

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Navigating the fruit fly brain : visual place learning in Drosophila melanogaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reflexes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster." Philosreflexes of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster." Phil.et al. (2002). "Fighting fruit flies: a model system for the

Ofstad, Tyler Arnt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ash fusibility and compositional data of solid recovered fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several approaches are established to analyse the fouling and slagging propensities of coal ashes, but the same cannot be said of solid recovered fuel (SRF) ashes. This work has been conducted by using some fouling and slagging indicators, which are commonly applicable to coal ashes, on SRF ashes to ascertain their applicability. In this work, laboratory prepared ashes derived from municipal solid waste (MSW), sewage sludge, demolition wood, shredded rubber tyres, and plastic/paper fluff are analysed for their fusibility leading to fouling and slagging using three approaches; the ash fusibility temperatures (AFT), ternary phase diagrams, and fouling/slagging indices. The results from each approach are examined to determine the inclination of the ashes toward fouling and slagging. A subsequent inter-comparison of the methods was conducted to validate the methods which are in agreement and are applicable to SRF ashes. The study showed that ternary equilibrium phase diagram SiO2–CaO–Al2O3, various fouling and slagging indices, and AFT can be used to complement each other to predict ash fusion properties, fouling and slagging propensities of SRF ashes.

Gregory Dunnu; Jörg Maier; Günter Scheffknecht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Oil shale fueled FBC power plant – Ash deposits and fouling problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 41 MWth oil shale fired demonstration power plant was built in 1989 by PAMA in Mishor Rotem, Negev, Israel. The raw material for the plant is the local “oil shale”, which is in fact organic-rich marl. Since then, and until today, the unit is operated at high reliability and availability. At first, heavy soft fouling occurred due to the Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) mode of operation, which caused a considerable reduction in the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchangers. By going over to the Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) mode of operation the soft fouling phenomenon stopped at once, the heat transfer coefficient improved, and the power plant could be operated at its designed values. After five months of operation at the FBC mode the boiler had to be shut down because Hard Deposits (HD) blocked physically the passes in the boiler. These deposits could be removed only with the help of mechanical devices. During the first two years the boiler had to be stopped, at least, three times a year for deposit cleaning purposes. Research conducted at the plant and in the laboratories of the Geological Survey of Israel enabled us to understand the mechanism of formation of these deposits. The results showed that the HD are formed in two stages: (1) Deposition of very fine ash particles on the pipes of the boiler, as a result of the impact of larger particles on the pipes. The fine particles adhere to the pipes and to each other, and step by step build the deposit. The growth of the deposit on the pipe surface is always perpendicular to the particles flow direction. (2) The deposits harden due to chemical reactions. The joint experiments at the plant and at the laboratories of the Geological Survey showed:(A) The rate of deposition depends mainly on the lime concentration in the fly ash. (B) The lime concentration in the fly ash is a function of the clays concentration in the oil shale. (C) The increase and hardening of the deposit with time is due to solid–gas reactions within the deposit. At first recarbonation occurs, reaction between CaO in the deposit and CO2 (produced by the combustion) in the flue gas to form CaCO3 (bonded deposits), and then sulfatization; the reactions of the sulfatization are: (1) SO2 in the flue gas with CaO and CaCO3 in the deposit, leading to the formation of anhydrite CaSO4; and (2) SO2 in the flue gas with the amorphous silicates in the deposit forming hydroxylellestadite Ca10(SiO4)3(SO4)3(OH)2. These minerals are the hard deposits. The conclusions following these findings for the combustion of oil shales with a significant Ca-carbonate content are:(A) The FBC is the preferred mode of combustion. (B) The rate of deposition in the boiler depends mainly on the lime (free CaO) concentration in the Fly \\{ASh\\} (FAS). (C) The ratio Ca-carbonates to silicates (Al, Fe, etc.), in the oil shale feed, determines the concentration of lime in the FAS. (D) The rate of deposition in the boiler depends also on the geometry of the boiler and on the particles aerodynamic conditions in it. Following these conclusions, the plant was able to reduce the shutdowns to twice a year. Furthermore, based on the understanding of the deposit formation mechanism, it will be possible to minimize shutdowns, for deposit cleaning, to only once a year in future similar oil shale fuelled power plants.

O. Yoffe; A. Wohlfarth; Y. Nathan; S. Cohen; T. Minster

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fundamental mechanisms in flue gas conditioning. Topical report No. 2, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and conditioning agents  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ask properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

Bush, P.V.; Snyder, T.R.

1992-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

PILOT DEMONSTRATION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF HIGH VALUE MATERIALS FROM THE ULTRA-FINE (PM 2.5) FRACTION OF COAL COMBUSTION ASH  

SciTech Connect

Broad range dispersants, including naphthalene sulfonate-formaldehyde condensates (NSF) and polycarboxylate based products, were tested on both wet and dry fly ash samples from the LG&E Energy Corp. plants in the study. Tests included both total adsorption and measurement of sedimentation rate via time density relationships. A wide range of dosages were required, ranging from 0.3 to 10 g/kg. In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. Leaching tests of 5% ash solutions by weight revealed a wide range of soluble salts to be present in the ash, and found a relationship between calcium ion concentration and dispersant dosage requirement. Other parameters measured included SO{sub 4}, Cl, F, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na and alkalinity. An assessment was made of the available software to digitally model the overall process circuit. No prefabricated digital model was found for hydraulic classification or froth flotation. Work focused on building a model for hydraulic classification in an Excel spread sheet based on Stokes Law. A pilot plant scale hydraulic classifier was fabricated and operated. The performance of the hydraulic classifier was found to be forecastable within reasonable bounds, and work to improve both are ongoing.

T.L. Robl; K.R. Henke; J.G. Groppo

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

New approaches for the chemical and physical characterization of aerosols using a single particle mass spectrometry based technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

composition of fly ash from a coal-fired thermal powersignature for coal combustion or fly ash particles. Singleresembles fly ash particles formed by coal combustion (

Spencer, Matthew Todd

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

373

Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ash Loading Protocol Rapid Aging and Poisoning Protocols to AssessFuel and Lube Effects on Diesel Aftertreatment (Agreement 13415) Neutron Imaging of Advanced Engine Technologies...

374

Determination of Ash in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ash in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NREL...

375

Development of an Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerated Ash-Loading Protocol for Diesel Particulate Filters Bruce G. Bunting and Todd J. Toops Oak Ridge National Laboratory Adam Youngquist and Ke Nguyen University of...

376

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of Altitude on Thermal Flying-Height Control Actuation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying-height control (TFC) is now a key technology used in hard-disk drives (HDD) as an effective way ... Precise control of the TFC sliders’ actuated flying-height (FH) is a major consideration...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy; Shuyu Zhang; Wentao Yan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Slider–bump contact and flying height calibration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultra-low slider flying height accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably the most reliable and ... One of the key issues to determine slider-flying height with the b...

Y. S. Ma; B. Liu; W. J. Wang; K. D. Ye

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Optimization of micro-thermal actuator for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders were successfully used in commercial products to compensate the flying height (FH) loss and reduce the risk of head-disk contacts (Gupta et al. 2001; Wang et al. 2001; ...

Jin Liu; Jianhua Li; Junguo Xu; Shinobu Yoshida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Flying Height Drop Due to Air Entrapment in Lubricant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, it is found experimentally that the flying height of an air bearing slider is influenced by the lubricant on the disk. It is explained as the air molecules ... in air bearing force, and hence, the flying

Wei Hua; Kang Kee Ng; Shengkai Yu; Bo Liu; Vivian Ng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels used in Power Plants PSO Project No. 6356 July 2008 Renewable Energy and Transport #12;2 Utilization of Ash Fractions from Alternative Biofuels)...............................................................................7 2. Production of Ash Products from Mixed Biofuels

382

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationarea to volume ratio of coal ash is 200 times greater than1 mm diameters and spherical coal ash particles with 5 ?m

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Seasonal effects of volatile oils in ashe and redberry juniper on preference and digestibility by goats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(qnodon dactylon (L.) Pers.), ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Buchholz) and live Oak [Quercus virginiana (Small) Sarg. var. fusiformis] during the spring and fall. Angora and Spanish goats were exposed to ashe female, ashe male, redberry female and redberry...

Riddle, Richard R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Iron-oxide Coated Coal Ash. In Arsenic Contaminationwater using  iron?oxide coated coal bottom ash  Johanna L.  using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash JOHANNA L. MATHIEU

MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C. The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Active flying-height control slider using MEMS thermal actuator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today’s head/disk interface design has a wide flying height distribution due to manufacturing tolerances, environmental...

Masayuki Kurita; Toshiya Shiramatsu; Kouji Miyake; Atsushi Kato…

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Simulation of Static Flying Attitudes with Different Heat Transfer Models for a Flying-Height Control Slider with Thermal Protrusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal flying height control (TFC), aka dynamic fly height (DFH), technique has been recently used in the head disk interface of hard disk drives to obtain a lower head-media ... effects are included in the ...

Du Chen; David B. Bogy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Predicting fruit fly's sensing rate with insect flight simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting fruit fly's sensing rate with insect flight simulations Song Changa and Z. Jane Wangb and actuation. Interpreting our findings together with experimental results on fruit flies' reaction time and sensory motor reflexes, we conjecture that fruit flies sense their kinematic states every wing beat

Wang, Z. Jane

389

BUILDING A BETTER MODEL OF FRUIT FLY WING DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING A BETTER MODEL OF FRUIT FLY WING DEVELOPMENT Rick Dilling CTMS Graduate Fellow (summer 2010) Advisors: Fred Nijhout (Biology), Tom Witelski (Mathematics) The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is one of the most important model organisms used in biology. One of the ways fruit flies

Wolpert, Robert L

390

Male fruit flies learn to avoid interspecific courtship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Male fruit flies learn to avoid interspecific courtship Reuven Dukas Animal Behavior Group Experimental data suggest, and theoretical models typically assume, that males of many fruit flies (Drosophila. melanogaster. These results indicate that male fruit flies adaptively refine their courtship behavior

Dukas, Reuven

391

TECHNICAL PAPER Numerical simulation of thermal flying height control sliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the flying characteristics at the head-disk interface. In this paper, a finite element model is developed hard disk drives. Thermal flying height control sliders are presently in common use to compensate and the magnetic disk (Schultz 2007). Dietzel et al. (2002) dem- onstrated the feasibility of dynamic flying height

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

392

Elytra boost lift, but reduce aerodynamic efficiency in flying beetles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Smoke visualization of free-flying bumblebees indicates independent...Morozov 1995 The vortex wakes of flying beetles. Zoologichesky Zhurnal...A. Hedenstrom 2011 Actuator disk model and span efficiency of...wingbeat kinematics in slow-flying pied flycatchers. J. R. Soc...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

STOCKER FLY BRAIN IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE PROTOCOL January 8, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 STOCKER FLY BRAIN IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE PROTOCOL January 8, 2001 Vosshall Lab 1. Anesthetize flies the brain, starting with the removal of the proboscis. Gently peel away the cuticle at the back of the fly the esophagus (hole in brain). Once all the cuticle has been removed, gently remove the fat body and trachea

394

Uncovering Fundamental Ash-Formation Mechanisms and Potential Means to Control the Impact on DPF Performance and Engine Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Results illustrate ash particle growth and formation pathways, and influence of lubricant chemistry and exhaust conditions on fundamental ash properties

395

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash deposition propensities Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ash, fouling, co-combustion 1... ;5 relative compositions of major ash species in coal, ... Source: Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Collection: Renewable Energy 51...

396

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash deposits part Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reading Collection: Geosciences 24 Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation Summary: being used for coal ash deposits....

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash char deposits Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ash, fouling, co-combustion 1... ;5 relative compositions of major ash species in coal, ... Source: Hawaii Natural Energy Institute Collection: Renewable Energy 86...

398

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash nasal lavage Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the people of North America for thousands of years. Of the nine ash... species, white ash (Fraxinus americana L.) and green ... Source: USDA, Forestry Service, Northern Research...

399

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash intranasal instillation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Residue: Origins, Fate and Potential for Treatment Summary: in the form of ash (Liberti et al. 2005). The management of this ash presents a unique challenge... or...

400

Characterization of the Thermal Transport Through a Temporally-Varying Ash Layer.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ash deposits in commercial coal-fired boilers frequently pose serious maintenance challenges and decrease thermal efficiency. A better understanding of fundamental thermal transport properties in ash… (more)

Cundick,Darron Palmer 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Study of ash deposition during coal combustion under oxyfuel conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparative study on ash deposition of two selected coals, Russian coal and lignite, under oxyfuel (O2/CO2) and air combustion conditions. The comparison is based on experimental results and subsequent evaluation of the data and observed trends. Deposited as well as remaining filter ash (fine ash) samples were subjected to XRD and ICP analyses in order to study the chemical composition and mineral transformations undergone in the ash under the combustion conditions. The experimental results show higher deposition propensities under oxyfuel conditions; the possible reasons for this are investigated by analyzing the parameters affecting the ash deposition phenomena. Particle size seems to be larger for the Russian coal oxy-fired ash, leading to increased impaction on the deposition surfaces. The chemical and mineralogical compositions do not seem to differ significantly between air and oxyfuel conditions. The differences in the physical properties of the flue gas between air combustion and oxyfuel combustion, e.g. density, viscosity, molar heat capacity, lead to changes in the flow field (velocities, particle trajectory and temperature) that together with the ash particle size shift seem to play a role in the observed ash deposition phenomena.

L. Fryda; C. Sobrino; M. Glazer; C. Bertrand; M. Cieplik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HARM'S WAY: Lack Of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers Americans And Their Environment 2010 Thirty-nine New Damage Cases of Contamination from Improperly Disposed Coal Combustion Waste, Editor and Contributing Author #12;IN HARM'S WAY: Lack of Federal Coal Ash Regulations Endangers

Short, Daniel

403

Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly B.V.Gurudatta and Victor G.Corces Abstract Chromatin insulators are DNA^protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components

Corces, Victor G.

404

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over

405

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

406

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department and Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-E Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-E Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-E Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations; the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water discharges to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit via dedicated pipelines. The 200-W Powerhouse Ash Waste Water is the only discharge to the 200-W Powerhouse Ash Pit. The 200-W Powerhouse is a steam generation facility consisting of a coal-handling and preparation section and boilers.

Atencio, B.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

Characterization of Reactor Ash Deposits from Pilot-Scale Pressurized Entrained-Flow Gasification of Woody Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(21, 22) Second, crude syngases can carry fly ash particles and gaseous inorganics that cause detrimental effects downstream, such as corrosion of heat recovery systems, contamination of syngas cleaning sorbents, and poisoning of biofuel production catalysts. ... Milled fuel is fed into the reactor via a single top-fired centrally positioned burner. ... The near-wall temperatures attained in the PEFG reactor were around 200–300 °C higher than the bed temperatures of most FB gasifiers/combustors.(4, 47-49) Considering also the temporal temperature elevations of particles (e.g., vicinal burning particles and passage through the O2-enriched flame regions), this would mean that both the average and temporal peak particle temperatures are significantly higher during PEFG. ...

Charlie Ma; Fredrik Weiland; Henry Hedman; Dan Boström; Rainer Backman; Marcus Öhman

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor  

SciTech Connect

The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Categorical Exclusion 4566, Ash Removal Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOrnI FOrnI Project Title: Ash Removal Project (4566) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is to split, containerize, package, transport and disposition one hundred and two (102) cans of mixed waste. General Administration/Management OA I - Routine business actions OA2 * Administrative contract amendments OA4 - Interpretations/rulings for existing regulations OA5 - Regulatory interpretations without environmental effect OA6 - Procedural rule makings upgrade OA 7 - Transfer of property, use unchanged OA8 . Award of technical supportlM&O/personal service contracts OA9 - Info gathering, analysis, documentation, dissemination, and training OA 10 - Reports on non-DOE legislation OA II -

414

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The "Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program" is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy?s Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100°F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles? Unit #1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 33 months of operation. The second and third sections remain in service and the second is expected to be removed in the fall of 2003; the last is tentatively planned for the fall of 2004. This paper describes the program; its importance; the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system; materials utilized; experience to date; and results of the evaluation of the first section.

McDonald, D.K.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Flying height calibration with bump disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultralow slider Flying Height (FH) accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably a reliable and acceptable method. The accuracy of the bump disk method on FH calibration depends on two key factors. One is the detection of the occurrence of sliderâ??bump contact. The other is the understanding of the complicated sliderâ??bump interaction process and the possible disturbance of the bumps on the slider flying performance. In this paper, the research work aiming to resolve these two key issues is reviewed. Key parameters that limit the accuracy of the bump disk method are discussed. Possible strategies to further improve the accuracy of the method are proposed.

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermomechanical Analysis of Coal Ash:? The Influence of the Material for the Sample Assembly  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the proposed temperatures were low compared to conventional AFTs, especially for iron-rich samples, the use of TMA appeared to be an excellent tool for routine characterization of ash fusibility of various coals. ... BN, C, and Al2O3 assemblies are not suitable in studying the thermal behavior of coal ashes due to reactions with components of the ash. ... ashing. ...

G. W. Bryant; G. J. Browning; S. K. Gupta; J. A. Lucas; R. P. Gupta; T. F. Wall

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

417

Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

Larry L. Baxter

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like blast furnace slag, fly ash, coal gangue, limestone,Blast Furnace Slag Fly ash Cinder Coal gangue Lime- stone

Worrell, Ernst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Smoking Status and Occupational Exposure Affects Oxidative DNA Injury in Boilermakers Exposed to Metal Fume and Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...oxidative damage on the weekends (e.g., marathon running and exposure to environmental tobacco...coal tars and derived products, shale oils and soots. Part 4. 35. Lyon, France...Williams N. Vanadium poisoning from cleaning oil-fired burners. Br J Ind Med, 1952...

Sutapa Mukherjee; Lyle J. Palmer; Jee Young Kim; David B. Aeschliman; Robert S. Houk; Mark A. Woodin; and David C. Christiani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Coal fly ash basins as an attractive nuisance to birds: Parental provisioning exposes nestlings to harmful trace elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29803, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Hopkins et al., 1998, 2003; Nagle et al., 2001; Rowe et al., 1996; NRC, 2006, Rowe et al., 2002; Ruhl et al., 2009). These by-products can contain toxic levels

Hopkins, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Smoking Status and Occupational Exposure Affects Oxidative DNA Injury in Boilermakers Exposed to Metal Fume and Residual Oil Fly Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exposure) during the overhaul of an oil-fired boiler. The well-validated...plant during the overhaul of an oil-fired boiler. Study Population...spectrometer measured 20 lines/peak using 50 ms/line for the following...adequate signal equilibration. The peaks for each analyte were integrated...

Sutapa Mukherjee; Lyle J. Palmer; Jee Young Kim; David B. Aeschliman; Robert S. Houk; Mark A. Woodin; and David C. Christiani

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gaseous Mercury Release during Steam Curing of Aerated Concretes That Contain Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Sorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The average loss on ignition (LOI) value measured following ASTM C-311-00(11) was determined to be 3.17 ± 0.11% (n = 7). ... After presteaming, the exterior box was positioned over the concrete “cake” and resealed to the base plate, creating a sampling volume of 34.1 L for steam and air to contact the curing concrete. ... Steam flow into the autoclave chamber (approximate volume: 0.75 m3) passed through a compressed air-driven rotary valve controlled by a microprocessor-based ramping controller (Watlow Series 982 Controller) programmed to elevate temperature at set rates ranging from 0.23 to 0.56 °C/min. ...

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Ping Sun; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; Panuwat Taerakul; William E. Wolfe

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Quaternary Science Reviews 26 (2007) 26312643 Charcoal and fly-ash particles from Lake Lucerne sediments (Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fire-derived carbon from biomass combustion (Thevenon et al., in press), and (2) new developments Abstract In order to link the charcoal record from sedimentary archives with the combustion processes. It allows a detailed quantification and morphological analysis of the combustion-derived products that were

Gilli, Adrian

424

The Development of a Small Engine Based Ash Loading Protocol  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

When 5% lubrication oil is added to diesel fuel in a small engine test, ash increases linearly and at the back of a filter, the amount depending on the differences in substrate and wash-coat type.

425

Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: December 2, 2013 S. Van Wychen and L. M. L. Laurens Technical Report NRELTP-5100-60956 December...

426

Coal ash composition of Australian low rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron-containing phases in nine precipitator ashes of widely differing composition have been analyzed by57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The importance of the relative proportion of calcium ferrite to magnesioferr...

L. J. Brown; J. D. Cashion; R. C. Ledger

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

INAA multielemental analysis of Nigerian bituminous coal and coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to analyzed Nigerian bituminous coal and ash. Good statistical agreement (p...?0.05) between the literature and reported elemental values of USGS AGV-1 sam...

V. O. Ogugbuaja; W. D. James

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Coal Ash from Thermal Power Plants in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review summarizes formation mechanisms of coal ash, its chemistry and use pattern in the Finnish industry. Coal is composed of organic and inorganic materials. The properties of coal varies from one region t...

Arun B. Mukherjee; Ryunosuke Kikuchi

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The mild hydrothermal synthesis of hydrogrossular from coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an attempt was made to synthesize hydrogrossular, a group of garnet minerals, under hydrothermal conditions at temperatures below 180°C, using coal ash, which is the solid waste from thermal...

Satoru Fujita; Kenzi Suzuki; Yasuo Shibasaki

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Ultimate bearing capacity of footings on coal ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal ash is recognized as an alternative fill material to the conventional natural soils near a coal fired thermal power station where its large ... This paper presents experimental investigations on footings on

Ashutosh Trivedi; Vijay Kumar Sud

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a...

432

Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wastes Increases soil pH Add plant nutrients Low cost #12;UNH COOPERATIVE EXTENSION Food & Agriculture and scab-susceptible potatoes varieties thrive in acid soils, and should not be supplemented with wood ash

New Hampshire, University of

433

Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The largest environmental release of coal ash in US history occurred in December 2008 ... Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such ... ...

Mark S. Greeley Jr.; Logan R. Elmore…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth

2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

435

Ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level meter for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which utilizes the known ash level temperature profile to monitor the ash bed level. A bed stirrer which travels up and down through the extent of the bed ash level is modified by installing thermocouples to measure the bed temperature as the stirrer travels through the stirring cycle. The temperature measurement signals are transmitted to an electronic signal process system by an FM/FM telemetry system. The processing system uses the temperature signals together with an analog stirrer position signal, taken from a position transducer disposed to measure the stirrer position to compute the vertical location of the ash zone upper boundary. The circuit determines the fraction of each total stirrer cycle time the stirrer-derived bed temperature is below a selected set point, multiplies this fraction by the average stirrer signal level, multiplies this result by an appropriate constant and adds another constant such that a 1 to 5 volt signal from the processor corresponds to a 0 to 30 inch span of the ash upper boundary level. Three individual counters in the processor store clock counts that are representative of: (1) the time the stirrer temperature is below the set point (500.degree. F.), (2) the time duration of the corresponding stirrer travel cycle, and (3) the corresponding average stirrer vertical position. The inputs to all three counters are disconnected during any period that the stirrer is stopped, eliminating corruption of the measurement by stirrer stoppage.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that, due to excessive wastage, certain tube samples needed to be removed and replaced in order to ensure that Test Sections B and C would have a chance of remaining in the boiler for their intended exposure period. These suspect tube samples were replaced and the two remaining test sections were put back into service. The tube samples that were removed from Test Sections B and C were set aside for later analysis at the end of the planned exposure period. Test Sections B and C were again examined approximately six months later. At that time, measured wall thickness losses raised concerns about additional tube samples. These suspect samples were also removed, set aside for later analysis, and replaced. The test sections then went back into service until the end of the second exposure period, which was concluded in May 2003 when, due to evidence of excessive wastage, the valves were opened increasing cooling steam flow and thereby effectively stopping corrosion. In August 2003, Test Sections B and C were removed for closer examination. Section C had experienced about 42 months of service at the desired team temperature set point with 28.5 months at temperature at full temperature. Additional suspect samples were removed from Test Section B, then, it was re-installed into the boiler (at the location originally occupied by Section C), where it remained in service until the end of the program. Due to this removal history, the samples from Test Section B had a total service duration that varied from a minimum of 15.5 months (for samples that performed poorly) to 37 months for samples the survived for the full intended service exposure for Section B. The figure below shows a schematic of Test Section B and indicates the length of service exposure for different locations. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section B, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. This report also is intended to compare and summarize the results for all three test sections. The analysis of T

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

uncovercalifornia.com http://uncovercalifornia.com/content/21978-better-smelling-beer-attracts-fruit-flies Better-Smelling Beer attracts Fruit Flies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uncovercalifornia.com http://uncovercalifornia.com/content/21978-better-smelling-beer-attracts-fruit-flies Better-Smelling Beer attracts Fruit Flies A new research has found that the smell of beer not only attracts beer lovers, but fruit flies as well. The research team discovered that fruit flies and yeast

439

Dynamics and Stability of Thermal Flying-height Control Sliders in Hard Disk Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ultra-low flying head-disk interfaces," Tribologyinto the gap between the flying head and disk, and they candifferent ways when flying over disks of different roughness

Zheng, Jinglin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Flying-height Control (TFC) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stable flying heights (Kurita et al. 2005; Song et al. 2007; Liu et al. 2008....

Pablo Antonio Salas; Uwe Boettcher; Frank E. Talke

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fly ash lf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Servo signal processing for flying height control in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, thermal actuated flying height control has been implemented in hard disk drives (HDD) to reduce the effect of flying height variations due to manufacturing tolerances or...2005). A stable low flying

Uwe Boettcher; Christopher A. Lacey; Hui Li; Kensuke Amemiya…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An overview of the behaviour of biomass during combustion: Part II. Ash fusion and ash formation mechanisms of biomass types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An extended overview of the phase–mineral transformations of organic and inorganic matter during biomass combustion was conducted in Part I of the present work. The ash fusion and ash formation mechanisms of biomass types and sub-types during combustion are described in the present Part II. For that purpose the identified systematic associations based on the occurrence, content and origin of elements and phases in the biomass ash (BA) system, namely (1) Si–Al–Fe–Na–Ti (mostly glass, silicates and oxyhydroxides); (2) Ca–Mg–Mn (commonly carbonates, oxyhydroxides, glass, silicates and some phosphates and sulphates); and (3) K–P–S–Cl (normally phosphates, sulphates, chlorides, glass and some silicates and carbonates); were used as classification of \\{BAs\\} into four types (“S”, “C”, “K” and “CK”) and six sub-types with high, medium and low acid tendencies and their description was given. Then, topics related to ash fusion behaviour such as: some general considerations and observations about ash melting; ash fusion temperatures (AFTs) of biomass and their comparisons with coal; relationships between \\{AFTs\\} and inorganic composition of biomass and coal; and ash fusion mechanisms of biomass and coal are characterized. Further, issues connected with the ash formation mechanisms of BA types and sub-types are discussed. Subsequently, aspects related to potential applications of ash formation mechanisms for BA types and sub-types, namely some key technological problems (fusion, slagging and fouling predictions, low ash fusion temperatures, co-combustion and application of BA) and environmental risks (volatilization, capture and water leaching of hazardous elements) are described. Finally, it is emphasized that the application of this new classification approach based on combined phase–mineral and chemical composition of biomass and BA has not only fundamental importance, but also has potential applications in prediction of behaviour and properties connected with the innovative and sustainable utilization of biomass and BA. It is also demonstrated that the definitive utilization, technological and environmental advantages and challenges related to biomass and BA associate preferentially with their specific types and sub-types and they could be predictable to some extent by using the above or similar combined chemical and phase–mineral classification approaches.

Stanislav V. Vassilev; David Baxter; Christina G. Vassileva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Prediction of Chinese Coal Ash Fusion Temperatures in Ar and H2 Atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of coal ashes on a weight percent basis shows that they consist mainly of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, and MgO, so that the properties of coal ashes at high temperature might be modeled by a five system SiO2?Al2O3?Fe2O3?CaO?MgO synthetic ash. ... The peaks from lab. ashes and corresponding combustion ashes derived from the same coals show clear differences which may be related to the evapn. of potassium during combustion and the reactions of the mineral residues to form combustion ash. ...

Wen J. Song; Li H. Tang; Xue D. Zhu; Yong Q. Wu; Zi B. Zhu; Shuntarou Koyama

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult flesh flies Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at the bait. Adult flies, larvae... were flesh flies in the family ... Source: Tomberlin, Jeff - Department of Entomology, Texas A&M University Collection: Biology and Medicine ;...

445

Study on the Volatility of Cesium in Dry Ashing Pretreatment and Dissolution of Ash by Microwave Digestion System - 13331  

SciTech Connect

Based on the regulation of the activity concentration of Cs-137, Co-58, Co-60, Fe-55, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Nb-94, and Tc-99, and the total alpha from the radioactive waste acceptance criteria, the measurement of the activity concentration of these nuclides in low and intermediate levels of radioactive waste such as in paper, cotton, vinyl and plastic samples was investigated. A dry ashing method was applied to obtain a concentration effect of the samples. Owing to the temperature dependence of the volatility for cesium, the temperature of 300 to 650 deg. C was examined. It was found that 450 deg. C is the optimum dry ashing temperature. After dry ashing, the produced ash was dissolved with HNO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system. The ash sample, for the most part, was completely dissolved with 10 mL of HNO{sub 3}, 4 mL of HCl, and 0.25 mL of HF by a high-performance microwave digestion system using a nova high temperature rotor at 250 deg. C for 90 min until reaching 0.2 g. To confirm the reliability of cesium loss after the performance of the dry ashing procedure, a cesium standard solution for AAS and a Cs-137 standard solution for gamma spectrometry were added to a paper towel or a planchet of stainless steel, respectively. Cesium was measured by AAS, ICP-MS, and gamma spectrometry. The volatility of cesium did not occur until 450 deg. C ashing. (authors)

Choi, Kwang-Soon; Lee, Chang Heon; Ahn, Hong-Joo; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyuseok [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)] [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedeok-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Prediction of ash deposition in pulverized coal combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

A predictive scheme based on CCSEM flyash data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been developed to study the slagging propensity of coals. The model has been applied to predict the deposition potential of three UK coals; Bentinck, Daw Mill and Silverdale, in a pilot scale single burner ash deposition test facility and an utility size multi-burner front wall-fired furnace. The project is part of a collaborative research program sponsored by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and involved various industrial organizations and universities. The objective of the project is to understand the fundamental aspects of slagging in pulverized coal-fired combustion systems. This paper is a sequel to the poster paper entitled: The Prediction of Ash Deposition in a Coal Fired Axi-symmetric Furnace, presented in the last Engineering Foundation Conference. The present model predicts the relative slagging propensity of the three coals correctly. The predicted deposition patterns are also consistent with the observations. The results from the model indicate a preferential deposition of iron during the initial stage of ash deposition. The average compositions of the deposits become closer to that of the bulk ash when the accumulation of ash deposits is taken into account.

Lee, F.C.C.; Riley, G.S. [National Power PLC, Swindon (United Kingdom); Lockwood, F.C. [Imperial Coll. of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

ADVANCED POWER SYSTEMS ASH BEHAVIOR IN POWER SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this initiative is to develop fundamental knowledge of ash behavior in power systems for the purpose of increasing power production efficiency, reducing operation and maintenance costs, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. The specific objectives of this initiative focus primarily on ash behavior related to advanced power systems and include the following: ? Determine the current status of the fundamental ash interactions and deposition formation mechanisms as already reported through previous or ongoing projects at the EERC or in the literature. ? Determine sintering mechanisms for temperatures and particle compositions that are less well known and remain for the most part undetermined. ? Identify the relationship between the temperature of critical viscosity (Tcv ) as measured in a viscometer and the crystallization occurring in the melt. ? Perform a literature search on the use of heated-stage microscopy (HSM) for examining in situ ash-sintering phenomena and then validate the use of HSM in the determination of viscosity in spherical ash particles. ? Ascertain the formation and stability of specific mineral or amorphous phases in deposits typical of advanced power systems. ? Evaluate corrosion for alloys being used in supercritical combustion systems.

CHRISTOPHER J. ZYGARLICKE; DONALD P. MCCOLLOR; JOHN P. KAY; MICHAEL L. SWANSON

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Influence of Coal Ash/Organic Waste Application on Distribution of Trace Metals in Soil, Plant, and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study was conducted to evaluate effects of coal ash mixture (coal ash, biosolids and yard waste compost ratio of ... fruits, and its leaching potential into groundwater. Coal ash mixture was applied at rates...

Yuncong Li; Min Zhang; Peter Stoffella; Zhenli He…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Memory flies sooner from flies that learn faster Daniel R. Papaj* and Emilie C. Snell-Rood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Memory flies sooner from flies that learn faster Daniel R. Papaj* and Emilie C. Snell melano- gaster have characterized a large number of genetic loci involved in learning and memory (2, 3 of a pattern of continuous ge- netic variation in learning and memory. In a recent issue of PNAS, work reported

Sokolowski, Marla

450

Ash bed level control system for a fixed-bed coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ash level control system is provided which incorporates an ash level meter to automatically control the ash bed level of a coal gasifier at a selected level. The ash level signal from the ash level meter is updated during each cycle that a bed stirrer travels up and down through the extent of the ash bed level. The ash level signal is derived from temperature measurements made by thermocouples carried by the stirrer as it passes through the ash bed and into the fire zone immediately above the ash bed. The level signal is compared with selected threshold level signal to determine if the ash level is above or below the selected level once each stirrer cycle. A first counter is either incremented or decremented accordingly. The registered count of the first counter is preset in a down counter once each cycle and the preset count is counted down at a selected clock rate. A grate drive is activated to rotate a grate assembly supporting the ash bed for a period equal to the count down period to maintain the selected ash bed level. In order to avoid grate binding, the controller provides a short base operating duration time each stirrer cycle. If the ash bed level drops below a selected low level or exceeds a selected high level, means are provided to notify the operator.

Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Rotunda, John R. (Fairmont, WV)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The abundance of AsH3 in Jupiter  

SciTech Connect

Both ground-based and airborne observations of the AsH3 Q-branch at 2126/cm, in conjunction with newly-analyzed laboratory comparison spectra at AsH3, are employed in the derivation of a new estimate of Jovian As abundance. The mole fraction on AsH3 in the Jovian atmosphere is 0.22 + or - 0.11 ppb; this is merely 0.5 times the solar abundance, and a factor-of-9 less than the mole fraction found in Saturn, duplicating the pattern noted in the relative abundance of P in these two planets and furnishing a useful constraint for models of heavy element incorporation in the outer planets' gaseous envelopes. 20 refs.

Noll, K.S.; Larson, H.P.; Geballe, T.R. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA) Joint Astronomy Centre, Hilo, HI (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash aqueous carbonation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Purification Technology 40 (2004) 251257 Copper and zinc sorption by treated oil shale ash Summary: Jordanian oil shale ash was used as an adsorbent for the removal of...

453

E-Print Network 3.0 - ash silica fume Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association... 's Twelfth International Coal Ash Use Symposium,Orlando,FL,January...

454

Elemental characterization of coal ash and its leachates using sequential extraction techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over 50 million tons of coal ash are produced annually in North America. Technological ... but have also increased contaminant concentrations in the ash of coal-fired boiler applications. The leaching of heavy .....

S. Landsberger; J. F. Cerbus; S. Larson

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Ash Transformations in the Real-Scale Pulverized Coal Combustion of South African and Colombian Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the formation of ash particles in the combustion of South African Klein Kopie coal and a Colombian coal was studied by measuring the ash particle characteristics upstream of the electrostatic precip...

Terttaliisa Lind; Esko I. Kauppinen…

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Tephrochronology and Stratigraphy of Eocene and Oligocene Volcanic Ashes of East and Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using neutron activation analysis (NAA) of bulk ash and glass shards, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) of bulk ash, and electron microprobe analysis of both apatite phenocrysts and glass shards to characterize their geochemistry...

Heintz, Mindi

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

457

Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal burning electrical generating facilities produce roughly 91 million metric tons of ash byproducts annually. Typically, this ash is retained at the power plant sites, adding to the cost of managing wastes at the plants. Another waste material...

Math